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The Great Falls leader. (Great Falls, Mont.) 1888-1900, October 21, 1888, Morning, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86075267/1888-10-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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.We hbakto thl toot, Great Falb Trlbume,
To th. too Cthat la bootit Clak,
Whloh Is ehootin him ap to the mar,
To the time of a free trade tune.
Oh, meeray we marvel Great Fails Tribune,
At thy nenre In espreug Clark,
Ah. true, it wa done la the dak,
Or at least In the llsht o the moon.
In the llht a the moon Great ads Trimne,
A moon ot the sold of Clark,
That tlbnsat Fhelds ne.er spark,
Unless he reeeveth a boop.
It ass turned thy head, Great alls Tribune,
Thou art madd thea'rt arl, stalk,
When thon aei gs to the came of Clark,
In the aste of c maoontrot loao-.[LlYe
stock Journal.
SPIRIT OF THE PRESS. fo
hi
The Chicago Inter-Ocean saye, "The he
presidential straws begin to show a vio- 1
lent agitation Harrisonward as Nov. 6 ha
approaches. to
The Brooklyn Eagle says, "We must it
bury free trade by a vote so big that it
will take the Cobden club a quarter of a on
century to dig it out again." am
The Cleveland Leader thinks that any It
nation on earth having a tariff for rev- ca
enue only would be very hapliy to see cl
something like our surplus in its treas- ca
ary. c
The New York Sun says, "With every ci
mugwump and traitor opposed to him, as
was the case in 1885, Gov. Ben Hill is a
again leading the democracy to triumph 01
in that battle." fc
The Philadelphia Niorth American n,
commenting on Mr. Mills' designation of
the Indiana democrats as "unsurrendered
battalions," says he probably meant that p
when the Confederate army capitulated
it did not include the White Caps .or the B
Knights of the Golden Circle.
The Courier Journal (Louisville, Ky.) o
says some of the Kentucky girls are so
intensely sensational that a certain Nich
olas county girl recently refused to marry b
a well-to-do suitor from Missouri because d
he is a Republican. The heat of the
campaign has a very peculiar effect upon
these damsels of Old Kentuck. b
The Newark (N. J.) Journal, democrat
ic, confesses that something must be
done, or the democratic jig is up. It de
clares that there is a dangerous amount !
of apathy among the democrats; that no
two of them are working in harmony and
that unless a radical change is made, the
state will be lost.
The Cleveland Leader predicts that|(
congress will go with the presidency this
year; that the election of Harrison will
carry with it enough close districts to 4
give the republicans control of the house
of representatives for the first time since
the congress which was elected with Gar
field and Arthur, eight years ago.
The sentiment of the republican politi
cal press of the entire North, as also that
of many of the leading journals of the
South, is that the Chicago convention se
lected the right man to succeed Grover
Cleveland. The more they see of him
the more they feel, as Dr. Storrs says,
that "precisely such a man should be at
the head of the American nation."
The Cincinnati Commercial Gazette
thinks that protection works better than
free trade in setting a nation out of debt.
Tree trade Great Britian, in 1878, had a
public debt.of $8,875,000,000. It is now
$8,600,000, a decrease in ten years of
1095,000,000. The United States in 1878
had a debt of $2,256,000,000. It is now
$1,154,000.000,a decrease of $1,102,000,000.
The Chicago Inter-Ocean relates that a
straw vote was taken on a late St. Paul
west-bound excursion train, the passen
gers representing almost every northern
state, with the following result: Harrison,
122; Cleveland, 41; Fisk, 10. The cor
respondent adds that the exercise of
woman suffrage on the same train would
have increased the Harrison total by 150
more votes. U
The Madison (Ky.) Courier is informed th
that a reliable gentleman residing at Lo.
cust, Ky., was wearing a Harrison badge. w
The gentleman stated that Blaine, in tr
1884, received but three votes in that pre
cinct, while now there is a Harrison club p
of eighty members out of a voting popu- p
lation of 180. This gentleman in 1884 ,
voted for Cleveland; but, as his badge ki
indicated, will vote for Harrison in
November. h
The Springfield (Mass.) Union charges a
that in 1888 Grover Cleveland "flipped j(
out" of office a U. S. district attorney in el
Western Pennsylvania because he made
republican speeches. This year Secre- tl
tary Vilas and Assistant Post Master e
General Stevenson are making speeches l1
for Cleveland, but there is no flipping
out. This shows the progress of civil b
service reform in two years. a
The Minneapolis Tribune says a battle t
for principle is in progress, but the act- e
ual necessities of the hour cannot be
overlooked without inviting evil conse- I
quences. The tariff needs revision, and C
the republican party is the only party B
competent to undertake the difficult task. c
It is now on record as pledged to execute I
a well defined and wise tariff policy, if
again placed in change of the govern- I
ment.
The New York Sun calls a halt upon
the western stump speaking carnival by
cabinet officers. Its latest orders are:
"Call in Don Dilkinson too, Brother
Cleveland! He is as bad with his tongue
as Vilas when he gets away from reason
able restraint and off into the frank and
boundless West. We are glad to see the
cabinet on the stump. It is a manly as
sertion of an inalienable right of every
American citizen, even if he be an office
holder. But when the cabinet gets on
the stump at the West, it ought not to
talk in such a way to hurt the ticket at
the East. Better stay in Washington!'
The Philadelphia Times is of the opin
ion that it may now be accepted as set
tled that congress will guggle along in
one way or the other to present any re
sponsible action on the tariff issues until
after election; that then, if Cleveland
shall be elected the Mills bill or some
bill closely akin to it, will be passed, and
if Harrison shall be elected, "our present
high war taxes on the necessaries of
life and of business will be reduced by n
proAigate appropriations and by high a
premiums to bond holders." But hold! ti
Mr. Times. Under the "present high
war taxes" you prate about, the Ameri- d
can workman ca can buy his suit of woolen tl
clothes as cheap in this country as in b
Canada or Great Britain; and ceutainly tl
his "bull beef" and plum. pudding don't tl
cost him any more here than across the b
water. The intelligent workman asks p
nothing better than this. As to the "pro- t.
flegate appropriations" the Times alludes a
to, it must have reference to the improve- s
ment of the rivers, harbors and water. a
ways of our country, one of the cardinal
doctrines of the republican party from its
foundation up to the present time. The
high premiums to bond holders might
° have been unheard of, had Mr. Cleveland
used the surplus in the treasury, which
Shas so disturbed his virtuous slumbers,
to reduce the public debt, as he was by
St law fully authorized to do.
t The New York Sun is deeply exercised
a over the widening gulf between the Hill
and Cleveland wings of the democracy.
y It says that Mr. Cleveland,, being the
r- candidate of the party nominated by ac
e clamation at St. Louis, and Mr. Hill the
e- candidate of the party nominated by ac
clamatlon at Bufllalo, there can be no dis
y crimination by democrats between them,
u which does not break the bonds of party
Is and defeat all the purposes of the party
h organization. Mr. Dana says, "it is time
for Mr. Cleveland to say the word that is
a necessary to avert the destruction which
his pretended friends in this state are
d planning for the party which made him
t president, and is now supporting him for
a second election." It is questionable
whether the wise counsels of the distin
guished journalist will be heeded by the
desperate land-lubbers now at the helm
of the ship of state; and it is yet more
m questionable whether any tactics they
- might adoit will save the party in Novem
ber from the over-whelming defeat they
a deserve.
1e The New York Tribune states that by
far the greater part of the voters of Irish
birth are wage-earners, and have a di
rect personal interest in the question
be pending before the country. It is not
le- strange if, with the history of their own
at land to enlighten them, they are more
no zealous than many Americans in resent
nd ing British assaults upon American in
he dustrial independence. Indeed, the voter
of Irish nativity who can support the
rat Cleveland-Bayard movement against the
is American protective tariff ought to be
ll able to plead entire ignorance of the
to country from which he has come, as well
'ee as ignorance of the history or the coun
ice try which has offered him a welcome.
col
TWENTY REASONS WHY. he
- of
Here are twenty reasons why the Unit- Ai
ed States should continue the protective an
system: to
1. Because the most patriotic Ameri- C4
cans have favored it. Washington, Jef- a
ferson, Hamilton, Jackson, Madison,Mon- th
roe, the two Adams and Lincoln were ns
protectionists. D:
2. Because free trade and secession all
are alike the products of sectional jeal- th
ousy. The first serious attempt to de- W
stroy the Union was promoted by free a5
traders, and in 1861 every secessionist ar
was a free trader. cr
8. Because the policy of free trade is TI
of English origin, and was confessedly
proposed to benefit the people of Great Ci
Britain.
4. Because there is a necessary com
mercial antagonism between the United 3
States and Great Britain. It has always B
existed, and will probably continue until 3
Great Britain surrenders her supremacy. n
Under the circumstances we, being her a
chief antagonist, would be fools to ac
cept her suggestions. b
5. Because under her system the
United States has reached the position of C
the wealthiest nation on the globe. o
6. Because by the aid of protection
we have created a manufacturing indus
n try which has no rival in magnitude.
7. Because by greatly stimulating
b production and mechanical ingenuity, A
protection has put within the reach of
wage-earners comforts undreamed of by -
e kings a couple of centuries ago.
n 8. Because it has created an enormous
home market for the farmer, without
%a which we would always have been sub
d jected to the vicissitudes of a varying for
s eign demand.
ie 9. Because by bringing the shop and
- the farm close together, it has greatly
,r enhanced the value of all agricultural
8 lands in the United States.
ig 10. Because it has enabled us in a
'l brief period to pay off the major part of
an immense national debt, incurred in
le the suppression of a war waged for slav
t- ery and free trade.
be 11. Because it has always kept the
e- United States treasury in a solvent con- I
ad dition; while free trade has always re
ty sulted in the destruction of the national
k. credit--and a resort to loans in times of
its profound peace.
if 12. Because it helps the workingman
g. to secure a fair compensation for his ser
vices, by shielding him from the fierce
competition of the pauper labor of
on Europe.
by 13. Because it is a fair system of taxa.
e: tion, which compel the foreigner to pay
ier for the privilege of entering our markets,
;ue thus relieving the home producer of a
on- portion of his burden.
md 14. Because it is a rational system, in
the culcating the idea that it is wise for a na
as- tion to be self-sustaining.
ry 15. Because it has stimulated national
Ice- pride by developing our resources on a
on grand scale.
t 16, Because the material prosperity it
at has brought about has compelled the for
eigner to recognize this country as a
pin- great one.
set- 17. Because it elevates to the first
in place the producer, considering his in
re- terests as of more importance than those
ntll of the mere consumer, who is too often
and of the class that toils not nor spins,.
)me 18. Because it promotes good work
and manship, the live-and-let-live principle
sent back of it making it unnecessary to re
of sort to what Carlyle called the cheap and
y nasty method of produotion, which al.
Sways characterizes the work of free
t traders.
h 19. Because it unhesitatingly con
t- demns as an economic error the theory
n that it is wise to put men on the level of
n beasts in order to secure cheapness for
y the consumer. Excessive competition,
I the invariable outcome of free trade, is
Le bound to produce a result by calling into
ce play the stern maxim of the survival of
. the fittest-which usually means in econ
,s omics the worker who will permit him
e- self to be crowded nearest the limit of
r. subsistence.
al 20. Because it is American.-[Ex.
C. T. GROVE,
GROCER,
A Share of Your Patronage
Solicited.
ill
y. Thirda Ave South between Third and Fouath St.
he
C. T. WERNECKE
e -Dealer In-
SGROCERIES,
Notions and Fruit.
rty
n3 Bargain Counter Goods.
i CROCKERY AND LAMPS,
re -
" Fresh Candies & Nuts.
for
le Kennedy's Fancy Blscuts In Thirty Diferent
In- Varleties.
e Fishing Tackle.
Dre Fish, alt and Fresh. Poultry.
" CROWN
Ley
SEWING MACHINE.
by
Ish
i CAMP AND RANCH OUTFITS.
ion
not JOHN BURKE,
1wn PropIaimro
' CASCADE HOTEL,
in- Comfortable rooms and excellent table. Popular
er prices. First avenue South, between
the Third and Fourth Streets. No bar.
entthe G T ly located
the GREAT WALLS. MONTANI.
MONTANA SHORT LINE.
When traveling every one should coa
sider well the questions of economy, Is
comfortsafety and speed,thesequestions
being of the same importanceina journey
of an hour as in one of several days' ride.
An examination of the map will convince Ni
anyone that this is the most direct route
to and from all the principal points in
Cen.- S tUL A tral
and Mon PoUol Nor
- thern AN ITA -
e neso-. AILWAy, t&a,
Dakota and Montana. Our epunipment
n and time are excellent. Our rates are
- the lowest, but this fact is something
which speaks for itself. Definite figures
e and maps can be obtained by applying to
,t any Agent of the Company, or the G .
eral Passenger Agent.
i The following are a few of the Principal
Points reached via this Line:
y Sr. CLOUD, SAum CENTRP, FERO FALIS,
it CRooKsroN, ST. VINCEmr, HuirCUINsON,
PAYNEVaILLE, MORRIs_ APPLrON AND
n BacwuNRIDE,MINN. WAT.IT'OWN Anxa"
DEIN, ELLENlDALE, WYAHP.rON, FARGO,
!d iN Foa e, Gt 'rron, Dvmrs LAKS,
s BoriNEAu AND BUWO.D, DAKOrA; GLAs
il 3ow DAWm (Fr. BELExAP), Assnunsonl u,
:.. BENroN, GREAT FALLs, HELENA AND
Y Bu:rrs, MOrNTrANA WINNIPE, MasrronA,
er AND ALL PACIFIO dmsr POnfIN.
c- Parties seeking farms or business loca*
lions will find unusual opportunities for
both on this line in Northern Dlakota and
1e Montana, also in Minnesota where the
of Company has for sale at low prices and r
on favorable terms.2,000,000oo acres of ex
cellent farming, grazing and timber landas.
n For maps and otherinformation address,
s- J. BooEWALTR, C. H. WARREN,
Land Commiuioner, Gen' Pass. Ag't.
Ig ST. PAUL, MINN.
Uy, A. MANvmL, W. S. ALEXANDER,
of aa'l Manager. ., 'lTMsNMmaa3lS
by
GO EAST
Out VIA
) The Northern Pacific Railroad.
nd -
tly The only Dining Car Boute, Palatial Pullmin
ml Sleepers and
a Free Emigrant Sleepers
of ON ALL THROUGH TRAINS.
TIME CARD:
on- In effect on and after 400 a. m., Sunday, Au
gust 6th, 1888.
al ARRIVALS AT HELENA.
of No. 1-Through West Bound, Limited, 9B 0 a. m.
No. S-Through West Bound. Local, 1.46 a. m.
No. 2-Through East Bound Limited, 9:15 p. in.
ian No. 4-Through East Bound Local, 10 a. m.
ter- No. 8-Butte and Helena Express, 1210 p. m.
roe No. l--Marysville Passenger, 106 a. m.
of No. 20-Rimini Accommodation, 50 p. m.
No. 7-Wickes, Boulder & Calvin pa'r, 50 p. m.
ga- DEPARTURES FROM HELENA.
pay No. l-Through West Bound Limited, 9:15 a. m.
ets, No. 2-Through East Bound Limited, 9'0 p. m.
of a No. 4-Through East Bound Local, 250 a. m.
No. 8-Through West Bound Local, 2.40 a. m.
No. 7-Helenaand Butte Express, 4:2 p. m.
, in- No. 9-Marysville Passenger, 50 p. M.
na- No. 10-Rimint Accommodation, 850 a. m.
No. S-Wickes, Boulder and Calvin, 9:10 a. m.
anal aFor Full Information, address
A. L. STOKES, Gen'l Ag't, Helena.
in a C. S. FEE, Gen. Pass. Agt., St. Paul.
ly it w. P. BEACHLEY.
for
is a
ir, General Stationery and News
hose Dealer.
ork
Alple A Full Liis of Legal Blanks for Sale.
o re o
rnd Corner of Central Ave. and Fourth Street.
HARDWARE!
SHOCHIKISS & HAWKINS
Have the fnest assortment In Great Falls of
- SHELF, BUILDING & HEAVY HARDWARE
f And the Largest Line of
Heating and Cook Stoves
of the Best Manufacture. Also
GUNS &AMMUNITION
At Prices that defy competition.
All Kinds of Tin Work. Done to Order.
CALL. AND GET PRICES.
STONE BLOCK, CENTRAL AVENUE.
Barnes & Collett,
Real Estate, Ins nce Agts. & Miling BIroers
PROPRIETORS OF THE
"FAIRVIEW ADDITION"
To the City of Great Falls.
Om on Ceatral Avenue. Correspondence Sollclted
DO YOU KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT
The very Low Prices
AT THE BEE-HIVE STORE?
We are selling Goode from ecents to 1. You will find something you need at prices to astonls
you. Call and look over our
Five, Ten, and Twenty-five Ceni
COUNTERS.
Our Terns are C.ASH---oour Prices LOW;
er Call at the BEE-HIVE, and you'll find it 80.
LORD BROTHERS,
CENTRAL AVENUE.
Great Falls Blacksmith Shop
my Is prepared to to any class of work in its line, and in a most thorough and wor
one manlike manner. All work done on short notice.
ney
ido. DISEASES OF HORSE'S FEET TREATED SUCCESSFULLY.
nee lmrn.haalr a Saaclatr,. C. PRATT, Proprieti
g JENSEN,
The Shoe Man
/1 s; aolmpened his Finely Equippe~
Boot and Shoe Establishment
in the Luther Block on Second St., Bet.
S(entral and First Avenues south.
Anl Inexhaustible and handsome Variety of
SBOOTS AND SHOES
i CARRIED IN STOCK.
Mail Orders filled Carefiully and
Expeditiously.
.,NDRE I"' JELNS'E.N:
ECLIPSE STABLES:
(UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT.)
Single$ doubleTurxnout'
Every Convenience Furnished that the Traveling
Public Inay desie.
i. SADDLE HORSES SPECIAL
THE PATRONAGE OF THE PUBLIC SI RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED.
on P.1 UL 4" FLETCHER, Proprietors.
SW. B. RALEIGH, F. I. MEYER, J. W. BELLIS.
W. B. R.ALEIGH-i & CO.,
Headquarters
Au
- For Fine Dress Silks,
Importee and Domestic Dress Goods, Carpets,
Curtain Material, Flannels, Blankets,
Comforts, Ladies' Scarlet 'Knit,
i . Saxony and Silk Under
ware.
Men's Knitted and California Underware, Ladies
and Children's Shoes.
-- All of these goods are now represented in endless variety and \ill be soh
At Remarkably Low Prices.
g 'Glve its a call and get pric.es. Mail orders receive promlpt attention.,.
W. B. Raleigh & Company.
Cm sa.r, AVENUlt, R(EAT F.uA, MONTH-C

" z
*MATTiES & ROEHL,
.I.i
-r W
INr~r~ ar
8. C. ASHBY. C. A. BROADWATER.
S. C. ASHBY & CO.
Helena and Great Falls.
McCormick Mowers and Binders.
TII[OMAS HAY RAKES.
KEYSTONE HAY LOADERS.
Minnesota Chief Threshers, ttldiung Twiue, "Mitchell" Farm and Springl \\ag
ons, Fine Carriages, Buggies, Phaetons, Buckboards, Road
g' Carts, Etc., Etc. Harness, Barb Wire,
Victor Feed Mill.
'Id Wall Tents, Wagon Covers, Etc., Etc. Extras for
Farm Machinery.
. James Brown's
Rlestaurant and Boarding-Hoi ise.
A Good Meal for 25 Cents.
tA' Third St. between Central Ave. and First Ave. South. - Great Falls. I. 'T.

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