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Democratic enquirer. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1867-1873, December 26, 1867, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86079037/1867-12-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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i Democratic at all times an
FARTnUR,: VINTON COUNTY,
under all circbmstancis
,.'1 -k v f. V: ':(: ;
OHIO: THURSDAY, ! DECEMBER 26, 1867.
12
' "
TT.
1 1
;;v-;.;NUMiiER:ii).:;
Democratic Enquirer
tfjill'gnrt S V E R T ' TIIURsnAT MdRNIJO, BY
. 1. jy.iOWK,HDITOIliHl)PBOPa!KTOJI.
FICl AL ORGAN OF VIWTOfj COUHTY
QFMOE-In Amiga' t Building owr Saeltond't
f, iSarf, cocntr J,in and Locutt Street, Eatt
r,-.,rl of the Court Haiti: , , !
'. 'f77&Bi8 orsftiisifiiiPTtoir. , ;:
(it ADVAMCl.)
On ertpy. yMfiff- '
Un.(n)y, six monn,
: in
! 40
2ft
,A ml
iM. MtwTmr.'tffnne HotOffl. " V0
'.fti-.im jPluir psymenl to be madetTsimT
Ai.ufflre'y lr noli of wish io rlioeontinn t
oMsn nUhP lima Mitocirilm-I ir, wil' ' nonwirt
rrt'fTlinenafl(i'mnti nd no j)ier m he d,s
onhidu?'! uniTInBrnll HrrpMg i -IikII he pnlft.
Uj.du nrjr..vnrii tliroliifh ttiK mail fr( of post-
wflhin c tie county, nml, aln, frp to nuhsnntiprs
Iitibv: in tha county, hoi pototflc in out of the
uotyi
' ; TERMS OF AD VKR TISIXQ
Cffnlinciofthntyps, or ths occupied by
he oftme, make one tumre, . .
ji on ,-niiare. one iitserlion. '
Eiick H.lilinonal mnortion,
60
All tituiaimil (tvorttin'i for nonr pmou ma"
Ihreoinuntlii, chawed t (lie oe lutes.
1 mm. nio. mo. 13 mox
M ooln
cnlu
it oiilni
mn,
IS 10 110 00 16 0u tini
ilumn,
1ft no
20 00
30 00
40 no
ilninn.
15 00
30 no
40 00
4S0O
60 00
60 oo
to ufl
2uoO
Hiiir.m oril. from 6 to 10 linon, per anDnm,' , 00
ffh.nr.A ViLi.. nntflvAilint(2u line. (1U
Evh additional 10 linn,
Attai!h,nentNotiei, (in adrnnce,)' ' 2 00
Administmtor'a or Execulor'a Notices, (in
adranc,) ' V
Notice of runaway hubndi or wlten, double
rio, and in aikance. '
Notireaof Deitln, free. Mar.iage Notices, aeeord
inglotlielilierulityoftnetiartiM.
Nonce in the loonl column, lo centi per line ftir
ach.inTtion. ' .
tntioe of nolitiral metroB.fre
. . BUSINESS CARDS.
F. H. H11DISTEB,
tO'ti AOHSMITII,
Cold's Old, Stand, near the Steam Mill,
!'. ".: MoARTtlCtt, OHIO,
II prepared to da all loaaaar ef Llicli-Smithing,
mioh - ,
Xerti Sluing,
Irtnitf o Buggitt,
Wtggtnt,
te,tc.,$c,
ti n.tnnfii'Liir and re na r of all liilld 1 1 Airri-
ultural imple 'iiim aiid tdija 'lool. All work
4oue in ailutaniiul mnnnr itnd warranted. "I1
iTl. w. i;i.i.a. a. wkisiiau rx. h.waiohtm
S. GOETZ & CO,
HAMDEN FOUNDIIY,
H AMD EN j OHIO,
. MANUrACTURIli or
STOVES, CASTINGS,
HOLLOW WARE,
All Kindt of Caittr't and Bed Fastinin$t,
Susar-Cane IVIills
A0
3VIocli.ira.or,:v of jail
ISLlxxcaLia Ropairoa.
TiIB Ware Manufu-tured at thu t'oundryis sold
low he bougi.t inany Market.
ost OftVe sddreas Keed'e Mills. Vinton County , 0.
May 16, 13U7-1
VIMTON COUNTY BANK,
''X'i ':(l0BtfOEATTO,)''
STOCKHOLDERS:
JtJS.J.McDOWEI.U ' JAS. W. DELAY.
I'asswrin:. ' Cashis.
. i. scsnr, . n. Dnro, andhf.w wotr,
. t, AVStllt, B. T. BAKNKI.S, , tllAH HOM,
'" A. A. Al'STlX. .
BANK OF DISCOUNT AND DEPOSIT.
HAVING formed aco-nartuershipfor the purpose
(if conducting- a ; ... .-
OliNERAL BAVKINO AND EXCHANGE
BU8LNE8S, ,. . '. .
n with ample facilities for' the transaction of any
bus less inriaining to legitimate Ranking, we tender
nt services to the boHuesspiihliu ronerallv.
V4 Hlir AND SELL EXi:HtNtiE, COIST AND
BO.VDS. Money loaned at reasonable rates en an.
eptab epaper .Revenue Htainpe . always on hand
and for sale. Interest paid on lime deposits.
. Persons wish nn to remitmoney to Foreign Coun
tries can obtsin Drafts at our OtHc.. '.
Kahrnary T,ll7-ly ,'
CUAU. UROtVN, Prett. IU.N. Wli,L, CaiA
WILL. BROWN & CO.,
Cm Door Weil Dan. VUl Bro't Store, North
u, ,; Sid Main Street,. . . . .'
McARTHUR.: OHIO,' ;
T0"A OENFRAL BANfCINQ BtSINSS
J Peal in Exchange, Government Securi
tits, Block, Bonds, Gold and Silver, &o. , ,
Deposits received. - Interest paid on timt
mepbslts.-'i '. ' !' " 'v r" " '-: t
Collections made st all accessible points
In he United States. . ;' 1 '
UnileJ States Revenue Stampi for sale.' -
All busiliess done on the most liberal terms
snd With the tit most promptness. ' v -
Febnry2,l0T-ly : ';" '
: H. C. MOORE, "
11
PHYSICIAN AND SURGKON,
-ALIENS VILLE, OHIO. N
(.,'-'.. : i: ! ,. .-'.I ' M! :!! I.,'
, i FTER an absence ol two years, ofler his pro.
J fei-sional'services to the oltisens of. Allensvllle
and surrounding oountry. .
March 2UlWl-tf . ' ; 1 -
aQIIM C. STEVENSON, u,
ATTORNEY 'AND- COUNSEUOR AT LAW,
OIACKBON'-C, H.,01JI0
IT lit practice in (HiConrta eIJeekeon! Viatei
T and other eonnHe t. :,r
JDaryM,lt-
ARCHIBALD MAYO, ,
Attorney; .at Ijci-w,
(PROSECUTING ATTORNEY OF VINTON COUNTY,)
McARTHUR, OHIO,
WILL attend promptly to all legal bnslneaa en
trusted tohiaonrein Viptonand Jncknon coun
ties. Office 1 1 Doddridge'" New Rnildintt, sonlh
west corner Main and Marketstreeta upstairs. Mr
Mayo Is in partnership with Porter IMiHadwayo1
javkson county, who can altrays be found, during
vacation, nt the office in Jackson, Ohio.
May3t,18,;7-H
D4BIEL 8. DANA.
Attorney; txt XjoLxv,
McARTJJuit.'OHIor ' " "
WILL practice in thct'onrta ofVlnlon, Athens,
and Jackson Counties ; also, in the United
States Courts ot the Southern District of Ohio.
Orc-Second Story of Davie Building, -on Main
Street.-1 . '- ---
CS'W. FOURTH 8T CINCINNATI. OHIO
.,.,.y, t DIALS IN' .- -
SHEET MUSIC, V
MUSIC BOOKS '
- , , AND ALL KINDS OF ( , . ,
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS,
IMPORTER ot French, German and Italian Violin
(ring. ' , . 1
The Trade supplied on the most liberal lerms.
, General Wettern Agent for ..'
' MASON & HAMLIN'S
CABINET ORGANS,
, - THl
" SI10NINQER " OEM ORGAN AMD
MELODEON
AND THE CILKDRTB ' ' ' '
3LXnq,T3e Flano.
ALSO A LARQC STOCK OF -
TTJl2STO&
From the Faetoiles of the most of the Cxmatb
Makirs, which I wdl sell low for ensh.
x Old Pianos tsken in exchf ne lornev.
WTl'ianos nd OrKnns for sale uud to rent, by the
- -Mont hi Quarter r Yean
amount paid for rent being applied t pur
chase, if de-sired;
tfAgentt for Cabinet Orgnsnd Pianol
wanted in every town in Ohio, Indiana aad
Kentucky. ' ' '
AddrfBS,
i JOHN CHUBCH, J., ;
Ju'n2t, 1867-t Cineinnali".
D. SIIIVEI.,
Attorney . at Law,
. t McARTHUR, OHIO. . .M. ,:
llfll.L attend promptly to all legal business en
W trusted to his care, in Tinton and, adjoining
counties, nffice In the Court House.
Julyll,187-ly - ( ,
J. LILIIBKlCs
FASHIONABLE TAILOR,
One Boor Etrt Ban. Will tro'itow,
JOSEPH BttADBKHI. WILLIAM MASK.
BRADBURY & MARK, .
Attorneys ot Xjcixv,
JIoABIHBB, VT3T05 COUHTY, OHIO.
WILL practicein Vinton and adjoining counties.
OHice on Logan, Street. . , ... 4'J-lV
J. A ' MONAHAN, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
II VMUEN, VINTON COUNTY, OHIO, ;
'l'HANKFULfor the liberal pstronage received for
S nn,,r",,m .........
ng his professional services , -that n may always be
onnd at h' Office or residence, on Main btreel.un-
essalisenton professional Dusiness.
February xs, iw-iy
RICHARD CRAIG,
XI03I33a"SI3I
AUCTIONEER,
MoArtnur, OHIO,
HAVINO been licensed to dispose of property by
public auction, he will promptly attend uU eon-
tions in Vinton county wheu solicited.
Otflce Shivers Law umce, in ine uoart Mouse.
August 1, 1807-tf .
j. j. McDowell, ,
Attorney art Law,
- ' " -" .' ;.(i' ad ' ;.'
' ' V. 8 Claim Agent, .
MeART HUH. OHIO.
WILL practice in Vinton and adjoining ceunties,
Also, Deputy Collector of Internal Kevenue.
Orrtcs In the Vinton County Bank. '
June27,lb67 6m"
FALL AND WINTER
DSTT-.-OOOIDSI
E. D. DODGE'S
CHEAP STORE,
IN -
MAIN STREET, ' McARTHUR, O
I HAVE just received a larire and well aelected
stock of Full and Winter Dry Goods, Notions, Ac,
which were purchased in the Ki.t-tern cities for cash,
durittg the decline in prices, which I will sell aa , ' 1
; 10 W AS THE 10 WEST. 1
I have (lithe latest styles of.
Dress Grobds ahi Plain t and
( l?j -anc Goods,
White Goods. .. f Laoes, V Embroideries,
Table Linens, !T Towelins, Shawls,
Balmoral Skirts. Hoop Skirts, Hosiery,
Gloves, Muslins, &o. so.
, AWqe and complete assortment of
WEfl 6 DOY'G CLOTHUiG.
! Booto Onoes.
.,. A ftilllineof all kind of NOTIONS.
,1 will not be undersold by any House In this market.
Oc. J0,1W7-1 " 'Ti, D. DODO.
AN ADDRESS:
Delivered Before the Vinton County
Teacher's Institute, by Prof. WM. H.
YOUNG, of the Ohio University.
First, its Nature ;
i It is a State provision, conceived in
kho most enlightened and philan
thropic' age of tho world, and, in tie
light ot past experience and philoso
phy, instituted and regulated by the
aggregate wisdom of. the State, with
all the sanctity of law and the high
est commendation of religion, having
in direct view the intellectual, ahf,
collaterally the physical and mbrl
culture of the people, as the indis-
pensahlecondition to individual good,
social improvement, national prosper
ity and human progress. ; .. , .; jj
. How more just to truth and the no-
hlo and wise spirit of the age, and
how more creditable to our own intel
ligence is this view of the Common
School than that which, too current
in some communities, regards it astf
common charity a place where coiti:
mon people are . taught the common J
things needful to their common livcell
This idea of tho common, growing out
of a misapprehension of the term, and
11
a misconception of the thing, is some
times so dominant as to beget in coni
muriitieB manifold weak prejudice!,
false notioni, and pernicious errorq.
Chief among them is that just noted,
that the Common School is a sortofi
charity to ignorance and povertya
place where tho pororaon people are
taught the common things needful'to
their common lives, as opposed to the
select school, where better people are
taught, in a better way, a better kind
of learning Hence somo people,
without much credit, either to their
heads "or hearts, would depreciate the
Common School into a thing of disre
putc, and some bow, strangely enough,
attach a kind of stigma to those who
labor in them,
The Common School is not a com
mon thing in any disparaging 6ensc
of the term. The word common, here,
has not. the slightest notion of medi
ocrity much less inferiority. Tho
Common School is in no sense a
common charity. It has its cause and
its reason in tho convictions that the
good of the commonwealth demands
the education of its members; that
the commonwealth as the beneficiary
should pay the cost; and that the in
tercst is so important, and tho responsi
bility so great, that the aggregate
wisdom, influence, and power of the
commonwealth is the only fit agent to
conserve jt. Tho Common ' School,
then; theoretically, is the place where
all the people in common are educated
at the common expense for the com
mon good. '
Now, you will admit such schools
ought to be the boat schools. I claim
that where citizens do their duty by
them they are the best schools
Assuming for the present that this
citizen obligation is fully met, I will
point out some' of the elements of
excellence in the public school. V If
some of them are less patent than you
look for, scarcely showing themselves
at all , to the, chance observer, please
remember all great forces aro silent
ones, and the mightiest influences are
mostly hidden beneath the outer sur
face. Tho Table Eock at Niagara fell
with terrific power, but the frost of a
thousand winters and the flow: of. a
thousand years had : quietly prepared
the catastrophe.
;
j
i
The threat of Mrs. Lincon to tell
all she knows about the frauds, cheat
ings, swindlings, &o., carried on by the
loaders of the Mongrol partyj has pro
duced a terrible fluttering among that
gentry. .'. They, in retaliation, threaten
to tell all they know about; ,Mrs. Jjin-
coln,'1' They boldly, hint at something
worse tha '' indiscretion " on the part
of tije "rosy; Empresi." ; They ;will
make ont the morals of1 the ;Whit
House as bad as its politics during the
New York
Day Book.
MISCELLANEOUS.
-; 1ax, ANLTuie ,DBAC0Nrr i.A few
months - ago, as,I)eaconj fngal!8, of
Swampscot, Rhode IslaqdJwas travel-r
inff through the" western nart of the
ing through the western part -of the
Statejjof jeWiYorkhe fell in with an
Irishmanj who hadlately urriyed in
this country and wasji eearch of a
brother who had, cpme before him.Jand
settled in 8ometof,the diggings intnat
part of, the country.' ; . r : . ;, ...
.. rat was a strongjman,;a true icoman
Catholic, and, had never seen the in
terior pf aJProtcstant church. v;
It was ,a pleasant Sundayaorning
that brothor(Ingalls met Pat, who in-1
quircdthe road to tho nearest church.
Ingalla was a pious, man. ., He told
rait ho was going to church, and in
vited his new made friend to keep him
company thither, hi4 destination being
a small meeting house nearby. There
.was a great revival there at the time,
and. one of the deacons, who was a
very small man in stature, Jnvitcd
brother 1 Ingalls to lake a seat in his
pew;' He accepted the invitation, fol-
wwca D7 rai' wno i-W0Ma m Yain Iur
lHe .
turncd ou?d Woth Ingalls, and
: L : .. il.. l v. l .i .11
in a whisper that could be heard all
round, he inquired ' 1 "" ' ' ' ."
"Shure, and isn't thig a" heretic
church?'' i '.' V-i-
.-."Hush !" said Ingalls j, if you speak
a word they will put you out.',', ,
"Divil a word will I speak at all at
all," replied Pat. , ';
The. meetings was' opened by
prayer by the pastor. ' .
Pat was eyeing -him very closely,
whon an old gentloman, who was
standing in the pew directly in front
of Pat, shouted liAmenl"
:. :?'Hist, ye divil I" I rejoined Pat, in
his loud whisper, which was heard by
the minister, "bo dacent, and don't
make a blockhead of yourself 1"-
Tho parson grew more fervent in
his devotions. Presontly the deacon
uttered anaudible groan "Amenl"
. "Hist, ye blackguard I Have ye
no dacency at all?') said pat, at the
same time giving bim a punch in the
ribs, which caused him to lose his
equilibrium
The minister stopped; and extend
ing bis hands in a suppliant manner,
said
"Brethren, we can not be disturbod
in this way. Will somo jno put that
man out?" ; ; '
- "Yes, your 'riverenco," shouted Pat,
"I will do it' '"' ' 1 ''. ;
And suiting the action to the word,
he collared the deacon, and to tho
utter horror of, the, pastor, brother
Ingalls, and the whole congregation,
ho dragged him up. the aisle, and with
a tremendous kick sent him into tho
vestibulo of tho church!
. .Absent-mindedness. -A man from
a neighboring town came to our city a
fow days since, with a horse and bag
gage, wagon, with the intention of
purchasing , a load of barrels not
whisky barrels," but apple barrels.
He hitched his horse which, by the
way, was a borrowed, team-r-on Mar
ket street, and commenced perambu
lating ,the place in search of his load;
but strange it is to say, that in the
evening he made his way home, some
three Or four miles, on foot,' and did
not discover his mistake until he
arrived there, when he had to retrace
his march' ra pursuit of his team,
which had been taken by the humane
to one of our city stab Jes, , and com
fortably housed from the pelting snow
storm,.; ..y,. -(;-.,:,.. i:; v!:-
This Teminds lis of a similar inci
dent,, which occurred; at the old Daniel
street Post Office in this, city several
years ago.. A pnysioian wna ,iieB a
good-horse,: and, always has ;one pr
morei,'rode for t his mail; and forget
fully walked i home and calling for
hia '.team at ,the stable after dinner,
was asked where the morning rig-out
was and going to the post-office,
found 'I Jimmy .t aJl (jftiiet am patient.
thpugh ho, had been,;8tasiding thre
unhitched four hours, and was an nni
Ual - of the highest .-metal : nod great
Portsmouth (N. H.) Chronicle.
Snw A" Strengthened ITim.-i-A
student of one of ourj State olleges
had a'barreljrf ale deposited in'hii
room, contrary, of course, to rulehd
usago.: . He received a summons.. to
appear before the President, who said i
1 " Sir, I ara"inforaci Jthat you have!
a barrel of ale' in your room."
"'tes, sir.1' -,;'":-; " ' '.A'
' Well,' what explanation can you
maker' ''' i '"-' J 4 -
,;,'TV hy, the fact la, sir, my physician
advised me te try a little tachday as
a tbnio, and! not wishing to itop at the
various places where the beverage is
retailed, I concluded to have a barrel
taken to my room.'!
. "Indeed.And havejyou derived
any benefit from the use of it ?" :
; i " Ah, yes, sir. : When the barrel was
first taken to my roomi"'twO' dayi
since, I could scarcely lift it.' Now I
can carry it with the greatest ease."
..; We bolieve the witty student was
discharged, without a special repri
mand. ' : ' I--" ;"' ' '! ' ; ';
, The OrrosiTioNH-It is amusing as
wel as intercsting'to recall the names
by which the opposition to the Demo
cratic party have been known since
the Revolution.; Here is a list, but we
do not pretend to say that all the dif
ferent parties that'have attempted the
overthrow of. Domocracy eince . the
jorrnation ct our uovernment are
named therein, for, like the color,
platforms, and pretensions of tho per
sons themselves, they aro innumera
ble. They were. .
In 1776, Loyalists or Loyal to King
George, or Tories. . . ...i ...
.1778, Loyal Tories. . : ;.,.:
,1780, Nova Scotia Cow Boys and
Tories. . . ,- .; -,!
1786, Convention Monarchists.' : '
1789, BlackJCockadcrs. 1
, 1808,- :Anti Jcffersonian Improve
ment men. ; ; . , ; ,, .; . v
1810, British Bank Men. ;
1812, Peace ; and Submission. Men.
1813, Blue Lights.. ; , .
., 1814, Hartford Conventionists.1
1816, WashingtonSociety Men.
1818, No. Party Men. !; v..
1819, Federals, -
1820, Federal. EcpublicanS. .-!
1826, National Eepublicans. ,
1828, Anti-Masons. ' ;
183t, Anti-Masonic Men.; .
1836, Conservatives. ' . : i .!
1837, - Independent Democratic
Whigs, -,y;: t, .,
; 1838, Abolitionist; 1, .j! i ' :
1839, Log Cabin Hafd Cider Dem
ocratic EepublicanAbolition Whigs.
1843, Native Amcncaii.Whigs:
1844, Anti-Annbxatidn Whigsi.
1845, ThoJWhig Party; -.
1848,'Eough and Ready Partyv
1850, Clay Whig Party. '. - '
1852, Scott Whigs. ' ;
- .1854, Know Nothings."1 '
1855, Native Americans. ' !
i! 1856, Fremohters or Abolitionists
and Know Nothings. ) , ; 1 :
1857, Black Eepublicans. ' " ' --;
M859; Opposition and People's Par
ty.:i ;
1860, Wide Awakes, Cap and Cape
Party. ; -':-'
1861, No'Pai-ty Union Men.
I
! n
: ;1862, NO PARTY: -J 'i'1 '
,: 1863, TJnion 'Loaguo-No -Party-
Emancipaticoi-High-Taxatidn-Centra-litatlon-Confiscation-Negro-Equaliza-tion-TJsttrpation-Aholition-Adminis-i-tration
Party.' '' '' '
f 1864, Cocrcion-Eepublicah' Party. :'
; 1865, Johnson Party..- v ., . i r
! 1866, Anti-Johnson! Party. : v ,
. J.867, Negri) r.l Suffrage : Diounion
Party.i t'.rA: KV.-U !.. ,-,.! ,
1868' No Party at all. ;
IT i.-' ' i'.i. t'l"., .'!' '"'fcii).!!.;
."Tell, the , truth, and.f:Bhamei the
devil.' . ; 1 1, know lots pf . , people who
can shame -the ,4evil easy enuff, Jbut
uvyua. uliiu iyvmif o.iuyuf;(
- Favorite game of blacksmilha
r-old sledge , .: .... r
..... . i-j x
"Weston and Sheridan . took
drink together at Chicago. r
wearing: hti8. been prohibited
in th;Avstrian arniy.j c ,,0 j3
, Tvvo-.birds of the teachers in
tho United States are women.
Price Napoleon ia one of tho
best billiard players in Paris. i
Mrs. Lincoln's Artery has beeli
locked np from public gaze.r;Ji
:.LT, -. , i ,-: .T.r..,,.,i.
jNinety-one newsparjer men iQ
Paris fought' duels last yeari' :' '
... There are fifty thousand per
sons out oremployment in Kew
York.-f V
The Virginia Convention Is
knowat -home ;asrthe;Banj
and Bones .Conyeption. oiiia
Scotch'papdrs 'announce tho
reappearance 1 of th'e'.: "catt&
piague. . ouecp nnu piner anv
mals have already died. i .5
- Grant couldn't keep ; chorsj
talk" out " of his1 impeachmejat
testimony. He mentioned "star
ble" government "several times.
1 Flax is so profitable in Cana
da that flour mills have beeu
turned into linen mills, and near
Preston 1,200 acres of flaxwerb
raised. ' r :n::
It may surprise many to leani,
what is nevertheless a fact, that
fully one-third of the whole a
mount of 6ugar consumed in the
world is manufactured from
beets.: :' ' ' - ' , ' y
There is an old lady at Marya
ville, Ky:, 83 years of age, who
walks eight miles to ! sell her
marketing, " carrying two bas
ketsfull of it on her aims, and
this several times a week, i Her
name is Mitchell, and she is a
descendant of Daniel Boone." ?
i Young ladies who are accus
tomed to read-the newspapers
are always observed to possess
winning .ways, most ami Abfp '
dispositions, invariably, .make
good wives, and always select
good husbands.' v-:. . .... y:i lo
Two of the i young ladies
Misses'. Morgankilled at the
recent railroad accident . hear
Cincinnati, were, during the late
war, banished from Hew Or
leans by Banks because they
failed tq salute, Admiral .Porter, .
and, lady, with whom ' ho, was
walking. ,w ;.,:',:, -:? .lo-?;
It is understood that ,.Presit
dent Johnson's, communication
of his reasons for the removal of
Stanton complain Of his refusal?
to resign and the defiant ton '
that officer, and . states.tHat, ike-:
only law under, which he could!
retain the position was tho ten-'
uoe of office act, which Stanton
elaborately" 'l.s and emphaticaljy
condemned -when ..consulted .on,,
it in the Cabinet. Ho specially!
charges Stanton with 1 having"1
DPen respoiisiuiy wi iuo xyii "
Orleans riot, In, 'not ; fimi&hlng;
Gen; Baird with, the , instruo(
tions asked for in relation to tho
Issemblihgof the !. Convention,' (
and, not,commicatip"' Gen :
Baird s dfspatcn.to jueu
n :::

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