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The Wenatchee daily world. (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, May 20, 1909, Image 6

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072041/1909-05-20/ed-1/seq-6/

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FORMER VICE-PRESIDENT VIG
OROUS IN MIND AND BODY AT
AGE OF EIGHTY-FIVE YEARS—
THREE OTHERS ARE LIVING.
New York, May 20. —Still fresh
and vigorous in mind and sound in
body, Levi P. Morton, the oldest liv
ing ex-vice president of the United
States, has celebrated his 85th birth
day anniversary Sunday. Besides
Mr. Morton there are now only three
other men who have held the posi
tion of vice president of the United
States. Adlai E. Stevenson, Theodore
Roosevelt and Charles W. Fairbanks.
Not only is Mr. Morton by far the
oldest among his surviving colleagues
but. with one exception, he has al
ready attained a greater age than any
former vice president. The exception
was John Adams, the first vice pres
ident of the United States, who died
in 1826 at the ripe age of 90 years.
While Mr. Stevenson has reached
the age of 74, the other two surviving
colleagues of Mr. Morton are still
comparatively young men, Mr. Roose
velt being 51, Mr. Fairbanks 57 years
old. Of his predecessors who have
joined the silent army, only John
Adams lived to be older than Mr.
Morton is now. Thomas Jefferson
died at the age of 83. Hannibal Ham
lin at the age of 81 and Aaron Burr
at the age of' 80. The latter holds
the record in one respect, however,
among the deceased former vice pres
idents; he survived the end of his
term of office by 31 years, a longer
period than shows the record of any
other of the deceased former holders
of that office. Mr. Morton will have
to live until he is'loo years old to
surpass Burr's record.
Born in New England.
Levi P. Morton is a New Engend
er and the descendent of a family of
clergymen. It may be due to a great
extent to that fact that he has re
tained his health and vitality to such
a remarkable degree. His family was
founded in America by the Rev.
George Morton, one of the conspic
uous members of the Pilgrim colony
of England. He was the financial
agent of the Pilgrims and raised and
conserved the funds which fitted out
the expedition on the Mayflower, al
though he was not a passenger on
the initial voyage. He arrived in
America in 1623.
Levi P. Morton may have inherited
his taste for finance from that treas
urer of the Pilgrim band. His father
was a Congregational clergyman, the
Rev. Daniel O. Morton, still remem
bered in Winchendon. Mass.. and in
Shorehani. Vt. The father of Levi
P. Morton lived in Shoreham when
his son was born. May 16. 1524.
Before the boy had obtained his
meager education the minister re
moved to Winchendon. There the
future vice president was wont on
Sunday mornings to ring the bell to
summon his father's congregation to
service, and he also acted as sexton
of the edifice. In that church there
is now a memorial window given by
Levi P. Morton to commemorate the
services of his father.
First Worked in Store.
When, at the age of 16 years, he
saw no hope of realizing his ambi
tion to go to Dartmouth college, Levi
P, Morton entered a country store at
Enfield. Mass.. where he worked un
til he had enough money to start a
modest establishment of his own at
Hanover. N. H. In 1549, at the age
of 25. he came to Boston and be
came a partner in a small dry goods
house. Five years later he went to
New York, where he joined a dry
goods firm.
He failed a few years before the
outbreak of the civil war. but imme
diately started a banking business,
appreciating that the rebellion would
mean a great demand for financiers
to handle the government loans. Mr.
Morton founded the banking house
of Morton. Bliss & Co.. in New York
and Morton. Rose & Co.. in London
and dealt largely in government
bonds.
Just before the close of the war,
when he had accumulated a fortune,
Mr. Morton gave a dinner to the
creditors of his former dry goods
firm. Every one found under his
plate a check for the amount still
owing him with interest. Mr. Mor
ton's first essay in politics was in
187S, when he was elected to con
gress from a New York district. He
might have been president if his loy
alty to the wishes of Senator Roscoe
Conkling had not made him refuse
the nomination for vice president on
the ticket headed by James A. Gar
field in 1880.
President Garfield made him min
ister to France in 1881 and Mr. Mor-
THE WENATCHEE DAILY WORLD. WENATCHEE. WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 1909.
FEATURES OF NEW
SCHOOL CODE
COMPULSORY VACCINATION IS
MODIFIED SOMEWHAT—SOME
OTHER CHANGES FOR THE
BETTER.
The policy of compulsory vaccina
tion for school children will be ser
ously modified through the operation
of the new school law, which goes
into effect on June 12 next. The new
law provides that school districts of
the first class shall have the power
to require successful vaccination as
a condition of school membership,
but provides that a pupil showing the
certificate of a reputable physician
that vaccination would be injurious to
health and possibly dangerous to life,
shall have access to the schools, or
one presenting a certificate showing
tnat vaccination has been once tried
and has failed to take effect.
The anti-vaccination campaign has
been waged along the lines that vac
cination is dangerous to the health of
the child, and some physicians are
(committed to the belief that this is
true as a general proposition. This
may render these certificates easy to
[obtain.
The law also provides for the ap
pointment of a practicing physician to
be known as the school district medi
cal inspector, whose duty it shall be
to decide all questions of sanitation,
and health affecting the safety and
welfare of the schools and to make
monthly inspections.
A further change in the school law
refers to the method of issuing school
warrants, and provides that the
county auditor shall audit all ac
counts of the different school dis
tricts just as other accounts of the
county are audited and countersign
and register all warrants upon the
written order of a majority of the
board of directors. Heretofore dis
tricts of the third class have issued
warrants which were presented to
the county treasurer for payment,
without being audited or counter
signed by the auditor. In the case of
warants for maps, school charts and
apparatus, the auditor shall not
countersign the same until the order
has been approved by the county su
perintendent of schools.
Districts Classified.
The new law classifies districts as
follows: All cities of the first class
to be known as districts of the first
class: cities of the second and third
class to be known as districts of the
second class; all other districts to be
known as districts of the third class.
In districts of the first class the
new law provides that all contracts
for furniture, supplies, building im
provements or repairs exceeding $3 00
shall be let to the lowest bidder af
ter publication in the daily papers
published in the district and all bids
shall be public.
Districts of the first class are also
given full power to prohibit secret
societies, fraternities and sororities
among the students of the district.
In all districts employing more than
100 teachers the city superintendent
may hold an institute, to be govern
ed by the law in the same manner
as those held by the county superin
tendent. This allows two institutes
in King county, one for the city and
one for the remaining districts.
An important, change in existing
law is that taking away from the dis
trict the sole power of levying dis
trict school taxes and granting coun
ty commissioners the power to levy,
annually, sufficient to produce $10 for
each child of school age in the county,
the levy not to exceed 5 mills. The
fund derived from this is to be dis
tributed as follows: Two-thirds to
the different districts in proportion
to the number of days attendance in
each for the preceding school year,
and one-third to the different districts
In proportion to the number of i
teachers employed for the preceding
school year. In addition, each school
district may levy a tax to be known
as the "school district fund," the pro
ceeds of this with the current state
school fund and the county appor
tionment to constitute the "general
school fund" of each district.
Royal Neighbors, Attention!
There will be a special meeting
Thursday evening, May 20. Refresh-;
ments will be served. •
iton made a fine record. He was!
elected vice president in 1892. In
11594 he was made governor of New'
York. Since his retirement from the
governorship in 1896 Mr. Morton de-
Ivoted1 voted himself to the direction of his,
large financial interests and to ex
tensive travels abroad. While in this
j country he spends most of his time in
New York or Washington.
LIGHTS HAY BLAZE
ON DOME
PROMISE MADE TO GET FUNDS
IF POSSIBLE FOR THE ILLUMI
NATION OF EXPOSITION—SEN
ATOR HALE ENLISTED.
Washington, May 20.—The super-1
vising architect of the treasury today
Informed Senator Piles that he would
have a surplus of $6500 from the
construction of the government build
ing at the exposition which might be
expended on exterior illuminations.
It is estimated that $30,000 will be
necessary for this work, and Senator
Piles has received assurance from
Senator Hale, chairman of the appro
priations committee, that he will fa
vor attaching to a small appropria
tion bill now before the house an
amount sufficient ror the purpose.
Since it was announced that there
was not enough money left in the
government appropriations for the
fair to provide exterior lights for the
main building, the officers of the
exposition have kept up a correspond
ence by mail and wire wtih the Wash
ington delegation in congress. It was
hoped by the exposition management
that there would be enough in the
emergency fund to pay for the light
ing.
The main government building,
with its beautiful dome, will give the
electrical workers an opportunity to
make a brilliant display of lights. The
dome may be seen from a great dis
tance when lighted, whereas now the
building is a dark spot in a brilliant
picture. The wiring of the building
will cost $18,000 and the cost of
maintenance $15,000, according to
an estimate furnished by the division
of works.
Cashmere Man at Wilson Creek.
Wilson Creek, May 20.—The fol
lowing teachers have been engaged
for the Wilson Creek high school for
the ensuing year: Lee McManus of
Cashmere, principal; Miss Goodwin
of Waterville. intermediate; Mrs.
Combs and Miss Turney, reengaged
for the grammar and primary grades.
Has Anybody Told You About
Those $15.00 Suits?
They Look Like $30 Suits and You
Will be Asked That Price For
Them Elsewhere
Straw Hats
in Plain and
Panama
Shapes
WE MAKE
THE
SAGEBRUSH
LAND BLOOM
LIKE A
ROSE
ORCHARD
TRACTS ONLY
TEN MINUTES'
WALK
FROM TRANS
PORTATION
Two and Three Piece
Garments
for Summer Wear
Fancy and Plain Cuts- Up-to-Date Styles
All Wool Materials
FIVE ACRES-INDEPENDENCE
Don't Speculate—lnvest your
money in a
Fisher Orchard
Tract
Have it planted to apples and
get returns as well as a steady
and sure increase in value.
Only $250 Down
and $25 per month buys a five
acre tract from the
ORONDO DEVELOPMENT CO.
(Incorporated)
Call up and make an appointment.
E. C. FISHER, F. C. LEMON,
President Secy and Treas.
Office: Columbia Valley Bank Building
Phone 2023
I Wenatchee Washington
FIVE ACRES—INDEPENDENCE
SMALL MONTHLY
SAVINGS
TODAY WILL
MAKE YOU IN
DEPENDENT
TOMORROW
LOCATED IN
ABSOLUTELY A
FROST PROOF
SECTION OF THE
WENATCHEE
VALLEY
Oxford La&s
in Douglas
and
Florsheim
Shoes

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