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Democratic enquirer. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1867-1873, October 10, 1867, Image 1

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YOLUME 1
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TJEMOCBATIC Al ALL TIMES
H'ARTIIUR, VINTON COUNTY,
AND tNDIB ALL CIRCTUf STANCES
.OHIO: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1867.
NUMBER 38. ;
Democratic Enquirer
HBMSBID- gVEBT TIIOKSDAI MoRSINO, BY
j. W. OWII, IU1TOB A fUOPEIETOE.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF VINTON COUNTY
OFFICE In lodge' i Building, over Swelland:
More., corner nam ana a,ocum direct,
r of the Court Home. t
For Terms; io see 4th Page )
BUSINESS CARDS
F. II. UIDISTEIS,
Gold's Old Stand, near the Steam Mill,
McARTHUR, OHIO,
T3 prepared to do 11 manner of Llssk-Smlthine;,
-a. sucn a
Hone Shoeing,
Ironing of Buggiee,
Wagaone,
a-c, Jte., Ice
nrf tfiA mftnuAtninrA and renaT of all kinds .t Auri
cultural Iniplenents and kdg9 Tools. All work
don in a substantial manner und warranted. sl'J
S. SOITS. WM. MUILIBB. A.WIAlft. B.Wllll
S. GOETZ & CO,
HAMDEN FOUNDRY
HAMDEN1, OHIO,
aUHOnCIUHERS or
STOYES, CASTINGS,
HOLLOW WARE,
All Kindt of Caeteri and Bed Fatimingt,
I . AND
MACHINERY FOR FURNACES
A Lh kinds of Machinery Renairin don. Th
' jf. Ware Manufkutured at the f'ouudry Is sold as
low can oo Dousni iukuj luiirKri.
J'om 0(Bo address Heed' Mills, Vinton County, 0
sjr iv Jem-
VINTON' COUNTY BANK
(DHINCOBroRATCD,) .
MoArtliur, Olaio.
STOCKHOLDERS:
Jos. 3. Mcdowell. jas. w. delat,
rassiiitxT. Casmikb
. S. SOKOT, . B. DOBOS, AfOBIW WOLI,
a. t. Austin, p. t. banksis, vbab stboso
A. A. AUSTIN.
BANK OF DISCOUNT AND DEPOSIT.
Tl AVING formed a co-partnership for the purpose
ax niconauciiog a '
GENERAL BANKING AND EXCHANGE
BUSINESS,
an with ample facilities for the transaction of ant
hue floss pertaining to legitimate Banking, ire tender
Hut services to the bivice.s public generally.
W MIY AND SELL EXCHANGE, COLS AND
sJfti Money loaned at reasonable rates on a
re-j'.flbepapur Itevenuo Stamps always on hand
sip. ior nsiv. inuirejt paia on lime aoposiis.
pHt.ojiaw sh.n.sjto remitmoney to foreign Coib
k.-r. .i .in com in urims at our umee.
?o!ir'jry 7,1337-ly
CHA3 bftUWN, freit. DAN. WILL, Catk
WILL. BROWN & CO.
One Door Weti Dan. Will & Bro't Store, Ntr
aide Jlam street,
. McARTHUR, OHIO,
T0 A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS!
JL7 Deal in Ezohange, GoTernment Seourl
ties, 8tock, Bonds, Gold and Stlrer, &o.
Deposits received. Interest paid on time
aeposits.
Collections made at all accessible points
ID th United elates.
United States Revenue Stamps for sal.
" All business done on the mott liberal terms
and with the utmost promptness.
February 88, l17-ly
H. 0, MOORE,
PHYSICIAN AND STIRGliON,
ALL ENS VILLE, ORI.O. j
1 FTERan absence of two years, oflers his tiro
JX. fenlonal services to the citiiens of Allensville
and surrounding country.
Marob21,180i-tf .
, J. A MONAHAN, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SUKQEON.
HAMDEN, VINTON COUNTV, OHIO,
THANKFUL for the liberal pstronaga received for
the two paatyoats, he would say to those desir
ng his professional services, that he may always be
onnd at his Office or residence, on Main Btreel, un
ss absent on professional business.
February 28, lH67-ly
RICHARD CRAIG,
A U C 1 1 U JN EEK,
Tka.vtlxxLxrf OluLO,
HAVING been licensed to dispose of property by
publio auction, he will promptly attend all Bas
tions in Vinton county wbeu solicited.
Office Snivel's Lair Office, in the Court Bouse.
August 1, 1887-tf
j. j. McDowell,
wCLttorxiey at Law,
. 7.; E8. Claim Arent,
M o A R T -H U K .OHIO.
WILL practice In Vinton and adjoining eonntles.
Alsn, Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue.
OrrioB In the Vinton County Hank. ,
June 27,1867-60) v ' I ! i ! ; .. .
' ' -JOHN C. STEVEWSOIV, ?
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR . AT LAW, ,
JACKSON C. H., OHIO, "
W ILL pre tine in theComts ef Jackson, Vinton
and ether oounties,
. January Si, 187- tf
ARCHIBALD MAYO,
Attorney at Xsvw,
(prosecuting attornev of vinton county
. moarthtjr;ohio, ;
TirTT.t. attend Dromntlv to all legal hnsineas
en
YV
-tm.tj.it to his care in Vinton and Jackson coun
t;; .' n.n.li lnililriHiri.1. Nnwf KHllillnff. SOUl
-iniwa iwiiiBtwo ii ...
west corner MHin and Marketstreets upalnirs. U
Jackson county, who can alwaya ba found, Uuriug
vaonilnn, at n omce in jkii,i""i
May30,18()7-U u
DAAICL S. DAKA.
.t t ornoy ctt Xjcwxr
McARTHUR, OHIO.
"1ITILL rrao.ticein the Courts of Vln:on, Athens
States Courts ot the Southern District of Ohio.
Orrica Second Story of Davis' Building, on Mai
vv ann jaiKson counnes ; amo, in tuo umw
street.
January 24, 1807-tf
D- D. SU1TEL,
Attorney ctt XjOiW,
'." V McARTHUR, OHIO.
w1
ILL attend promptly to all legal business en.
trusted to his care, In Vinton and adjoining
oounties. office In tbe Court tlouse.
Julyil, 1W7-1T
joiin cnvRtn, jr..
86 W. FOURTH 8T, CINCINNATI, OHIO
DIALia IM
SHEET IVIUSIC.
MUSIC BOOKS
AMD ALL KINDS Ot
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
TMPORTEEt of French, Gorman and Italian Violin
I strinas. .
The Trade supplied on the. most liberal terms.
General Wettern Agent for
MASOtf & HAMLIN'S
CABINET ORGANS
TBI
" 8H0NINQER " OEM ORGAN AND
MELODEON,
AND THE CELBBRATKB
I5L3STi.I33IS PIANO
ALSO A LARGE BIOOK OF
PIANOS
FromtheFikctoiiesofthe most of the Celimatid
MAKEB8, wnicn I Will Wll iuw wr vwu.
vxa ri j DUhau tolrttn In nvrheri tfH ffir nW.
v UIU I 1 liuun innvai las -
WTFianon and Orgwis for nil and to rent, by the
riifri tLiunriFT or j ear.
amount paid for rent being applied to pur-
nKiifl. If deairAil.
Rty-Agents for Cabinet Organs ana rianos
wanted in every town in Ohio, Indiana and
K.eniiicB.7.
Address.
JOHN CHURCH, J:,
June27,I8M Cincinnati, 0
IN A CEMETERY.
Here they so softly rest!
No trouble heaves their bieast,
No cares annoy ;
In this most still retreat,
Where peace and beauty meet,
And holy joy.
Never a fear or pain .
Can haunt their so nil again,
Or any wrong.
An everlasting sleep!
Lapsed in a dream too deep
For sigh or eong.
Would I might weep no more ;
Would I life's fever o'er
Wert well at rest;
Freedom from all life's foes,'
An end to endless woes;
Here with the blest! .
OCTOBER.
BY EMMA F FRADT.
Time hath lain the glorious summer
In hia golden urn;
Autumn's footsteps are around us,
Wheresoe'er we turn :
In the woods, where breeies softly
Fading trees caress ;
Where October robes the herbage
In ber russet dress;
Golden gleams the squash and pumpkin,
'Mid the stubborn oorn ;
Plaintively the doves are cooing,
From the flowing barn;
And the songs of merry farmers,
Bringing home the Lay,
Mingle with the piping quail and
Blackbird's roundelay.'
And tbe squirrel, with timid footstep,
Seeks among the leaves
For the chestnuts, and the spiders
Flimy laoes wtave;
'er the fading flowers hangs the
Pollen-dusted bee, r '
And the dreamy hum of looust
Floats from yonder tree.
Lofty reals the pearly vapor
Over hill and town;
And the'erickets lond are oalling
From the meadow brown.
Nature's voices are telling -
Hew the summer died,
Ushering in the glorious Autumn, .
sAs eld Winter's bride.
JUST A FLIRTATION.
BY S. ANNIE FROST.
"Ju8T,a flirtation; nothing more so
nous, I assure you. Ho amuses me,
I seem to amuse him there lies tbe
whole affair in a nut-shell."
' "Tnst a flirtation!" - '
- 'Th first Speaker hacT -uttered
words In a gay, careless tone, witn a
laugh that displayed the curves of a
pretty mouth, two rows of pearly
teeth, and the daintiest ot dimples on
a round chin and in rosy cheeks. She
was standing before a mirror twisting
llowera into her hair. Verv win
some, graceful and beautiful she look
ed in her airy evening dross, with the
myrtle twisted in her glossy curls.
But as ,the echo of her words fell
upon her ear, the smile fuded from
her face, and she turned to her com
panion with a look of surprise that
was almost terror, lhe measured,
stern tone suited well the grave, sad
face of the elderly lady who had spo
ken to them.
"Just a flirtation," she echoed, ris
ing as she spoke. "Take heed, Elea
nor Browning; flirts have been mur
dered before now. James Hill is not
a man to flirt with. He is too noble,
too good and true to be tie plaything!
of a coquette. I shall tell him how
you regard his attentions." And bo-
tore Jilanor could reply, JUrs. Wilk
ins had left the room.
"I wonder who made her my judge
and adviser?" said the young girl, pet
ishly. '-She takes strange liberties
tor an acquaintance. xJeing James
Hill's Aunt docs not make her my
dictatress. I wonder if she will tell
him what I said? I don't care;" and
she tossed her head defiantly. "Only
eight o'clockl I won't go in to hop
yet. I wonder if she will tell him
she thought again, "rshaw, "why
should I care?" "
And vet she did care. She . sat
down by the window and looked out
upon a wide stretch ot beach, and be
yond that the tossing, gleaming
waves ot the broad Atlantic guttered
in the soft moonlight. Here and
there were groups of strollers, who
had come out from the heated ball
room into the cool, sea air. tay
laughter floated up to the window, low
murmurs of distant voices crept there
too, and Eleanor wondered if some of
them bore the burden of the same
dream she had led James Hill intoj' '
Sitting there, half amusing, half
mocking her own thoughts, she thought
tho summer over. She had come from
her New York home tired of gaiety,
and thinking she was weary of being
a belle. Yet she had entered into all
the pleasures of the fashionable wa
tering place with tho keenest zest
Feted and courted as the only child
and heiress of a wealthy father; ad
mired for her beauty and the spark
ing talents she evinced in music and
conversation, few had deemed it worth
while to seek for any inner treasurers
of heart and soul. She had been the
spoiled child of fortune from her in
fancy, and perhaps the keen blade of
criticism had never cut one of her re
marks till now.
"Flirts have been murderers before
now," she said in her heart, and forth-
with rose the memory of the list of
cavaliers that had danced attendance
upon her for the last two years. There
was not one where her vanity could
flatter herself with execution to death
Thn
tamentalize and recover; but-rbat
James Hill was of different metal.
He was in earnest. A self-made man,
who had struggled up from ignorance
to eminence in his profession law.
man who had never been in the
round of society, who had nothing of
fashion s gutter and empty forms. A
man who had lived a deep, true life,
and who had come now for rest from
mental labors, and to attend the wish
es of his aunt, who was fast sinking
under a fatal disease. , .)
It was hard to say how suoh a man
ad come into the train of Eleanor's
overs, but there ne was, ana sne sin
gled him out for a special favor. Her
consience was not easy as sne sat in
the moonlight recalling the flirtation.
She had let him see far into the reces
ses of her heart, half unconsciously
fiening to his earnest sincere naturt)
1 that was real and true in her own
ong walks and long talks came to,
her memory, ana sne Decame restless
as she thought of how she had opened
her soul's chambers to the eye of the
man who she felt in her inmost heart
oved her. ' : ' : - ; . ?
"Dreaming in the moonlight?
The voice roused her. "Aunt Ed
ith," she said, looking up, "did you
not tell me Mrs, Wilkina was an old
ichool mate of yours?" !
to
to
"ies, but I have not seen her since
fye left school, until this summer."
'She is very cross and disagreea
hie.". ' ' .
i "Hush, Nellie hushl She is bro
ken hearted. She is dying of grief."
"Auntie!" - . .
,,"Ihada long talk with her this
morning. Shall I tell you what she
JlG;!'' Lrae?"
"Yes." T like a storv. von Wow.1 '
'-This is a sad one. When I knew
Ellen Wilkins, or, as she was then, El
lon Lawson, she was one of the
brightost, happiest girls in our school,
in full health, with beautv. talont and
weaKh, a favorite of fortune. Two
years after leaving 6chool she married
a gentleman to whom she was was de
votedly attached; to this day she can
not paention him without tears, and
slill'wears weeds, though hedied thir
ty years ago. Perhaps thisis morbid,
but it is true. One year after her
marriage she waB a widow, and a lit
tle daughter ot two weoks old lav in
her arms, fatherless. This child be
came her idol. I cannot tell you all
the love she manifested in the men
tion of her name. She watched her
grow to' womanhood, training every
impulse of heart to bear the fruit of
cultivation and education. No voice
but her own taught her, and tho fond
est love existed between them, till at
eighteen, Myra her name was Myra
tell in love. She gaye all tho pure,
true love of an untried heart to a man
who was only flirting to pass away a
summer. Her mother was ill with
the seeds of thediseas&that is now in
curable, and Myra was uner the care
of a friend whose son thus violated the
sacred charge. He . flirted and she
loved, and when the summer ended
and they parted without one word of
the love she had believed her own
passing his lips", she drooped and di
ed. Does this seem unnatural? It is
true. Her mother in vain sought to
check low nervous fever that succee
ded weeks of forced, feverish excite
ment, and when the last hours came,
found the long sought clue to the
1 1 1 1 V ...
cnange m ner cniia. Bhe died of a
broken heart, and her mother is fast
following her to the grave."
"But men donotdie of love?"
The words sprang half unconscious
ly to Eleanor's lips.
"They may die a mental death that
is worse. A man becomes cynical,
hard and cold, may lose his trust and
hope for happiness. Is not that death,
Nellie? Death to the noblest, purest
impulses of nature death to hope,
death to peace of mind, death to all
that makes life dearest? Nay, worse:
men have so died mentally from such
a sorrow that they have become un
believers in the faith of their child
hood, and turned religious scoffers in
tbve overwhelming bitterness of the
angaish of such a blow." .
A long silence fell upon the room
xne moon tnrew long silvery rays
upon JNellie s lace and dress, and
showed the cheeks pale, and the eyes
growing earnest ana aeep.
After awhile she whispered: "Go
C6wn, auntie. I will join you in our
parlor alter a little while.
And when she was alone she knelt
down by the chair and prayed. Soft-
? Purely the moonlight mantled the
little figure in the its soft snowyrobes
of lace, with the flowers drooping
among the curls. The uplifted face
was pale, the raised eyes full of peni
tence and yet hopeful, the white hands
elapsed as if in pain, and the lips mo
ved 'wkiapovaH imt.it'ona for pardon
and guidance.
She was in no mood for the ball
room, so she went te her aunt's pri
vate parlor." There was no one there),
and again Bhe sat bp the window and
looked out on the beach.
"Miss Browning." -She
had not heard him come in, but
he stood there before her, stern and
pale. She looked on with a smile, but
the lips quivered se that it was only
an imitation, after all.
"I came tp say farewell," said he,
still ' standing there. "I am foolish,
perhaps, to seek you again, knowing
now the estimation in which I am
held. I had believed you, Eleanor
Browning, a true noble woman one
whom to win would make a man's life
happy beyond expression " His
voice broke here in spite of all efforts
be calm. "I had believed you oh,
Nellie! Nellie! say it is not true. You
have not played with me. I have
loved you so dearly so truly, You
are not so false so fickle.".
It was fearful to see the agony on
that face so calm and grave by nature,
hear the . cold voice broken and
pleading as if for life. But he was
shaken to the heart, and .Eleanor was
almost terrified to see how he loved
her. He had half turned from her as
he finished his passionate appeal, and
sne rose to stand beside him. . ;
'I have done very wrong," she said,
humbly, "but if you will forgive
me -" ... .
"Nellie my Nellio!"he said, in a
wiiisper.. . , t .
' M'Yours if you can forgive me1!
"Ftfrgive is not the word between
us.two," hesaid, as he folded. het
clotely in hls arms. love vouwlth
all my heart. Do you love me, Nel
lie?" ' '
She lifted her brown eves to hia
face, and he read his answer there.
Time, io order to keep up with the
progress of the aK, is said to have ibao.
doned tbeeytha and the hourglass, and
purchased a sewing machine sod a
watch.
Probably the reason that the wsj of
transgressor is hard is, that it if io much
travelled.
A itoroa in tbe oonnoieace will ilwiyi
bring clouds ia the ooanlenance.
HOW HE HAD HIM.
A man named Wells kept a tavern in
one of our Western villages, bat though
his house had a very good name, it was
more than he had himself; for it was
surmised by his neighbors that he used
a great deal of fodder, corn. Ao for
"high he "lover gave an equivalent,
though it had never been olearly proved
upon him. -
Early one morning be was net by an
acquaintance, naaed Wilkes, ai he was
driving before him a heifer, whioh he
ha4 most probably borrowed from some
farmer.
"Halloo, Wellsl where did yon get the
heifail '. eriei Wilkea. ,.
"Bought her ot Colonel Stevene."
was the unhesitating reply.
"What did you pay for her?"
ittm ....
".twenty dollars," said Wells, as he
hurried on.
Aoout an hour afterwards, is Wilkes
wae sitting in Wells' bar-room. Colonel
Steven. entered. After few minutes
conversation. Wilkes said:
"A fine animal that yoi sold Welle?"
l don ( understand your: I
never
sold Wells any animal,"
A;iantyou7 Why, I met him this
morning with a heifer, whioh he said he
bought of you for twenty dollars."
us aid, eh? Well, sinee he said eo.
ne nas got to pay me for her " eaid
Stevens.
Wells entered rood after, and Stevens
"'Pping up to him, said:
"Come, Wells, I'll trouble you for the
money for that heifer; it was oaih bar.
gain, yon knowr
"I never booghtany heifer from yon."
"Don't yon remember yon boight one
of me for twenty dollars? Here'i Wilkei
oan trove it?"
"No, ho can't," laid Well..
"You told me so this moruine." said
Wilkes. ,
A carious exoression nmsert
r .
over
Welle' face; he felt himself eonoerned;
he had either to tell where ht got the
animai, or lose . twenty dollars; and
thinking it not safe for him to do the
first, be palled out his wallet, counting
out the money, and haidiog it to Ste.
vane, nid:
"So I did-io I did. I Ltd forgotten
all about it; you mast exouae me."
Only Once. Two men' were dis
puting about a certain street in Chica
go, when one of them impatiently ask
ed: "How many times have you been in
Chicago?
"Only once," admitted the other,
modestly. .
"Only once!" said the first, triumph
antly. "I have been there halr-a-dozen
times, and therefore ought to
know more of it than you."
. "No, I claim that 1 should know
most of it."
"How bo?" ;
"Because I stayed eight years the
time I was there." ;'.
A great cheese made at In
gersoll, Canada, last year, which
weighed seven thousand pounds
J Ml 1. M !i . 1 .1 11 .
is BuuexniDneciaiineiacrory.
VALUABLE RECIPES.
To remove freckles .cut them
out with a razor and throw them
away. They will never return.
To bring out a mustache, tie
to it a strong cord, twenty feet
long, to the other end of which
attach-a heavy emoothing-iron,
and throw the latter from a
fourth story window.
To procure a fair complex-
ion, go to sea in a crazy old
boat, and the first gale you get
into your face will become
white. v ( . .
To get rid of red hair, hold
your head for a few minutes in
a strong blaze of gas.
io preserve your eves, out
them in a bottle filled with al
chohol.
To. avoid
corpulence, quit
eating.
To conceal bad teeth, keep
your mouth shut.
To keep cut of debt, acquire -the
reputation of a rascal, and
no one will trust you.
To keep your name up, write
it frequently on the dome of th
Capitol, the State House stee
ple, and other high places. -,
To become a competent book
keeper, borrow all the books
you can and never return them.
To "raise the stamps," say a:
funny thing on the stage.
To keep your doors from be
ing broken open by burglars,
don't close them.
...TQ.keep out of a fight, stay
by yourself.
To gain time, steal a watch, j '.
To keep from stuttering, don't
talk.
"May it please your honor,"
said a lawyer, addressing one of
the judges, "I brought the pris
oner from the iailon a writ of
habeas corpus."
"Well "said. a fellow, in an
undertone, who stood in the
rear of the court, "these law
yers will say any thing. I saw
the man get out of a cab at th
front door."
People neither acute nor pro
found often'say the thing with
out effort whicb we want and
have long been hunting for in
vain.
Dutch Cake. Six ounces of
butter and lard mixed, four
eggs, half a pound of flour, half
a pound of sugar; beat the but-
er and lard to a cream, mix it
witb the eggs well-beaten: then
add the flour and sugar, both
warmed, and a little nutmeg
and cinnamon: when well-beat-
en, aaa a spooniui oi brandy,
and bake a full hour, in a bat
tered mould, in a quick oven... -
A retired English sea cap
tain, who had made the tour of
Continental Europe and the Ho
ly Land, was asked how he was
impressed by his visit to Jeru
salem. "Jerusalem," said he, "is tbe
meanest place I visited 1 There
is not a drop of liquor in the
Whole town fit to drink."
To Cure a Felon. Insert
the finger or thumb, whichever
the case may be, into a lemon,
m the first stages ot the disease,
and keep it on 12 to Z hours,
and it will relieve the pain and
cure the felon without further
trouble.
: A truly great man never puts
away the simplicity of a child.
Silkworms fried in castor oil
are considered a luxury in Chi
na. ' , -

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