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Democratic enquirer. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1867-1873, July 24, 1872, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86079037/1872-07-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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M'ARTHUR, VINTON COUNTY, OJttO: WEDNESDAY, JULY 24, 18T2.
VOL. 6. , , v.i, ptt- and Proprietor
i"0!??' :j NO. 28.
fin II raaMi
,V U to .- :.rv::,': : -b :, ': ;
' ? ' ; i
; 1 . -
Railway Time.
Marietta & Cincinnati Rail Road
TIME TABLE.
On and after June 0, 1871, Trians -will
run asiouowe :
3.a
9
:o :
:.a : ; '
Has' j I ! i li
o e w to to
J . ...
a..n ni J nn m a m - (A M cN 0 h- b- t- 'D ID "5
t3 Bu
4
: :x
3 H.
BS2S8S8SS8 8SSSSSS8522S!?
tci to ih Sh wZ2 200" "
-tr-
o
QQ
O
tn
u
a
-3s
' 3
3T3 ra
i-3 jo-2 2-3 3 8.9.iSSapao'a
v
Q
Allies I
: t : : : :
n m : : m i . . : : i : : i
::::
S s : ::::::: v: :': :
Vi"7i?IT v; . 1 V. T. " m "5 ?
5 :
01 o
i 9 : i . : : I'
O ; . . ; ; ,
sisi : i : :
5 :
o
52
si
CINCINNATI EXPHBSS will run dnlly
A II nt.hppTrii.l na rlall v. PYnnnt. HilnflfLV.
OINCUNATI EXPltESS EAST makes no
stop betwoon llamuon ana Athens.
- f
I
Portsmouth Branch.
Mall. Accommodation.
S.30P. m. 0:00 a. M.
Dap. Ilnmdoii
JiKsksoti
Ar'r. Portsinoiitli
Don. Portsiiviutli
ArV. .TaolCHon
.Htvmdon
4.09
7.08 "
105 "
1220 P. M.
4-.00 "
5.17 "
8.H0 '
8.30 A. M.
10:50 "
11.80 P.M,
Trains Connect at Loveland.
Kor all points on th l.ii tle Miami Railroad, and
at me iiiaiuuivpim-) .t( nicinuuii Kuuroiiu juno
tl.iii for aH points Wet.
W. W: PEA BOOT,
fitrrnf Trnnnpnrtntlnn, '
BALTIMORE & OHIO RAILROAD.
Great National Short Line Route
East and West,
Only Direct Route to the National
Capitol and Eastward.
On nnd after Monday, Novombor 10, Trains
will run iih lonown :
EASTWARD.
I'ln'nam rant I Mail
ExprtuA Unt, Exprm
Dapart
P.irlcorsbur
C.'ninliorlan'l
IInruBr'n Ferry
Washington Juuo'n.
Arrive
Baltimore
Washington
PhlMulpliU
New York
WESTWARD.
am, Am
9 35 Pm
0 40Pm
188 Am
B44Aro
I12Pm
4 4S "
8 05
6 95 "
8 03 "
8 8tf
BBS "
10 00 "
8 85 Am
815 "
8 01
8 38 '
8 45 "
10 00 1'
190jir
410'
19:24Pm
Depuvt .......
NewVorlc
hiludoliihlft .......
WasliliiKton .... ...
Baltimore
Arrive
Washington Juno'n.
Harper Ferry
Cumberland ,
1'urkoraliurg. .. ,.
12 80 Pm
8 80 Am
9:90Pm
4:00 Am
8:00 Pm
8:60Am
9s20
It 54 Am
11 48 Pm
8 Pin
8 00
8 20
UMPm
800 "
4 08 Am
4 8S
4 89 "
10 82 "
8 20 "
19:04 "
8 M Am
11 Ort "
5(10 Pm
Pullmin Falaot Drawing Boom Slwplng Oarii
Which areas comrortablo, elegantly furnished,
mid almoequHl to a flre-iide, are on till Trains
VomOluotnnnt! to Baltimore and Waihlngton.
HueSuheiluleof Marlotta and C'lnolnnatl Hall-
vivy ror time or arriving ana aeparung rrom
UcArthur. ...
The advantages or thts route over all oiners
i, that It gives all travelers holding through
tlukets the privilege nf visiting Biiltlmore,
l'lilladepr)la, and the National Oapltol free.
Tlmequloaor and rtes of fare lower than by
any other lino. '
' fh soendry along this UftHway Is not equaled
fpc grandeur on Ml Continent. , .....
TO SHIPPERSOT FREIGHT.
This line orTors superior Inducements the
riusbolng one-tlilnl lower tosnd from Boston,
Juw York, or any other Eastern point. In or
dering goods of any description front the East
lyeuireutiqns 10 snip naiumure uniu
ft
It.. and Insliiuulnn Must slve same directions.
reiuhtSHlilupeii by this route will have des
patch, and be handled with cure and save
shippers uuub money. J. L. WILSON,
M aster Trmsportntlon, llultimore,
Q. B. BLANOHAHI),
, Gen. Freight Ag't, Baltimore.
, L. M. CO LB,
H. B. JONES, Gon. Tloket Ag't, Baltimore.
Gen. Pass. Ag't., Olnulunatl
Indianapolis, Cincinnati & Lafayette
Rail Road.
GREAT THROUGH PASSENGER RAILWAY
To all Points West, Northwest
and Southwest
THIS IS THE SHORT LINE VIA INDIANAPOLIS.
. ,
r Thodreat Through Mall and Express Pus
sougnr Line to Bt. Louis, liansas Olty. 8t.
Joseph, Denver, San Fmnclsoo, and all points
In Missouri, Kansas and Colorado. . ,
The shortest and only direct route to Indian
apolls. Laraotto, Terra Haute, Cambridge
City, BpringlUtld, Peoria, Burlington, Oliloag'i,
Mllwaukue, 8t. Paul, and all points in. the
Northwent. ,
The Indianapolis, Cincinnati and Lafayette
Railroad, with Its connections, now otters pas
sengers more facilities In Through Coach and
Hlueiilng Cur Horvlce than any other line from
pinnlniiatl, having the advantage of Through
pally Oars from Cincinnati to 8t. Louis, Kan
sas Olty.Ht. Joseph, l'ufli'ia,Burllngton,Chtcsgo,
Omaha, and all Intermediate .points, presenting
to Colonists and FuiulUos suuh' comfort and
itouuitiinodutlons as are afforded by no other
route.
TlirouiiU Tickets and Baggage Checks to all
points. .
Trains leave Cincinnati at 7:30 A.M., 8;00 P.
M.. anil 9:00 1. M. ,
Tlc.lii'ts oan ho obtained at No. 1 Burnet
House, comer Third and Vine l'ubllo Land
ing, corner Main and Itlveri iiIho, at Depot,
corner Plum end Poitfl fltroots, Cincinnati, O.
Be sure to piirnliasu tickets via Indianapolis,
Olnoinnatl and Lafuyette.ltallroad.
C. K. LOItO, , ii, L.BAHRlNOIlE,
Chief Tloket Clork, Muster Transportation,
Olnoinnatl. Cinolnnat
ttctihtm Mvxt.
OHIO & MISS. RAILWAY,
Is the Shortest, Quickest
and oul Road running its en
tire trains through to
ST. LOUIS AND LOUISVILLE
WITHOUT CHANGE.
Our arrangements "and. con
nections with nil lines from St.
Louis and Louisville are per
fect, Reliable and complete for
all points ' , . r,' ' . ; -
This is the shortest and best
route to Kansas City, Leaven
worth, Atchison, St. ; Joseph
and .to al) points in Missouri,
Kansas and Nebraska. .
Through Tickets and full
information as to time , and
fare, can be obtained at any
K. R. Office or at our office in
Cincinnati.
E. GALLUP, Gen, East Pas. A (runt,
CINCINNATI.
W. It. HALE, Gen. Pass, and Ticket A St.,
ST. LOUIS.
1111 iX'UI - V .- A' 1 1 1 I
I I I I II HI! II
IILIUl VV UUUlil
ROUTE WEST.
23 MILES THE SHORTEST.
EXPRESS TRAINS leave Indlnnnpolls
) dully, except Sunday, for ST. LOUIS and
. THE WEST.
rTHE only Line runninar PULLMAN'S cele-
I brntcd Drawing-room Slcenlntr Cars from N.-
i., ricisotirKii, uoiumous, iouisviiie, Cin
cinnati, and Indianupolls, to Bt. Louis without
uhango.
PiiKsenirers should remember thnt this Is the
urcatwest Hound Route for Kansas City,
Leavenworth, Lawrence, Topeka, Juno
. tlon City, Fort Scott and St. Joseph. - '
CMIOD A fcJTO TO KANSAS, for the pur
CrVllUnHri I o Doseof ostahlishinir tliem-
aelves lu new home, will have lilioruldlscrlm-
lnntion macietntnelrlavor by this Line. Hat
Isfiictorycoinmutivtloii on rcirulnr rates will bo
given to Colonist and largo parties traveling
iorci nor: aim ineir onirgage. emigrant ontut
and stock will be shippudou the most favora
ble terms, presenting to
COLONISTS AND FAMILIES
Sucn comforts and scnommodntlons as aro pre
sented by NO OTHER ROUTE. -
TTclvEr.S can be obtnlned st all tho Drlnclnnl
Ticket Olllces in the Eastern, Middle and
Southern States.
O. E. FOLLETT,
General PiiHsonger Agent, St. Louis.
UOlil EMMET1',
Eastern Pussencer Agent, Indianapolis.
JOHN E. MMPSON,
General Superintendent, Indianapolis.
Columbus & Hocking Valley Railroad.
On and alter December 10th, 1871, Trains will
u n as follows:
DtBart.
Depart
Athens 6.20 a. m.
T.M V. M.
, . Arrive.
Arrtv.
9:45 A. if.
6:45 P. M,
6:00 "
Columbus.
5.40 P. M
2:20 a. M '
9:00 "
7:80 "
Pittsburgh
Sandusky.
Cleveland... 8:50 "
Siring!lcld..l'2:25 "
Xunia 12:i'5 "
Davton l'SO "
7:50P. M.
7:81 '
8:30 '
11: '
Richmond... 8:15 "
Indianapolis 0:10
8:30 A. M.
Chicago 12:15 A.,M
8:30 '
Olose connection made at Lancaster for Clr-
clevillo, Znnesville, and all points on the Cin
cinnati iiiul Muskingum Valley Railroad.
uirecc connections mnue at commons ror
Davton. Surinirfleld. IndinnaDOlls. Chlcairo.
and all points West. Also, for Cleveland,
Buffalo. Plttshurirh. and sll Dolnts East.
Take the Hocking Valley and Psn Handle
route to Cblcaaro and the Northwest, it Is the
shortest by slxty-slx miles, giving passengers
ino Deneuioi quicaer time ana lower rates
tnan by any other Hue.
, ' j. w. uuur.ni i,
' Superintendent,
E. A. Busli,, Gen'l Tloket Ag't.
"BEE LINE."
Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and
Indianapolis Railway.
On and alter MON DAY. Mav 28th. 1871. Ex-
nrcssTmln will ebuvi COLUMBUS and
CKE3TLINE and aebivi at points named be
low, as toiiows i
Stntlonl.: . No. 9. No'. 4.'.
No.,
Oolnmbns IliHUm 4iiQpm
Crestline 12:80 pm 6:56 pm
2i3B am
4:ouam
7:80am
Cleveland 8 :45 p m 9 :45 p m
Buffalo 10:80Dm. 4:10am
2:00 pm
4:40 ora
Niagara Fall.,.. 7:00 a m , 6:45am
Koohestor liHoam 7:05am
Albany 9:48am 8:00 pm
Boston 5:20 Dm 11:90 Dm
6 :05 pm
i:ouam
11:00am
New York City.. 8:80pm 6iB0pm
:40 m
Crestline . . ..... . 12 46 a m
8 85 p m
"T85 am
Pittsburg. 985 p m
Harrlsburg TIB am
Baltimore: lG40a m
i so am
1125am
J 40 n ni
945pm
9 4Q am
XVaahl ntrtnn 1 II) n in
6135pm
8 15 p m
Philadelphia... II 15am
TOO am
restllne . .,
..1180 pm
.. 580am
,..12 10pm
7 45 p in 6 55am
115am 11 95 am
780am 600pm
Fort Wayne .
Chicago
BirNo. 4. leavlncr Columbus at4:10n. m.
has a Through Carvfa Delaware for Springfield,
reachlngSpringfleld wlthoutohangeat7:!0pm.
Train No. 9 on the Columbus It Hocking val
ley Railroad connect with No. 4 Train. Through
Tickets for sale at Athens.
PASSENGER TRAINS returning arrive at
Columbus at 1 2:88 a m. 11 :15 a. m. and 9 ;50 a. m.
jPalace Day and Sleeping Cars
un aii Trains.
"No 6" leavlna Columbus at 2:85 am. on
Siindiiy, runs through without-detention, by
both Erie and New York Central. Railways,
arriving at New York on Monday morning at
6:40 A.M, i
ror particular information in regara to
through tickots, time, connections, etc., to nil
address K. FORD. Oolnmbns, Ohio.
E. B. flint, uen. sopenntensient.
., , JAMES PATTERSON,
Gon. Agent, Columbus, O.
EUOENEFORD, .
Fisie"" "-' "-'-nbui.Oi
Indianapolis Railway. NOTICE
To Stockholders of the G. McA.
&C. R. Co.
ALL persons having subscribed to the Capi
tal Stock Of the Galllnolls. Me Arthur
Columbus Railroad Co., aro hereby required to
iiiuk. pnyntniib tu tne necrecarv or tne compa
ny, at hlsnfllue in Galllpolls, Ohio, and parties
living in Vinton county. Ohio, may make pay
ment, If more convenient, to Danibl will,
President nf the Vinton County Bank, instal
ments on thelrsubsorlptlons. as follows:
A 4th Instalment of 10 per oent,,-on or before
July 23, 1879. ,
A 5th instalment of 10 per cent., on or before
August 99.1878. ,
A 6th Instalmnntof 10 per cent., on or before
BoptmboT23, 1879,
A 7th Instalment of lOpercent., on or before
October 93, 1879.
An 8th instalment of 10 por cent, on or before
November 98, 1872. ' ,
A 9th instalment of 10 per oont., on or before
Bonembnr 98, 172, ...-..'!
By ordur of Board of Dl rootnrs i
..... U j, ... W. 8HOBER, 1 ' '
TBoo'y G,, MoA. A 0. S. fi. C&
July 8,187. ' '
HEALTH AND BEAUTY!
Strong and Pure. Rioh Blood I
creaea of Flesh and Weight
Clear Skin and Beautiful
Complexion,
SECURED TO ALL
RAD WAY'S S ARS AP ARILLI AA
RESOLVENT
HAS MADE THE MOST A9T0N1SHIN
CURES. SO QUICK, SO RAPID ARE
. THE CHANGES TUB BODY UNDER
i OOES UNDER THE INFLUENCE
OF THIS TRULY WONDER
i FUL MEDICINE, THAT
Every Bay an Increase of Flesh and.
' Weight is seen ana .am.
Scrofula, Consumption, Syphilis in its
many forms, Glandular Disease, Ulcers
in the Throat, Mouth ; Tnmors, Nodes in the
uinnus. ana other parts oi tne system ; core
Eyes,' Htrumous Dischnrgps from the Ears;
Eruptive Diseases of the Eyos, Nose. Mouth
and tho forms of Skin Diseases: Eruptions. Fe.
j'.ei'aoresfHoald Head. Rlne--vomf. Salt Rhcnm
erysipelas, Ague, 131 ac.K spots, worms lu tne
a lesn, Tumors, cancers in tne womo, nno an
Weakening and Painful Discharges; Night
sweats, ami all wastes or tne i.iie 1'rincipie
are with n tho curative Hnntre ot uuilwav
SarsaDitrilllan Rcsolvont. and a few days' uso
will prove to any person using it for either of
tneso lorms or aiseuse its potent power to cure
tnem. .
Not only does the SAKSAPARILLIAN RE
SOLVENT excel all known remedial agents in
the Cure of Chronic. Scrofulous. Constitution
Skin and Syphiloid diseases, but It is tho only
positive remedy tor
KIDNEY, BLADDER,
Urinary and Womb Diseases, Gravel, Diabetes
Dronsv. Incontinence of Urine. Brlirht's Dis
ease, Albuminuria, and in all cases where
there are Brick Dust Deposits, or the water is
thick, cloudv. mixed with substances likothe
white oi an egg, or threads like white silk, or
there is a morbid aarK , bilious appearance, ana
whits bone-dust doposits. and whore there is a
pricking, burning sensation, and pain in the
Small ot the Back, and along the Loins, In all
tne conations kaii waits MAitoAr a
RILLIAN RESODVENT.uhled by the spnllca
tion of Radwny's Ready Hrcliof to the Spine
and small or the isaek-, anil tne liowois regula
ted with one or two of Railway's Regulating
ruisperuav. win soon iiihkb a complete cure.
In a few days tho patient will be able to hold
and discharge water naturally without nain
and the Urine will be restored to its natural
clear and amber or sherry color.
THE WASTE OF THE BODY
Are supplied with npw, healthy and vigorous
blood, i hat furnishes sound structure. Hence
all suffering from Weakening Discharges,
either Male or Feinnlo. or from Ulcors or Sores,
through the reparative processof RADWAY'S
oAKnArA ttiiji an , are arresteu, ana tne rap
tured orsrans healed.
OVARIAN TUMOR CURED TUMOR OF
TWELVE YEARS' GROWTH CURED BY RAD
WAY'S RESOLVENT.
Beverly, Mass.. July 18. 180
Dn. Radway : I have had Ovarinn Tumor in
the ovaries and bowels. All the doctors said
"there was no holp for it." I tried every thing
tnai was recommenoca. imr. nothing neipeo me,
I saw your Resolvent, and thought I would try
It, but had no faith in it. because I had suffered
for twelve years. I took six bottles of the Re
solvent, one box of Radwny's Pills, and used
two bottles of your Bendy Relief; and there is
not a sign of a tumor to be seen or felt, and I
feel better, smarter, happier than I havofor
twelve years. The worsttumor was in the left
side of the bowels, over the groin. I write this
tsvou fot the benefit of others. You can pub
usn u yon choomi.
sAMHMir. K-flArr,
BSyPriceOne Dollni.
iLLEIVSVILLE
WOOLEN MILL!
HOUSTON. DILLON Sc CO..
Having purchased the above Woolen Mill
would resnertfiillv announce to their Datrons
and the publlo ingencrnl, that this Mill Is now
prepared to do all Kinosor unwnmi n uutt.
AltDIMi. 81'INNINU. WKAVIMU, and ail
kinds of work usual' done in Country Mills.
With FIRST-CLAPS WORKMEN, and MA
CHINERY, under the Sunerintendence of I. N
LOTTRDGE. work will bn dono with neankss
nd dispatch. ALL WORK WARRANTED
where the Wool is good and clean, and well
wnsnea. .
Onr prices for doing work are a follows:
Roll Carding, lb Oflconts,
riardlngsnd Spinning, f) ft 18 "
Making Stocking Yarn, double and
twisted, ft . 80 "
"vrooiiEnsr Groons,
such as
JEKN8.FLANNEL8.BLANKFT8,
STOCKING and other YARNS,
Constantly on hand and for sale,
WHOLESALE OR HET AIL, '
which we will exchange for Wool, . at rate
thatoannot fall to satisiy those who give us
us a call, and at the same time give you the
satisfaction or patronizing a
HOME. TNSTITrTTTON !
Ths highest Market Price paid in CASH for
wool. uuwaxva, Ui.i4i.ua at w.
May 89, 1879.
gnERFF8 SALE,
State of Ohio. Vinton County.
Edward D. Dodge, Plaintiff.,
. against
Charles Sldman and Wife, Defendant".
In Vinton County Court or Common Pleas.
Order of Hale. '
Pursuant to the command of nn order of sale
in ths above oae Issued from tne uquri oruom
mon Pleas of Vinton nountv. Ohio, arid to me
directed as Sheriff of taid county, I will offer at
publlo sale, at the door or the court House in
thetownofMoArthur, la laid Vinton county,
on
Monday,
thjJSth Say
of July,
A. D. 1878,
At ths hour of I o'olook P. M. of isld day, the
following described lanai anu tonera.nts, to
wlti .
In-Lot Number One Hundred and Slxtv-nev-
n (187,) In thetownofMoArthur, Vinton couo.
ty, onto.
innMluul afPwn TTiinrlMfl nnil TwAntv.flvS
Dollars ($295.00,) and must bring two-thirds of
mat sum.
To be sold ss the property of Charles Sldman
tknA ! a ah ah ntvf.a a anla IimiiiaH (pnm thai
Court o Common Plea of said county in favor
of Edward D. Dodge
AKRMS OF AL- can in nana.
. DANIEL BOOTH,.
r Sheriff Vinton county.
E. A. Bratton, Att'y for Pl'ff.
June 98, 1878.-6 w.
OLD IRON WANTED.
WISH to buy. to bo delivered at my itoro. In
Zaleskl, every desorlptlon of
1 Cast ani 'froilil Iron!
For which I will pay the highest market price
in .... .... .... ... ....
oash o:e oooidsi
Gather up your OLD IRON and bring it to
mystore ' N, itHirjLur.
aprii s, ioi-a 1
Trees, Flowers, Bulls,' Seels!
HEDGE PLANTS!-
Nursery i atock! Fruit and Flower
Platesl .
Address F K. PHOENIX,
BLOOMINGTON NURSERY,
' ILt NOIS, '
ftOrt A cms: 91st vear; 19 Greenhouses.
Apple 1000 1 yr.. 80; 9 y., :Kl; 8 y., 140 i 4y., $ 50.
- 4 Catalogues, 80 cents.
S0-flm.
Heira of William Ross.
ProlaU Court, Vinton County. Ohio.
NOTICE is horeby given that Henry O. Har
den has lllud his accounts horein, as guardi
an of Nancy A. Calvin, John II. and .George M.
laid accounts aro set for bearing
of August next ensuing, at iO
H. B. MAYO, Probate Judge.
July 10, 1DT8.-4W,
For the Enquirer.
THE KISS.
BY NEXT.
The kiss is a telegram
From heart to Hps rovrallng
A tost of lovo and friendship sweet,
That silence was couwiiliug.
More eloquent It is than 'speoch,
More teudor and more liolyj
And touches equally alike
Both autocrat and lowly.
Give me a kiss while heart aud soul
Urow warm as green wood embers;
One that will breathe off prlng-timo'S days,
And not of cold December's.
MoAktuub, July 20th. '
BY NEXT. General Grant of the U. S. A.
AIR "Captain in."
I was General Grant of tho U. S. A. , 1
With nothing to do but lounice all day,
And drink aud somoke andiV aw my pay
As Geneal of the Armv.
I had shown the rebels how to fight,
How to light, how to light-- i i '
I had showu the rebels lv A-Jh.'t ''J j. .
-ABdlwaspetofthoarnly. ' "
I was General Grant of the U. S. A.,
I feur that I will rue the day
When I gave up the honors and pay
Of General oi tho Army.
I am President now of the U. S. A.,
Not much to do, and less to say,
With plenty of gilts and bettor pay
Thau as General of the Army.
I give my relations each a place,
Each a place, each a place . 1 ;
I give my relations each a place,
But not the men of my army.
I was General Grunt of the U. S. A.
I fear that 1, &c.
Fred's a Lieutenant of tho IT, S. A.,
He has gono to Europe on full pay,
And with him has gone, in a flunkoy way,
'flifi Gnnnntl nf tlin Armv
Fred shows tho foreigners ho can take,
Ho can take, he can take
Fred shows the foreigners heenn take
Gifts, as well as his daddy.
I was General Grant, &c. ,
I should like to be President many yours,
But I begin to have my fours
They will cut off my head with political shears,
And vote for Horace Greeley.
And then I shall not bo President,
President, Prcsidont
And thou I shall not be President,
Nor General of the Army.
I was General Grunt of the U. S. A.,
I fear that I shall rue the day
When I gave up the honors and pay
Of General of the Army.
Circulate Democratic Papers.
pers.
We do not know of any wny
and we speak entirely. with
out regard to personal interest
in which Democrats can do so
much towards advancing the
success "of their principles as
by encouraging in every man
ner they can devise, the circu
lation of sound and vigorous
i m i ...
jouinalH. ine more political
experience we obtain, the bet
ter we are convinced that the
key-note of ultimate victory is
to be found in this-idea. It
has long been a stigma upon
the Democratic party that it
never gives its journals as lib
eral a support as our opponents,
and to this negligent spirit
may easily be traced the secret
or its past defeats, and prostra
ted condition at present. In
the canvasses that have taken
place since 1860, we were not
met with discussion we were
beaten by the abuse. Such
warfare could not have been
successfully Waged by our op
ponents had the circulation of
sound Democratic papers thro'
the country been pushed with
all possible vigoi. The pas
sions or the people can not b
made the foundation of political
success, it the people are made
to listen to argument and rea
son. This can be. efecte4 in
no otner manner than by a
wide diffusion of the Conserva
tive preea The times are threat
eninir. Weilcnow not when
the storm clouds may burst.
T1 1 I 1 , 1 i . .
ine ppopir Bnouic- qe pqcnte,a
for the probable emergency
We will cuarantee that everv
additional copy of a staunch
Demo ratio paper circulated in
any neighborhood, - will bring
in a have.st qf ao additional
freeman to vote, or, if neoessary
a patriot to strike on the side
oflow and order. Let our
friends' reflect on this point.
and they will say that t is
[Zanesville Signal.
Paste for the Scrap Book.
You have had inquiry for a
good paste that wilj kec'p, and
in reply I will say that after
an experience ot over thirty
years daily, I may say hourly
use, I have found none so good
as flour paste, made with alum
waierj say a piece oi aium as
arge as a small ' walnut to a
pint of paste, with a few drops
of oil of cloves added to the
paste when made. The alum
irevents the fermentation, and
the oil is degtrqetiye to vegetai
ble mold. Paste when made
his way will keep for weeks
in the warmest weather. Add
the water to the flour cold and
bring to a boil. 1
We have about as little use
or Grant and his relatives an
other four years' as a grasshop
per has for nee-buckles.
I
Campaign Notes from Theodore
Tilton's Golden
Age.
8iin outshining itself,
and shedding a daily bright
ness on the Greely campaign.
The Philadelphia ticket is a
peculiar composition. Grant
stands for battles and Wilson
for bolts.
The World, . after' having
been strenuous for several
weeks in its.assertionsthatMr.
Greeley can not be elected, is
now dis'cussinsr the coranosi-
tion of Mr. ; Greeley's cabinet.
Ihe World moves. '
'fill' Tl " r-.W - Hr-".vrf-
j lie uraniir.es aote on uer-
ritt Smith as though he were
a strawberry shortcake whiten
ed with a whole shower of
powdered sugar. None of
them bare to remember when
he signed Jeff. Davis' bailbond.
Oh, no; it was only Mr. Gree
ley's signature that was wicked.
"The franking privilege
ought to be abolished,"' says
the Philadelphi platform; and
yet the Grant committees are
crowding the mails, day and
night, with franked documents,
which they are sending broadcast
over the country at the
government's expensa.
The N. Y. Times speaks of
the Ureeley .Republicans as the
'outat-el bows' p'arty. Now
'elbows' likemobled queen,
in Hamlet is 'good.' It re
minds us .of the 'elbows of the
Mincio.' Would not the
Times be very glad to be safe
ly 'out' of these? The Times
should never 'elbow' its neigh-
Dors.
It is admitted by the Ad
ministration organs generally
that General Grant was not the
first choice of many of the del-
gates to the Philadelphia Con
vention. Why did they not
say so there and then t Why
II il 1 1 J
am an uiese independent gen
tlemen thrust their preferences
inio tneir pocKets nefore the
voting began, and scieam for
Grant at the top of their lungs?
Wnndprful nnsnimit.vl Vt...
.. M. ......... . Vj t , T . y
wonderful! Indeed very sus
piciously wonderfull
The only two memorable
things Grant has ever said
were 'Let us have peace,' and
I will fight it out on. this line
if it takes all summer.' Since
his election to the Presdency
he has done little but stir up
strite and prolong the hostility
of the South,, and divide the
Republican party by insisting
upon his own re-nomination.
And instead of 'fighting it out
on this line,' he" changed his
base of operations and line of
aqyaqca in less than a fortnight
Dl Lit...! I 1. i
tuner uttering nis on or c-ravaao,
- Not Quite all. Tho9e hi-
cellent Republicans who hesi
tate to go for the Cincinnati
nominees because the old reb
els support thera, may connt a
goodly number of the gray
coats on the other side. The
Convention fully realized, th,e
want9 or the hour, and was de'
termined to meet the . occasion
with a man whose name is
tower of strength, and' whose
character is irreproachable.-
Hon. Geo. W. Julian made i
characteristic apeeoh, by invi
canon, anu would have oeen
nominated Congressman at
Large had he not positively de
clined the hQIW o,n, account of
ill health, go grandly does
the campaign open with tlie
promise of victory brightening
our banner?,
There is no question that
Colfax was politically slaugh
tered by the Washington news
paper correspondents. , It was
cruel, but nevertheless . they
stabbed him with their pens.
And this is wha); they say for
themselves: when Qolfa was
nemher of the house he was
all Atniles and graciousuess to
the 'bpecials, .nnd they wrote
him up into the speakership.
lie showed them, every atten
tion, and they puffed, him into
ranie anu, paragrapnea mm in
to the Vice Presidency. Then
he forgot their service, treated
them superciliously,1 snubbed
them on, all occasions, and play-
cd the My-Lord.unapproacha'
ble until they went back
on
him infdisgust. When thev
ceased to notice him he ceased
to be talked about or thought
of, and his fame collapsed like
a pricked bladder when they
rt -4 e
refused to keep up the supply
of wind. This is decidedlv
hard on Mr. Colfax, who has
our heartiest sympathies. But
we. can not for the life of us
understand how a man who
had climbed into the Vice
Presidency over a ladder of
newspaper; paragraphs should
kick the ladder oVer the mb-.
is not quite a fool, if he does
smile at everybody and say
nothing very graciously on all
occasions. And we strongly
suspect that there there is
something behind this newspa
per syndicate which has not
yet been divulged. The lamb
has been sacrificed, but wheth
er the Administration will suc
ceed in pulling the wool com
pletely over the people's eyes
is pretty doubtful.
Earthquakes.
The earthquake of 79, in
which the cities of Pcmpeii and
Herculaneura and their inhab
itants were buried-.
That of 543-, felt all over the
world.
That of 546, in Syria, in
which 250.000 persons perished
t That of 742, in Syria. Pales
tine, and Asia, which destroy
ed 500 cities, and lives beyond
estimate.
That of 1450, at Naples; 40,-
000 persons perished.
That of 1662, at Pekin, in
which 300,000 persona were
buried.
That of 1693, in Sicily, des
troying 354 towns and 100,000
lives.
That of 1755, at Lisbon ;
50,000 persons perished.
In 1797, the whole country
between Santa Fe and Panama
destroyed ; 40,000 people bu
ried in a second.
In 1840, at Mount Ararat,
3,137 houses were destroyed,
and half a million of people
perished.
In 1851, at Rhodes, where a
mountain fell, crushing a city
with its .inhabitants.
la 1668, at Sandwich Is
lands; 1,000 shocks within 15
days.
Same year, 60,000 people de
stroyed in Peru and Chili; also
Eicuador and many large cities
along the coast,
Earthquakes. Murder of Nun-Fearful
Disclosures in a Monastery.
A terrible scene has taken
place at a monastery at Paler
mo. The facta aa they have
reached us are as follows: For
some months past rumors have
been flying about to the effect
that a nun (a young lady of
great expectations and exqui
site beauty) bad been attached
to her father confessor, he be
ing one of the brethren of the
monastery. Thither, it would
appear, she was secretly con
veyed, and kept in close con
finement for a long period.
bhe gave birth to a child, the
result of her illicit intercourse
with the monk,. The child
was quiokly disposed of, and
the unhappy mother was even'
more cruelly treated. Not
knowing very well how to hush
up the scandal, several of the
monks determined upon de
stroying her during the tem
porary absence of her para
mour. lhey passed a cord
round her neck, and dragged
her along the floor until she
was strangled. Her scream
ing, however, attracted the at
tention of some1 Greek sailors,
who effected an entrance into
the monastery. Three of the
hoh fathers paid the penalty
of their crime. - One received
a death woud from the sword
of the first sailor, another was
shot through the lungs, and the
third received several wounds
on the head while he was in
the act of retreating, from
which he has since died.
High Culture of the Strawberry.
'.. berry. . ,
, , At the recent Fruit Con
vention in this city, says the
Practical Farmer (Philadel
phia,) there was considerable
discussion as to the most prof
itable mode of growing straw
berries, whether in hills, or
rows, or in beds. The hill
sy8tem,and taking off the run,
ders, was spoken of as adapt- .
ed for small gardens and ama
teur cultivators. .One speker
announced that Knox, of Pitts
burg, grew successfully on this
plan f apr, but at the, tirae ,
of his visit to his grounds, bed
culture was the only kind seen.
This is the mode usually adopt
ed by large growers for mar
ket. E. Satterthwaite, of
MontgotneryrPa-and who
brings the finest size and qual
ity of strawberries to the Phil
adelphia market, detailed his
practice of setting out the
f)lants in contiguous rows, and
etting the runners grow to
gether, so as to make beds
about three feet wide the first
season. In the fall he gives a
good top-dressing of manure,
which acts both as a protect
ive mulch and as a fertilizer.
Tt inquiry of a member: "Does
not this promote a large growth
of weeda?" he replied, it does;
but the heavy increase of
crop3 pays for the labor of
eradicating thera. He had
grown 300 bushels to the acre,
which returned gross $2,000.
He plants every year, the best
crop always being the second
season . from planting, after
which the product annually di
minisnes; and it was considered
more profitable to plant new
beds than to retain the old
ones.
A Burglar's Blunder.
It becomes ouc painful duty
to record one of the most ex
traordinary burglaries in the
history of Burlington criminal
sensationalism. It opens a
new era in the system of mid
night calls, and teaches a beau
tiful lesson of the costliness of
crime. At a dark and early
hour yesterday morning the
dog appertaining to one of our
most prominent citizens indulg
ed in a big noise, which, was
followed by the slamming of
the gate, and the sound of rap
indly retreating footsteps. The
good man of the house, on ex
amining the field of the short
but decisive fray, was made
glad by the discovery of a roll
containing a considerable
amount of money, It is con
jectured that some one pocket
served the burglar both- as
bank and arsenal, and that, iu
pulling his pistol iu compli
ment to the dog, he pulled al
so his greenbacks. Our friend
suggests that he will be glad
to receive such calls, at the
same price, at all times; and,
in order to secure the patron
age of other like generous gen
tlemen, he agrees to add to the
attraction of his show the
charms of a. double-barreled
shot-gqjj, with a few Colt's re
[Burlington (Iowa)
Hawkeye.
Testing Kerosene.
Tf consumers are willing to
be put to a little trouble, a
simple experiment will deter
mine the safety of the kerosene
they purchase. Fill a pint
bowl two-thirds full of boiling,
water, and into it put a com
mon metallic .thermometer.
the temperature will run up to
over two hundred degrees.
By gradually adding cold wa
ter, oring down the tempera
ture of the- water to one hund
red and ten degrees, and then
pour into the bowl a spoonful
of kerosene, and apply a light
ed match.' If it takes fire, the
article should be rejected as
dangerous; if not, it may be
nsed with a confident feeling of
safety. In . this experiment,
which is the most simple that
can be devised, the fire test is
directly applied. Upon prac
tical trials it has been found to
afford correct results.

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