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Virginia gazette. (Williamsburg, Va.) 1893-192?, January 09, 1913, Image 1

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THE VIRGINIA GAZETTE.
Established 1/36 bv William Parks First to Publish ths Declaration of Indapsndancs* W. C* Johnston. Editor and Publish***
VOL. 175 (Old Series.) VOL XX. (New Series.) NO. 33 WILLIAMSBURG. VA.. JANUARY 9. 1913 fl.SO fER TEAR
SUPERINTENDENT CO
VOCATIONAL Ff
PAPER SETTING FORTH ME
BEAUTIFYING SCHOOL GI
[Paper read to teachers ot his
district by W. B. Coggin. division;
superintendent of schools for New
Kent. Charles City and James City.]
To have attractive grounds and
building in which to educate country
boys and girls is an expression new
to many people in our rural districts.'
Our people have not been taught the
value of environment on the mema j
growth and moral development ot
the child. Every impression made
by our environment, or any part of
it, has a lasting effect. This being
true, it is very important that c
child have those things around him
which will contribute best to his
moral, mental and phsyical growth.
Not only the people in the rural
districts realize the importance of an
attractive school buildings and
grounds but many teachers fail to do
so. or. they fail to have e:
enough to make any effort to im?
prove things. To do this work weil
takes time and no teacher can do all
the work in one year. Because it
cannot be done in one year is no
reason why you should not do a
small part this year. Any teacher
who does not do some one thing
toward beautifying her building and
grounds during this term has failed
in one of her greatest opportunities.
You should not be satisfied with
your work unless you have done
something alcng this line which is
more or less permanent. Let this
one thing be a monument that stands
as a mark speaking for your work
this year.
There are so many things that one
can do along this line. You have
walls to paint inside and out. pictures
to put on them and libraries to buy
You have grounds to clean up anc
flowers and shrubbery to plant. Ir
many cases, we have yard fences tc
build and ground to plow and sow tc
grass. But the most important mat
ter for each teacher to consider is
what must I do this session? Yoi
ought to decide the first month o:
your term what you are going to at
tempt. Thc thing you will attemp
will depend largely upon what ha:
been done Defore, also, upon wha
the people in your community wan
to do. If the school has had ai
enthusiastic teacher before you th
people will want to do something
and fortunate :s the teacher who ha
a school in which the people wan
to do something.
-Any teacher who desires to d<
some work in improving condition
and fails or lacks ability to lead he
pupils and people into doing wha
has been care: inly planned shoul
begin at once a most serious stud
of herselt. If you made som
serious efforts along this line ia
continually fail the next step for yo
is to resign. If you cannot com man
the respect and confidence of yen
pupils and people to the extent tha
they ??will co-operate with you in im
proving and making more attractiv
and efficient your school plant yo
are not the person for the jol
Wiien the hour comes when ye
conclude that you cannot do an]
thing, but you will stay it the peop
will be so kind as to tolerate me fi
a few months, this is the hour i
write your resignation.
The energy of the children cana
bc used to better advantage th.
working on school yard and impro
ing school house. But this enerf
cannot bc utilized for these Uuni
m*aa% they have ? 1-Mdcr. tod tl
GGIN ADVOCATES
IAINING IN SCHOOLS
THUD OF IMPROVING AND
SOUNDS AND DUIUIINGS
teacher is to be that leader. Teacher
aod pupils must work together if
anything like ideal conditions may be
expected. The teacher leads best
who works best and enthusiasm is
her best tool.
It is easier to write to a member
of your school board and have him
send a man to make some simple
repairs, such as putting in a few
window panes, building a stand fer
water cooler and putting up window
shelves for plants, but have you not
done your boys a great injustice''
You could hardly teach your boys
anything more practical than to find
the size of the pane needed, write an
order for them and when received
ally remove the sash and put
them in. Any teacher is ignorant of
what is being done if she gives any
excuse for not seeing that her boys
can do these things, unless she says
to herself that others can do that
work, but I cannot.
Beautifying the school house and
grounds is best left to the teacher
and pupils. It is to them we look
for the accomplishment of this great
work. It is best that it is left tc
them because its irfluence on the
minds and hearts of the children is
worth more, yes. ten thousand time!
more, than If some one should give
enough money to have the work
done. Most of us are forced b>
necessity to do things for ourselves
and we usually value the thing w<
do more than the thing done for w.
by some one else. This is certainly
true of the self respecting and am
bitious person. It should be true o
everyone. Instead of learning t<
look for and appreciate charity wi
should learn to despise it.
I do not mean to say that thi
school should not use every mean
in the community to help in this work
The school should give its entertain
ments for the purpose of raisin]
money, giving thc people who con
tribute the worth of their money a
far as you are able. Then you tri
use thc money contributed in a wa
that will be pleasing to all concerne
and when it has been used to beaut
ty and to make more attractive th
school house and grounds all cor
cerned ought to be pleased and read
to help again.
Any community that has an ai
tractive school building and ground
with an enthusiastic teacher or traci
ers who are interested in the childre
and the community has solved tb
greatest problems in education;
work. You will have no trouble i
netting the children to attend; ye
*| will have no trouble in getting tb
people to attend your entertainmen
and give their money; you will ha\
no trouble in equiping your schoi
with tools for the boys' carpentr;
and cooking apparatus for the girl
and finally you will have at yo*
hands a complete plant which w
be a joy to all the children and pei
pie ot that community. Thc
should be a room at every scho
house equipped with tools for ca
pentry, for repairing shoes and t
ware and for repairing furniture.
should be a shop open to everyoi
in reach of that school. I can see
tormcr pupil on a rainy day going
the school shop with a shoe, a pie
of tin ware or t broken set oi hame
which needs repairing, because thc
he has all the necessary tools f
doing his workr
e
u
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-e
Dr
to
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IL
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jy
gs I No plant is attractive unless it
ae| (Continued on page fivtj
HARD WIND STORM
IN THIS SECTION
A wind storm that lasted for more :
than twenty-four hours prevailed!
throughout this entire section and all
along the seaboard the latter part of
last week. Much damage was done
to shipping and high tides prevailed.
In Richmond, Newport News and
Norfolk considerable damage was
done to buildings. So far as we
have heard no damage was done
in this immediate section, ex
cept to old buildings and decaying
trees. Several tile were wrenched
off the roof of Bruton Parish church,
and tne roof of the Presbyterian
church was slightly damaged. Some
old trees at the hospital were blown
down. Fortunately no one was
ed.
vt wind blew at a hurricane
velocity and walking was well nigh
impossible, oiiurday the weather
-dana Sunday and Monday
were typical.v spring days, the sun
shining and the birds singing.
PRIZES TO YORK
CORN CLUB BOYS
On Dec. 23. 1912, the prizes in the
York Co, Corn Club were awarded.
The following boys won: Bob. Nor
ment 1st prize, Lionel Roberts 2nd
prize, Woodfin Curtis, Tabb, Va,
3rd. These boys won more through
their "sticktoitivcness" than any othei
one thing. While their yields wer?
not high, being 43 and three fourtns
forty-three and one half, twenty
three and one half bushels, re
spectively, I know a number of far
. mers wbo would have gladly worker
; j to have done as well. The followicj
. i gentlemen very generously sub
. I scribed prize money as follows
i G. L. Eastman, supt. schools
, j Geo. L. Smith, Co. treas. $2 (X
Lane and Christian $1.00; R. VV
Mahone $2 00; Jas. H. Stone. K
The rest of the pool of $15.00 cam
from another source. We hope fo
better seasons and better results thi
year.?H. R. Hubbard, Dem. ageni
Y'ork Co.
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IS
HAS RETURNED FROM HOSPITA1
Miss Bessie Wynne Marstor
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. 1
Marston, of near Toano, has returt.e
from a Richmond hospital aftc
having undergone a very tec-Hoti
operation following a previous opei
ation for appendicitis about tw
years ago.
Miss Wvnne is now slowly ia
proving and her speedy and perm;
nent restoration to health is conf
rientlv expected.
?HUME I. DURHAM
Mrs. Annie Durham, wife of J<
seph W. Durham, died in her hom
on College avenue last Thursda
night after a short illness of pneum<
nia. Mrs. Durham sat up duric
the day Thursday and she w;
thought to be improving. She w;
taken worse that night and the ec
came suddenly.
She was 4^ years of age and b
fore her marriage was Miss Ann
Morecock, of Charles City. Besidi
her husband, she is survived by
young son, Powhatan Durnam. Tl
funerat took place Saturday afte
noon at 3 o'clock from the Methoi
ist church, the services being co
ducted by the Rev. John Hethori
in the absence of the pastor. D
Whitley. Burial was in Ced
Grove cemetery.
The Bank of Williamsburg i
creased its surplus $-500 at the reg
Ur meeting of tht board of directc
held January 6a
HAPPENINGS OF THE WEEK
GOSSIP OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD
BOILED DOWN
Mr. Boyd Henry has sold his
house and lot in Block D at Norge
to Mr. G. S. Strader. of thst place;
consideraton given at $5. etc. A
deed was admitted to record Friday
from Dr. J. M. Henderson, convey?
ing a vacant lot in thc West End to
Frank Armistead.
Httorney Norvell L. Henlev spent
yesterday in Richmond where bc
went on iega business.
Constable Buck Gr.ffin, of York?
town, was here last Friday with a
warrant for the arrest of S. L.
Vaughan, colored, on the charge of
passing bid checks. Vaughan paid
up the amount of the checks and all
costs and was not taken into custody.
Hon. M. H. Barnes, ot New
Kent, spent Sunday here with
tami
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Barnes have
returned home after spending thc
holidays with relatives and friends
in upper James City. While absent
they were aenorg the guests at sev?
eral old fashion dinners that remind?
ed one of ante-bellum days.
"The Story of the First Woman."
is the interesting topic on which the
amsburg Methodist pastor. Dr
Whitley, will discourse next Sunday.
Jan. 12 at 8 p. m. This is the
second of a series of sermons under
the general title: "Some Old-World
Stories Retold and Interpreted."
The first of the series was preached
last Sunday evening to a large con
gregation. Seats free, and every?
body welcome.
Mr. Wakefield Minor, of thc
county, was in town Monday tc
* consult his physician for an attacli
of the grip. His father. Capt. Johx
W. Minor, continues to improve.
R. E. D. NO. I NEWS NOTES
jo late tor last week
Bacon. Va . January 1?Mr. ant
r Mrs. Theo. Cieaiens has returnee
home after spending the holiday
with the latter's parents at Schuyler
Va.
Misses Annie and Clara New, a
Richmond, have been spending th
Jays with their parents. Mr. am
eNew.
Mr Skaro and family spent Sue
v with their daughter at Green
spring farm.
Mrs. E. M. Slauson and atti
jghter. and Mrs. Willie New sn
daughter spent Sunday at She
Bank, the guest of Miss Virgin*
Hitchens
Miss Inez New. teacher at th
Five Forks school, is out again aft*
a severe attack of grip.
Mr. Arthur Ayers and family, c
Neck of Land, is spending a :e
days at Tunstall thc guests of Mr
Ayer's parents. Mr. snd Mrs, lui
stall.
Mr. R. C. Nightengale is movin
his saw mill to a ti act of timbi
owned by Mr. John Jones, of Wi
liamsburg.
ge
U
A number of the most prominei
people of this city have certified i
the fact that A. D. S. Cold sn
Grippe Cure sets like a charm. E<
ery box guaranteed satisfactory, <
money refunded. If you live in tr
country let us mail you a box. Pru
25c. No extra charge for postag,
Ja-.. H. Stone, Druggist. A. D. <
Store.
If your children sre subject
attacks of croup, watch for thc fir
symptom, hoarseness. Give Chas
berlain's Cough Remedy et soon i
the child becomes hoarse sad ti
>r? attack msy bc wsrdcd oft. Foe m
by ell dealers.
NO QUORUM OF THE
BUSINESS ASSOCI
PRESIDENT HAS CALLED
THE COURTHO
Tnere was no qoorem of thc
amsburg Business Associa boo
.ast Friday night, and President
Phillips has called a special meeting
at thc cou* th ouse tonight at 8 o'clock
About ooc dozen men were oo baud.
but it requires twenty-two for a
quorum. Tne inclement weather
probably kept the country members
may. but it does seem that ?
uamsburg men. those who call
themselves business men. could have
been there. There was business
worth wh re thc Association
ind t e to have a meeting
was uufortunate.
Toe mee. ?: called for tonight
pen kt $ j clock, if there is a
quorum. Tne resignation of Mr.
ps. which will bc tendered.
makes it necessary te chose another
dead for the Association. Var
names have been suggested, -among
tnem Ut H E. Bennett, first vice
president. Mayor E. W. Warburton.
J. B. C. Spencer. James H Stone
md others.
Business that should have bees
t>efore the regular meeting will br
transacted at tonight's session. Try
to bc present and bring an old or
new member with you.
ANNUAL REPORT
BEING SENT OUT
The annual report of Commission
er Koiner for 1912 is now comin|
off the press. Tne report is vcr}
nteresting aud valuable to the prac
tical farmer. Within its pages il
gathered a vast amount ot new dan
ind information that the averagi
farmer would otherwise prooabi:
never see. beciusc he has not th
opportunity to get it or does -ac
know where to apply for it. Com
missioner Koiner. bciag a pra
tarmer himselr. knows just wh*
helps thc farmer needs to increas
his profits. Toe report carries
spirit of encouragement to thc *arm?
to give more thought to his tar mia
operations.
This report is well ulustratcc
Mr. Koiner was thc first commisi
toner in the south to illustrate h.
annual reports. This report sun
that the agricultural values in Vu
ginia have largely increased withi
thc past twelve years. Thc valtM
have gone up from $323,000,000. C
in'1900 to $715,000,000.00 in
The department of agriculture hi
issued this year one million Ou-uctu
to our Virginia farmers rhe numb*
of farms has increased more tha
J00 and thc size ot thc farms ku
decreased from 200 acres to ll
acres. Thc farmer is kerning tl
important lesson that it pays betti
to farm on thc intensive pian, whic
simply means to grow more oo lei
acres.
Thc important subject of sc
improvement is emphasised ia th
o-sllctin. The commissioner MM
that bc has kept this important sol
jeet to the forefront and will coi
tinue to do so as bc regards this ?
the foundation of all success!
farming. The work of thc deper
ment is broadening each year. B
?ides the publication of many bott
tins, thc work of fertiliser analyst
the inspection of agricultural teed
the issuing of Hog Cholera Smsa
which has saved tho tttmo
$100,000 00 from lota the yest yoe
thc battle with mt insect uhtmm i
WILUAMSBURG
ATION LAST FRIDAY
A SPECIAL MEETING AT
USE TONIGHT
tha farmer ia fisit aad
growing, tbe Lime Lew.
bec is
dissesasssTffasm ol help tai
by PanrscTsJnstitsCes thst have
bead al) o*er the state, sad tabs ee
taatioas la tba state.
The report cemtaas* ifiX)
is devoead largely to rebe
of important subjects tbst sre
fal to the farmer, trech aa SjtU la
resogstioQ. ft rt diet Plot for Can.
Why Wc shoaldGrovCtocvCrcraa.
How to Eradicate Worst Weeds,
vsboa is Fertility. Hoer tabs
Sol Takes Phosphoric Aod. Some
fundamental Principles or. Plllfliiy
Maintenance. How to Keep Pi ress
neut Pasta es. Breeding ot Draft
Horses in V .rgime. P-rachcal Po-mts
?boat Dairyiag. Silo, s NeceseUg oa
the Farm. Crops Profitable to Grace
for Hogs. A List of Pre-ifs Best
Suited to Ditfercat Sj ctr, oas of
virginia. Methods ia Orchard Cal
dvation Spray mg Orcbsrds. Usc Cf
Concrete oa Farm. Uss ct GrmetiM
hagues oa Hana. D-fsaaarae. Co
-pcrstioo?Its Bcaefits. aWccomrtui
robacco Giowiac. Hidtomcmi ced
Its Value to Prait Growers. A Dis?
cussion of Help tor Farmers by Co?
operative Credits ia Sccariog Lucca
on Long Time sad Low ti am aa
Ia tercet. Every fermer ie the molo
should read ton valuable rep eat. It
can be bad by application to Cern
missioner Koiner. who will bc
te sen'! it to all parties sot ca
nt who will scud him theil
for this hit
:'treasihlh SELLS
DELINQUENT LAND
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Monday between thc hours of 109
in thc merutog sad four ia tam
afternoon, many tracts ot lead ia
J aces City and the city of Williams?
burg were sold at public aacbvw
before the courthouse door for taxes
delinquent tor the yeer 1911. Taa
list this yeer.was s large oae. Out
the aggregate amount of taxes ams
not ss large ss that of toe pis items
ve-ar
There were a number of bidders.
Jj The* woeld simply lace tech tracts
as seemed to them desire baw. select
tag those tbey thought weald aot 00
redeemed Ooc or two bidder*
-were pointed as "profsinoaili" ia
that method of tseaheg leal estate.
It is a busmesas, however, that does
not appear to tbe average am.
although it is perfectly kgabmaae.
Thc amount of thc b-tde swear ia aay
case exceeded tbe amoact orr taxes
dec aad tbe extra costs attached.
Most of thc lead aad lots sold wiil
be redeemed later. Sjcae bl ll lint
bought tracts to protect fncads ot
ocigobors wbo were too poor et this
brno lo meet their oblagaooa. There
might bc socae mtcrcsroag sidelights
oa thc sale of dchaqeeat lead, if cac
were of a mind to tere them oa.
It ia said tbat more thea oae large
property owner ia this sad othes
counties not far from herc sccared
their first stake through too beW
quent land false.
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The annual musting of tba
holders of tbe Williimibarg Co
Operctt-rc Cree mary, lac. wfil ba
beki st thc Couftboaac oa isa. tee
1913. et 2 o'cloch p. rn.??. m.
Slmoi, Secretary.

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