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Democratic enquirer. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1867-1873, December 19, 1867, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86079037/1867-12-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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DEMOCRATIC AT ALL TIMIS AN XHtlTl ALL CIRCVMSTANCZ8.
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VOLUME 4.
M' ARTHUR, VINTOK i C0UNTTv:
OHIO: THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1867.
at-.ia.
HTiir u"t iWHf a imrHVwrir
Democratic Enquirer
PJULISIIED EVERT TIIDB8DAT MORNING, BY
J, W.OWP.1,KD1TOB AMDPBOPHIIITOK.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF VINTON COUNTY
OFFICE In Podge't Building over Swetland t
Score, corner Main and Locust Street, East
of the Court Home,
I '" TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
i . (l ADVANCE.)
One copy! ono yar, I 1 BO
One copy, six months ' 76
One copy, thr0 months, 40
Fiw nopieii, one jrewr, to one Peit Offi, fits
Tan c pie3, nna yn:ir, to one Pot Ollii'o, 10 00
' our UTniH require payment i be nuide stuictlt
IX ADTANt'E
i A tiilnre to glvp.nottc of ft w'nh to rtispontimie nt
die eloso ol tli'n time subscribol for, will hn consul,
t re ft now cnir m'tnont ; uiul no pnpp'r will bp dis
eonilniied nnt l oUrrnll nrrenngre slmll be pniri.
Pnpir nre debverpd through the until frpi of post,
ee witbiii the ponnty, nml, n!io, frpp to snbsoritipr
1 1 virile in (he county, Aim.su pomntllee in out of the
aunty. 1
TERMS OF AD VFR T I ST NO
' Ten linPK f thin typo, or the apnea occupied by
Hio dnnie, nvvka one frimre. i
, in squniOi one inspi lion, Jl.On
K:ich mlilltiniml insertion, fiO
All trnnsiient nrtverlioiti"; for n horler period tlmn
' t hree '.nuiithu, chiuurdnt the u'-nvo rntcD.
. 3 inos fi mos. ti h'or. 12 mon
iiPolumn. f'J1" Slow tflfiilO (211(10
"I VIIIIIHIIl, I" nil ivi'u ii"
fieolnnin, Ui on 30 "0 4f (10 . 6" no
1 ao'.innn, 2uoi) 40 00 no no 80 on
'-: pnlnrtm. 10 on 2U
iik mi mi nit in nn An nil
1 nuiriPN pnrd, from n to in lines, por nnnnnii. 8 no
Jiivnree Notices not exceeding 2 linp, (in
inhMtiite,) 2 00
J'.vb iidditlonal lOlinei", 2 00
Attachment Notices, On adv mee.) "' 2 00
Administrator's or Kxocutor's jotices, (in
ndv.nao,) 2 00
Notices of ruimwiiy liubunda or wives, double
Jriee, nnd in advance.
Notices of Donths, free. Murrisgp Notices, Record
in? to the liberality of th parties.
Notice in tho local column, 11' cents per line fur
neh insert ion.
Notices of politicnl meetiniis.frce.
I
BUSINESS CARDS.
r. n. HiDisTEie,
BIjA ousmitii,
Gold's Old Stand, near the Steam Mill,
' ' McARTilUR, OHIO,
13 prepared to do all mnnnor of Llack-Hmithinji,
such as
Horse Shoeing, '
'" '" Ironing of Puggiet, " ;
Waggon),
Sr., .J-., $c,
and the mintificlisre and repa r of nit kind." 1 1 Agri
cultural linplenents and Bdgs Tools. All work
done in asu'istantinl manner lind warranted. sln
, lOKTl. WX. MUF.liLKR
A.WBISIIAUPT.. II.WAr.OHTl!B
s.
GOETZ & CO,
HAM DEN FOUNDRY
HAMDEN, OHIO,
MANUFACTURERS OF
STOVES, CASTINGS,
' HOLLOW VVA55E,
All Kinds of Casters and Bed Fastenings,
Susar-Oane ILUls
0 A Nil
' 3Vltcliirioxy of nil
IS.inci rLerixec3..
THE Ware Manufactured at tho r'oundryis sold
loiv can be bought in any Mnrket.
1'ost Office address Keed's ilills, Vmtou County, 0.
May 16, 1307-ly .
... (UNINCORPORATSD,)
MoArn ur, Olaio.
STOCKHOLDERS:
jos. j. Mcdowell. jas.w. delay,
Tbisiuknt. Cariiif.e.
b.s. nranv, r.. n. dodos, axdrsw woir,
: . F. AUSTIN, D. V. BANNKI.B, FRAK 8TB0K0,
' A. A. AUSTIN.
BANK OF DISCOUNT AND DEPOSIT.
HAVING formed a co-partnership for the purpose
of conducting a
' GENERAL BANKING AND EXCHANGE
BUSINESS, ...
and with ample facilities for the transaction of any
bus ness pertaining to legitimate Banking, we tender
out services to the business nublio ffonerallv.
t .We BUY AtfD SELL EXOHANGE( CHIN AND
HON Money loaned at reasonable rates nn Ac
ceptable paper Revenue tftamps always on hand
and for sale. - Interest paid on time deposits.
Persons wishing to remit money to Foreign Coun;
.'. tries can obtain Drafts at our Ottice. -. . .
February 7,1807-ly
CHAS. BROWN, Pret t, DAN. WILL, Cash
.WILL, BROWN & CO.,
Tl A IXrjbLJLiH-S,
: Out Door West DaA. Will $ Bro' i Store, North
. , Side Main Street,
; moartiiue; ohio,
;T0 A GENERAL BANKING B USIKES
J Deal In Exchange, Government Seouri
tias, Stock, Bonds, Gold and Silver, &o.
" Deposit! received. , Interest paid on time
deposits. , .. ' . . ; i
. Colleolions made at all accessible points
. in the United States, , . ......
United States Revenue Stamps for sale.
t, i All business done on the most, liberal terms
. and with the utmost promptness. - . '
,.-. yebruary28, 1807-ly . '.' ;' "
,h. o. moore, ;.;
riivsroiAN AND sstirgk'on,
ALIENS YILLE, OHIO,
.1 ITER an absence of two years, offers his pro
J. fetsional servioes lo the citjsens of . Allensvillo
and surrounding country.. ,
ia iurrounoin
Marah21,180
07-tf , ;
.. JOIIW C. cLTKTEKSOIV, j:
ATTORNEY ,! AND ' COUNSEUOR AT' LAW, i
.I ,,,' JACKSON C. n.', OHIO, j
WILLpraction In the Courts of Jsekaon, Vie ton
and other eounriei
Jannary !4, 1I0T-K . " - J '.'
AHCIIIBALD MAYO,
-flLttojcxioy ctt Law,
(PROSECUTING ATTORNEY OF VINTUN COUNTY,)
MoARTHUR, OHIO, : ,
WILIjnttend promptly to nil lefjnl hiislne'serr
triHted to limcnrein Vinton and Jackson conn'
ties. Olflce !a Doddridge's New Bnildinir, south
west corner Main and Mnrketstreels upHtnirs. Mr
Mayo. Is in partnernhip with Porter IHiHadwayol
Jackson county, who enn always be found, during
vacntion, nt the oflice id Jackson, Ohio.
May , 1807-11 ,
DIM FX S. DiilVA.
Attorney ctt Xjv-w,
MoARTHUR, OHIO.
WILL practice in the-Courts ofVlnlon, Athens,
and Jackon Counties: also, in the United
States Courts ot the Hnuthern District of Ohio..
Omcs Second Story of Davis' Building, on Main
Street. - -
cnuiicii, Jr.,
CO W, FOURTH 8T, CINCINNATI, OHIO
DEALER IM ..1
SHEET MS.C, t
MUSIC BOOKS
, and All kinds of .
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS,
TMPOUTF.K ol French, German and Italian Violin
strings, , "
Tbe Trnde supplied on the most liberal tomi, ,
': 1,1 General Wetter Agent for
MASON & HAMLIN'S
CABINET ORGANS,
8II0NIN0ER " GEM ORGAN
AKD
MELODEON,
AND THE CELEBRATES
TS-TXixJoo Piano
ALBO A LARQE STOCK OF
P.IA2STOS
From the Fnctoiips of tbe most of the CituraaATiD
Makriih, which I will sell low fur cash.
Old PiannH taken in exnbrnpe lorn'ev.
e-Pianos and Orpans for sale and torent, by the
amount, paid for rent being applied to pur
4U I'll Y1"" l 4 nilf
chase, if desired
L oi7;a i..hu.
Kentucky.
IT.UIVU III W T V I J IVHU . U. UI1IVJ "
Address,
j V JOHN CHURCH, Jr.,
June27, 1RG7-1 , Cinoiiinati
. U. SUIT EL,
Attorney tt Xjctxv,
McARTHUR, OHIO. .. .
WILL attend promptly to all leijal business en
trusted to his care, in Vinton and adjoining
counties, (.ifflce In the Court House.
July 11, 18(l7-ly
J. LILLIBKinttE,
FASHIONABLE TAILOR,
Oue Soot East Dan. Will & Bro'iIStore,
JOSEPH BRADBERT. . . WILLIAM MARK.
BRADBURY 6 MARK,
Attorneys zxt Law,
MoARTHUR, VINION. (WTJHTY, OHIO.
WILL practice in Vinton and adjoining counties.
Otlice on Lognn Street. r 4-ly
J. A MONAHAN, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
HMDEN, VINTON COUNTY, OHIO,
1'HANKFULfor the liberal patronage recoived for
I the two past, years, ne would say to inose oesir
ng hix professional services, that ne may always be
ound at his Office or residence, on Main Btreel, un
ess absent on profefsional business.
February 28, 1807-ly
RICHARD CRAIG,
AUCTIONEER,
J&oAjrtltxxvv, Ob.lO,
Tl AVING been licensed to dispose of property by
S1 pnijiic auction, ne win promptly anena an ano
t ions in Vintonfounty wheu solicited.
Offlce-Hhivel's Law Office, in the Court House.
August 1, 18G7-tf
j. j. McDowell,
Attorney txt Lctxv,
"" AND'. ,J ! ; .
T. 8. Claim Agent,
MoARTHUR. OHIO.
yrriliL practice In Vinton and adjoining counties.
f T Also, Deputy (jonecior 01 internal nevenue
Orrtcs In tbe Vinton County Bank.
June 27, 18(17 6m . ' ",'
FALL AND WINTER
At
r E D DODGE'S
; CHEAP STORE,
MAIN 8TREKT i-i . t, MoARTHUR, 6
T!HAVE Inst received a larje and well selected
JL stock or 1-all and Winter Hry UnOds, notions,
which Were purchased in the Esstemelties tore
duridg the decline in prices, whiah I will sell a
LOW AS THE LOWEST!'
' i, V w . j have all the latest styles of
Dress Goods" a'ni A Plain ' and
, . . , Fane Goods, - !
White Good, . Laces, Embroideries,
laoie litnens,' i Towellns, bhawls,
Balmoral BkirtrJ Hoop Skirts, Hosiery,
Gloves,''1 t." Muslins, ' &o. jco,
A nice and complete assortment of i
filEflfi COY'S CLOTHir.G.
Boots tSo Bnooa.
'A fnlt line of all kinds of NOTIONS. 1
I will hot be undersold bv any House in this market.
Oct. JO, 1907-ly , ,r S. D, DODOS.
'
j
Democratic State Convention.
DEM. STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE ROOMS,
COLUMBUS, OHIO, Dec, 1867.
To the Dtmoeracy of Ohio:
A State Convention of the Democra
cy of Ohio -will bo hold at '
Columbus, on "Wednesday, thi 8th
Pay oy January, Next,
To appoint four Senatorial Dolcgates
to the National Convention to nomin-
ato candidates for President and Vice
President of tho United States; to
nominate two Senatorial Electors of
President and Yice President, and to
nominate candidates for the following
State offices, viz: '' '
Secratary of State; '
One Supreme Judge;
One Member of the Hoard of Public
Works. ' .; , , ; , .
Tho ratio of representation will he
as follows: Ono delcgato for each
county; an additional delegate for
every 500 votes cast for Allen G.
Thurman for Governor at the last
election, and an additional delcgato
for every miction ; ol ZM or more
votes so cast. ' ' ' !: "
We omit tho counties and the
number of delegates to which cacli
county is entitled. Yinton county is
entitled to 4 delegates. Tho several
counties in the State are entitled to
574 delegates. . . . :
It is respectfully suggested that, as
far as it may bo practicable and con
venient, tho delegates be chosen on
Saturday, the 28th inst. ,
It . is like
wise recommended that the delegates
of each Congressional District in at
tendance on tho Convention elect two
Delegates to the National Convention,
and appoint ono Presidential Elector.
Fellow Democrats, you have this
year achieved great victories. But
the work is not complete. The coun
try is yet unredeemed from tyranny
and misrule. Let us then press for
ward in the great work of redemption
Let us lose not one momont. Lot us
spare no exertion and this time next
year will find us rejoicing over our
country and Constitution rescued from
destruction.
By order of the Democratic State
Central Committee.
JOHN G., THOMPSON, Ch'n.
C. J. BEAM, Sec'y.
AN ADDRESS:
Delivered Before the Vinton County
Teachers' Institute, by Prof. Wm. H.
YOUNG, of the Ohio University.
The subject of popular education,
though often discussod, is not yet ex
hausted; though every day handled,
is not worn threadbare; though long
dwelt upon, never becomes staid to the
true man or woman. The education
of the people is too vast an idea to
have reached its full development even
in the nineteenth century; too great
a thought to be greatly comprehended,
too profound a science to be thor
oughly mastered oven by the genius
of our day. There aro deep mines
truth in jt yet unopened. .; There are
broad fields of experience in it yet
untrodden. . There are lofty heights
of .observation in , it yet unsealed.
There are far extended reaches
philosophy in it, that, running paral
lel with human destiny into the dim
future will only bo plain when Heav
en's lights shall shine upon and Divine
Wisdom shall interpret them.' For
the '. education of the people includes
the whole problem, six thousand!
years studied ' and '. 'wrought ' at, in
weariness and pain, sorrow and sigh
ing, ' tears and , blood the whole
problem . 6f . humanity individual
happiness, social -improvement, na
tional prosperity, and - the broad
world's disenthrallment and redemp
tion. Then how manifold tbe phases,
how intricate the bearinsrs. now irrand
the range, and how' sublime, .tho final
end of popular ' education 1 0'Is it any.
wonder . modern philosophy; takes m
at pno view popular education and
. . ' -'ii ' a V"!' yL '!'' 1"'' i ' 'ii
numan aesuny r is it any wonaer ine
profoundoet i intellects iOf the.' age
of
of
J
rocqgnizo in the education of tho peo
ple, the directest solution of tho prob
lem; of humanity? and that the
mtgfitiest minds and noblest hearts
are, to-day, in tho pains of labor, to
bring forth into the light, and give
substantial life, and vigor, and growth,
and permanence, to such ideas ot edu
cation as will soonest realize their con
ception of its nature and importance?
, Education, then, may be held as
gtod matter, still, for discussion, and
even your speaker may bo pardoned
for introducing a single phase of it, in
tho light of his own thought and ob
servation,:! mean. ,,tho Common
School, its nature, function, claims and
potential valuo. '' "
As a first step, we must arrive at a
prociscr notion than is commonly held,
as to what education is. You h'ave all
heard the etymology of tho term:
thero is no better ' definition of the
thing. To educate means, literally to
draw out, and' is directly opposed to
tho common notion of putting in. It
is to awaken and strengthen by rous
ing to activity, and promoting growth)
not distend and weaken by an over
feeding that clogs and burdens.'.
In the corn grain is a mysterious
life germ. Of its nature wo know lit
tle. Drop it in, tho soil where are
moisture., and , warmth, . and it .will
swell, burst, send down a rootlet for
meat and drink', shoot up a lealiot lor
air and light. Stir the earth about it
apd ; it will throw out root after root
for a firmer hold. Let the winds
shake it and it will add fibre to fibre
to resist them. Let the sun dart his
beams and tho even drop her dews up
on it and it will unfold blade after
blade to gather them to its bosom, and
finally put out its nodding ensign, bid
ding man to joy in its beanty and
come and take of its plenty. '
Divine wisdom drops a nut in the
forest. It, too, under the stimulus of
hoat and moisture, and in answer to
tho wondrous life-power in it, sends
down its root with mouths for food,
sends up its branch with lungs for air,
adds limb to limb and leaf to leaf to
catch the sunlight and rain drop, adds
growth to growth and root to root to
stay the tempest, until the little thing
you might fill up with your finger,
swells to tho mighty monarch of the
forest, lifts its head beneath the weight
ot centuries, and challangcs the king
of storms to battle.
Now it is not putting in the grain
seed or acorn that makes the harvest
or the. oak. But the conditions of
their growth aro met; tho proper stim
ulus is brought to bear, rousing into
action the latent life-forces and evolv
ing the good and beautiful -from one,
and majesty and power from tho othor.
It is the heat, and moisture, and air,
and light, and hoo, and plough, and
wind, and storm, that wakes tho life
principle and keeps it active, while
this puts forth its own organs of nour
ishment and these find their own sup
plies in the abundance God has stored
around them. . ' - '
There is in tho child a triple germ
elemont. Each is, of distinct nature,
yet they are some ,how. combined and
interwoven in mysterious union. Each
has its distinct life-forces and separate
sets of, conditions and stimulants ncod-
ful to. their enorgizing, normal action,
and highest effort.) But what is most
worthy, of note, and apropos to tho
matter in hand, these several Jifo-forces,
their energizing! conditions and laws
of action ; are adapted to ., harmonize
with each, other, and work together in
the evolyemcnt of a compound physi
cal, in tellectualj and moral being, the
perfec, divinity-imagedf God-yisaged
maiM Inn .."!ri !.n .n? J:: '.'
; ;Nofl yon ask me, j'winl ,t ducationf I
answer: Like applying warmth' and. moist
ur, and then air and light,1, and rain and
wind, and storm, to the germ-bearing lied,
energiiiag and Stimulating lis imherent life
forces' to' involve the .healthful, . vigorous,
symmetric beautiful and majestic oak ; is
to take the child,, taemingvith r the 1 ivelv
elements of phys'cal, mental and moral, be-
Ing. and supplying the proper encrizing in
fluenees,!hy furnishing the' growing condi
flitions and by favoring the laws of its de
Teloproenl, torouse, eneouraje, dlro ai d
ditciplme the life-forces inherent there, to
the evolvementof the healthful, vigorously
constituted, symmetricallr developed, heau
tlful and mniestictperfect man and wotnanj.
Aye, it is to make a nation, a irord of such
men and women! .
From this standpoint wo can easily
see answers, to several very pertinent
questions. As to the importance of
education, it is alNimportant. As to
its claims, they out-weigh every thing.
As to value, it is invaluable. : As to
tho dignity of the work, it is divine ;
for tho truo educator is a direct asso
ciate with Deity, gathering tho germs
of humanity, that are scattered about
so lavihhly, and without Bueh' caro
must perish, and developing them,
growing them'that is tho better term,
growing them, in the world's garden,
into bright intelligences to people the
courts of Heaven. , ;"
Bat by-this time some of yon-arc
thinking,' is not this a ' little removed
from what is commonly held to bo ed
ucation?. Perhaps BOi but perhaps,
also, bur educational views arc com
monly too restricted. Education must
comprise the wholo man to make him
a perfect being; and of' course .his
destiny will aecept no less. Indeed,
no one part can reach a high develop
ment unless all'the rest approximate
the samo standard. - Now, tho physi
cal demand is moasurably met in the
manual duties of th.e home, sports of!
tho pluyground, and labor of the shop
and farm. The moral must devolve
largely on 1 home influences, youthful
associations, the Sabbath school and
Pulpit. Tho intellectual' largely left
to the professional teacher and the
school room. 1 But all are so closely
related, and in tho nature of things
interwoven and mutually dependent
that riot only is their separate treat
ment impracticable, but were it possi
ble, tho ' result : must bo disastrous to
true success. ': ,
Then, the State recognizing the true
nature and importance of education,
and acknowledging the obligation
foster t, legislates, in fact, in accord
ance . with the views just expressed.
Seeing that physical culture is pro
vided for, in the main, by. natural in
stincts and parental oversight, and
that moral culture is measurably safe
under the watchful care of individual
piety, and an enlightened, Christian
sentiment, she gives her attention
chiefly to mental trailing. So far,
however, from ignoring tho others, she
amply provides by liberal taxation for
the physical comfort, convenience and
health of her children, and by prudent
legislation aims to place such teachers
over' them as will secure the moral
improvement of her citizens. The
State, then, does conceive and act up
on tho true thoofy of education.
she docs not by. actual enactment pro
vide for all the details, it is because
trusting in the enlarged views, strong
personal intcrbst, patriotism an'd phi
lanthropy of her citizens, she expects
theny-in hoir parental, official ' and
private rciauons, to uo wise ana laiLn
ful in tho manifold duties, that, in the
very nature of things, must bo rather
theirs than tiers"' " -:: ' " '! '.
."v7a.,,thus .arrjvo...,atwhat may
called a birds eyo view of tho naturo,
functions, claims and potential ;value
of tho Common School. . ,
(TO BE CONTINUED.)
TitB Princo of Wales has just turnod
twehty-severi; but not anewieaf.' '
A work of aft-'A widow trying
gotfr'imsband; i;-'J f'c!J.w.jf,;.
', Ifyoudah say'iibthing good
1-Lofi:
The lady who ,taxer her, fiiem-
ory did iiot get her pay.'uMera-,
bry protested.'
MISCELLANEOUS.
no
1
If
t
be
.
to
M ISUNDERHTOOD THE TSXT.
-A )vorthy deacon hircdiL'a
journeyman' farmer from a
"neighboring town for.: thq gum
mer,and induced him although
he was unaccustomed to churcli
oing-n-to aecoropimy the fami
ly to church on I-the,- firaj; a,b
b;ath ot'his stay.t ; v-rnt
i Upon their return to the dea
con's house, he asked his lnre4
man how ho likddr the preach-
ing.'.: '.' .a s:;
He replied : ; , ) ,: .
"I don't like to hear any, min
ister preach politics." .' .j;:;
"I am very sure you heard no
politics to-day," said the dea
con. , ;. .; ,.!,,!
; "I am as sure that I did," said
the man. , 1 , ''; 'r
"Jlention the 'passages,'.1 said'
the deacon. , , ; , . . , .'
' "I will. He said, 'IftheDein
ocratg scarcely are saved, where
will 'the Republicans appear ? "
cAh,'' said' the . deacon,' "yW
mistake. These "were the words
'If the righteous scarcely .are
saved, Kow will the iihg6dly,and
wicked appear?'-'' ! 3: i.
(iO, yes, ' said" the man,' he
might have nsed those words,
butl knew duced well what ho
meant! ' , . ,
A lady at a party, singing in
a wretched manner the song En
titled ''The Brook," .on coming
to the lines:
- "Men may oome, men may go;-.
. But I go loreverl".. , jr
provoked tho remark from a
gentleman present that,
"if she was going on forever in
that style, he "guessed he'd take
his hat and retire." : 1
"We once heard a hrmn sung
by an' old negro woman which
ran thus: ' "' s
, "I hear a rumblin in de skies,"
Jews, screws; de fi dumt
I hear a Tumblin' in de skies,
Jews, screws, de fl duml'V .' i,
:Vn inquiry elicited the 'fact that
the second and ; fourth lines,
which form a sort of chorus, or-
- ' I - ' ' ' T '
iginally read: ' ; --f
"Jews crucified niml"" '
'-I J ....i -,.r
It is said that: a : true friend
unbosoms freely, advises justly,
assists readily,1 adventuresb61d
iyitakes.all '..patienty,'.'. defends
courageously, and continues a
friend unchangeably., m i,
Two female 'practical jokers
frightened a -y oung married wo
man into insanity ,at ilWaiikee,
lastjwefek ; bytelling her. that
her husband was dead. .TItx
. Stewart, the great dry ; goods
merchant of Now lYprk, is said
to have lost a round million of
dollars by the shrinkage in pri
ces, ., , ";t; v 1
" III Covington, :iKy., opposite
Cincirinati,the price, of Pomferoy
and Coalburg coal advanced to
32 cents last 'Week; vj-.o
"Jtnowb
day's p th'e rocky mouiita'ms .
Liv.Mucniado about, cn6thing-
Thcparting: of ypiing ..Jadics.y
ii't;(

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