OCR Interpretation


The Wenatchee daily world. (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, August 05, 1905, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072041/1905-08-05/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

WENATCHEE DAILY WORLD
VOLUME I.—NO. 30.
KENNEDY SAYS
THE STRIKE IS
LOST
GREAT NORTHERN SUPERINTEN
DENT SAYS THAT MEN ARE
RETURNING
TRAINS ARE MOVING
WILL GIVE CREDIT TO STRIKERS
FOR REFRAINING FROM
OVERT ACTS
"There is no telegraphers' strike;
the strike is lost!'' announced H. A.
Kennedy, assistant general superin
tendent of the Great Northern road,
yesterday afternoon. '"The men were
half hearted on the start, didn't be
lieve in the strike at all, and most of
them would tie glad to have the old
status of tilings restored today.
"The following telegram indcates
the trend of matters elsewhere on the
road:"
"'MINOT, N. D„ Aug. 3—H. A.
Kennedey. Spokane, Wash.: Superin
tendent Nic'mlson advises that the
chairman of the Dakota division of
tne O. R T. has telegraphed his resig
nation to Piesicent Perham. Every
agent and operator interviewed today
has accepted the new schedule and
gone to work. All trains on time.
*' 'Assistant General Superintendent,
Central Division.'
"We now have 01 agents and oper
ators working on the Spokaoe and
Cascade divisions, whioli is 55 per
oent of the normal force. Today we
had five accessions to the working
force by men who had gone out on
strike and returned to wok. On the
Cascade division only three agents are
not working. Agents have mstruct
ions to ship perishable freight and
less than car lots as heretofore to all
stations with the exception of not to
exceed six points. The probability is
that three more agents will resume
work within the next 24 honrs.
"One thing I give the strikers credit
for and feel gratified over is that they
have not attempted to interfere with
our circuit by any foul means. This
is sometimes done under circumstan
ces now existing, and I give oar men
credit that they have avoided such
actions."
THREE TRAGEDIES
AT ROSSLAND
MAN BURNS ON LIVE WIRE--
BOY DROWNS AT PICNIC AND
AND GIRL DIES OF FRIGHT AT
SIGHT OF DROWNED BOY.
ROSSLAND, B. C, Aug- 5.—L. M.
Harden, local sunerintendent of the
West Kooteuay Powei and Light com
pany, was electrocuted this evening.
He was working on the Silica-Jumbo
circuit of the company and was re
pairing some wires on top of a pole.
When le had almost finished he
sent a lineman back to the station at
Black Bear mine, half a mile away,
and told him to telephone the station
to turn on the power.
Hayden lingered longer than he
should over his work and when the
current was turned on he was still on
the crossarm and when the lineman
returned he found Hayden's lifeless
body resting on the wires.
Reginald Mcintosh, the IS year old
son of Harry Mcintosh, was drowned
in the Columbia river yesterday after
noon while on at a picnio given by the
Methodist church.
Flora Anew, the 1< year old daugh
ter of George Agnew, was found dead
in her room this morning. She had
attended the picnio yesterday and saw
the lifeless body of Keggie Mcintosh
taken from the water and it is
thought that the excitement of the
day and the tragic Jdeath resulted in
heart failure.
When found she had been dead for
come time.
NOTED MEN VISIT
OUR CITY THIS
MORNING
TAKE AN EARLY MORNING DRIVE
THROUGH WENATCHEE
AND VICINITY
TALK OF STRIKE
THINK THE VALLEY HAS A GREAT
FUTURE-LARGE CITY WILL
BE BUILT HERE
A party of Great Northern officials,
consisting of L. W. Hill, vice preei
ident; R. Campbell, 4th vice president;
F. E. Ward, gen'l manager; W. W.
Broughton, freight tiatfic manager;
D. Miller, First vice president of the
C. B. and Q. railroad, and Mrs. Miller,
and George F. Baker Jr., of New York,
came through here this morning on a
special train on their way to the coast,
most of the party taking advantage of
a short stop that was made, to take a
drive through the Wenatohee valley.
The party is on a pleasure trip and
has been a week or more on the way
from St. Paul. They expect to arrive
in Seattle tonight. Fr«m there they
will go to Pordand to Jvisit the
Fair. They will not return by the
way of Wenatchee but will travel to
Spokane via the O. R. and N. railroad,
visiting points of interest in Oregon.
J. M. Davis.
Mr. Miller was formerly vice presi
dent of th« Great Northern and it
was on aocount of his desire to see
Wenatchee that the stop was made
here. Immediately upon arriving here
at 7:30 this morning, Mr. Miller and
others of the party entered carriages
that were waiting ioi them and were
driven through the city and valley.
On his return to the oar, Mr. Miller
was very enthusiastic in his praises of
Wenatchee. He said •
"This is the first time that I have
been iv Wenatchee since ray appoint
ment on the Burlington, and the
changes that have taken place in the
short wnile that I have been away
from your city, are startling. I have
always had a great deal of faith iv the
future of Wenatchee but 1 must say I
did not expect to see such strides for
ward as has been made in the past
few years I believe that there will
be a city here that in time will be se
cond only in size to the large cities on
the sound."
Mr. F. E. Ward when interviewed re
garding the strike situation said:
"I left St. Paul before the telegraph
ers' strike was begun and have kept in
touch with it as I travelled west. I
believe that the railroad officials have
the situation well in hand and the on
ly injury that has been done is a slight
slo.vness in handling freight at vari
ons points along the line. A large
percentage of our operators have re
turned to \vork and more men are
joining them "very day. We have no
trouble in handling trains aud (he sit
uation grows brighter every day. I
wish to say that operators on the
Great Northern system are, in some
respects, higher paid than on any
other road in the United States. As I
understand the situation, the dissatis
faction was not so much with the
Great Northern as with the Northern
Paciific but the union officials decided
to hang together and strike on both
lines. Our men are with us at heart,
though they are forced to obey the
laws of the union. To illustrate: one
of the local chairmen of the order on
the Dakota division of this road hand
ed in his resignation and returned to
work, taking most of hie fellow em
ployes on the division back to work
with him."
When the body is cleared for aotion,
by Dr. King's New Life Pills, you can
tell it by the bloom of health on the
cheeks; the brightness of the eyes; the
firmness of the flesh and mnsoles; the
buoyanoy of the mind. Try them. At
U. G. Pogue Drug Co., 25 cents.
WENATCHEE. WASHINGTON. SATURDAY. AUGUST 5. 1905.
Cleared for Action.
DEATH FOR MEN
WHO GO TO
PANAMA
FEVERS LURKING IN THE YELLOW
MISTS OF THE TROPICAL
CHAGRES RIVER
DOZENS GO INSANE
ATMOSPHERE SO MOIST THAT MEN
WRING WATER FROM CLOTHES
BEFORE DRESSING
PANAMA, Aug. 5. —Laborers ure
wanted on the big ditch in Panama.
No cravens or weaklings need apply—
that is, no cravens who are afraid of
the fevers lurking in the yellow mists
of tlie Cliagre*- river, and no weaklings
who cannot stand under a sky that
bends overhead like a molten ball, and
labor in a ditch a hundred feet deep,
in mnd up to, the ankles, in humidity
that drives men mad, and in a plague
of flies and mosquitos aud noxious in
sects
Yet men will go to their deaths just
the same for Uncle Sam holds forth
inducements and the ditch must be
built.
Even under the improved conditions
since the United States assumed con
trol, Panama is still "the garbage spot
of the earth." The streets are filthy
and odorous and even the strongest
laborers from the states find the cli
mate enervating and demoralizing
aud are unable to withstand the awful
heat after a few days work.
Dozens of'laborers are confined in
(he insane asylum, a qua-liangle of
noisome and breathless cells around a
cement covere.. court, so hot under
foot that it can he traversed.
A laborer may escape yellow fever
but there are other human ills which
are almost inevitable. Acute malarial
fever is one of these, and once firm y
planted in the system it means either
a change of climate or a slow drag
ging death.
Even now, with the complement of
laborers not nearly filled, the ambu
lance Is constantly on the ro. When
the French were building the canal
there were dozens of vehicles on the
go day and night, conveying the sick
to the hospital and the dead to the
graveyard.
Even at Culebra, the highest of the
island stations, the atmoephere is so
moist that clothing left off <xt night
cannot be resumed iv the morning
without wringing the water out of
them.
GOVERNOR ORDERS
GUARDS DISCHARGED
SOUGHTTO GAIN A VOTING RES
IDENCE IN WALLA WALLA BY
MERELY HIREING A ROOM IN
THE CITY.
OLYMPIA, Aug. 5. —Governor
Mead has instructed Warden Kees, of
the Walla Walla penitentiary that it is
bis duty to dismiss Charles B. Wood,
captain of the guard, and D. H. Wool
ery, H. Kinsman, R. R. Hazleton, T.
P. Donahue, Fred Scott, W. H. Dixon
and C. L. King, employed as guards
at the penitentiary. The action of the
governor is the outcome of an investi
gation of charges of perjury made
againet the men, and subsequently dis
missed iv the superior court, in oon
nectiou with their registering in
Lewis precinct, Walla Walla, prior to
the recent oity election.
J May 1", Wood, as related in the
governor's letter, engaged two rooms
in an annex to the Paioae hotel and 21
men were registered as occupants. In
the early pirt of June they applied at
the office of the city olerk for registra
tion, gave their residence as the annex
and were registered on siguii g what
purported to be an oa h stating their
qualifications.
The penitentiary, where the men
are employled is not in the Lewis pre
cinct, and the state provides sleep
ing quarters and board for all its em
ployes at the institution and requires
them to spend a greater portion of
'heir time, clay and nigbt, there.
I HAVE A MAN
Who wants a large, well improved fruit farm
close to town. Is not afraid of the price if
the place is worth it. Tell me what you will
take, QUICK.
ARTHUR GUNN
. . REAL ESTATE AND FINANCIAL AGENT .. .
Cor. Wenatchee Aye. and Palouse St.
A FIVE-ACRE HOME
-$900
This snap will not last a week. All in crop.
Small house. Small barn. EE QUICK.
BOUSQUET &. HOLM
Did You Ever Stop to Think
That every time you spend a dollar not only that dollar but
also the interest on :t is gone for all time. Open a savings ac
court with a dollar &idne t only have it for rainy day but also
the interest. Full ii formation <s to our Savings Department
given on application in person or by letter
Columbia Valley Bank
Th* Old Strong Bank
Established 1895? Wenatchee, Wash.
HEAVY RAINS PUT
A CHECK ON
ARMIES
CHINESE ASSERT DOWNPOUR OF
PRESENT RAIN WORST IN
TWENTt YEARS
OHIO AGO, Aug. 5. —A specia' cab
let o the Chicago Daily News from the
staff oorreabpondent with General
Nogi, says: Last week as a result of
a sudden torrent of rain two Chinese
carts with eight horses and two driv
ers were completely swallowed up on
the main road leading toward Harbin.
Dispatches from Korea state that
the Japanese have began a simnltan
eons advance from Kwalchodo against
the Russians bnt that the north col
umns were checked under pressure of
the Russian advance detacl nient.
Japanese warships are reported to be
cruising off the mouth of Peter the
Great bay, on which Vlaiivostok is
situated. Chinese arriving trom the
south Bay that the Japanese are most
active in establishing trade relations
in southern Manchuria. Ovei a score
of businesses have been established in
that section and Japanese traders fol
low closely in the wake of the army.
WHAT PERHAM SAYS
President Perham of the Telegraphers Union
Says Railroads are Badly
Crippled by Strike
Si. PAUL, Aug. 4.—The striking
telegraphers will urdoubtedly have
the Northern Paoific and Great North
crn roads seriously orippled today.
Northern Pacific passenger No 4 has
been annuled and is runniug as No. 3.
Perham says all passenger trains
are seven to fourteen hcurs late,
while freight traffic is completely par-
alyzed.
No violence or acoident* are report
ed. Seventeen non-union operators
have left for the west.
W. J. Bryan. Jr.. in Hospital.
CHICAGO, Aug. 4.—William J. Bry
an Jr., is lying at the Presbyterian
hospital where he underwent an oper
ation yesterday for the removal of an
abcess on his right knee, brought
about hy inflamation that began with
a corn on his foot. Young Bryan was
brought to the hospital yesterday from j
Winona Lake, Indiana on a fast train, j
He is a student at a military academy. I
FIVE CENTS PER COPY.
HE HAS ASKED
UNCLE SAM
TO HELP
GOVFHNOR OF PLAGUE STRICKEN
STATE FINDS SITUATION
BEYOND HIS CONTROL
WASHINGTON, Aug. s.—President
Roosevelt tonight forwarded to Sur
geon Gent-eral Wyman of the public
health marine hospital service, a tele
gram from Governor Blanchard of
Louisiana requesting th t the United
States government take charge of the
yellow fever situation iv New Orlenas.
Tlie president directed that the sur
geon general take every step in his
power to meet the situation in New
Orleans and to no ify him what fur
ther action is advisable aud possible
for the federal authorities to take.
President Roosevelt said:
•'Please take every step iv your
power to meet the situation iv New
Orleans aud at other places, and noti
fy what further action for federal
government to take. Would like full
report from you as to what should be
done. Please confer with the surgeon
general of the army and navy if, in
your judgement, this is wise."
Dr. Wyman has acknowledged the
president's telegram and will report
tomorrow.
Force Operator to Quit.
BUTTE, Aug. .—Ralph E. Spurrier,
a telegrapher and formerly a member
of the Mill and Smeltermen's union
of Butte, refused to join the striking
operators on the Northern Pacific and
tonight several hundred smeltermen
held a meeting aud marohed in a b"»dy
to the depot, Bin-rounded the strnotare
nod compelled Spurrier to quit work
under a pain of "being escorted out of
town," an expression which is signifi
cant in Butte circles. Other operators
were looked for but none were found.
A Creeping Death.
Blood poison creeps np toward the
heart causing death. J. E. Steams,
Belle Plaine, Minn., writes that a
friend dreadfully injured his hand
which swelled up like blood poison
ing. Bucklen's Arnica Salve drew out
the poison, healed the wound, and
saved his life. Best in the world for
burns and sores. 25c at U. G. Pogue
Drug Oo

xml | txt