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The Wenatchee daily world. (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, July 26, 1905, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072041/1905-07-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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WENATCHEE DAILY WORLD
VOLUME I.—NO. 21.
FIGHT IN FIERCE
RIVALRY FOR
OVERALLS
EIGHT WOMEN SERIOUSLY INJURED
IN A BARGAIN DAY
STAMPEDE
2,500 IN THE FIGHT
PITTSBURG STORE TURNED INTO
TEMPORARY HOSPITAL FOR
THE INJURED
PITTSBURG, July 25.—" Bargains.
Men's overalls 10 oents; men's shirts
10 cents."
The above sign in the window of a
store on Fifrli avenue at noon today
caused a disastrous stampede of bar
gain hunters. Eight women were ser
iously hurt in the rush to secure over
alls or shirts for the men folks, and a
reserve foroe of police had to be call
ed out in the downtown district. Am
bulances and patrol wagons backed up
to the doors of the store and for a
time it lookei as though there would
be a great loss of life.
As a result of the trouble and dan
ger iuourred it is likely there will be
a rule issued by the police against
bargain day sales in Pittsburg.
Mrs. Mary Hoover was worst
-hurt of the women who'got caught in
the orush. She fainted at the head of
a stairway and would have fallen to
the lower story had the crowd not
been too dense. She was held up in
the crush apparently dead. More
than a dozen women fell in a faint
and the police had to use their clubs.
After abont 2,500 of the women had
got out of the store, which by this
time looked like a wreck, it was turn
ed into a hospital and the injured wo
men revived and sent to their homes.
;.The .condition of Mrs. Hoover is
considered serious.
VICTIM OF INTENSE HEAT
David D. Jenkins. Farm Laborer, is Overcome
and Dies Almost Suddenly
on Reservation
YAKIMA, July 25.—David D. Jen
kins, a laborer on the farm of W. F.
McNatt, five miles west of Wapato.
on the reservation, died from tbe ex
cessive heat last Saturday evening.
He had been workiug with the other
men in the field all day patting up
hay. At about sp.m. he dropped his
fork and remarked to the men with
him:
"I'm all in; l guess I'll have to
quit,"
He began to turn black in the face
and in a few seconds fell to the
ground. He beoame unconscious at
once. The men oarried him to their
bunk house a short distance away,
and in a few hours he died.
MAKES THE OLD MAN SICK
Secretary Wilson is in a State ol Collapse
Brought about by the Strain Caused by
disclosures in Agricultural Department
NEW YORK, July 25.—A Herald
dispatch from Washington says:
"Secretary Wilson is in a state of
collapse, brougtit on by the strain un
der which he has been laboring since
the disclosures of wrongdoing in the
department of agrioulture, especially
in the bureau of statistics. He went
away last Friday to get a rest, feeling
almoet prostrated. On his return he
had a vomiting spell. The secretary
is confined to hie apartments.
"Mr. Wilson will be 70 years old
the 16th of August."
M. E. Poyeson goeß to Entiat on to
morrow morning's boat. On his re
torn he intends going to Mo-cow, Ida
ho, to arrange for moving his family
here.
A few good horses for sale. O. G.
Fish.
TOWN OF CONNELL
DESTROYED
BY FIRE
TWO THIRDS OF CONNELL'S BUSI
NESS DISTRICT IN
RUINS
FULLY INSURED
A STRENUOUS EFFORT WAS MADE
TO SAVE THE
TOWN
CONNELL, July 25.—Two thirds
of Connell's busineFS district is in
ruins. The fire had its origin in Dr.
Gallagher's office in the Connell Pro
gress building at 3:30 by the explo
sion of a bottle of acid. A box of
matches ignited the wall paper and
tnen the roof. The blaze was discov
ered* too late although a strenuous
fight was made by the citizens.
The losses aggregate about 175,000,
with considerable insurance
The town of Ccnnell is built on a
level stretch of prairie, in the Equat
zel coulee, and oontains only one busi
ness street —0 street, extending north
and south. The office of the Pro
gress, where the fire origiated, is sit
uated about th« center of the town.
The fire burned north from the print
ing office then came back on the other
side of the street, cleaning about two
thirds of the business part of the town.
Connell has a population of about 400.
Klnar Oscar 11.
History contains few parallels to the
caf-e of Oscar 11., king of Sweden and
until recently of Norway also. For
thirty-three years he ruled over
two countries, which in 1814 were unit
ed under the government of one mon
arch, but otherwise remained separate
states. The union gave rise to friction
in the matter of the consular service.
Norway desired a separate service
from that of Sweden. King Oscar's
opposition to this plan resulted in the
action taken by the Norwegian storth
ing declaring that he was no longer
king of Norway and that the union of
that country with Sweden under his
rulership was dissolved. The king is
seventy-six years old.
Burned San Jose Scale.
YAKIMA, July 25.—County Horti
cultural Inspector Brov .1 is after the
people that sell and buy infected fruit.
He dropped in on the merchants this
morning ana found fruit in some of
their stores that was infected with
San Jose soale, which he immediately
proceeded to destroy by burning the
same. Mr. Brown says he is deter
mined to stop the traffic in inteoted
fruit. He says that the Horticultural
laws contains a great number of let
ters, and that he is determined to en
force every one of them so that both
buyer and seller had better be on the
lookout and keep their infected fruit
at home. ,
The funeral of the 2-year old son of
H L. Wiester was held at six o'clock
last night.
WENATCHEE, WASHINGTON, WEDNESDAY, JULY 26, 1905.
RUSSIA MUST PAY
INDEMNITY TO
JAPAN
BARON KOMURA BELIEVES THAT
WAR WILL SOON END ON
SUCH TERMS
PEACE MUST COME
JAPANESE WILL BE MODERATE IN
THEIR DEMANDS ON
RUSSIA
NEW YORK, July 85.—That Japan
will demand an indemnity of Russia
in the negotiations for peace and that
the wai will be declared at an end at
the conclusion of the negotiations at
Portsmouth N. H., next month, is the
belief of Baron Komura, head of the
Japanese delegation, who arrived here
today, as voiced by Aimar Sato, who
is official spokesman for the baron on
this mission Mr. Sato, in an inter
view tonight, said:
"I am confident that peace will be
successfully negotiated by the appoint
ed delegatons. The Japanese will be
guided by moderaton, and no excess
ive demands will be made, but the
sentiment in Jaban and Russia is for
peace, and in the Interest of humanity
and propriety there must be peace.
FLOATING COFFIN
The Gunboat Bennington is a Floating Coffin
and Unfit for St • ; ce Declared Chief
Machinist Wheeler Last February
STOCKTON, OaL. July 25.—"The
gunboat Bennington is a flouting cof
fin and unfit for servioe," declared
Chief Macbinist C. G. Wheeler last
February when he said goodbye to his
mother, Mrs. C. C. Wheeler, of tnis
city, when he returned to his post on
the naval vessel. He realized he was
going on a dangerous mission. He
now lies among the wounded at San
Diego.
The declaration of the chief mach
inist that the Bennington was a float
ing coffin tends to conf.rm the gener
al belief that the boilers of the gun
boat were in a dangerous condition.
YELLOW FEVER IN SOUTH
Steamer Colnmbia Arrives from Panama witn
Four Cases of Yellow Fever
on Board
FORT MORGAN, La., July 25.—
Four oases of yellow fever were dis
covered on the Columbia which arriv
ed Sunday from Panama. The ves
sel has been sent to quarantine.
Taft and Alice in Japan.
YOKOHAMA, Tuesday, July 25.—
Secretary Taft and party arrived on
the Manchuria today. The shipping
and streets are gady deoorated. Min
ister Qrißcom and representatives of
the Japanese impeiial household, for
eign officers and war department,
boarded the Manchuria and extended
greetings to the secretary and Miss
Roosevelt, who held a recaption on
deok.
The party then was driven to the
station and boarded a special train for
Tokyo. On their arrival at Tokyo,
Taft and his personal staff went to
Shiba where a detached palace was
provided for tneir accomodation.
Miss Roosevelt went to the Ameri
can legation.
YAKIMA, July 25.— Old Sol seems
to be reluctantly withdrawing his
forces from the Yakima valley. After
renching temperature of 107 degrees
Friday he has been gradually losing
strength until 98 was recorded at 3 p.
m. today. On Saturday 105 was soor
ed in his favor and on Sunday 102 was
the highest point reached.
Hot in Yakima.
I HAVE A MAN
Who wants a large, well improved fruit farm
close to town. Is not afraid of the price if
the place is worth it. Tell me what you will
take, QUICK.
ARTHUR GUNN
. . REAL ESTATE AND FINANCIAL AGENT .. .
Cor. Wenatchee Aye. and Palouse St.
Pay Less and Dress Better
We announce the arrival of the new Fall Cloth Samples from
the famous Royal Tailors of New York and Chicago. One
thousand different pi ttr ms and weaves from the most cele
brated woolen mills of England, France, Germany and Unjted
States to select from. Made strictiy to your measure in any
style you fancy.
prices:
$12 a Suit
AND UP
20 ACRES 4 " R0? «*"°""«»
nY SOME ALFALFA
ALL TILLABLE SOME TREES
One-naif mile from G. N. Station f\ m lilAlir'O 111 ITm
tZSZTis&sL* 25 INCHES WATER
SEE US AT ONCE Absolute Water Right
SlOO.?? PER ACRE
INCLUDING WATER RIGHT
BOUSQUET & HOLM
A BIG CUT
IN LUMBER
We do not mean that we have cut the price on lumber,
but that there is more lumber beii.g cut up this summer
than ever. We are looking for more business. We
want you to call and let us figure your lumber bill. If
we can save you money, that's what you are looking for.
If we can sell you the lumber, that's what we are look
ing for.
■ ■ ■
The Pioneer Lumber Firm
WENATCKEt LUMBER COMPANY
F. M. GCHEBLF. & SONS.
WANT LAND FOR COLONY
Omaha Capitalists in Western Washington
Looking for a Tract of 50.000 Acres
of Land for One Colony
BELLINGHAM, July 25.—Omaha
capitalists now in Bellingham will
make a trip of inspection thrnagh
Whatcom oounty ii a few days with
a view to purchasing several thousand
acres of agricultural lands for colon
ization purposes. Representing the
Omaha people is Glen C. Wharton, an
Omaha capitalist, who arrived in Bel
lingham today in oompany with W. E.
Bennett, land agent for the Canadian
government. Mr. Wharton admits
that it is possible the Omaha man may
close a deal for an immense tract of
land in this county.
Mr. Wharton's company operates
on a large soale and should it become
interested here it would take upward
of 50,000 aores. He deolares that 50,
000 acres is usually the minimum.
In this county there are many blocks
of agricultural and timber lands avail
able for the Omaha concern, and it is
possible that some purchases will be
made in other Puget Sound counties.
WANTED—Correspondents in every
town in North Central Washington,
including the counties of Douglass, O
kanogan, and Chelan. Address World
Publishing Co. Wenatohee, Wash.
FIVE CENTS PER COPY.
BUILD CANAL BY CONTRACT
President Roosevelt May Invite Contractors
From all Over the World to Bid for
Subdivisions of the Work
CHICAGO, Jnly 25.—A Speoial
dispatch to the Reoord-Herald from
Washington, D. C , says: '
An important ohange of polioy in
regard to the Panama canal is now
under serious consideration. It is
nothing les6 than the proposal that the
government abandon the effort to oon
struot the canal directly across
through Jits own agenc ; es, and that
the whole or a greater part of the en
terprise be let to contractors, Amer
ican or foreign. This 'suggestion has
been made to President Roosevelt, and
the President has discussed it with
Secretaries Taft and Root, and others
with whom he advises as to the canal
enterprise. Presindet Roosevelt is
about half way convinced that the
way to dig the canal is is to get the
job in readiness lor the contractors,
subdivide the work into specialties,
and then invite the contractors of the
world to submit bids.
Through the kindness of Mr. W. T.
Simmons we received a box of fine
aprioots, picked from his 4 year-old
trees whioh will average abont 3> s
boxes to the tree. They were uniform
in size and measured t% inches in
oircumference.

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