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Democratic enquirer. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1867-1873, September 18, 1872, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86079037/1872-09-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL.- 6.
' J, W. BO WEN, I
IFublialier and Proprietor,
M'ARTUUR, VINTON COUNTY OHIO: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER i872.:
I I
NO. 36.
I la AdTsnoe, f
Railway Time.
1(1-! !'f -1 il I P'-'!.J ". "T '
Marietta & Cincinnati Rail Road.
TIME TABLE.
On nnd after Juris O, 1871, Trlatns will
run sis follows :
a a
.8 ;
51 ;
sex
II
OS
Kg
. : ;
: o :
- : a i
o ;
H
: :x
N
sSsri : i i : :
a..n 00 Q en
i X ch e
a
o
O
ft
'3
V n oi ei ei i jj cj
5
4h
! i 1
: M
p o 6 cd - HNHn-ooqaDt-f i-
HH HrtH H r" t
Miles gggggg SSS3E:pg;gs33
T
to
2 t
issi
an
3j "n;n"::.uc
Glials fi55a.2l258l3
"f ! (
tl
Q
!!:::::: ::::::;:: : : :
? : : : : : : ::!!;:;: : : :
aSSSSSSSS S52SS322SSSSffl
H
to
s
s
o
o
CO
v.:..:. ............
b : . : : :::::::
a-3 -S ; ;;;;;;;!:;;
as : : : :1
s :
01NCINHAT1 EXPKKSS will ruu dully
ah outer rnuiiH oiiuy. exoopi nuauay.
CINCINNATI EXPRESS KBT makes no
top Itdtweon Hamann and Athens.
Portsmouth Branch.
Mail, Accommodation,
Dep. Htimden
JuckKon
Ar'T. PorWmoiith
Dep. PorMmuulb
Arv. JttukHou
Hinnden
S.10P. m. ii-M a. M.
7.0rt "
10.65 "
liWP.u.
4:00 "
5.17 '
,w
8.80 A. K.
n.m v, m
Trains Connect at Loveland
Kor all poluU on the Little Miami Rnllroad, and
at the Iinlliiniipolis ACInoloiuil BitllroadJuiio-
iiou rormi poiiiw west. .
W, Wi PEABODY,
.Vittr of ,Tranpnrtation.
BALTIMORE & OHIO RAILROAD.
Great National Short Line Route.
Great National Short Line Route. East and West.
Only Direct Route to the National
Capitol and Eastward.
On anil uftor Mouday, November ID, Trnlni
win run nm miiiowh i
EASTWAIIU.
(;f'ii
fiut
lint.
Hail
Kxpreti
.... . Dopurt
Parlcersbuiv ....
Cnmborliiiur... .
Haruer'a b'urrv. .
C55 Am
1 135 Pin
(lOPm
1 38 Am
8 44 Am
1 12 I'm
4 45 "
506 ' '
6S5 "
0
880 '."
855 " :
1000 "
S5 Am
615 "
6A1
8 45 '
10 00 "
WaHhlngtonJuao'n.
Arrlvs. ...,..
nnltimura,...
Wanhiugton
Philadelphia
Ner York
WESTWARD.
Dopurt
New York
PhilitUelphla
Washington
Bultlmoie.
Arrive
Washington Juno'n.
Harper1 Korry.....
Cumberland
Parkemhurif
S0 Pm
18:24Pm
410
ISaOPm
13IM Am
8 80 Am
0:20 Pm
4:00 Am
8:00 Pm
8:60 A id
9:20 "
11 45 Pm
45 Pin
8 00 "
8 90
8 00 '
4 05 Am
4 85
8 69 "
laiNIPm
IS :04 "
tuOPm
10 8i "
8:45 Am,
85 " I
II 00."
Pallmin Ftlao Drwln Eoom Sleeping Can,
Which are as comfortable, elegnntly furnished,
and almott equal to Are-aide, are on nllTralm
from Olnolnnatl to Baltimore and Waahlngton.
HeeSeheduleof Marietta and Cincinnati Rail
way for time of arriving and departing from
Mo Arthur. .
The advantagea of thin route over all othem
la, that It give all travelera holding through
i!2k,eti f". lwlvlloKO f vlaltlng Baltimore,
fh adelphla, and the National Capitol free.
any othdr line.
Th aoanery along thla Hallway la not equated
lor grandeur oa this Continent.
to SHippsnJor freight.
This llae offon auuarlor Induoementa tha
rates being one-third lower to nnd from JJoaton,
Now York, or any other Kiwtoru polna. In or
daring goodaoranydujorlptlon frout.the Kiwi
K'vediieptlonato thin tia Unltlmoro k Ohio
iT Inshipplng East glveauinodireotlona,
rrelghUahliipoil by thla routewlll have Uoa
patch, and bo handled with care and aave
hipperamunh money, J. L. WILSON,
a. n.iSllrvorUtloa BftUlmore-
Uon, freight Ag't, Baltimore.
M. B. JONES, Gen. Ticket Ag Baltltnore.
Oen. Paia. Ag't..
Indianapolis, Cincinnati & Lafayette
Rail Road.
GREAT THROUGH PASSENGER RAILWAY
To all Points West, Northwest
and Southwest.
THIS IS THE SHORT LINE VIA INDIANAPOLIS.
, MANAPOLIS. '
riioaroat Tlirough Mull and Kxnrnna Pna
longnr Line to St. Louis, Kanaai Clty.Bt.
loHiiiih, lunvr, Uan Vmnoisoo, and all uainU
In Mlttnonrl, Kaiiaaitml (Jolorado.
The ahorUtHt andoiilydlreotmutetolndlnn
apolia, Lafiivette, Terrs Hantn, . Camnrldifti
City, Sprlugllold, Peoria, Burlington. OIiIohk p,
Milwankeu, tit, Paul, and all uolnta la tlie
Nurtliwent. , i . ,
Tin, litdinnnpolta, Olnolnnatl and Lafayette
Railroad, with Ha oounautimia, now iiHora uaa
aengemnoro fiwIIIUuH In Through Ciiaclt and
Hlueping (Jar Uervlee than any othor linn from
Oinolpnatl, baying the advantngn of Through
Uailv OarsfroinCinoiiinnU to Ht, Louis, Kan
ana Ulty.Ht. Joseph, Peoria, litirlington.t'lilcago,
Omiiha, and all Intermnliate polnw, presenting
to Unionist and 'iMiililee smilt uoint'orta unci
aomiinniodatluiis nt aro aflorilod by no othor
route. ....( .
Through Ticket and Baggage Chocks to all
points. . .
Trains loaro 01 aolniiatl at 7i30 A, U.t 8:00 P,
M.. ami 1:0(1 P. M, '
Tleketa can bo ohtalnnd at No. 1 Ijiimet
iiiuh, oornor xiiirn ami vine Pitbllo Land
ing, comer Malu and Hlvori also, nt Depot,
ooniur Plum and Puar Htreeiii. iiinninnnti it.
Ha sure to purchase ticket via littllutmpolla,
VIIIUIIIIIIIVI ItlUI aJRI 8T Q(M1 IVI4JinN(,
C.K.LOItl), (. L.llAltI!tMflIlK.'
.
Chief Ticket Clerk, laslcr TraiiHpurtutlon,
w kiiucinuac ..
THIS IS THE SHORT LINE VIA INDIANAPOLIS. Railway Time.
OHIO & MISS RAILWAY.
; la - the Shortest, 'Quickest
ana ouly Koacl running its en
tire trains.thrpugh to' . y, '.. ;
ST. LOUIS AND LOUISVILLE
WITHOUX CHANGE.
Our arraofjeraeiits . and con
nectibua with nil lines from St.
Louis and Iouitwille are per
feet, Reliable and;complete for
ft' it J ,1 . i a . , .
an, pomrs ., i . :
-T This i-t!i(jf!, J.pH''j$'t'''anjl. h$t
route to .Kansas Citv Leaven
worth, A'tchis6y St. Joseph
and to all points in Missouri,
Kansas and JN ebraslta. V
Through' Tickets and full
information as to time and
fare, can be obtained at any
li. R. iOffice.oivat oui' office in
Cincinnati.: '' -; -: x
E. GALLUP, Oen. East Paa. Agent,
CINCINNATI.
W. II. HALE, Oen. raas. and Ticket Agt.,
ST. LOV18.
EOUTEWEST.
23 MILES THE SHORTEST.
O EXPRESS TRAINS leave IntllnnnpollB
u (laiiv, I'xcopt Bitnnay, tor sr. i.uuis ana
THE WKST.
milE onlv Line runhlnir PULLMAN'S cle
I brated Drawlng-rooin Slcoping Cam from N,
v nitiuKr,.ii r-ni,,nii.o Tjtt.f.iruu ri-
cli'inati, and riidianttpolia, to' Si. Louis without
cltango.
Ptissongers should remember that this k the
urent West Hound Itoute for Kansas city, ,
Leavenworth, Lawrence, Topoka, Juno
tlou City, FortHcott and St. Joseph.
Ptllfn H AITft TO KANSAH. for the pur.
CiYIIUnHrl I d poseofestitblisltlng them
selves in new notnoii, wtn nave itiierni uiscrim
inutloo nindo in thulr favor hv thla Line. 8at
st'ai;torycointntitatlo,i on regular rntes will be
given to Colonist and large parties traveling
together: and their hnggitge, emigrant outtlt
and stock will le shippedon the most favora-
ute terms, presenting to .
! COLONISTS AND FAMILIES
9ucn comforts and accommodntlons as are pre'
lonted by NO OTHER ROUTE.
TtCIfKT.S nnn h nht.ntnnit .tall lllft nrlimltml
Ticket OIIIcoh in the Eastern, iliadle and
BotitliorD states.
O. E. FOLLETT,
' Qencral Pasxoiiger Agent. St. Louis
IlOllT. EMMKTT,
Eastern Passenger Arent, Indianapolis.
JOHN E. SIMPSON,
Qenernl Btiporintcndent, Jmlianapolla.
Columbus & Hocking Valley Railroad.
at
On and after Uecctnber 10th, 1871, Trains will
un aa iollows:
Devart. Depart
Atnons o.oo a. m. i:id r. v.
Arrive. Arrive.
rolnmbns... 9:50 A. II. 5.40 p. X.
P ttshurgh.. 8:H6 P. u. 1:00 A.
UloTelnnd... 8:55 7:80 "
Xenla 14:10 ." 7:50 "
Davlon 1-05 " 9:111 "
Richmond... 8:80 " 11:17 ."
Iiidlanauolls 8:10 " - S:20 A. M.
Chicago 12:15 A.M. 8:80 "
Clone connection made at Lancaster for Clr-
nlevillo. Zunesvilln. and all nointa oti .the Cin
cinnati and Muskingum Valley Kailroud.
uiroct connections made at iniumbns for
Oavton. Horlnc-nolil. IiitllnnaDOli.. Chlcairo.
tnd all points West. Also, for Cleveland,
mtmuo, I'ltt.Himrtrn, and all points Kast.
Take the Hocking Val ov and Pan Handle
route to Chicago and the Northwost. it Is the
shortest by elxty-six miles, giving passengers
the benodtof quicker time and lower rates
than by any other line.
j. w. uuiiMur,
Superintendent.
E. A. BuiLb, Gen'l Ticket Ag't, ' .
Columbus & Hocking Valley Railroad. "BEE LINE."
Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and
Indianapolis Railway.
On nnd alter MONDAY. Mnv Sfith. 1871. Ex
press Trains will KBUVI COLUMBUS and
CHEST LINE and Ahkiyi $t points named be-
low, sa luitowai ; s j .
Stations. No. 3. No: 4.
No..
2:35 tm
4:60 a ui
7i80am
1 2K0ptn
4:40 pm
6:06 pm
1:80 am
UKIOsni
uotnmnua IlllOslB 4il0pin
Crestline. cs;; rii.Jpiu A a:wStii
Mil
Clnvolimdi....-. 8:45 pm ' f:46Bitt
HnOalO . . . ... . . 10 :B0 p in 4:10 pm
NiagaraFalli... -.-7:00a m 6:46am
Rocliestor..V...liUOAm ; 1.05a m
Albany ..... .. . . .9:46 am 2:00 p m
Boston.... 5:'J0nm ll:90Dm
Sew York City.. 880pm - 8:80 pm
8:40am
Creatllne
1246pm
( 85 p in
swam
8 46 pm
2 40am
...cv,,.
'7 Mam
6ti6am
11 V5 am
nOOptn
HilUburg.,.1
Karrlsburg ,
Baltimore?..
Washington
Phlla(tri)hls
..'8 85 p m
... 715am
.. .16 40 am
. 1 10 pm
.-. it 1R am
1 xoa m
11 25 a nt
f 40 p m
4p m.
8 16 P in
4i'i p m
1 la a in
7 fit) a m
Creatlln
TTh so p i
D nt
Fort Wayne ...V 6 80 a m
Chloago llllOifin
titfiiOt 4. lnavlnv t'olmnlnj. at 4:10 n. m.
has a Through Careu fMawaroforSprlnglleld,
ruiichlngflprlngMeld without change at 7:) Dm.
Train No. a on the Columbus Hooking Val
ley Railroad connect with No. 4 Train. Through
Tlnkota for sal at Athena.
PA8KENGKR TRAINS returning arrive at
Columbus at 12:80 a. m, 11 :15 a. m. and 8 M a. nt.
l"Palaoe Day and, Sleeping Cari
un aii iraina, , . ,
a"No"lavlnB Columbus at Ii85 a m.on
Sunday, runs through without detention, by
both Erie and Now York - Central Railways,
arriving at Now York on Mondav.anoriJnr at
8:40 A.M. . ,
For particular Information In regard to
through tlcketa, time, connections, etc., to all
h)Iiki East, West, North and South, apply to
oraddreaa R. roRtt.OoliimbuB.'Olilo.
r-.B, r lin t , urni. Btipcrintonuent.
JAMES PA TTKUHON,
Oen. Agent, Oolumbua, O.. i ; . ..
EUGENE FOB D, . .
p ..- "i- nbua, Ot '
NOTICE
To Stockholder of the G., McA.
& C. R. R. Co.
ALL persona having subscribed to the Capi
tal Stock of the UallloolU. McAKhur Jk
Columbus Uallroad Co., are lierijliy required to
iiukii pityniiiiia io tne nroromry or mo compa
ny, at hlaoiUco la &alllmlla,0'liio, and parties
living In Vinton county, Ohio, may make pay
ment, If more oonveuloiit,, to Iuntki, Will,
President of the Vinton County Hank, (natal
men Won their sulisnrlotlons, as follow:
A 4th InstalRiont of 10 iinritinil nn nli.fr,n
JulyS'l, 1878.- . .
v oui iniiniinent oi iu par cunt., on or before
august 81. l"7'l. - . . .
A lllh Instnlinontof 10 nuroont. Oil At hit fl VTA
SepteinbnrM, 1B7SI.V i .
A 7iit lustuiineuioi upercoui,,ou or before
October IM, IWtJ.- ' . ' '
- au nth instaiincni or io porcent.,on or before
November 8H.18T2. ' , . . ,
A till Inataitneiit of 19 per oont.j en or'bofore
Doceiuberllil, ln7i.
t Hy ordoroCUoardof iiifetaofii ' ' iv,i"i
. .. ; . W. SimftElt1" ! 1
. . i ' . - ev'y 0. ileA. A U. at. Co
,July8,ib7S.i.. f, ,,i.U!,7,.i
Business arte.
DRY GOODS, &c.
ESTABLISHED 18 YEARS ;
i s
:.,..t ,. .
WHOLESALE DBA IKK IN
DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS.
Front Street r; . Portsmouth, O.
J. F. TOW ELL la agent for aevernl Milla, and
his house Is headquarters for uimy desirable
makes of Eaatern Goods. All goods will be
sold at the lowest posslbl price. -,- v
Close Cash Buyers, rirst Class Tlmo, Tfada;
Wholet-alu Peddlers and s'uruancmua are iiar
tleularly invited toaticxnminatlon of lit stock
.1 i! i J- MARBLE WORKS.
U i
- B R. 'HIGGIHS & BR0.,
.Maaitfaotrreri ofl .'" !!''
r. I S TOMB STONES, i Z': hi
MANTLES FURNITURE, &c.,&c,
XjOQ--A.it, OHIO
riOOO assortment of Marble
enniitantl v on
nana, ah sunns oi
Cemetery Work
Done to order In the finest stylo. S4
HOTELS.
AM ERIC AN HOTEL
Corner High and State Streets. ' :
(Nearly Opposite Stale House
OOIjTJJVCBTJS OHIO
E. J, JUflVVX V , Propriet'r.
THIS HOTEL Is furnished throughout with
allthe modern improvements. O nests can
rely on the best treatment and very low bills.
Streetcars pass. this Hotel to and from all
uallroad Depots.
PEPOT HOTEL,
CHILLieoTHE, OHIO,
M. MERKLE,
Proprietor
THIS ITotel, a few feot front the Railroad
Depot and where all travelera imon all
frnlncnan loir. i .... 1 .1 . r. n I , . 1 . , t ...... . r...i ,1 .,
v..,,,ci.i.u ,m. luvilin. iim junv KICCtltJ'
enlarged and thorouglily repaired, painted,
so., ano is now in complete oruer ror tne re,
ceptlon of guests. ana-Trains atop ten mln,
u tea for meals. SWTRKMS moiikkatb.
ISHAM HOUSE,
JACKSON, OHIO
Dr. I.T.MONAHAN. Proprietor
THIS Hotiae.fqrmorly tHe Jlatn House, has
been thoroughly rtmovated and 'uentitl
fully furnished. Having superior facilities.
everyining win oeiione lomnKe guests com-
lortaoie. Tame always supplied wllli best
marketaffoi-ds. Nicely furnished Rooms nnd
cleanest Beds . Good Htiibles. Every elfort
mode for the comfort o(palrona. All charges
mooerate.
MERCHANT'S HOTEL,
S. Wi VARNER
Propretor
TIIIS Hotel Is In the moat convenient par
x or tne city onrroninireei.neiween Mar
net, ami j enenion .
ATTORNEYS.
O T. QUNNINQ,
l'a. W Y E ,
McARTHUR, OHIO.
OFFICE AT DRUQ bTQHK, MAl)f STREET.
D. B SHIVEL,
McARTHUR OHIO.
Tlll n 1 1 1 ,t il n.nmntiu .. u airol l,naltaaa
entrusted to his care In Vinton and adlolnlng
counties. OFriCB In the Recorder's Office.
J. M. M0QILLIYRAY,
ATTOB3STBY AT Xi-A.W,
. MoAlvIUUK, UH1U.
WILL attend promptly to any business
alven to his care and management In
my Courts of Vinton aiinadlulnlng cottntles.
OrriOB In theCourt Hons. Ui Htair.
-tl
CHARLES W. QISTi: V:
Attorney iat Law an! Notary Pntlic
Z ALE SKI, OH IO.
WILL attend ail legal bual noss en trusted to
his care. Supply of Blank Deeds and
lnrt.irni7
;cs always on hand. Otiflplt-No. 12
West Wing Balnbrldge Hlock.
Hincat. . . h
U. S. OLAYPOOLE,
(Proaeoatlag Attorney of Tlotoi Ooniltjri)
WILL prsotlo In Rom, VlnUm, and siljolnlna
ooantlea, - All legal bualnrs rntrntel to his
oar paomptly attended to, li-tt
HOMER C J ONES.
i . .. ....
A.TTb35TB33r AT XiA-W,
V, M'ARTnUR, OHIO." t
OFFICE 1st noon West of Dan. Will A Bros.
Especial attention given to l lieoolleotlon
f claims. ' . ig.iy
Trees, - Rowers, Bis, Seeds !
HEDGE PLANTS!
Nursery Stock! Frnit and Flower
Platgs
Address V K. PHOENIX,. J 5 J
BLOOMINGTON NURSERY,
Attn AAWtl1a VAS1K 1 anMAMS.n...na ' I
iivivn) vmnv J VB Mm VI I VllU IliriintSJI .
Apple 1000 1 yr., 10; y., 8.KM 8y.,40; 4y., 50.
' ' V VP)WtVBJUVD M VVUlsli . ,
i t ....... . ... . . S8m,
AMERICAN SUBMERGED TUMP,
'The Best Pump in the World-'
OU B Agents report over $800,000 worth of
pmpertyaved from' Fir this i ear by these
pumps, bolngtbe most powerful foroe-puuips
in toe worm, aa well asMoa-rreealng.
Him OntntMF tllimluil-' LAM Mill uluri Dm.
nilllin.T.llife m.ru ailttArfliM Am A .11. ...lo.
Thla paper never deoelve tlie fanners. He
nonce in t ouruary nnintior, page 40, Try one.
If It don't do the urAPk itlitli
get your money, as wo wrrj'titoiir pumps to
ii wouiHiui iiirinem on our ciraiiiars.
Hend rorelrculst-lnrordiirs o the Ilrldgeport
M'f'g Co., No AS Chamber Ht . New Vork.
- - ..v . i, h , ..ww k vr
An nrvi t,i- ntrnln. W 1 U .
"a? u-tf.1'
W.W.T WITH uuui,
.,l,.V,i
I
Closing Remarks of Gen.
Ward In Speech at Lebanon.
August 20th.
HORACE GREELEY.
Horace Greeley U one of the
people, and the architect - 'of his
own fortune. In all his life not
one-tenth of one pet cent.' of his
receipts came , "fi-omV the , public
coffers. ' : Born . ou the ;. rugged
rocks.of New Hampshire, to no
estate but honest -.'.ncostry and
penury, his own i oil ... not only
; supplied his own I'mgat ! wants,
but aided to drive poverty from
the door of his' i -v.il v. , The
common '.school only
;acadetnyrar4.kii;U.
his only college. - Penniless and
friendless he entered t the great
metropolis, and by industry and
thrill amassed , a fortune, His
hand was ever open to help the
struggling around him, - and; his
heart ever opened to the cry of
the distressed. Honest, industri
ous and temperate himself, he
ever pitied and sought to reform
those who were not. Like most
Americans, he had a strong pas
sion lor politics, and earlv m
life the integrity of his character,
tne Dreadth oi Ins knowledge,
ana tne enthusiasm of his; nature
made him a power in the land.
His political ideas were adverse
to mine, out neitner l, nor . any
one, ever doubted his intellectu
al power and his moral .upright
ness. : .. .' ' ;
Horace Greeley has, for thirty
years, had a .National reputation.
He has borne an active Dart in
all the great struggles' of his age,
lie is eminently a man of ideas.
a thinker, a leader of the nennlft.
There is no subject of public in
terest on winch he has not ' spo
ken with frankness and vii?or.-.
He has been the peculiar disci-
pies ol nobody. Bold and orig
inal, he leads, and asks others to
follow, but nercV fttltcnr whether
they follow or not. Such a man
being a public journalist, speak.
mg Hvery day, and , discussiner
every passing event must nec
essarily say in a generation
much that is ill-considered and
crude. However sagacious and
o T" ttrrr
clear-sighted he may be, he must
magnify out of their real proDor-
tions ideas of policies which seem
tor the moment to promise con
trolling influence over the future.
and the quly wander Is how In a
long life of journalism a mind so
active and : enthusiastic should
have blundered bo - rarely. 1 He
nas, in tne main, kept up. too.
with the spirit of the &se. ' No
antiquated dogma. except protec
tion pas rounci layor in his eyes,
and out of that Eas sprung most
of the errors, aa I regard themi
of his political policy,
But in this he does not stand
alone. It is an idea ; which, in
its various ramifications, ,, has
filled the minds of many thinkers
and statesmen. . Many who have
thrown it off tq riff retain
it as to other concerns, and Seem
unwilling to admit thftt the neQ
ple can manage'' their riwplest
concerns without the aid of the
Government It must b ailm?.
ted that Greeley belongs to this
scnooi oi tmnKers. enthusiast
ically devoted to popular richts.
he treats the people as under the
perpetual guardianship ,, p the
the creator tq the creature. His
policy - sends , the, , supervising
hand of the Government into all
the concerns, and seeks to shape
by political action even the hab
its and ideas of the' peoDle.
This whole theory of the funo-
1 ft ' ' 1 i I " .a
upns pi- government u anti-Democratic,
and contradicts our thfl.
ory that "that Government is
lrto4' wrlishll r?vmyn n lnrt M T..A
all ' these ' abstract notions-' are
outside the issues of the ' dav! .
They are speculative rather than
i. -1 I 1... !i
prucuciu. ureeiey remits to
Coneress the tariff question, and
that is the only branch of ', the
protective idea that can . have
any political force in the Feder
al Government, when the sec
tions are reconciled and local
government " remitted to the
States. . So his idea on the eub-
-1 Ai ' ' ; .it I
wui oi BiHvery maiiera - womiBg
now that slavery is deact . ' His
theory of the righ'ts-'and - powers
ol the federal Government j are,
it must be confessed, latitudipa
rian, and if he made 'law instead
of administered it, would be
highly obnoxious. As to all this,
however, rhfii ias.JbuHittle power,
antV his speculative; opi pion s ran
little Jaria siUdisiiii
past career shows that his theo-riea-haveeyerbeen,
allowed -to
cripple his-pctidahactirfnrrIn
all his past life he has tried hard
m opMe mmi
make tbepthe, creed of parties,
but he never lay dreaminsr over
lheir perfection,. or failed to take
i.vmv, jiitttutiu Jliirii 111 me
movements of public affairs" b-
cause' Hii IthedriestVel-efhbt
adopted. Still, he has not been
vacillating;, button tlio; contrary;
steady in his adherence to prin
ciples. Through opposition and
obloquy, he adhered to the cause
of Abolition till -slavery was .'no
more., He has never', faltered in
his advocacy' of protection,' tho'
the thinking world has ' been . in
arms against him. Time has not
shaken his devotion, to temper
ance, his faith" in religious tolea
tiony or, iis coniide'ifce human
progress; Vile is ever the-'sanie
steadlhst friend of the people,
advocating their? interests,?, and
pointing them to the paths of in
dustry. , temperance,, .economy,
rectitude' " and virtue. ' "Every
new invention, ; every labor-savins
machine, everv aid to tho
elevation of the" working 'masses
finds in him an, early: and con
stant, advocate. - Peace and .) the
triumphs qf peace, freedom to all
oi every race, coior ; . or.- persua
sion, happy firesides to the hum
blest sons of toil and love to the
whole human familv. tue tho
W&tohwords of his policy. He
shrinks from war and violence
and oppression with the sicken
ing horror of an i anchorite, and
yet would brave prisons: "'"or
stripes, or death itself, in defense
ot tn - Tight' ' Whatever else
may be said, Horace Greeley is
no common-place man.' His ca
reer has not been that of a mere
place-hunter. JJo scorns ,the
highest offices if they cost ;the
surrender of his convictions, and
dehes'even his friends when his
consciousness of duty: requires
him to o.pnopo them, Jle is the
strength and the docility' of
greatness, the elevation and firm
ness ol conscious rectitude.1 ,No
country ever more needed these
great qualities ... than ; they are
now needed in tfee . Presidential
chair, ., He is cheerfully support-
ed by all old parties. . ; for his
known integrity andpurity, fit
him to sit , as umpire , between
contending factions.! Abolition
ists and pro-slavery men, Union-
iU j:a t ,
ions uuu weBBionisisiemocrats
and Republicans. . all find thsv
can trust the ., bid - philosopher,
and feel thae his administration
will harmonize thehi' dvinir strifes
Into a' publjo policy -which shall
supserve toe puwio good, who
else could so thoroutrhlv . brine
bobclllatidn? , Although i before
find during the war,' the, ) boldest
ftnd bitterest of tha Idf fl's nnd in'.
teresta most , cherished by the
oeutJBBioiiiBis , oi me ooum, ne
has. since it closed, been , the
most generous frie pf the ifall-
t;Tv-v wui iiie ( re
bellion collapsed he 'has urged
peace, reconciliation, . universal
amnesty. While his party friends
hungered hungered and thirsted
for 'blood!' he 'soutrh't' to' slake
; , t i o , i ,
their vengeance by coiqrnending
to their parched , lips cooling
draughts from . the' chalice '. of
mercy. 1 When' the olive branch
is held out by such a man a
man, from the ranks of their old
enemies it comes with moire
significance and touching grace
than if presented by the hand of
an old friend. The magnanimi
ty of an enemy softens us' (when
the kind offices of a friend would
not touch the hidden; springs Of
v..vv.iu. AAV TT A &AAAA11A
President humbled tbeir; ViHde
. i ? ; . a "
in the very dust daring the war;
auu ma mimoiis nave eaten up
thoir sabstance and gc'oflbd 1 at
their i weakness . evei '. sincQ.
- ' I-. ''..'' ::
urceiey raised up the. vanquish
ed, anointed his woyaJs . with oil
and shielded hint from1 the ' fiery
vengeance of tlie victor.: - Make
him President and the Execu
tive chair will be, no longer the
throne' of vengeance, but ' the
mercy1 seat of f forgiveness -the
altar of love. . ; !
Mottoes for the Grantites.
We commend ' the fnllftwno
statement' of ' political ' facts to
Al. '.AA- A! - 1 Allt' ' T . V .
tue iiLiuiiuon oi me xvaoicai . par
ty for use1 ' during , the present
campaign: '' . ' '. '
. It was William Lloyd Garri
rison" who' declared the'. Consti
tution 'a "covenant with hell." .
. '" It was General ' Grant who
threatened to take his regiment
over to the rebels if slavery was
li-A-i1 i ':ai ' ' s
mieriereu wim. . ,
It was John A. J. Creswell
who urged Maryland ,td secede
from the Union in 1861." ,
It was John r A. ' Loean who
recruited, fifty-one men in Illi-
noic for Beauregard s army,
It was William Doyd Garri
son who "thanked God he had
worked for thirty years to break
up the Union as it was." ,
;' It was Judge Settle, president
of the Grant Convention, who
was kicked out: of the rebel ' ar
my for robbing "the sick! soldiers
of hospital stores. -:
It was the"" President's father
who got a permit from his son to
steal cotton during the. war.
i It was Senator Morton who
spoke of Germans as "the Dutch
men who are only fit to eat cab
bage ana drink, beer. .
It' was Henry Wilson ' who
took a' solemn oath never to vote
for a Catholic or a foreigner.
It was Governor Noves. of
Ohio, who said that "the Repub
lican party can get along with
out the whisky drinking ' Irish."
; It was Mrs. General Grant
who received a $25,000 check
for "the Government's" share in
Black Friday.
It was Oglesby, of Illinois,
who. declared that "he hoped lor
a law to sweep the . Dutch and
Irish out of America."
" It was Henry Ward Beecher
who. stated that "Grant knew
more' about horses than states
manship." ' ' : ' '
'. It was Wendell Phillips who
wrote from Galena ' that "Grant
is owing several old whisky bills
here." ; ' '
It was Ben. Butler.who said a
year ago : "Grant hasn t the soul
of a dog," ;
It was Zack Chandler who
stated to Charles A. Dana that
"we never had such an ignora
mus in thd White House."
It was Robeson who paid a
claim of $75,000 over a law
made on purpose to prevent it.
It was Bullock, a Grant Gov
ernor, who stole millions of dol
lars. And it waa Henry Wilson who
said Gen. Grant drank too much:
(I told him 60,- and said I had a
: J a. . t. i; a. Ain
iiuiiu to risk, iiiiu io jum me con
gressional Temperance Society."
A Green Passenger.
, Conductorcket.r.""r'j " n
, Greeny I've 'got none,"-''" .
Conductor-Money' then. "
Greeny.I halnt any.
, Conductor Got a pass? '
Greeny No, I hain't got a
pass. " ' ' , ; ' " : '
; i Conductor Thunder and
spikes l7 You ; dont expect to
travel on these cars for nothing,
do you? ' ; - ; . :
,l Greeny You advertis to take
a feller for nothing, anyhow.
- Conductor How so?
Greeny Why, down there in
your office in Cincinnati ' you
have got a great big' sign stuck
uo in store writing. . It lavs :
"Through to New YorK without
The conductor 'drona his an
chor, and puts that fellow ashore
right by a big white post, with
some black letters on it, which
read, ."0. ,30 miles." . , ' , ,'
t-Tite , , .ft to ; James Gordon
Benijiett taught school in Steuben
in.the.year 1818. He taught
two- months.' and at the close of
his school; September 18, 1818,
111'' ti tf j .4m 1
ne? drew trom tho viownsmp
Treasury fts, compensation. j (- r
Dreadful Story of a Diamond
Ring.
' As aire
.!v ffated.,
, 0
recent1 ryilroad v smash-uD
at
Metuchen, N. ",'; 'was a Danih
couple named Potassen, but : two
months married, Nr.. Potasscn
being the. eon of a Danish . no-
1,Y rrti. . .
uieuiau. - xuey were on tlieir
bridal tour.' and were en route to
San-Francisco, yvhere, Pqtassen's
brother is JJanish Consul. When
the terrible crash came all was
darkness and'xonfusion for a few
moments; but the gentleman soon '
recovered consciousness, and his
first thought was for his bride.
An immediate search, .was made
forthe-.ladyV , who ... vry,s .-at last
found beneath a-lieap 'of debris,'
senseless and covered with blood.
Upon raising her' up' her husband
was horrified to find that one of
her amis had been ' completely
torn off'.. The.unfojtujaate lady
was removed to ' i. .sfiielter. and
the husband began', the sickening
tasK oi seekrng his.Wlte s miss
ing arm. iik' prooluned that
upon one of the fingers.was the
diamond wedding, ring, a jewel
worth manyj- hundred dollars,
and instantly a general search
was begun- .-.Amongt the prowl
ers about theiwrcck'was a train
hand, who. wall ..observed to se
crete somethmg';un(cr his coat
and walk away. He was soon
overhauled, and on perceiving
that he had been' detected he
threw down his burden, whioh
proved to be- the lost-, arm. It'
was picked up by the nobleman,
who removed the ring and caus
ed the arm to be taken care of.
The lady was brought to St. Bar
nabas' Hospital in Newark,
where she now lies in a fair wav
for recovery.
A Mechanical Cat.
Leonard of the Cleveland Lea
der, has invented a sheet iron .
cat, with cylindrical attachment
and steel claws 'and teeth. It is
worked by clock-work. A bel
lows on the inside swells up the
tail at will to a belligerent size,
and by a tremolo attachment,
causes, at the same time, the
patent cat to emit all , noises' of
which the living bird, is capable. :
When you want fun, you wind
up your cat .and. place him on
the roof. Everv cat within half
a mile hears him, girds on his
armor, and sallies forth. Fre
quently fifty or one' hundred . at
tack him at once, No sooner
does the patent cat feel the
weight of an assailant than his
teeth and claws work with light
ning rapidity. Adversaries with
in six feet of him . are torn to
shreds. Fresh battalions come
on to meet a similar fate, and in
an hour several bushels of hair,
toe nails and fiddle strings alone
remain. .
' Income. If, your incomo is '
five dollars a day, spend but four.
If it is one dollar, spend eighty ;
cents, it it is but ten cents spend
nine. If it is three potatoes',
save a half a potato for seed .
Thus you will gradually acquire
something; while, if you spend
as you go, you will never get
ahead one inch in life, but every
sunset will look upon you poorer
than at sunrise, because you will '
have used unprofitably 6ne day
more of your strength and your
allotted term of life. .
The longest bridge in the
world is said to be on' the Mo
bile and Montgomery Railroad,
over the Tensas and Mobile riv- .
ers. It is fifteen miles in lencth. '
and has ten draws, one for each
navigable channel. The bridge
is of wood, but the supporters
are iron cylinders. ' The struct
ure, cost $1,500,000, and has
been three years in course of
construction.
The St. Louis Republican
suggests the revival ot the
American party, and offers as
a ticket: I'For President, Spot
ted Tail,, ot the Iiocky Moun
tains; for Tice President, Hen
ry Wilson, of Massachusetts."
t.lUl 1
If tho office-holders aro not
afraid of Greeley Why . do they
mako so much fuss about him?

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