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Democratic enquirer. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1867-1873, November 27, 1872, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86079037/1872-11-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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' :3 ' Awf 51'".:
'VOL. 6.
f J, W. BO WEN, l
I Publisher and Proietor. I
M'ARTHOR; ' VINTON COUNTY, OHIO: WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 18T2.
1-5AB't V NO. 46.
tie ''. . '1 ' .': '
i i i k. .. av . i . r,. a.
muh in- m m rn
Railway Time.
Marietta & Cincinnati Rail Road
TIME TABLE.
On and After Nov. 8. 1872, Trians Will
run as follows :
H
ta
t
H
o
o
CO
a
:fl . : :
:o : : ! ; !
:a : : : ;
- ig ; :.; ;
glass's
lO CO l id rf
3 :
l6
):;..:.: : J :::::::: :
ii :ii::!;:i:i!
: : i ' ' ' . : j :
X
3 a.
S. 0, J
: o :
: S e : ; i
I'd ! m ;
A3 :E2
S'ga Basils
8 HfrJ!
a
1 1
mien "Wfrig BfSsllgl'Q
H
o
B
o
o
w t
3 : : i". : :
,5j
S3 SI-
P4
il ! : : : :
:3j HUN-
Si
33
CINCINNATI KXPKESM will run dally
All other Truing lBlly, except Snnday.
HINCINNm EXPRESS EAST makes no
gtop hntwnon ttnimien biii iiim
Portsmouth Branch.
Hall, Accommodation.
4.00 p.m. - 6:15 A.M..
4.80 " - 7.SI "
7.00 11.10 "
8.45 A. H. 12-20 P.M.
ll'.OS " 4:00 "
11.45 P.M. 5.20 "
Dop. Hamden
Jackson
Ar'T. Portamonth
Dep. PortaiuoutU
Arv. Jackson
Hamden
Trains Connect at Loveland
For all polnta on the Little Miami Rullroad, and
at the Indiuniipolis A Ciuclnuati Railroad Juno
tiou for all points West.
W. W. PEABODY
W. W. PEABODY Master of Transportation.
BALTIMORE & OHIO RAILROAD.
Great National Short Line Route
Great National Short Line Route East and West.
Only Direct Route to the National
Only Direct Route to the National Capitol and Eastward.
On and after Monday, November IB, Trains
will run as follows : -
EASTWARD.
Oln'natl fat
Riprotu Lliyt.
655 Am 40Pm
t 86 Pm 1 8.') Am
6 0S " 6 61
830 " 8tf "
8 65 8 45 "
10 00 " 10 00 "
85 Am I 0 Pin
616 " 410"
U TO Pen 8 80 Am
1154 Am II 46 Pin
6 46 Pin 800 "
8 00 " 405 Am
8 20 ' 25 "
19 Oil Pin 6 59 "
6 00 Pin 10 82 "
8 25 "
Depart ......
Piirkorsburg
Cumberland
Harper's Ferry. ....
' WashingtonJuuo'n.
Arrive
Hiltlmoi-e
Washington
Pliilalolphla
New York
WESTWARD.
Depart.
New York
Philadelphia
Washington
Baltlinoru
Arrive
Washington Juno'n.
Harper's Ferry....
Cumberland
8 44 Am
1 12 Pin
4 45 "
6 05
8 25
12:24 Pm
9:!0Pm
4:00 A in
8:0Pin
8:60 A in
9:20 "
12:04 "
8:46 Am
11 00 "
p.trkrsi)iirg
Pullman Palace Drawing Room Sleeping Cars.
Which areaaeomfortable, elegantly furnlshpd,
and alintwteciuiil to a nro-sldo, areon nil Trains
from Olnolnnati to Baltimore and Washington
SuoSclieiluloof Marietta and Cincinnati Rail
way for time of arriving and departing from
MnArthur. ,, '
The advantages of this route over all othet
is, that II glvos all travelers holding through
tlckots the privilege of visiting Baltimore,
Philadelphia, and the National Oiipltol free.
Timequlckerand rates or fare lower than by
any other line. , . '
Ths scenery atongthls Railway is not equaled
for grisndour on tills Continent. .
Pullman Palace Drawing Room Sleeping Cars. TO SHIPPERS OF FREIGHT.
Tills line offers niiorior Indiii-iMiionW tne
rates being one-third lower tosnd from Boston.
New York, or any other Eastern point. In .or
dering goods of anydoscrlptlon from the Baal
give directions to ship la Baltimore 4 Ohio
ft. R.,nnd Inslilpplng East give same dirootlons.
VreighU shipped by this route will have dos
pstch, and be handled with osre anil save
J. L. WILSON.
Master Transportation, Baltimore,
G. R. BLANCHARD,
Gen. Freight
Gen. Freight Ag't, Baltimore. L. M. COLE.
S. B. JONES. Gen. Ticket Ag't, Baltimore.
Gen. Bass. Ag't., Cincinnati.
VA.iriDA.X,XA. f
ROUTE WEST.H
23 MILES THE SHOETEST.
3 EXPRESS TRAINS leave Indianapolis
dally, except Sunday, for ST. LOUIS and
THE WBST.
milB only Lino running TULLM AN'H osfn
Y Pittsburgh, Columbus, IiOiilsvllle. Cincinnati,
and rmllanapolls, to St. Louis without
change. '
Passengers should remember that this Is
Ureatwest uouna nuun ir
Leavenworth, Lawrence, Toneka, Junc
tion City, Fort Hoott and BU Joseph,
rHIPOAIilTC TO KAN8AW, for the pur
twllUrtAri I J posoofostiiblishlnR them
selves In now homes, will have liberal discrim
ination made In tlmlr favor by this Line. Hat.
1 i ' ... I.,Ia ah unnnluM Ml ttSl SVlll
itlvHn o OoIodIhU And UrK pHrtltM trvolln
Hinlttook wUlbeihlpiMMion tno rnont lavora-
COLONISTS AUD FAMILIES
' 8non comforts and accommodations as are pra.
sented oy mi uiu mhwv .
TICKELfl can hotohtalnml stall theprlnolpal
Tlokot Ofllces in the Eastern, Mlddlo
Southern States. aK
General Passenger AKnt. St. Louis.
ROBT. EMMKTT,
Esstsrn Paisenir Agent, Indllinapolls.
- JOIIS E. H1MPHON,
General upsrloUodsns, Iudlanapolll.
Gen. Bass. Ag't., Cincinnati. Railway Time.
"BEE LINE."
Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati and
Indianapolis Railway.
On and aiwr MOJS DAY. May IBth. 1871. Ex-
Sro8 Trnlna will IK VI COLUMBUS, and
It EST LINK and abkivi at points named bo-
Station).
No. 2.
No..
mn
4 :60 a in
7 :80 a m
2:00pm
4 :40 p ni
6 .-06 phi
Ooluuibu
Ciestllne..,..
Clveland ...
-IlilOam
. U :S0 u 1U
..8:46pm ,
.10:80pm '
...7HX)am
...1:80am
No. 4.
4:10 pm-
(:46pm,,
4:10pm '
6:46 am
7Ka m-
Huffalo. ....i
Niagara Falls
Hochestor
Boltoa ..i '.:,..B;20pm 'llSOnm 'if :00am
Neiv York City.. 880p m 8:80pm 6:40 a m
Allmny
,.9 :46 am
2:00 pm
1
iwanj.
Crestline
1245pm..
6 86pm. (85am
I'lltwlntrg
Harriaburg ....
Bditimoio...:...
Wasltlnxton ...
Philaclelphla...
. 96p m
. 7 15 m
10 40 a m '
1 10 p m
11 15a m
lxsam Bopni
1126am: 240am
9 15 pin -7 00 am
CreHtliuo . ..
Fort Wayno .
.1130 pm -.
680am
..1210 pm ,
745pm .8 55am
115a.m llSSam
TSOam 800 pra
Chicago
)JjNo. 4, leaving Columbus at 4:10 p. m
has a Thron eh Car via Delaware for SurlnRflold
reachlnaSpringfleld without change at 7:H0 nnt.
Train No. 9 ou the Columbus Hocking Val
ley Katiromt, connect will! no, Train-, 'i nrouxii
Tickets for 1p nt Athens. , .
PAStlENUKR TRAINS returning arrive at
Columbus at 1 2:30 a m. 11 :15 a. m. and 1 :60 a. m
Palace Day and Sleeping Cars
On All Trains.
HE"Ko6" leaving Columbus at 3:35 a A, on
Hunaay, runsitnrougn wituout detention, dj
both Erie and New York Central Railways,
arriving at Now York on Monday morning at
8:40 A.M.
For particular Information in regard to
through ticket, time, connections, etc., to all
points East, West, North and South, apply to
oi aiioiess it. rKD,uoiuraous,Lnio.
K. 8. FLINT, (ien. Superintendent.
. JAMES PATTKK80N,.
. God. Agent, Columbus, 0. .,
EUGENE FORI),
i ; . ..-.,,' Passe " nbus.Oi
'
OHIO & MISS. RAILWAY,
! Is , the Shortest, Quickest
and auly lloiul running its. en
tire trains through to
ST. LOUIS AND LOUISVILLE
WITHOUT CHANGE.
Our arrangements' and con
nections with all lines from St.
Louis and Louisville are per
fect, Reliable and complete foi
all points
This is the shortest and best
route to ivansas uity, Lieaven
worth,1 Atchison, ' St. Joseph
ind to all points in Missouri,
Kansas and .Nebraska.
Through Tickets and full
information as to time . and
are, can be obtained at any
It. It. Office or at our office in
Cincinnati.
GALLUP. Gen, East Pas. Agent.
CINCINNATI.
W. B. HALE, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt.,
ST. IvUUIS.
Indianapolis, Cincinnati & Lafayette
Rail Road.
GREAT THROUGH PASSENGER RAILWAY
To all Points West, Northwest
and Southwest.
THIS IS THE SHORT LINE VIA INDIANAPOLIS.
DIANA1-U1.1S.
The Great Through Mall and Express Pas.
JoHuuh. Denver. San Francisco, and all points
In BLlssoun, naiiBas aim uiurnuu.
Tim .imrtKHt and onl v direut route to Indian
i- . 1 . .. T..m U ..... larv.l.rliltM.
City. Sprlngllold, Peoria, Burlington, Chloag',
MIlwaiiKeo, ou ram, iuu an iuiiio iu iut
Northwest. .....
The liullannpous.uincinnaii anil ijniayeiie
nllrniul. with its counoctlons. now offers pas
sengers more facilities In Through Coach and
coping car nervioe man any uiuvr one irvui
ncinnatl. having the advantage of Through
saadltv.Ht. Joseoh. Peoria.Burllugton.Chlcsito,
m v Ours rrninuincinnatl to si. unuis. nan-
Omaha, and all intermediate pninw, presenting
tj n,.l.nlt mid Families such comforts and
ocommodatlons as are anoruea Dy no otner
fiute. - '
Th rough Tickets and Baggage Checks to all
unlnts,
Trains leave Cincinnati at r;30 A.M., 8;00 P,
Tl..lrata nun llH OlltalnAll St No. 1 Bumel
ni a m p. u.
House, comer Thlrrt and Vine Pnbllo Lsnrt-
ivirnor Plum and Pearl Streets, Cincinnati, O.
De sure to purchase tickets via inuianapous,
Cincinnati and kaiayeue.iiHiiroaa.
i; K. i.iI4I. u li.uAttKinuriE.,
?hlef Ticket Clerk, Master Transportation
Cincinnati. i;woinna
Columbus & Hocking Valley Railroad.
On iukI after Uooember 10th, 18U,Truius will
ill a u r.tllniVB
. , . . . Depart. Drpart
Athens..'..-... 6.80 a. m. - - r. m.
Airit. Arrive,
Columbus..; :60 A. U. , 0.40 r. M
" ' 7:80
PlttsburitU.. 6:H6 F. H. . l:0U. M
Closland... :55 .
Dayton ..... 1'05 :l ,
Xnla.( ... 1:10 1.0O
Hicnmonn... i:xo - u:k
IndlananollB 6:10 : 1:20 A. M.
Chioago 12:10 A. u. 8:80
Clnse'ennnectlon made at Lancaster for Clr
elovlllo, Zannsville, and all points on tne un
ninnuitsiul Musklflmim Vallov Railroad.
Dayton, Sprlngnelil. Indianapolis, cnicago,
and all points West. Also, for Cleveland,
Direct connootions tnaue siuiiumiroi ior
HiiITh n. Plttstmrirh. and all Doints nasi.
Tul (he Hnnkina Vallev and Pan Handle
rnuto to Chicago and the Northwest, It Is the
ahortostbv alxtv-slx miles, alvlng passengers
the bouuOtof quicker tlmo and lower rates
J. W. DOHERTY.
Superintendent.
E. A. BUELL Gen'l. Ticket Ag't.
NOTICE
To The Stockholders of the G., McA,
& C. R. R. Co.
s4
'
V tal Stock of the Ualllpolls, MoArtlinr ft
Colniiilins Railroad C.. are nvrehy reatiired ktt
A LL nnrsons harlni subscribed to the Oani
make payment to the Henretary of the Oompa-
nv, at niNomce in uhiwmmis,viii, ann panics
living la Vinton county, unio, may mate Py
ment. If more onnvenlent, to Utmiii VV III.
President of the Vinton County Hank, tnstal'
mnnlsnri thnlrtUlltcrintlonS SSfblloWS!
A 4th inatalmvDt of iu per cent., on or before
JlllV 9, 1872. .- - .
A' 6th Instalment of 10 per cent,, on or before
August 28. )H72. . ' ' '
A nth instnlnientnf 10 per oont,, oq or bofore
September 28, 1872. . ...
A 7th limtulmntOflOpercoit.,on or bofore
OotolierSS. 1H72. , '. I ()'.
An 8t li instalment of 10 per oont., on or before
November 28,1872..
A till instalment of 10 per eent.,oa or before
Decnmbnr23, 1H72,
By order of Board of Dlreeterst , ..
, ......... . W. SUOBXR,
- lec'y 0. MsA. 0. . t. Co.
JnT.t,m, .
Business (Earirse
ATTORNEYS.
D. B SHIVEL, .
ATTORNEY J' Ij-A.'W,
McARTII UH. OHIO.
Will attend tromptiy o a. .eual business
entrusted to niacare m vintou and axuoinmg
tounties. urrici-in tne liecoriter'sumce.
J. M. MoQI LLIVRAY.
MoAKltlUK, UltiO.
tXTltlj attend promptly to any buslnea
WW tnhls ansa H1.H IYlOIOMma.nt l
inyCourU of Vinton ano adjoin Inn counties.
T.-QUNNINQ,
LAWYB S ,
McARTHUR, OHIO,
OFFICE AT DRUG 8TORE, MAIN STRF.ET.
" U. S. CLAY POOLE,
(Proseotttlag Attorney of Vinton County,)
VTTILL practice In Ross, Vinton and adjoining
nis care promptly attendca 10.
ww ivkiinrii. aii ip it ni iiiiHiuriiw nuirustcu w
HOMER C. JONES,
A.TTOBITET A.T ZG-A-W,
M'AETHTJR, OHIO.
OFFICE 1st dooh West of Dan. Will ABroa.
Especial atteptlon given to the eol lection
ofolalrna. 18-lv
CHARLES W. GIST,
Attorney at Law ami Notary Mlic,
ZALESKI, OHIO.
.i - '
WILL attend all legal business entrusted to
his care. Bnpply of Blank Deeds and
Mortgages always on hand. Omcis-No.12
West Wing Bainbriuge hiock. ii
HOTELS.
MERCHANT'S HOTEL,
' PORTSMOUTH, OHIO.
J.WiVARNEB -
Propreter
THIS Hotel It In the most convenient par
of the city on FrqitStreet.belween Mar
get ana j enerson .
AM ERICAN HOTEL
.! lllsrH And rilnte Streets.
' COIiTTMBtTS
(nearly upyuniiQ otnio xiuutio
OHIO
E. J. BL0TJKT.
Propriet'r,
THIS HOTEL is furnished throughout with
all the modern improvements. Guests can
re t nn th hat treatinciil anil verv ill inns.
Kaiiroad Depots.
Streetcars pasa mis noiei to mm irvw mi
DEPOT HOTEL,
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO,
M.MERltLE,
Proprietor
TniS Hotel, a few feet from the Railroad
Tuti .nA whnra all travelers UDon all
tralnscan take meals. has Just been greatly
enlarged and thoronghly repaired, painted,
option ofguests. aws-Tralns stop ten mln
c. and isnow in comnipi ururr iu. ui.
n tea for meals, swtbrms soiiirati.
ISHAM HOUSE.
JACKSON, OHIO
Dr. I.T.MONAHAN. - Proprietor
I.IIITO TT .... I'.BmB.l .Hi. TulmtM . M Il .
X been thoroughly renovated and beautl
everything will oeaone tomaaegoesiscom-
tuny rurniBiieu. nmiins u iur .Miuiun,
rortRDie. t aoie always sunpuvii nu ioti
mn.ir.1 oiTinU NIcbW fumlsliad Rooms and
cleanest Heds Good Stables. Every effort
made for the oomrort oi patrons. Aiicnarges
monerate.
DRY GOODS. &c.
gSTABLISHED 18 YEAES
0". IF. TOW E"nii
WBOLK8AI.I DB1I.XH IN
DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS,
Front Street. . ..Portsmouth, O.
J. F. TOW ELL is agent for several If Ills, snd
tils house is headquarters for many desirable
makes of Eastern Goods. All goods will be
sold at the lowest possible price.
Close Cash Buvers, First Class Tlmo, Trade,
WJinlsala PmIiHrii and Furnscemen are liar-
tlcnlarly Invited to an examination of his stock
MARBLE WORKS.
B.
R. - HIQGIXS St BE0.,
Haanfstetnrara of
MARBLE MONUMENTS,
TOMB STOKES.
MANTLES, FURNITURE, &c, 4c,
TjOG-JlIP, OHIO
GOOD assortment of Marble constantly oa
band. All kinds of
Cemetery Work
Done to order In the finest stile. 14
AMERICAN SUBMERGED PUMP,
The Best Pomp in the World-' '
OUB Agents report over 1800,000 worth of
proprtyavel from Fire this ? ear by these
pumps, being the most powerful foroe-pum ps
In the world, as well as Bon.freeslng.
Bee October number, page 8V6, also the Free
mlum List, page HH8 of the Am, Agriculturist.
This paper never deoclves the farmers. He
notice In February number, page 46. Try one.
If It don't do the werk claimed, send It bank and
Eet your money, as we warrant our pumps to
do all we claim forthem on our circulars.
Send foroirculars or order, lo the Bridgeport
M'Pg Co., Mo BS Chambers St , Mew York.
As order fornlne Mo. 1 Puurps aeeores aa ex
clusive town atrenor. . Bo H-tf.
ON MARRIAGE.-Happv Relief for Toxng
Men from UinelTeots of Errors and Abuses
In early life. Manhood restored. Nervous
debility eared. Impediments to Marriage re
moved, New method of treatment. New and
remarkable remedies. Book and Circulars
tent free. In sealed envslopesj.
Address HOWARD A GrtoOIATIOUT, No.
t SwUt Mtatti St., lilladelnb.lf.Pa. 1-tf
WINTER IS COMING.
BY ALEXANDER JOHNSON.
The yellow loaves are thickly strewn, ,
O'or forest. Held and fallow, ' '
The tall dead rushes stand aloes,
In every marshy hallow.
The trees are yellow, browu or bare, .
And drop -with every motion
Their leafy vestures, sear and fuir, '
j Into the leafy ocean. , j
There's not a bird In all the land, .'
Whose voice is tuned for sluclni; .
But soutlfward, fast on every und, -
Their rapid flight they're wiuxlng.
The wild geese angles far above,
From north-lands are retreniiiig,' v ;
And gabbling out their word: ot
encouragement or greeting.
The squirrel, deep In leafy mound,
His nuttv hnHrd Is storinr: i
. The woodchnck further in tlie gtouud,
His sunless cave ii boring. i
The day is balmy, dear and full,
The wild bees still are hmnimjiK. '.
Tet everything in enrth and air
Knows well that Winter's f udng. . '
The stubble fields are ruaMt brown,'
X he corn Holds still are yellow i
The ripened fiuits are dropping do
All Juicy, rich and mellow.
The earth puts on a withered look,
Like slowly dying ember,
And nature says in every nook,
, 'Twill soon be bleak November.
Koarse Shots.
It iz a grate deal eazier tew
be a philosopher after a man haz
had a warm meal, than it iz
when he don't kno where he iz
going to git one.
Most men lament their con:
dishun in life, but thare r phew,
after all, who r superior to it.
Trie in a tew define love iz
like trieing. tew tell how yu
kum tew brake thru the ice t all
yu kno about it iz yu fell in and
got ducked.
A week man wants as much
watching as a bad one. . ,
A wize man never enjoys him'
sell so much, nor a phool so
little, az when alone. . (
There iz a grate deal of vir
tew in this world that iz like
jewelry, more for ornament than
use.
: There are" menny people who
not only b'eleave that this world
revolves on its axis, but they
beleave they are the axis.
Self-made men are most al
wus apt to be a leetle too proud
of the job. i -
I think there iz az menny old
phools in this wond az . there iz
young ones, and there is this
difference between them: the
young ones may outgrow their
phally, but the old ones never do
Marrying for beauty iz a poor
speculashun, for enny man who
sees yure wife haz got just about
az much stock in her az you
Josh Billings.
Overgrown Hogs.
There is not one single ad'
vantage to be claimed in favor
of big hogs. There never was a
monster hog which did not make
the man who raised him pay for
every pound he weighed. They
do not furnish an ounce of mea
gratis, but charge full price for
every atom of their carcass.
When slaughtered,-' it takes
long time to get one cool to the
marrow in the bone; and then
when the hams are put in salt it
is troublesome to finish them to
the centre. Four hundred' live
weight is as large as hogs should
be, in order to make good bacon
Beyond this size there is a loss
somewhere. Either the feeder,
butcher or consumer . is 'cheated.
and as a general thing every one
who has anything to do with the
big hog will find, if he observes
closely, - that they . are' not so
profitable as the smooth, nice
hog of 350 pounds weight. 1
small head, with little, ' uprigh
ears, and legal and ears delicate
to Derfection, are marks which
indicate the greatest amount o
food consumed ; and it will 1
ways draw more readily the at
tention of every butcher. 7ar-
ford Times,
There exists in New York
a company for the manufacture
of pies, with a capital of . $200,
000. Some idea of the extent
of the business maybe conceived
from the following summary of
articles used per week; pugar,
40,000 pounds; ; butter, 8,000
pounds ; cocoanut, 1,500 pounds
squashes and pumpkins, 60,000
pounds; milk, 12,000 ; quarts;
eggs, 60,000; flour, 150 barrels;
beef, for mince pies, 800 pounds;
apples, 500 barrels; berries, 100
boxes; pie-plant, 100,000 -
T-rNew York city covers an
area of 22 square miles, has 350
miles of Croton water pipes and
277 miloB of sewers. I Vi
The Horse Malady—How it
Affects a Man—What the
Commissioner of Agriculture
Says About It.
;
In the annual report of the
Uommissioner ol. Agriculture,
there is an interesting and valu
able article on ;'the epizootic
apthse which broke out in this
country in 1870. It says that
though no broken chain of evi
dence concerning the source of
hat outbreak is forthcoming, nq
one acquainted with the nature
of the disease' pan for a moment
doubt that r it was imported from
Europe. ; 1 ThoughctTtamly 'pre
vailing in Central Europe for
nearly two centuries, it reached
Great Britain only in 1839, Den-
i 1 i - 1 OH 1 1 5
mars in ioij.,- ana America in
1870. No atmospheric or cli
matic changes would account for
such results.: ; Diseases like in
fluenza, which appear to be due
ty such vicissitudes, sweep over
simultaneously; or nearly so our
continents and island's' and even
ships in mid ocean ; whereas this
is circumscribed for centuries by
a narrow sea or a well guarded
neck of land," and crosses only
when the. victims are' allowed to
pass. , Moreover in each of these
cases a definite importation can
be traced. Cattle shipped from
an English port in August showed
signs of the disease when two
days at sea, passed through it
on the ocean and landed appar
ently well, but conveyed it to the
stock among which they were
placed on their arrival, in Can
ada. Whether it spread from
this point, or whether there was
another importation, there is no
evidence to show. Its existence
was reported at Oriskany, One
ida county, in September, about
the time of the State agricultural
show at Utica, supposed to have
been brought by Canadian 'cattle,
but subsequent inquiry has failed
to afford anything more than re
port for this alleged origin. At
different times, from the 15th of
November to the 7th v of Decem
ber, it was brought into Duchess
county by five separate droves
from Albany, which had been
carried East on the New York
Central railroad. It prevailed
extensively, and caused great
losses at Amenia, Pawling; South
Dover, . Dover Plains and La
Grange. From Duchess county
it was conveyed into Connecticut,
and spread widely in New Mil
ford, Kent and Sherman. It was
also conveyed to the valley of
the Connecticut river, and spread
in the towns of Hadley, Hatfield,
Northampton and East Hamp
ton. The disease Was also con
veyed to Brighton,' Mass., and
spread extensively around Bos
ton, at Concord, Ipswich, New
buryport, Acton, etc., reaching
some points in New Hampshire.
' The only cause of itself capa
ble of inducing the disease is
contagion or contact of a sound
animal with the virus discharged
from the sores of an aphthous
patient Many accessory causes
may be named, such as wet,
muddy season, which insures the
contact of the virus deposited on
the soil with the skin about the
tops of the hoofs ; the accumula
tion of cattle in large fairs or
markets; travel of stock by rail
or road, and the like. Yet these
are but means of the diffusion of
the poison, while no one of them",
nor taken . together,' can call the
disease into existence where the
poison is not already present.
Though prevalent in Europe du
ring, or after almost every great
war since 1695, it did not reach
Great Britain until 1839, when
it was brought by Dutch cattle
imported into London.
In 1841 it is first reported in
Denmark. The list
of real causes is narrowed down
to the simple contract of the
virus with a healthy animal. It
is often carried on the clothes,
boots and hands of men, on the
fibres . of bay and ; straw; pre
served on the walls, floors man
gers and other fittings of build
ings ; on stable utensils, in yards,
parks, roads , and railroad cars ;
on drinking troughs or it may
carried on the legs or. bodies of
dogs, chickens, rats- arid other
animals which themselves1 escape
the infliction. In short any solid
body may retain and be a. bearer
of this contagion. "
Its transmission to man has
been noticed during almost every
great outbreak since that of 1C95.
It has been reported, among oth
ers, by Valentine, Nadberny,
Xeirtsky, Kold, Hesturg, -Bayer,
Bosquet,- Loude, Sevigny, Dun-
dressy, Hubher, Holmes Balfour,
Karkeek and Watson. Cases of
thejsjeinjnan jwere. geen in
Albany and at Soutn Dover,
Duchess county, N. Y., during
the outbreak of 1870. It shows
itself in man by slight feverish-
ness ana tne lormation on tne
tongue and inside the lips and
cheeks, and sometimes on the
head, of small blisters, rarely
amounting to the bulk of a lentil.
In children and young animals
feeding exclusively on milk, di
arrhoea and fatal inflammation
of the stomach and bowels occa
sionally supervene. On chick-
ens it has been lrequently no
ticed among others by Ilenicke,
Lager, Lamberlecchi,j Dickens
and Youatt. . Chickens were atr
tacked in December, 1870, on
the farm of Mo. Elgnme, La
Grange, Duchess county. Drink
ing the castaway milk is prob
ably the common cause. Dogs
and cats have been noticed hy
Lagar, Younghusband and . oth
ers, to suffer from drinking , the
milk.
Words in the English Language.
guage, j.
Words derive their power, not
from their number, but from the
directness and intensity with
which they are delivered. Max
Muller says : "A well educated
person in England, who has
been at the public scjioola and at
the University who reads his
bible, Shakspeare, he London
Times, and all of Muddie's li
brary (i. e.. nine twentieths of al
the books published in England,)
seldom uses more than three, or
four thousand words in actual
conversation. , Accurate think
ers and elose reasoners, who
avoid vague and general expres
sions, and wait till they find the
word that exactly fitd their mean
ing, employ a larger stock ; and
eloquent speakers may rise to a
command of the thousand. Mil
ton's works are built up with
eight thousand, and the Old Tes
tament says all it has to say with
five thousand six hundred and
forty-two. .
, What a mistake it is for
any poor man to deprive him
self and family of a good live
newspaper. Some men say they
cannot afford to take a newspa
per this , is a sad mistake, and
one we know too many make.
If you are a poor man, you need
a newspaper to cheer you in
your lonely nours' and to take
the place of books, which cost
much more. If you have no
children your wife wants the pa
per to interest her in her home
when you are compelled to be
absent. If rich tr poor, you
need a live and interesting pa
per, and no family - should be
without one, or as many as they
can find time to read, and there
is no better season of the year
than winter to have a good news
Exchange.
' The Union Pacific Railroad
is having constructed at its
shops in Omaha, a monster
snow plough, which when com
pleted will be the (largest in the
world. The trucks were made
especially for it, and are very
strong. Tho platform' on the
trucks are twenty)
two feet long
and ten feet six
inches wide.
composed of solid oak timbers
eight by sixteen inches, held to
gether by large iron bolts run
ning crosswise. Tiis solid bed is
fastened to' the tjransora beams
by forty bolts, twenty over each
truck. Tho monfeter will weigh
fifty tons, and w 11 v be operated
by three of tho hpaviest engines
on tho road. The cost will bo
over $5,000
j p winner II, 2
fteod'i MiUi V. O.
Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin.
.'I,, , i. cousin. , .
[From the Cincinnati Volksfreund.]
The regular Republican Grant '
party of Illinois' has to eat its ;
own poison of which it . will
probably die too. ,The abomina
ble temperance law, foisted upon
that State a year ago, has come
home to it.'- At' Chicago, where
the influence of the Eastern mo- ;
nopolists whose money is used ,
to reconstruct ' the city, is now
stronger than ever before,' it was
hitherto supposed that, the Grant :
l-'J '-.'1.1 ' t ' .: '' 1
majority (i coum uo maiiiiaiueu
unimpaired,xand TJriols", thus
cured for Grant, ;This'; expecta
tion of, the Grantites' has receiv
ed a terrible . and wholly unex-'
pected shock. The enforcement
of the temperance and' Sunday j
law has created a general change '
of sentiment among the"Chicago
n i .j i : i .1, . ,
uermans . wno were niiuerco ,
greatly attached fo the ', Grant
party, and produced an uncom
mon excitement i wmcn ail re
dounds to the benefit of th$ Lib
eral party. ThG'.Chicago papers
write in a tone, ot junnustakable
despair. The . Republican party
passed its tyrannical temperance
law in the Legislature, as a par
tisan measure i By, "means of .a
strict party , vote (seven , German
representatiyes excepted) It de
serves the punishment now me
ted out to it,, .. : .
U ' ''I-
[From the Same.]
i ." Indiana is ours, in Hlinois it
is dawning, l and in Wisconsin
the' Liberals are .about to fight'
the party of arrogance and cor
ruption . a battle such , as was
fought here in. Hamilton county.
The Germans of Wisconsin have
the Grant clique by the throat.
and are about to strangle it We
need but.twa.,lof -the States
named to be victorious, and are,
therefore, entitled to .the. best
hopes. ., Therefore, 'to, work here ,
in Ohio ! One more strenous ef-.
fort and our State is wrenched
from the: rule of the most infa-
mous clique that ever ruled
America.
m
About Alaska.
' The waters of northern Alaska
abound in the largest and ' finest
salmon. , - ' , '. y - '.
Iron has ; been found, in vast
quantities in the Tchilchet coun
ty, Alaska. ; ,'; ; , , ;
Alaska has unlimited resources
in fish," forests and great regards
coal and minerals.
The skin of seals used in com
merce is. taken only ; from the
male of from 4 to 6 years of age.
In Alaska the severest cold ;
in winter . is seldom lower than
23 above Zero, and to procures
ice for summer use is difficult
The Alaska Indians are'treach-
erous, selfish, ; filthy, and the
greatest beggars in existence.
: The Aleuts in Alaska, of Mon-
golian descent, are 'good schol-.
ars, accountants, honest, gener-
ous, skillful chess" ; players, and.
most expert boatmen.;. , ' '
Alaska As; hfgreat- need of
skillful surgeons and physicians,
who can (instruct and improve -
the people as , well, rather than
missionaries. ' '. ;i
; The Cincinnati Qazctte does
not consider the re-election of
Grant an '.endorsement by the
people of all the acts of the ad
ministration. ; It says: . .,,
No one who- has -.been a close
observer of tho current of. public
sentiment during the campaign
will claim that the people meant, ;
in voting for and electing Grant
and Wilson, and; in continuing
the Republican party in power,
to be understood as . endorsing.
without qualifications, tho course
of that party during the last
four years. The : statesman or '
the leader who puts such a con
struction upon the decision of
the people , will commit a grave
mistake. If tho successful party
shall so construe it, it will com
mit a grave error. j :
A quart ot4, Colorado potato
bugs ' boiled in a pint of water
for an hour, will prove an ' in
stantaneous remedy for removing,
the bark of a dog.
SOLD lf ALL DttUdQISTS EvTCRYmiJERJl

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