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Democratic enquirer. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1867-1873, October 09, 1872, Image 1

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L M' ARTHUR- VINTON COUNTY, OHIO. WEDNESDAY, . . OCTOBER 9, "1872.
f 11.60 PER TSAR, l
I la Advanos . , ,
VOL. 6.
f J. W. BOWEN, 1
( Publisher and Proprlstor. J
NO. 39.
Railway Time.
Marietta & Cincinnati Rail Road
TIME TABLE,
On and after Juno 9, 1871, Trlana will
run as follow :
. S'M
(A
H
:a :::::: :
:b !':::: :
MM-
.8
3 :
33 ,
H
01
2 i
55
B
o
O
.SB
5
. : t
a
T
T
it a.
: : : :
2 : : :
5 :
a
ilf
; a
JO
it
AM
2 SjSSS3 3315.23
3 353353 ga-aa
0 at
ft
Q
muo. "fsr sssjsssgsss's
-2 : i : ! i : :2 : i : i : ! i i : i i
H
co
H
o
o
c i : :
31 . .
4
: : :j
S3
CO
-
a
: o
"8 :
:
H
od i (6 i5 o 6 3
CINCINNATI EXPRESS will run dally
A 11 tV.. T... n ,1,. II. avani- Qimil n tr
CINCINNATI EXPRESS EAST .makes no
Itop betwffftn Hnmdnn and Athena.
Portsmouth Branch.
Mail. AeeommodaUon.
Dep. Hamdeu
Jackaon
Ar'T. Partamoiith
Den. Ponsmouth
Ar v. JaokHon
H amden
8.WP. . . . 6:00 A. X.
4.09 " . 7.00 "
ftSO " 10.65 "
8.WA.M. 12-SOP.
10150 " 4-.00 "
11.80 P.M.. 6.17 "
Trains Connect at Loveland.
For all points on the I.lttlo Miami Railroad, and
at the Indianapolis A Cincinnati Railroad Juno
tlon for all points Wet. .
W. Wi PEABODY, .
BALTIMORE & OHIO RAILROAD.
Great National Short Line Route
East and West.
Only Direct Route to the National
Capitol and Eastward.
On and afW Monday, November 19, Train
will run as follows :
EASTWARD, gff gg, KL.
Depart
Parkenburg 8 55 Am 8 40Pm
Cumberland 8oPm 83Am 8 44 Am
Harper'aKrry. .... 6 08 " 8 61 lPm
WasbinirtonJuuo'n. 8 88 " 886'' 4 4fl"
Arrive
Baltimore 888 " 848 " B05"
Washington 10 00 " 1000 " 6 88 '
Philadelphia 188 Am 1 80 Pm 19:14 Pm
Netr York 618 " 410 "
WESTWARD.
Depart
New York....: 19 80Pm 8 80 Am 9:50Pm
Philadelphia 19 84 Am 11 45 Pm 4:00 Am
Washington 6 48 Pm 800 " 8:O0Pm
Baltimore 800 " 405 Am 8:60Am
Arrive
Washington Juno'n. 8 90 " 495 " 9:20"
Harper's Ferry 19 0Pm 8B9 " 19HH "
Oo mberl and . . : 6 00 Pm 10 89 " 8 :4S Am
Parkershnrg 895 " 11 00 "
Pullman Falaot Drawing Boom Sleeping Can,
Whloh areas oorafortaule, olegantly furnished,
and almost equal to a Ore-side, are on ull Trains
from Cincinnati to Baltimore and Washington.
Bee Schedule of Marietta and Cincinnati Rail,
way for time of arriving and depsrtlng from
MoArtliur.
The advantages of this rout over all others
is, that it gives all travelers holding through
tickets the prlvilogo of visiting Baltimore,
Philadelphia, and the National Capitol free.
Timequioker and rates of fure lower than by
any other line.
The scenery along this Hallway Is not equaled
for grandeur on tUUContiutmt.-
TO SHIPPERSOF FREIGHT.
This line offers superior luducsments the
rntos being one-third lower tosnd from Boston,
Now York, or any other Eastern point. In or
dorlng goodsof anydescrlption from the Kast
ftivedlreotionsto ship fs Baltimore 4k Ohio
. R.,snd in shipping East give same directions.
Vrelghts shipped by this route will have des
pstoii, and be handled with osre and save
shippers rauoU money. J. L. WILSON,
Master Trsnsportatlen, Baltimore.
G. R.BLANOHARU,
Oen. Freight Ag't, Baltimore.
L.M.COLE,
H. B. JONES, Gen. Ticket Ag't, Baltimore,
Sen. Pass. Ag't., Cincinnati. -
Indianapolis, Cincinnati & Lafayette
Rail Road.
GREAT THROUGH PASSENGER RAILWAY
To all Points West, Northwest
and Southwest.
THIS IS THE SHORT LINE VIA INDIANAPOLIS.
VIANArOLllt.
' ' The Great Through Mall and Exprnas Pas
senger Line to Ht. Louis, Kansas City, Bt.
Jowpli, Denver, Ban Francisco, and all points
in Missouri, Kansas and Colorado.
The shorUwtnnd only dlrort route to Indian
apolii,. Lafayette, Terre Haute, Oamhridge
(ity, SprlngUeld, Peoria, Burlington, Citlonu'i,
. Mllwaukuo, Bt. Paul, and all points in the
Northwest. ......
The InillftniipollS.OInnlnnatl and Lafayetto
. Railroad, with Its counoctloni, now offors pas-i-eiiKor
moro fiwllltln in Through Coach and
Hleoulng Car Hurvlne than any other line frqin
Olnolnnuti, having the advantage of Through
' Dally Oars from 01 nolnmitl to Ht. Louis, Kan
smOlty.Ht. Joseph, Poorla.Burllngtonilc.sKO,
Oimtlia, und all tutnrmodlate points, prosonting
to O.ilunlits and Kamlllos sunli comforts and
nitnmninodutlons ai are afforded by no other
ron to, ' '
Through Tickets and Baggage Checks to all
points.
. Trnlos lesve Olnolnnntl at 7:30 A.M., 8;00 P.
M ., and :00 P. M. ,
TlolccW can ho obtained nt No. 1 Burnet
House, corner Third aud Vino l'ubllo Lsml
.' ing, corn or Main and Itivert alxo, at Depot,
oornor Pluln ami Ponrl Btrools, Cincinnati, 0.
, He suro to pimdiae tickets via Indlaaapoll,
.Cincinnati and LafayoU,Ilallrnsd. -
O. H. LOUD, ' (. L.BAKItlNORH, !
Chief Ticket Clsrk, Mastsr Transportation
ninnUnatl. OiBnlaaat '
THIS IS THE SHORT LINE VIA INDIANAPOLIS. Railway Time.
OHIO & MISS. RAILWAY.
Is the Shortest, Quickest
and oul Road running its en
tire trains through to i '
ST. LOUIS AND LOUISVILLE
WITHOUT CHANGE.
Our! arrangements and con
nections with all lines from,. St.
Louis and Louisville are-perfect,
Reliable and complete for
all points J ' ! ( , x !
w k sural
;This is the shortest and best
route to Kansas City, Leaven
worth,, Atchison,: St.' Joseph
and 'to all points in Missouri,
Kansas and Nebraska. : '
Through Tickets and lull
information . as td time1; and
fare, can be obtnined .at any
R. R. Office or at our. office i
Cincinnati, t , .". ! I
E. GALLUP, Gen, East Pas. Agent,
CINCINNATI. .
W. B. HALE, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt
BT. LOUIS.
OHIO & MISS. RAILWAY. VANDALIA
OHIO & MISS. RAILWAY. VANDALIA ROUTE WEST.
23 MILES THE SHORTEST.
3EXPRE8S TRAINS loavs Indlnnapolli
dally, except Sunday, for ST. LOUIS and
TUB WEST.
THE only Line running PULLMAN'S cele.
brated Drawing-room Bleeping Oars from N.
v in . . .i v. nAinn.K... T ii I - r-ln-
I ,, : rHIBUillKii, vuiuuii'un, uvuia.ni., v-
clnnatl, and Indianapolis, to St. Louis without
change. .
Passengers should remember that this Is the
Uront west Hound uoute for Kansas city, ,
Leavenworth, Lawrence, Toncka, Jnno
. tlon City, Fort Soott and St. Joseph.
rillOD A 1JTO. TO KANSAH, for the psir
tMiUnAN lo poseofesttlhliihing them
selvos in new homes, will havelihernldisorim.
Inatlnn made In their favor bv this Line. 8at-
'tfactorycommntutlon on regular rates will be
given to uoinnists ana large parties iraveimK
together: and their baggage, emigrant outfit
and stock will be shlppeuon the most favora
ble terms, presenting to
COLONISTS AND FAMILIES
Suon comforts and accommodations as are pre
sented by NO OTHER ROUTE.
TTCKEI8 oan be obtained at all the principal
Ticket omcea in the Eastern, Middle and
Southern States.
. 0. R. FOLLETT, -
Qeneral Pasaenger Agent, St. Louis.
robt! EMMBTT,
' Eastern Passenger Agent, Indianapolis.'
JOHN E. SIMPSON,
i Oeneral Superintendent, Indianapolis-1
23 MILES THE SHORTEST. Columbus & Hocking Valley Railroad.
' On and after Deoember 10th, 1871, Trains will
uu as iuuuwb
Dutart.
Deport
1:15 r. M.
Arrive.
5.40 P. M.
1 :00 A. W
7:80 "
7:50 "
9M "
11:17 "
9:90 A. K.
8:80 "
Athens.
, . 6.80 A. M.
Arrlvt,
, 9:50 A. M.
, 6:H5 r. If.
, 8:55 "
19:10 "
, 1-05 "
Columbus..
Plttahurirh.
Cleveland..
Xenla
Dayton
RtMimnnri.
8:88
Indl.nKimlls 10 '
Chioago 19:15 A. .
Close connection made at Lancaster for Clr
clevllle, Zanesville, and all points on the Cin
cinnati and Muskingum Valley Railroad. -
Dlreot connections made at C'oiumbns for
Dayton, Springfield, Indianapolis, Chicago,
and all points West. Also, for Cleveland,
Buffalo, Pittsburgh, and sll points East.
Take the Hocking Tallev and Pan Handle
route to Chioago and the Northwest.it is the
shortest by sixty-six miles, giving passengers
the benefit of quicker time and lower rates
than other line. ''
by any
Superintendent.
'1 Tloket Aa t.
S. A. BuiLl. Gen
23 MILES THE SHORTEST. Columbus & Hocking Valley Railroad. "BEE LINE."
Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and
Indianapolis Railway.
On and after MONDAY, May 98th, 1871, Ex.
press Trains will CBiVI COLUMBUS and
CRE9TLINS and ABHIVI at points named be
low, as rouowsi
Stations. No. 9. No. 4.
No. 6.
mz
7:80sm
2:00 pm
4:40 pm
6:05 pm
1:80am
11:00am
Columbus IlilOam 4tl0m
Crestline 11:80 p in 4Sfm
Cleveland 8:45 pm 9:45pm
Buffalo 10:tt)pm 4:10 pra
Niagara Falls..,. 7 :00 am 6:45am
Rochester 1:80am 7:05a m
Albany :toam 9:00 pra
Boston 5:20 pm, 11:90 pm
New York City:. 80 pm 8:80pm
6:40am
Crestline
.124601
185pm 885am
Pittsburg....
Harrlsburg..
Baltimore...,
,. 986 pm
,. 716am
,1040am
. 1 10 pra
,1116am 1
lsoam lupra
1125sra 140am
940pm
6 25pm
Washington
Philadelphia
siopm twsbs
Crestline . .,
TTTso p ra
. 680am
..1210pm
7 46 pm 5 55 am
115am 11 95 am
7 90am 600pm
Fort Wayne ,
Chioago
M a A lat.ln. rl m nihil, .ft 1-1(1 n m
has a Through Oareia Delaware for Springfield,
reachlngSprlngfleld wlthoutohBngeat7:Wpm.
Train No. 9) on the Columbus Hocking Val
lav P Hllrn.H nnnnant with No. A Train. Throuah
Tickets for sale at Athens. :
PA8HENGKR trains returning arrive at
Columbus at 12:86a, m. 11:15 a.m. and 1:50 a. m.
tar Palace Day and Sleeping Cars
."No 6" leaving Columbus at 1:85 a m,on
Sunday, runs through without dotentlon, by
ootn XLTim ana now iur wmiw w mj m.
arriving at New York on Monday morning at
6:40 A.M. !
For particular Information In regard to
through tickets, time, connections, etc, to all
points Kast, west, ortn snaooum, VVlJ
or address E. FORD.Oolnmbus, Ohio.
jHj, B. FL.in i, wen. oupwnuMsiiuwu.
. JAMES PATTERSON,
(inn. Agent, Columbus, 0.
EUGENE FORD, vl
n
Passs-"" nbus.Oi
NOTICE
NOTICE To the Stockholders of the G., McA.
& C. R. Co.
ALL persons having suhsorlbed to the Capi
tal Stock of the Gallipolls, MoAfthu ft
Columhus Uallroail Co., are hereby required to
make payment to the Heorntary of the Compa
ny, at nlsolllce In Uiillipolls.Ohlo, end parties
living Ih Vinton eounty, Ohio, may make pay-,
mnnt, II more convenient, to Danikl Will,
rrealilenc or tne vmura ioaniy inns, insuu
mentson thelrsubscrlptlons. as fnllowti1 ' i
A AthinatAlmant of 10 ueroeut.. on or before
July 99, 1879.
A Din inniniinuub ui iv foi von.., vu wi vvivwv
August 99. 1H79.
a ai h in.t.imrnt of 10 osr osnt. on or before
September 99, 1M78.
A 7th instalment oi iuporuen.,un or uciura
Ootobfr9S, 1H79. ' . "v.'.'
An 8th instalment oi ivperon.1uur
Rovmnber 98, 18Y2. '
A 9th InstnimentoflOper oent.,ca or be furs
DtNiamber9S,lH79. - '
By orderof Board of Dlrsotors! ' , .',(,
V li W. HHOBER,
:' ' , Sss,yG.,MA.AO.B,a.Co.
July 1,11m
Busings CftrDs,
DRY GOODS, &o.
TSTABLISHED 18 YEARS
j I '
' sT." E1. TO-W 'EJTiIj
WHOLES ALI Dsil.R III . . .
DRY G00DS AND NOTIONS.
Front 8treet. . . . Portsmouth, O,
J. F. TO WELL Is aeent for several Mills, and
his house is headquarters for tanny desirable
makes of Eastern Goods. All goods, will be
sold at the kwst possible pf ice.
; Close Cash Bnvers, First Class Tlmo, Trade,
wnoiesaiet'euuiersanaiurnacemen are par
ticularly invited to an examination of His stock
1 1 1. MARBLE: WORKS. . ,'
r.B. E. HlGGlTffS. ' & BR0.,
' Maufactnrrs of
llIAllBLE '. monuments,
' :tomb stones.
MANTLES, FUENITUEE, &c, Ac,
XiOOA.1T, OHIO
( 0OD assortment of Marble constantly oa
A band. All kinds or .
. Cemetery Work
Done to order in the finest style. - 14
HOTELS.
AMERICAN, HOTEL .
Corner nikh and State Street.
1 (Nearly Opposite State House
. OOIiTJ-EBTJS OHIO
E. J. BL0TOT
Propriet'r.
HPHIS HOT'EL is furnished throushont with
X all the modern improvements. Guests can
rely -on the best treatment and very low bills.
. Street Oars pass this Hotel to und from all
Railroad Depots.
DEPOT HOTEL,
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
M.MERKLE,
, Proprietor
THIS Hotal, few feet from the Railroad
Depot and where all travelers upon all
trains can take meals, has Just been greatly
enlarged and thoroughly repaired, painted,
Ac, and Is now Incomplete order for the re-
oeption o: guests, imr x rains u,p ibii miu'
utes for meals. s-Tkbms modeuatk.
ISHAM. HOUSEi
JACKSON,' OHIO
Dr. I.T.MONAHAN. - Proprietor
THIS House, formerly the Dili am House, has
been thoroughly renovated and beauti
fully furnished. Having superior facilities,
everything will be done to make guests com.
fortable. Table always supplied: with best
marketaffordB.'Nlcely furnished Roomsand
oleanest Beds. Good Btnbles. Every effort
made for the comfort ofpatrons. ; Allohargea
moderate. . ,
M E R C H A NT' S H OT E L,
PORTSMOUTH, OHIO. -t
S. Wi VARNEK - - Propretoi?
THI8 Hotel Is in the most convenient par
a. or the city on r rpntrMreewoevwecu iv
icetanu jenerson. ;
ATTORNEYS.
0.
! T. GUNNING,
LAWY.B IR.i
..MoARTHUR, OHIO.
OFFICE AT DRUG STORE, MAIN STREET.
i . i. -1' - .. .a ! 1
D. B. SHIVEL, , ,
A.TO?ORlsnE3Y A.' I' L'Alv,
'.MoARTHLTR. OHIO.
Will attend prompt ly a. egal business
entrusted to his care in vmton and adjoining
oountles. Oiricx In tne Kecoruer'sunice
J. M.MoGILLIVflAY, :
ATTOB1TET A.f LAW,
MoARTHUR, OHIO.
TiriLL attend promptly to any business
v v given to nis oare ana manairemeni in
any Courts of Vinton and adjoining oountles.
Orrica In the Court House. Up Stairs. 18-tl
CHARLES W4-QI8T,
Attorney at law.anl Nqtaiy Pnljlic,
Z ALE SKI, OHIO.
WILL attend all legsl business entrusted to
liis oare. Supply of Blank Deeds and
Mortgages always on band. Owe No. U
West Wing Bainbrldge Hlook. tf
U. S. CLAYPOOLE,
ATOBITEY A.T DAW,
; .MeARTHTTR,
(Proseontlng Attorney of Vinton Oonitj,)
WILL practioe in Ross, Vinton and atljolnlng
counties. All legal business entrusted to
his eare promptly attended to. 88-tf
HOM.CR C.J ONES,1
A-TTOEfclTIEnr A.T X.A.W,
M,' ARTHUR, OHIO.
, i : . t . .- t , . :
OFFICE 1st noon West of Dan. Will A Bros,
Especial attention given to thecolleotlon
ofolalms. lS-lr
te,' Flows BisS!
HEDGE PLANTS!' 1
Nuriery ; Stock! Fruit and Flower
. , puteit -."
' ' Address F . K. PHOENIX,
BLCOMINGTON NURSERY,
"'i:"i"Y-iir,'Hoi8;::t",-'i''i' ''
tOO Acres! list year) 19 Greenhouses.
Apple 1000 1 yr., aoS 9 y 80; a y., 40i 4y., 150.
, . . , i,r itJtalofues,l)4eut..,. . . .i
16 4m.
American Submerged pup.
' 'the Boat Pump in the World-' ! '
OUR AgenU report over 6300,000 Worth of
propertyVavad (rom'Klre tills J ear by these
r umps, being the most powerful force-pumps
n the world, as well as Noa-freaslns;.
Bee October number, page 808, also the Pree
mlum-Llst, page 3U3 of the Am. Agriculturist,
This paper never deceives the farmers. Be
BuMos in February number, page 45. Try one.
If It don't do the werk claimed, send it back and
Sat yoarmonoy.aa war'tour pumps to
do all weolalra for them on our oiroulsrs. I
Send for circulars or orders lo the Bridgeport
MTg Co., No 65 Chambers St., New York.
An order for Bin No. 1 Pumps secures an es
elttilv town Manor Do 11-L .
The Ground Burning Up.
[From the Memphis Avalanche.]
One of the strai zest of phe
nomena of the time is reported
to us from the silo'; of old Fort
Pillow. GO miles a' ove this -,city.
It is no more , or loss than that
the bluff batik of tlis river,' which
rises 50 or 60 feit above the
water level, is on lire, and for
the past several weucs has been
steadily burning Hie a volcano
for a distance of veral hun
dred yards iffong jhe east side
of the river, oh a Hie 10 or 12
feet above the wateK level.,, Ai
night a lurid , flan; j", or .Maze' of
flame risei from thfir 'side of the
bluff, to the , height of , two ' or
three . feet, which hen ; spreads
into smoke and passes on over
the summit of the hill, distribu
ting itself, with the atmosphere
ana uoating away sKywaru.,
The steamer Celeste, on -her
last trip, passed by the place in
broad aayiignt, ana a time wnen
a light wind blew from the 6hbre,
carrying the smoke towards the
Arkansas shore, and covering
the river with a thick haze, al
most like a fog. ,'; What rstrange
combustible formation .composes
the river bluff of , the-, oldjfort,
or what, iirst set it on hre, to
burn after the fashion described.
is .one of the most marvelous
events of the times, and puzzles
the the people of the vicinity no
little. We shall seek to be fur
ther informed unon this wonder
. A t i
ful phenomenon . with . no . little
curiosity. ... ;, . ,! , :
Origin of Coal.
According to Prof Wurtz the:
formation of coal depends entire-;
ly upon the action, of the' iron
which was dissolved in the ,wa-i
ters of the coal period, The com-
bmations of iron wita which coal
is always accompanied are py-j
rites, iron spar, and - hydrated
oxide. These wera.flnuhtlftbnrlA;
rived from the, strata interjected
between the coal beds. , In this
case, the oxygenated 'water '.ap
peared to act upon tiie metallic
sulphurets which were contained
in the crystalline slates, f rom the
destruction af which these . coal
strata were derived. , Coal, con
sequently, is the , normal result
of the , eremacausis of orgamo
substances in waters which con
tain sulphate of iron and free
carbolic acid. An immense pres
sure upon the mass,, while , in! a
plastic condition, was also, with
out doubty an additional . element
ot importance. t
The mechanics of : this
country, if they I would, ennoble
and dignify their calling should
all vote for ' and elect Horace
Greelev. Thev have often com
plained that all the great offices
of the country went to. ' lawyers,
physicians, merchants, bankers,
and so forth, and that none : of
their craft were elevated, to the
high plaoes. Now,' Mr Greeley
is the only man who ever Tan
for, President of rthe United
States that served a regular11 ap
prenticeship at .his traded He
was what is known as ' a bound
and indentured apprenticed- 'Af
ter being an apprentice he 'work
ed ten years at his, trade as' a
journeyman. LADor would ( in:
deed be honored by the selection
of such a man to the Presidency;
to succeed the rich politicians,
the aristocratic lawyers and the
generals ' who; have ' filled - the
oihce.
I. 5'V
A Carlinville (HI.) t wife be
coming angry because she could
not have the last word in dis
pute, recently put her, sicki hus
band out of : doors , , at , midnight
and in a thunder-storm., in the
morning she found him ou 'the
door step dead from- exposure.
She is now in the proper place -
an insane asylum. . !
i.-f ... r . -!'J
. Two centuries aco not one
in" fifty wore stocking'1 r; Fifty
years ago, hot & boy was allowed
tq irun jat large; at.;iught'Pifty
years' ago ' not - ii'ligirl. raade a
waiting-maid of 1 1 her 1 'mother.
Wonderful improvements In this
: A social glass' to which ladies
are addicted--th'e blIbor?, t t
Can You Afford It?
Can; you afford, to work hard
all day, and .read, study, or court
the vagaries of society , nearly
all night, thus wasting your , vi
tality, exhausting1 your nervous
system,' and bringing' on prema
ture disease, 'de'cay; and old age ?
! . . Cm you, afford, to; eat hastily,
and. tlien rush jto study,' or . busi
ness, .withdrawing the heryons
energy from the digestive' system
to the - brain and muscles, and
thu inducing dyspepsia; iri a
fewi years at , mpst to scourge;
and ha,untj and make you miser
able lor yeara, lor hie t 'fr--";Can
you afford to 'live on rich
and hiehly seasoned 1 food, eat
champagne suppers, because an
artificial appetite" is ' thus grati
fied, rendering , gout, dyspepsia,
or apoplexy. , in the middle, of
me, aimost a ceriamiy i , , , ..
Can you afford to commit sui
cide through' the indulgence of
appetite and !passionrr adopting
the; fool's motto,; "A short life
and, a mery one ?" ., ... .,
: .Can you afford to indulge in
fast living,'dressing beyond your
means', driving livery hqrsesj! or
keeping a !h6rse yourself, when
your income is not ; adequate : to
such expenses ? , ; ... ,-, .,.
, . Can you afford to smoke and
chew tobacco, thus spending
from five' to fifty dollars ' per
month, and injuring your ne
vous ' system,' and -'perverting
your whole constitution ? :
:: Can you afford to -burn out
your , nervous system, and demor
alize your . whole character by
me use oi aiconouc uquors i
Can' you afford to make money
at the expense of vour man
hood,1 your morals, your health,
your just respectability,, . and
your, integrity 7, r.. t
Can you . afford to gain , even
a whole world and thereby make
of yourself a moral wreck " 1
i-'fCan you'afforoV'i to rob your
mind' to . 'clothe yout; back with
silkand4.satins.And gratify
mere love for difmlnv?
' Can you afford1 to ' be ,tricky
ano. tnereDjy aerraua your em
ployer of the just services you
owe him, even though you get
your pay, thus 'making .yourself
a moral bankrupt? , ,. . , , !
Can you, afford to be otherwise
than upright, truthful, 'faithful,
temperate, courteous, and in all
respects,-correct i 'u 1 " l
: ,. v, , r
,. . , ,.
A seaman, James Dugan,
arrived at New York from Sydr
ney, Cape i Breton, tells a strange
story."' Sydney Cape Breton1,
lies r.southi of; the I Gulf - of : St.
Lawrence, ,.and. to the east of
LNova Scotia,-, Dugan asserts
I. a . i ' ,1 ' ..'t 1 A Ve ' s
that on the; lyth ,or September
the schooner Lancaster, in which
he was a 'passenger' found ' upon
an abandoned vessel five r skele
tons, part or perhapsthe whole
of a crew that had perished, ap
parentl, Tfrowlhuer. The
name on thisBsei Was Glenal
von. Paper'sOwere 'i found on
board, which were delivered to
the authorities at Sydney.:! 1 It is
very strange thatif f'the tale of.
jjugan snouia do true,' ic is so
meagre, y It is impossible "to be
lieve that, In' a case bo ' inyster
btis and ghastly, the papers, said
Uhave beeh 1 taken- to Sydney,
were riot ;: immediately1 ; opened
there if 'nbt before ithey reach
ed there for human curiosity is
strongjif The' whole story1 weaiis
an air of improbability, and it' is
very hard to giveit credence. -
It has been ascertained that a
working-horse 'requires a trifle
oyer thee pounds :of, h.y( or its
equivalent per day, td' each 100
pounds; of its;'; live weight; ! oxen,
2 1-2 pouhdsVfeows' fn milk, from
2 14 Ur 1 2-12:Op6unds '1 ..farrow
cows,! nearly 2 Jl-2 pounds; young
growing cattle, 3 pounds; sheep,
j pouncis. uucysix , ppunus, . oi
qorn meal areLequal; tq one huU-.
dred pounds of good hay. ''x'1 !
Vj ,(!.! i.i ii, i Ljlj ".; '.shunl)
,t To become the ,lion off, a party
if is not necessary to make ' a
beast i)f one's ielf'' '"'''!"
A great cbniposerrr-sleep.
f
.V.'.Yt
Wormwood coffins. l. :) .
Can You Afford It? Sagacity of a Mare--A Case
for Darwin.
From the Virginia City Mountainan, September
19th,]
A TftmaTlrftlilfi inefanra inf ta
sagacity (is it 'not reason? of a
horse has come to our notice.
Mr. John Fletcher of Norwegia,
owns an unbroken cayuse mare
whioh runsln apasture adjoining
his house. " The mare, which is
very wild, has a . young colt at
ner side. A lew nights since,
after r. .Fletcher had returned,
he was" aroused by the mare com
ing to the window of his house,
and by pawing, neighinsr. and in
every way possible trykurtocet
his attention. This continuing
for some time he got up and went
out and drove her away, and re
turned again to bed : but she im
mediately returned, and if possi
ble increased her demonstrations;
he again went out, when ; the
mare came ,. up to . him and rub
bed her nose against him, al
though always before she had
been very shy of allowing any
one to come within reach of her.
then ran on a few - yards before
him continuing her neighing;
then, as he did not follow her,
she returned to ? him rubbinc
- . o
against him in the most demon
strative manner, v He attemDted
.to drive her off, struck her with
a stick, and followed her a few
yards to frighten her awav. "As
soon however,' as he; turned to
ward the house she returned and
in every ;wayr tried . to prevent
him from doing so. ' H then re
marked that her colt was not
with her, a fact he had not no
ticed before: as it was quite dark,
It occurred to him then to follow
her, which he did. So soon as
she saw he was doing so she ran
off before him, stopping every
iew yaras, turning' arouna to see
that he was still following, then
againt running on keeping up her
taaaAuovti, uuiui u 11 vj ivinnjiiviu u u in--
tant part bf th field where she
stopped at an old "prospect hole."
On -- coming up , with her , she
again qommenced rubbing against
him,' and drew, his attention to
the hole, where he soon discov
ered the colt It appears that it
had slipped into it and was una
ble to get out, and the mare had
taken this method to obtain - as
sistance. ' Being unable to cet it
out alone, Mr.-Fletcher went for
some of his neighbors, and with
them returned. While they were
taking the little fellow out the
mare manifested the most intense
delight," and seemed ' almost bed
side herself with joy ; and after
wards, when the men had got
out of the hole, she came up to
Mr. F-' and placing her nose on
his should gave every sign, of i
gratitude that a human mother
might under similar circumstan
ces.' !.".; i ; ' ' ' i
' Who will say the horse does
not reason? ' "' 1 1 ; ,'
Unxike the Grantites. the Dem.
ocrats and Liberals have no rick
treasury; to draw, upon for. fund?,
no oihce-holders to assess, no
jobs to promise, no power to in
timidate, no military force to
strike terror through a common
wealth. While on the one side
thet government is arrayed
against the people, on the other
side the people are arrayed
against an incapable, corrupt and
dangerous government In a
Republic like ours such -a con
flict can have but one result, , i
.Vote for Greeley I
1 . i
' -Ben Butler, the spoon thief,
in his Cincinnati speech, deliv-
ered a few days ; ago, .defended
Grant's taking a million . dollars
from the Treasury, , without law
and applying it to ' his own use,
iipbn the ground that it would
only be two cents' and a half to
every man, woman and child in
the country. , This is the boldest
and, most , audacious argument
ior; stealing mat , we , have ever
seen, but it is worthy of .Butler,
and it is worthy the cause which
he supports i '":. - ; ' 1 i!-
A water pitcher a , fire en-
; ); Painful suspenseHanging.l
Importations of Grain Into
England.
The "London. Timn says : The
statistics of bur grain importa
tions for the twelve 'months end
ed the 31st ulL. (from harvest
to harvest,) show a : striking in-'
crease in the quantities of every
description of foreign corn taken
consumption,; as ..compared . with ,
the preceding year and also in
most instances as compared with
the twelve, months ended August
31, 1870." ;As compared with
last year the increaso in our im-
portatic ; f been wheat, 12
- . i nt i
oats, 15 per cent, pgas, 10 per
cent, beans, 51 per .' cent, and
Indian corn,' 3 9 'per cent In
flour, however, owing to.the extraordinary-diminution
in the
supply from' the-'.-United States,
there has been, a -'falling off of
25 per cent; ';!
It appears .A that I. during the
past month '-;the'Bhipments oi
S- 1. At- "I;'J:'' I''- -A
epecio w vim . uiisuiunu iieiua at
the Cape;exrnenced a ' consid
erable cheeky owing to the cred
ence' temporarily given to ' the
Californian " concoctions of dis
coveries in Arizona, the, amount
having -.i been only;; ,70,000
against 168,600 in the corres
ponding month of . last year.
Seasonable.
The following recipe is just in
season: A correspondent of the
Ohio Farmer -says : "Noticing
in your - paper; an article, "How
to make a barrel of apple but
ter," I will give my plan : As .
soon as the cider is brought from
the press, we proceed to boil it
down as quickly as tolavoid fer
mentation, but instead of begin
ning to fill in with apples when
half boiled, and stirring with a
paddle twelve hours, we continue
the boiling process till It, is all
boiled down to a good syrup, say
about five gallons into , one,
which can.be poured ..out into a
wood or stone vessel, and will
keep if not ready to make up
immediately. The evening' pre
vious to making up, with the
assistance of , our men folks, we
pare and core pur apples, which
we stew in a little' sweet, cider,
if we have it, otherwise, water
or some of the boiled " cider
weakened down. ; When the ap
ples are -cooked, soft, we com
mence stirring,, adding the boiled
cider, as fast as it will bear, four
bushels of apples being sufficient
for thirty-two gallons of cider.
Three hours brisk boiling with
constant stirring will make it
strong enough to keep a year, if x
desired."
A few- days 1 aeb. at Samuel
Thomas' farm; near . Carrolton.
0., an old well was dug deeper,
and in the dirt that was , thrown
out at the, depth of 86 feet were
a large number of periwinkle
shells. 1 But strangest of all is that
in this same clay was found 1 a
set of teeth,' one inch and a half
square and three , inches .long,
completely petrified, and set into
the clay as in the recrular aveo-
lar processess. ' The teeth are
stone, and the' clay on" analysis
proved to be bone. 1 1 ; , i ;
The Northern .Ohio Lunatifl
Asylum, a State Institution,, at
Cleveland, was totally destroyed
by fire, on Wednesday, Septem-
her loth. Loss r to the : State,
$450,000,, with no ; insurance,?
The 600 insane inmates wai-a nil
taken out in safety, but a num-
oer ot other persons lost their
A Vermonter, who sent ; for
one of the $2.50 " hand sewing
machines advertised ;ih the pa
pers, received a shoemaker's awl
worth about 10 Icenf a'. ' !
-Rawley rDent was married
last week and therell be . anoth
er batch of worthless relations to
appoint w office. :"r ! ; r:
! The' ilouMHoratio Seymour
and Hon,' .George .'IL, Pendleton
have taken the stump , for Gree
ley and . Brown. , , x
Why ought one not to ioke a
queeu? Because she ia no sub
ject:; ..;) ..(.. : . .,

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