OCR Interpretation


Virginian-pilot. (Norfolk, Va.) 1898-1911, October 16, 1900, Image 5

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86071779/1900-10-16/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 5

COURT DECISIONS.
DIGESTED BY W. B. MARTIN
EXCLUSIVELY FOR
VIRGINIAN-PILOT.
Notes of Cases Recently Decided
Which Are of Interest to
Our People.
A. & D. R. CO. V. DEL. CONST. CO.
Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia.
September 13, 1300.
WHETHER A CONTRACT IS EN?
TIRE! OR SEVERABLE IS TO BE
DETERMINED FROM ITS LAN?
GUAGE AND SUBJECT MATTER.
WHERE THERE WAS A CONTRACT
TO BUILD SEVERAL PIERS, &C.
INCLUDING A WAREHOUSE ON
ONE OF THEM, AND AFTER THE
COMPLETION. OF THE WARE?
HOUSE AND ITS OCCUPANCY P.Y
THE OWNER, RUT BEFORE THE
WHOLE WORK WAS COM
? PLETED, IT BURNED DOWN, THE
LOSS FALLS UPON THE OWNER
AND NOT UPON THE CONTRAC?
TOR.
PROFITS WHICH MAY ARISE FROM
A POSSIBLE SHIPMENT OVER A
RAILROAD ARE TOO REMOTE TO
BE ALLOWED AS DAMAGES.
A PROVISION IN A CONTRACT
THAT CONTRACTORS SHALL NOT
BE ALLOWED FOR EXTRA WORK
OR DELAY UNLESS BY SPECIAL
AGREEMENT DOES NOT COVER
A CASE WHERE THE DELAY
WAS THE FAULT OF THE OTHER
PARTY.
THE LOWER COURT CANNOT BE
REVERSED UN LESS THE APPEL?
LATE COURT IS SATISFIED THAT
IT IS WRONG.
This was a suit in chancery by the
railway company to recover from Hie
defendant contractors damages n>r de
lay In completing the wprk iroqulred by
the contract. The contractors Hied u
eross-.bill asking for compensation for
extra work and for delay arising from
the fault of the railway company.
An agreement in writing uas entered
into on August 30, 1894, between the At?
lantic and Danville Railway Company
and Rutherford <v Brown, contractors,
whereby the latter agreed and con?
tracted to furnish all materials and la?
bor for, and id construct, according to
prepared plans ami specifications, cer?
tain dmUs, piers, and warehouse, and
to do certain dredging, for the Said
railway company at its western termi?
nus at Norfolk, and to remove such old
docks and pier work as was shown on
the plans by dotted lines. The work
was to be completed within four
months from the date of the contract,
lo-wlt. on December 30, 1804.
The contractors employed the Dela?
ware Construction Company as sub?
contractor to do the work; which it did
hot complete within the specified time
und does not claim to have done so un?
til about five months tliereaft.fr, until
early in the following June.
The lower court entered a decree
against the railway company for $7,
324.74, and It appealed.
The court, says:
It Is provided in the contract that
"no claims for extra work <>r delay will
be allowed, unless such extra work or
delay Is excessive, in such event the
engineer and contractors shall agree
main the compensation for extra work
and upon the extension or the time
necessary to complete it." It was
claimed that no such agreement had
taken place ns was contemplated by
the said provision, and strenuously
argued that therefore the contractors
could not escape liability for damages
for the failure to complete the work
within the time limit. The above pro?
vision of He- contract could not have
been intended and cannot be construed
to cover a case of delay that resulted
from I be fault of the railway <um
pnny. It cannot take advantage of its
own wrong. So much in response to
the general claim of damages for delay.
The two speciile items for which
damages were specially claimed are
founded upon the evidence of the gene?
ral freight agent of the company who
testified that the company had been
put to extra expense to the amount of
$3.066.18, owing to the non-completion
of the work, in handling 11,793 bales of
cotton which reached West Norfolk
after December 30, 1894, and that it had
been also deprived of the sum of $3,525,
which would have been the net revenue
on a. shipment of 15.000 bales of cotton
that It had to decline because the work
had not been completed. As to the first
Hem. in addition to what has been said
ns to Ihn responsibility of the railway
company for the delay of the contrac?
tors In completing Hie work, the claim
of extra expense in handling the cotton
referred to. even if it be admitted to be
a proper ground of damage under the
circumstances of this case, is not so
satisfactorily proved by the evidence
adduced In support of it that it can be
said that the court below erred in re?
fusing to allow it. An to the other spe?
cific item of damages claimed, it conies
under the head of remote and specula?
tive damages and was properly disal?
lowed. Blirruss v. I lines. 94 Yn., 413.
It is altogether uncertain and wholly
conjecture whether there would have
been any'gains or profit from the ship?
ment of (he 15,000 bales of cotton.
It Is next assigned as error that the
court did not allow to the railway com?
pany damages growing out of the de?
struction of the warehouse and pier
No. 1 and the trestle alongside of the
pier by lire, without the fault or either
party before the completion of the
work, nnd which were not rebuilt by
the contractors.
No precise or Invariable rule can be
laid down by Which it may be deter?
mined whether the contract Is entire
or severable, for it Is a question of
construction as to the intention of the
parties to be discovered In each ease
from the language employed anil the
subject matter of the contract. An in?
spection of the con tract in the case
before us would lead to the conclusion
that it is an entire contract.
It is. however, immaterial in this
case, whether the contract is entire or
severable, for It Is not controverted
1hnt the pier nnd trestle, which were
burned at the same time ns the ware?
house, had been fully completed, nnd It
satisfactorily appears from (Ju1 evi?
dence that the warehouse, with the ex?
ception of the skylight, which was the
subject of n subsequent and separate
contract, .was likewise completed as
originally contracted for. that it had
been turned over by the contractors to
the rnilway company, which had moved
into and taken possession of it and
was using it for all the purposes for
which It was Intended and built. It
Is. however, contended that it had not
been accepted by tho railway company,
and the superintendent and chief en?
gineer of the company states In his de?
position that he had meant to raise
an objection to the weather boarding
upon tho completion of the whole
work and when the final estimate was
made, though no intimation of such
intention was given until the destruc?
tion of tho property and the com?
mencement of this controversy, and the
existence of such proposed objection
was unknown to the contractors, it
is true that there had boon no formal
acceptance of the pier, trestle und
warehouse. This was not necessary,
since the company had taken posses?
sion thereof and was occupying and
using tho same for its purposes, with?
out having made any objection to Its
construction. Its acceptance, umter
such circumstances, is to be implied.
The loss resulting from Its destruction
was properly placed by the court below
upon the railway company.
We have now gone over the various
questions und Issues presented In this
case. Their proper and just disposi?
tion has given the court much concern
and trouble. Much time ami pains
have boon given to their consideration.
The record is large, the evidence vol?
uminous, conflicting and inconclusive,
nnd wc are frank to say that the
conclusions reached are not altogether
free from doubt. Tiny result, how?
ever, in the affirmance of the decree
of the lower court, which must prevail,
unless we are prepared to pronounce
that H is erroneous. It Is not sufficient
for the appellate court to doubt tho
correctness of the decision complained
of: it must be satisfied, in order to re?
vert" thi' decision, that it is w. ong.
Affirmed.
BURKHI?I V. PINKHUSSON.
Supreme Court of South Carolina.
August 21st. 1900.
PAYMENT FOR BURIAL. CLOTH KS,
WITH THE PURPOSE OF OHTAIN
ING ADMINISTRATION THERE?
BY. IS NOT SUFFICIENT TO GIVE
A RIGHT TO THE APPOINTMENT
AS A DM 1NISTRATOR.
The point decided is shown by tho
following extract from the opinion of
tin- court.
The c??rl says:
The fourth exception, based as It is
upon the assumption that Burkhlm was
tin- largest creditor of the Intestate,
cannot be sustained, because it is
directly contradicted by the Unding of
fad by the probate judge, concurred in
by tin- circuit Judge, that the appellant
was tint a creditor of the Intestate,
Indeed, it appears from the testimony
of Burkhlm, as stated In the "case."
that he does not metend to have been
a creditor "i" Ncuberl .-it tin- time of
bis death: but his claim lo be a credi?
tor Is based upon the fact that after
the death of Neubert be bought a suit
of clothes in which to bury the de?
ceased, for which be paid "about $20."
It Is true that In in Am. K- Eng. Ehe.
Law. at pnge 195, It Is said. "A claim
which accrued after tho death of the
deceased, as for funeral expenses, Is
sufficient to give the right to adminis?
ter." Hut this is bused upon only two
cases, which seem to admit that this is
a doctrine only to he applied in excep?
tional cases. Certainly it should not
IMJ applied in n case like this, where
ti<<- probate Judge finds as a fact that
Burkhlm's action "in paying for the
burial clothes was intended to obtain
administration." And when to this Is
added that the attempt is made in this
< .'is.- to apply this exceptional doctrine
In favor of an applicant for adminis?
tration who is a non-resident of the
state, who is Incumbored with debts to
a large amount, which have hen re?
duced to Judgment, we are certainly
satisfied that the probate judge was
rieht in declining to Issue letters of ad?
ministration to the appellant.
AMUSEMENTS.
N. c. GOODWIN,
The advance sale of seats for Mr. N. '
C. Goodwin and .Miss Maxim; Elliott;
who appear at the Academy of Music
Friday, October 19th Instant, In "When
We Were Twenty-One." will begin to?
morrow morning at !> o'clock. The
prices for Mr. Coodwln's engagement
will he as follows: Orchestra, up to
and including R. $2: balance of or?
chestra, $1.50; balcony, reserved, $1;
general admission (not sold until S:30),
first door. $1; balcony, 50c.; gallery. 25c.
"THE PRISONER OF 55ENDA."
"The Prisoner of Zenda," that great
romantic drama from Anthony Hope's
celebrated novel of the same name, will
bo given here at the Academy. Satur?
day, matinee and night. A carefully
selected company, which Im-ludon soy- .
era l oi .\ir. Daniel Krohuui n's own or
ganlsatlon, is promised. The theatre
going public is well acquainted with
the play, and Daniel Frohman's trade?
mark, which accompanies it. indicates
that it will be well worthy of the pa?
tronage of the best citizens. It is now
live years since the play was first pro?
duced In New York by E. H. Sothern,
and each year it has been received with
large audiences nnd enthusiasm.
Sale of seats commences Thrusday,
0 a. m. Prices: "'>, r>o. 75c. and ?1: mat?
inee, ."lOc.
FROHMAN'S I :< (MEDIANS.
An event of unusual Importance lo
the theatre-goers of this city will be
the first appearance at Van Wy< k's
Academy of Music on next Monday
night of Charlies Frohman's comedians
from the Madison Square Theatre. New
York, the representative comedy or?
ganization of America. They will pre?
sent their latest New York success,
"Self and Lady," a farce of the style
in which this company is seen at its
best, and Which tho New York public
seem to like the company best. it
has been called the companion piece to
"The flay Parisians." because its com?
plications revolve,;around a restaurant.
The humor of the piece lies In u wife
falling in love with her husband, and
the husband falling In love with his
wife. The leading members Of the
comnany are: E, M. Holland. Fritz
Williams. Isabel Irving nnd May Rob
son. Associated with them in the cast
are Arnold Daly. .Tames Kearney, Jay
Wilson. Tony lt. Eddlngcr, Maggie H >l
loway Fisher. Marie Derlckson. May
Lambert, Nellie Butler, May Galyer,
The Madison Square Theatre produc?
tion will be seen in this city.
You should see tho Oxford mixed vi?
cuna overcoatings, a high class of
goods now being tailored.
RUDOLPH I & WALLACE,
333 Main Street.
Eyea Kxnmlned Free,
p-. A. Week man.iger of the optica
depar'.mont of the Cnle Jewelry Com
liany. will examine your eyes free. De?
fective vision and c.'mnlic.i ted c .-? ,
specially Invited io call / le2S-tf
Tlnif has proven that Clay's West of
England black unfinished worsteds are
the best wcariti" goods made. We beg
to announce a large lino of Clay's cele?
brated weaves.
.KUDOLPHI & WALLACE,
333 Main Street.
SUIT FOR $5,757.
T. S. Ross Sues the Rowland
Lumber Co. for Dredging,
Ulrd. Knlilwln & Co. Recover From n. V.
Coppertlilte Hot Cbestiiut Men Must
Kuep Off tbo Sidewalks ? Win. Dickxoii
lu Jail tor Threatening to Kill Wife und
Motlier-lu-Luw.
Several eases in the Court of Law |
and Chancery were disposed of yester?
day us follows:
Dunlop Printing Company vs. S. W.
Bowman; dismissed on motion of the
plaintiff.
j The Washington Building Lime Com?
pany vs. Stakes & Co.; judgment for
the plaintiff for $144.30.
T. J. Penn, administrator, nnd It. T.
Bass vs. Norfolk Railway and Light
Company; order for special jurv for the
18th inst.
T. Sanford Ross vs. Rowland Lumber
Company. This is a case involving $5,
757 for which the plaintiff sues for
dredging done on the defendant's prop?
erty. The latter disputes the account
and is willing to pay only $1,587, claim?
ing that to he the umuunt due on the
contract.
The case was fully heard before a
Jury yesterday afternoon and a vor.'.:
for $4.244.99 was rendered against the
defendant last night.
JUDGE HANCKEL'S COURT.
Byrd, Baldwin & Co. against Robert
F. Copperthlte, in an action of debt
befoi\. Judge Hanokcl, without a Jury,
the judgment was against the defend?
ant for $10 and one-half the costs.
HOT CHESTNUT MEN.
Police Justice Taylor decided yester?
day that the "hot chestnut'' men must
keep off the sidewalk. The Greek ar?
rested Saturday for obstructing the
corner of Main and Granby streets with
his roasting apparatus was discharged
with a warning.
THREATENED TO KILL.
William Dickson, colored, threatened
to kill his wife. Delia, and the but. r's
mother also, with tin axe on Sunday.
He was sent to jail yesterday In default
of payment of a $20 fine imposed by
Police Justice Taylor.
STOLE FRIEND'S CLOTHES.
Luther Williams, colored, of 121 Smith
street, allowed George Copelnnd, alias
Bowers, to have his room, and as a re?
sult lost a ?,'! pair of sboes ami and $^
pair of trousers from a trunk. Cope
land was arrested and sentenced to six
months in jail.
AWAITING BURIAL.
A colored woman named Moody died
nt 134 Liberty street yesterday morn?
ing. The city took charge of lite body,
which laid at the morgue last night
awaiting the' act ion of the coroner.
This is necessary when there Is no
certificate of the causa of death from
a physician.
MARRIAGE LICENSE.
A marriage license was issued at the
Clerk's olllcc yesterday to George W.
little and Krina Powers, daughter of
Joel E. Powers.
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
H. F. Ronney to w. M. Bohney, un?
divided one-hair Interest in a lot on
DeBree avenue; $150.
C. A. Woodurd to Norfolk and At?
lantic Termlnu Company, live lots on
DeBree .avenue, part of Enterprise
Kami Company property; $2,0t>0.
Mary V. Necly to Norfolk and At?
lantic Terminal Company, four lots in
DeBree avenue, part of the property
of the Enterprise Lund Company;
$1.(100.
w. K. Rock to j. H. Shumadlne, lots
and improvements on the west side of
Fort street; $1.100.
IN Till-: POLICE COURT.
In Justice Taylor's court yesterday
there were sixty-four cases ami $62 in
cash lines.
George L. Wilson, colored, begging
and trespassing; lined $7.::r>.
Jules Gregory, colored, disorderly
conduct on the ferryboat: fined $6.75.
Willie Gale, slide nuisance; ten days
in the jail hospital.
Elisha Hurdle, colored, fast driving;
lined $6.76.
Willie Talbert. alias Goodbalr. stab?
bing and cutting Willie Carey Septem?
ber 17th: three months in jail.
Weldon Perry. .Tames Artis and
Frank Trnnson, all colored, obstructing
the street; lined $4.75 each.
Sum Taylor, colored, drunkenness
and profanity: lined $7.25.
S_E.?D.iiini.i and J. .1. Allen, .thus-'
ing an ofllccr; lined $7.75 each.
Peter Martin, profanity on the street;
lined $12.25.
G. W. Travers, colored, drunkenness
and Bleeping on the street; fined $4.75.
Charles Wtnn, colored, drunkenness
and disorderly conduct; lined ?7.t?.
Frank Jenkins nnd Morris Pearson,
suspected of stealing: discharged.
William Skinner, colored, soliciting
baggage without n license: fined $(t.
James Lovitt. colored, cursing and
assaulting Sarah Scott: fined $t;.75.
Robert Gasper, colored, held for the
county authorities: ordered delivered.
Elijah Little, colored, drunkenness,
disorderly conduct and abusing an
officer; ltn.-d $12.25.
Robert Holley, colored, suspected of
stealing a searchlight from the Nor?
folk Steam Laundry: continued until
Wednesday.
Herman Diggs, n negro arrested by
Policeman Sweeney on Sunday for
carrying n concealed pistol, was sent
to Jail yesterday in default of pay?
ment of a $50 line imposed by Justice
Taylor.
JUDGE PRENTIS' COURT.
The Fall term of the Circuit Court
x\lll begin on Monday. November 12th.
but the term will be short, as there are
on Clerk Warlng's docket but few
cases. Judge R. R. Prentis will pre?
side.
NEW SOCIAL CLUB.
Judge Hanckel has granted a char?
ter to the Olympic social Club ? !'. E.
Hansford, president: George C. Fergu?
son, vice-president: W. Fields, score?
tary; W. A. Hoggs, treasurer and man?
ager; L. M. Hudgins. sergeant-at-arms.
The object of the club is stated to be
the dlsslminatlon of political and liter?
ary information, and for social inter?
course.
RYAN RAILWAY CASE
JUDGE EDMUND WADDTLL HERE
TO GIVE AN OPINION.
Judge Edmund Waddill arrived at
the Montlcello Hotel last night. He is
here to render a decision in the, case of
Ryan ngainst the Seaboard Air Line
Railway Company. The question to be
passed upon concerns only the right of
Mr. Ryan to file an amended bill.
It is understood that Judge Waddill
has not prepared a written opinion.
The arguments In the case were
heard bore two weeks ago, at which
time the attorneys for the Seaboard Air
Line objected not only to the form of
the affldavls filed by Mr. Ityan. but de?
nied that he had any reason for making
the application for an amended bill.
The object of air. Ryan Is to prevent
the marketing of $75.01)0,000 worth of j
bonds that the railway wishes to sell, i
METHODIST PREACHERS
SUP.M1T H N CO C R AG I NO REPORTS
?THIRTY CONVERSIONS SUN?
DAY ?T W E N T1 ET 11 CEN?
TURY KIND.
The Methodist Preachers' meeting
was called to order by the President,
Rev. lt. M. Chandler, at 10:30 a. in.
yesterday. Prayer was offered by Rev.
John \V. Oi l.lor.
The call of the churches was taken
iil> and reports heard from the follow?
ing:
Rev. j. w. Baker held bis usual ser?
vices Sunday, preaching at Oaketto in
the morning and at G Ilmer ton itt the
afternoon.
Centenary?Rev. R, M. Chandler re?
ported the largest and most Interest?
ing Sunday school in a year and excel?
lent congregations morning and night.
Cuml erland Street?Dr. Johnson re?
ported three additions to the Sunday
school, a good congregation at the
morning service Sunday, and the con?
gregation at night larger than usual.
H>> had thr. e requests for prayer.
McKendree?Rev. \V. C. Vaden. pre?
siding elder, preached to a good con?
gregation Sunday morning. At night
the usual large audience heard the pas?
tor. Rev. W. R. Proctor, who also
preached at the Mission. In East Bram
bletotl, ;:i the afternoon.
Rev. John YY. Crlder taught a huge
Bible class at Cumberland street and
worshii I with the congregation at tho
morning service.
Rev. John \V. Carroll preached to the
usual congregations at Lambert's Point
Sunday meriting and nicht, and had
four additions to the Sunday school.
Liberty Street, South Norfolk -Rev.
Paul Bradley hud Rev. L. p. Brans
ford, Of Danville, with him Sunday,
and reported a Pentacostnl day. Mr.
Brunsford conducted four services dur?
ing the day?first in the Sunday school,
where there were a number of con?
versions; i reached at 11 o'clock, held a
meeting in the afternoon, at which
there were seven professions. At
night Mr. Uransford discoursed to an
Immense audience. At this meeting
there were nine conversions. Total
number of conversions during Sunday,
twenty-six. The' meetings will con?
tinue through Hie week.
Rev. J. c. Carey had a good attend?
ance at each of his services at Port
Norfolk Sunday. He attended the Y.
M. C. A. meeting at Portsmouth in the
afternoon.
Epworth? Rev. A. t'oke Smith had a
good congregation to bear him Sunday
morning and an overflow audience at
night, when be preached on "Tho
Christian in Buslhscs." Or. Smith
took up his conference collection nrtd
realized more than the amount as?
sessed.
Trinity?Good congregation and plea?
sant services. The pastor. Rev. George
Wesley Jones, preached in the forning,
and the presiding elder. Rev. W. <'.
Vaden, at night,
Rev. .1. T. WlillIcy. pastor of the
First Methodist Church, Hampton, was
a visitor, lie referred to a two weeks'
undenominational meeting held under
a tent in that town, conducted by him?
self ami the Rev. Dr. WOOdlin, of the
Baptist Church, assisted by the other
mem hers there. These meetings, lie
said, had been largely attended at
times, and that a widespread spiritual
interest had been awakened in the
community, ami that there had boon a
number ol conversions. These meet?
ings will he continued through this
week. lie saiil that Methodism was
making some progress in the commu?
nity. He had raised ?7.)>o tor the
Twentieth Century fund, ami that the
flnani lal report as a whole will show
as good an exhibit as In Conner years.
Mr. Whliley. Is closing up his fourth
year at this church.
Rev. L. P. Brttnsford said he was
glad to he present with his brethren.
Ho stated that Mr. Bradley had made
bis report for him. but said the signs
at Liberty Street Church were favor?
able fur a great outpouring of tho holy
spirit.
Dr. Johnson called attention to the
Importance of the brethren complet?
ing the work ol' securing homes for
the members and delegates to the An?
nual Conference. He said it would he
necessary to get nt least homes for 325
persons, and that these had not all
been secured. He announced a meet?
ing of the committee at his residence,
No. !i? Charlotte street. Friday night.
Rev. George E. Hooker had Hue con?
gregations at Wright Memorial. At
night he preached to an attentive au?
dience from the text. "How Shall We
Escape it We Neglect So Great Salva?
tion?"
Rev. I-!. II. Rawlings delivered a
most interesting and thoughtful nd
dress before the Sunday School MIs
sionary S?cToTJ :'t w right Memorial in
the afternoon.
Rev. Dr. J. C. C. Newton delivered a
powerful missionary sermon at Mon?
umental church. Portsmouth, Sunday
morning. The pastor. Rev. E. II. Raw
lings, hehl forth nt night and Inaugu?
rated a Sunday evening evangelistic
service.
Dr. Newb ??' preached at Park View
Church Sunday night.
Rev. R. T VVaterfleld preached at
Owens Memorial morning und night,
ami at Brighton Mission in the after?
noon. IP- also conducted a funeral
Sunday aft< rnoon at bis church.
Rev. N. H. Robertson preached at
Deep ?'re,U Sunday morning, ami
preached twice in the afternoon, first
at Indiana and then at Olive Brandt,
ami administer 1 tho Lord's Supper at
the latter chun h.
Rev. .1. T. Mnstlh held Interesting
services at < "he., nut Street. Berkley,
and conducted a Sunday school at the
Mission in tho afternoon. He received
one member on profession of faith at
Chestnut Street.
Rev. S. i'. Hatcher preached to the
usual hu ge < ongregatlons at Queen
Street Sunday.
OTHER LOCAL ON PAGE 6.
IN HIS VALISE.
A Doctor Cnrrlc* Oiiipe-Xiit* Food.
A physician in Mcp?de, Tex., who
cured himself by the use of Grape-Nuts
food, says: "l.agrlppe left me a phys?
ical and i. ,'oiih wreck, with indiges?
tion, dilated stomacm cOnstfuatloh, ami
neurasthenia. I tiled electricity, vapor
baths, tra1 camping, and medi?
cines, ad nauseum,
"Finally I Pf' myself on Grape-Nuts
food, and before the first package was
gone. 1 ma Ic I uch an improvement that
It seemed difnoult lo believe. 1 flnafly
got to carrying Grape-Nuts in my va?
lise, and !;' my pocket when I didn't
have a valise. Yesterday I secured a
new case of two dozen packages.
"The facts are that I could.,-at. and
did eaL dl ' "?? an"* ut-similate ti e food
and gained remarkably in strength. 1
am now regularly attending to my
practice. 1 have beep twenty years in
practice. ;;>'i am free to say that
Grape-Nuts food is the most perfectly
ami scientifically made food 1 have
ever known. My name, for profession?
al reasons, should ne,t he published/'
It can ge given privately to those who
care to Inquire, by the Postum Cereal
Co., Ltd., Rattle Creek, Mich. It
Dry Goods!
GRAND OPENING! GRAND OPENING!
PETER SMITH & CO.'S
WEDNESDAY, 0GT05ER 17th.
In our magnificent store, modernized in every
particular, with appointments perfect
we are now ready for business.
l
I
r.
I
?
e;
I
g
i
I
4
Copyright . -v
by The Btetn-Rtneti
You Don't Want
to wear the some patterned salt as your
neighbor. Thai's one of the disadvan?
tages of buying the ordinary RcadY-to
Wear Clothing, from which the STEtN
BI*OCH Clothes diner in that the pat?
terns of the fancy saltings are exclusive;
and besides wo have only a very limited
number of each pattern. Von run a
smaller chance of seeing your suit dupli?
cated on another man when buving
STELN-HLOCHS clothes than when hav?
ing a stilt made-to-measure at your tail?
or's, because a dozen tailors may have
the same pattern in this city, while wo
alone sell BTEIN-BLOCH clothes here.
SUITS, $15 TO $30.
OVERCOATS, $15 TO $25
DREWREY'S.
We close at 7 p. m., Saturday excepted.
Steiger's Trunk & Bag Factory,
249 Main Street, Norfolk, Va.
FROM MAKER TO WEARER.
$1.69
For our own Make Dress Suit Case?made of best Mack?
intosh cloth -bass lock and catches- Inside Straps?three
hinges?cannot be matched in town under $S.0O?Our special
$3
ftfj Eor t Real Leather Dtesa Suit Case?In tan or olive, the
HX In lest shades, nest Irish linen lined?best looks; hinges and
? w w brass cnlohes?hnnd-Slltched handles, and WO guarantee the
ir and keep In repair for flvo ye..is?real value Is $5.00?Our special
?e for a few days as quantity Is llmltcd-33.93.
$1.19 S
or Our Own Make Hand Lags -for ladles' or men?elegant
tiding locks. In fact the latest cat and best value in tlie mar
fur short trips and shopping?they are real leather?with
for the price?worth $2.33?Our special price, $1.19.
(TO QU **or Trunks made In our factory -some Just a little scratch
n& MD from handling?the real value Is $9.00?as long as they
v*' ' last?Your choice?you can select for $3.:?5.
POCKETBQOKS FOR HEM. WOfllEN BHD EVEN THE?DBEB
i\ fj _ ' "r Ladles' or Men's Pocket Look?made of good leather?
H f! the latest styles in single or double combination?real value 75c
*JV'U but tor a few days, 39c.
REPAIRING DONE AT SHORT NOTICE!
'PHONE
^j^/^ can lind something to suit them in our large double
stores tilled with bargains on the latest and newest fads in
Furniture, Carpets, Stoves, etc.
Just .take a look at our elegant Reception Suites of three
m.ilivgatiy frames, best silk tapestry upholstering, from $23.00 up
Five Piece Parlor Suites that are wonders for the money, from f',3 up.
Everything new, pleasing and lasting in Carpets. Wo sell no shoddy
Carpets?every one the best of Its grade. You run no risk buying hero.
Everything will l?o jast its represented. Would like to call your atten?
tion to our Axmlnlstcr Hugs, all sixes.
C?SH OR CREDIT.
3i9 and 321 Clmreli St.
Carvir.g...
is Easy.
If the butcher does his duty and siveaj
you the class of meat your money en?
titles you to.
Wo i .i make, carving a pleasure, bm
the excellence of Oi l: Meats furnished.
Bell, Jr. &Co>,
BOTH PHONES.
.OPEN ALL DA if.

xml | txt