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The morning star and Catholic messenger. (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, February 26, 1871, Morning, Image 2

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Moruing Star and Catholic Messenger.
»mW ORL.,A8. BUmNDAY, ]RBBBUARY I 1670.
WiUianm Pitt Foiled sa Robert Eametrt assated.
Tho Act of Union did not receive the
Royal assent till the month of June, 1800,
and it was to- come into operation on
the Bret day of the ensuing year. It
provided that four spiritual and twenty
eighbttemporal lords, with 100 commoners,
should represent Ireland in the Imperial
Parliament that the Churches of England
and Ireland should be united, and that all
subjects of Great Britain and Ireland should
be placed on the same footing in naviga
tion and trade. Many friends of the Irish
people were sanguine in their hope of the
Union being a harbinger of prosperity and
peace. But those who had listened to the
promises of the Castle soon found that they
had been betrayed; and it soon became
evident also that Ireland was still to be co
erced. The seat of coercion only was
transferred from College Green to St. Ste
phen's. The talents of the country, like its
property, were dragged from Dublin to be
sold in Westminster. The 100 gentlemen
who twere deputed to represent Ireland
were adventurers of tip most expensive
jort-adventurers, as Gfhttan said, with
nrensions-the images of degradation
nde representatives of nothing-dressed
d exposed for sale in the grave-clothes of
the Irish Parliament, and playing their
tricks upon its tomb for hire. Onehundred
and ifty thousand armed men were still
required for Ireland in a state of "peace;"
and for several years after the Umon the
average expense of the standing army to
the Government was £3,500,000 sterling.
By theInsurrection Act, which was in force
for two years after the same measure, per
sons found out of their houses between
sunset and sunrise were liable to transpor
tation; the Habeas Corpus Act continued t
to be suspended, and the whole land was
under martial law till the year 1805. t
From the moment when the Act of Union t
passed into law, the Prime Minister, Wil
lam Pltt, turned his thoughts to the fulfil- c
ment of those expectations which he had, c
through his political agents, held out to the o
bishops, clergy and laity of the Catholic a
population of Ireland." He had been too G
cautious to bigrj himself by any definite r,
and solemn promise, but he made no con- hi
cealment of his opinion that the Irish Ca- A
tholics had a moral claim on the Govern- m
ment in England. iHe determined to lay p,
their case before the Cabinet iwhen it le
should reassemble, after the summer re- m
cess, and he summoned Lord Castle- fe
reagh from Dublin to be present on the oc- hi
casion, as he had been when the subject at
was brought before the. Minister in the pre- ui
vious year. Lord Castlereagh, be it ob- cc
served, was then, and continued to be till pt
the day of his ghastly suicide in 18'2, the th
unwavering advocate of Catholic emanci- d&
pation. But a secret influence was at work. si,
The same Wedderburn, who had insulted ta
Dr. Franklin, the American Envoy, before br
the Privy Council, and who had been the th
friend of Pitt's illustrious father, still de
lived nay, held, under the title of Lord I
Loughborough, the Great Seal of England. he
He was yet to be advanced to a higher rank sh
as Earl of Rosslyn, and he seems to have ha
htd a secret design of displacing Pitt, and wi
of grasping the honors of a Prime Minister, mi
when be worked upon the unsound and wi
sensitive mind of George III. at Weymouth, mi
alarmed him abjut the concessions which its
were to be made to Catholics, and inflamed in
.his prejudices to such a degree as to bring mi
back distressing symptoms of madness. ai
Lord Auckland and his brother-in-law, the wi
Archbishop of Canterbury, added to the lat
unhealthy excitement of the King's mind, ju
and they were aided in this perverse at- dc
tempt by the Primate of Ireland, a younger K
son of the former favorite, Lord Bute. II
While Pitt was communicating with his «
colleagues, on the subject of providing for a
the Catholic clergy, contriving emanc:pa- al
tion and amueuding the system of tithes, w
some papers which lie forwarded to Lord tit
Loughborough, previously to laying the un
entire matter before the King, were made lit
by that nobleman thl. mecans of irritating w
and alarming still further the Royal breas .
In a Cabinet Council, held in Septembd , i
1800, thet lRoyal Chancellor strongly op- aI
posed the project of a:ipitting Catholics r
into PIarliamelt, and Pitt was compelled to at
instruct Lord Castlereagh to return to Dub- tl
lin, and to apprise the Lord Lieutenant of le
the difficulties which had arisen. lie did mr
not at that time suspect the perfidy of ti
Loughborough, and it is probable that if he ti
had done so, he would have sought an in- i,
terview with his Majesty, and have en- sl
deavored to convince him that no violation ]i
of his coronati-m, oath was involved in the a
renr6ia' of political restrictions pressing h
hard upon Catholics. In January, 101, -
Lord Cornwallis wrote, '"If Mr. Pitt is o
firm, he will meet with no difficulty." But ii
he little knew the strength of the anti- d
Catholic interest at that period, which c
would in all probability have been too t,
mighty for Pitt, eves if Pitt had been sup- a
ported by all his colleagues, and the Royal ,
prejudices had been made to give way. Iv- a
stead of this being the case, other mem- I
bers of the Cabinet arranged themselves on
the Chancellors side, and Pitt now found i
himself opposed by the Duke of Portland, d
and the Lords Vestmoreilnd, Liverpool c
and Clhatham. Every prospelct of agree
ment was already at an end, when thle King s
brought tihe matter to an issue ait a lhvwe
by walking up to Mr. l)unldas, and asking r
himi engerly, in reference to I,ord Castle- d
reaghl, " \VWhat is it tha:t this young lord 1.
has brought over, which tlhey are to throiiw
at ny hiad f Th'e milbo t Jacolhiiicai thingi I
1 evi-r heard of! I shall rtckon ary aIlII 11
;::," ;prls"'na'l e mllenl)" whlo proposes any. suIcth II
iit;p.li-asu." 'l'These lbst words ele Ixhnctly 1
it(h silll- as his Majesty had is-ied ini si'eak- ,
inl:!- at lIrd Telmple ion thl subject oif Fox' i
;'A, iII. l, y tlhese w llds hle lhad ovn r- ,
:t-,.u n the coalition .Miinistry of Fox andii
,ti; and biy these wIus, doubtless, lie I
*.t iltl i -ither to break up tli, Pitit Cali- I
S i:' i. , to itlter its cllief firo l vn turini g to ,
proP! 1- - iti -eas in lre in lflv-r itf Caitoi ho st II
Nvw 0 - ith King wrtrte to Adihiigitonite 1 li
.< 1', Ix ol t" I h.e llousle of ('CoIlloui,1i I dh.Siring
hun ti I p, ni .1". Iitt'S e s tIn the dlilgt
,, " l n g,, ~u l iu ' itsite t. ]ut Pist'i
,ii ; :  ,, I~ti, ulir l ii t tuli~ UL ti t rtl.u -h i
-or ward a Catholio relief bill, backed by the
weight of the entiye Government. The
. King asked notidng ml that he would be
silent on the suet; but Pitt believed
and belleved rljhtiy-tbat his honor was
at stake, and-'he persisted in resigning.
he His renowned administration of seventeen
00, years' standing was at an end, and the reins
on of Government were assumed by the in
It competent and feeble Addington. Deeply
t- as we regret the untoward circumstandes in
rs, which Mr. Pitt was placed, we do not con
al cur with those who censure hirm severely
nd for not having insisted on having his own
w1 way. He would have driven the King
ild again into a state o.f insanity; his col
a- leagues would not have supported him, and
Sb the country was not yet ripe for the equit
he able measure which he had tor propose.
ud We will not attempt to justify the promise
he which he subsequently made to the King,
ey that lie would never again, during his Ma
oe jesty's lifetime, moot the Catholic question,
o- but we are sure that no one can examine
ras carefully the circumstances under which
te- that promise was made, and yet feel sur
its prised at Pitt's having made it. The sin
be cority of his desire to ameliorate the con
en dition of Catholics is proved by the fact of
hd his resigning office rather than fail in carry
VO iug out, so far as in him lay, measures
ith which which were intended to accompany
on the Act of Union.
ed The view here taken of Mr. Pitt's con
of duct is believed by the writer to be that
eir which was entertained at the time bya
ed large proportion of the leading Catholics in
il Ireland. They accepted in sadness Pitt's
li" efforts when out of office to allay the bit
e terness of their disappointment. They
heard of th6 seitiments which he expressed
*g towards them in communications made to
cc Lords Castlereagh and Cornwallis. They
r- forbore in general from violent proceed
en ings, nor did they indulge in resentful lan
r- guage. They were disposed, on the whole,
ad to wait for brighter days, and to rely (too
as fondly, as it proved,) on the fidelity of
those friends who had for their sakes quit
)I ted office with Pitt.
il- But there were in Ireland, both among
.1- Catholics and Protestants, spirits which
d, could not be so easily pacified. Long years
le of oppression, violence and injustice had
co alienated them altogether from the English
10 Government, and caused them to look for
e redress to another people who were the
- hereditary enemies of the British name.
I- Among these was Robert Emmett, a young
man of pure and patriotic motives, but im
pY elled by a enthusiasm which far over
leaped the bounds of discretion. The
military despotism exercised in Ireland I
fevered his heart and brain, and prompted
him, while in Paris, to contrive another in
it surrection, notwithstanding the recent fail
ure of that of 1798. His family portion,
consisting of £2500, was devoted to the
.1 purchase of ammunition and arms; and t
e these were laid up ready for use in several
depots in Dublin. Many promises of as
sistance had been made to him, but they t
f tailed him in the hour of need. The out- I
break which he meditated was hastened by f
o the accidental explosion of some gunpow- I
I der in one of his stores in Patrick-street. I
I With a fewtJiundred desperate ressociates, (
he issued from his head-quarters in Mar- |
shal-lane on the 23d of July, 1803. Pikes t
had been distributed among a large crowd
waiting in Thomas-street; but when the t
main body proceeded to the Corn Market, t
i with a view of seizing the arsenals and i
military depots, and of storming the Castle c
itself, the number of insurgents, far from l
1 increasing as Emmett had expected, di- 1
minished miserably. The appearance Ii
among them of the carriage of Lord Kil- C
warden, the Chief Justice of Ireland, caused
a cry for vengeance to be raised; and the "
judge, having thrust his head from the win- n
dow of his coach, qund exclaimed: " It is I, O
r Kilwarden, Chief Justice of the King's Y
benchl!" one of the insurgents replied,
s "Then you are the man we want," plunged '
r a pike into his body, and killed him on the t
spot. His body was covered with thirty I
I, wounds, and his nephew, who had been sit
d ting at hais side, was slain likewise. A more
Sunutortunate commencement of the rebel- s
c lion could not be conceived, for many who
g would have encouraged open fight, de
`` nounced with horror the crime of assassi
nation. The military were soon in sight. I
and they lost no time in firing on thearried 3
s multitude. About eighty lives were lost ;
0 and many, taking to flight, concealed t
I- themselves and their wounds. Their young
f leader, Emmett, escaped to the \Vicklow
d mountains, and dissuaded the peasantry
)f there from attempting another insurrec- E
e tion. His friends urged him to quit the s
a- island, and to seek for safety on a foreign c
c- shore. But he had left behind him in Dub- I
n lin one who was dearer to him than life, c
e and whom he loved above all things except t
1g his country. His passion for Miss Curran I
1, -the daughter of the celebrated wit and t
cs orator-induced him to venture once more
It i into the place which to him was the most I
i- dangerous on earth. But in Dublin only
:h could he obtain one last heart-rending in
)o terview with a lady worthy of his devoted
P- attachment. To Dublin he repaired, and
al while waiting in his lodgings the receipt of
a letter, he was suddenly surrounded, as
- )r. Smiles relates, by armed men( , under
the er-rs of Major Sirr. Rushinging into his
adp:rtment, they seized their prisoner acd
I, dragged him off without delay to his lonely
oh cell. From that dungeon lie passed, with
- seventteen ofhis fellow conspirators, to the
g scatfoldc. lint why should we dilate oi a
e story which is kcowc in all its pathos acid
g romcance to every render of Mlooro's Melo
- dies, and \Washington Irving's Slketclh
d Book ? \VWhile we deplore Robert Eimmett's
v want of jpclgment, andc condelcn hils revolt,
g we canndt but symnlathiize with his inclg
i na:tion ini contemlllating the wrrogs ic
h hllictl on his coulntry, tnor with!oitl tlhe
V tribute oh o"cy achcmiirati'oc br his lioble
sc-i llilcentsa and enthIusiasmu fisr Irish lacre
domci. Sonie words there are which lIhe uit
I- Ite cld in hius speech on the trial that de
cc serve to be recalled, and soule couIIencIctsI
e on his clia;lactcer written Icy tile sweetest of'
I- hehacud's iccsatrels which bear distinctly oni
ti ccIr pluIrhl.ie.u icl these sketches, bnut they
nl cust he 'reserved till anotlher olchortu
A goold parodi'YS ws that involved in thec
a of y yiocng Ecinglish lctilelmianli, wicll a
aiI nhlnu ,, ,ic liles c nd ( i ,ery s cahIll
1am111nt of rn:lils--l.ordl this, Viscounct thilat.
and s, 0c, ,c,!a ic.l itum. ' My fair tlriric ls,"
s' aid ch c \viltv N--, "nel' oIf his titlhes .ou
" al ear It, have ft'rgi oti-n." "'Oh!" wuis tice
g- cIetaucl i'Cx('iilidtlatiion, *whit iS 11hat ?" "lh.i
is IIlct l i' l t itelletd," was the , ejindtdr.
c al Th,. d,,:'rest slot on e.rth " has at lnst
u1 li ei.n lih'catd. " Thlsie wi -hi.,g to lind thai
p t." ill ind it it ti- st're that does I
r- not advertise.
D Henry Edward Manning, D. D., Arch
- bishop of Westminster, and successor t.
B Cardinal. Wiseman, is in his CNd year. Hip
Grace is in every respect one of the mos
distinguisbed relates in the Catholia
SChur. Gifted with rare powph of mind
Sadorned with aquirements as extensive a
r they are unrivaled, simple as the -tenderesl
a child that hangs upon his words, the Atch.
bishop of Westminster stands almos'
r alone in mental type and personal charac.
i ter. A scholar, whose research and accuracy
have been °keenly tested, a thinker whose
speculations have been examined with un
I sparing criticisnl, a social reformer, whost
action has been whole-hearted and earnesl
as the man himself, he has won without of
fort the applans of the learned, and re
tained without appeal the sympathies ol
the crowd. Clear as his transparent styli
is his whole carper; and though he did
that which ever touches the Englishl peo
a ple to provocation, yet he defied their cen
sure, and never ceased to enjoy their re
spect. His efforts in the cause of sobriety
have been unceasing and personal. lie hnas
f come upon the platform face to face with
his countrymen, and has spoken unpleas
ant truth and keen reproach with his own
wonderful power, but with his own for
bearing generosity. As a preacher he is
distinguished for grave dignity, simple ex
pression, cogent reasoning and homely il
lustration. He seems to speak without ef
fort, but it is because he has thought out
the matter patiently, cautiously, candidly;
aqd then resolved his plan. His counten
ance is singularly expressive, his voice
clear and searching. He is heard with at
tention for his gifts and remembered with
fdelity for his truth. s -
The Archbishop's father was a London
merchant and a member of Parliament. He
sent his son to Harrow School and from
thence to Baliol College, Oxford. In 1830
he took his degree of A. B., with honors in
the fret-class; and soon after won a Fel
lowship. Almost immediately he Was se
lected as one of the University preachers
a promotion of little pecuniary advantage,
but of great collegiate distinction. He
gave up his fellowship in 1834, when he'
was appointed to the vicarage of Laving.
ton and Gaffham, in Sussex. Six years
later he was named Archdeacon of Chiches
ter, a very valuable office, to which was
attached a stipend of about £1600 a year.
For eleven years he remained in this pre
ferment, well known as an active worker,
a deep and subtle thinker, a ready
and earnest preacher. At the end of eleven
years, and twenty-one years from his ordi
nation, he left the Protestant communion
and joined the Catholic Church. He lost
his uncome as a Protestant dignitary, he
swept away his reputation as a Protestant
thinker, and he challenged the hostility of
the Protestant Church. Consternation is a
weak word by which to describe the panic
that followed his conversion; and when lie
became a priest the disappointment of his
friends was unspeakable. He became su
perior of an ecclesiastical congregation at
Bayswater, known as the Oblates of St.
Chales Borromeo. The degree of Doctor
of Divinity was conferred while on a visit
to Rome; and he was further honored by I
being appointed to the office of Provost of
the Archdiocese of Westminst r, Prothono
tary Apostolic and Domes ~eelate to his
Holiness the Pope. For fourteen years he
continued to discharge the high duties of
his office, and in June, '65, on the ever-to
be-lamented death of Cardigpl Wisenman,
lie was appointed Archbishop of the dio
cese. While in the Protestant Church
Archbishop Manning wrote several sermons
and other theological worke. The most
notable were: -"Rule of Faith ; a Ser
mon with Appendix;" "Holy Baptism
with introduction ;" a treatise on the "Uu
ity of the Church;" "Sermons at the Uni
versity of Oxford;" and "Thoughts for
those that Mourn." The first work lihe
published subsequent to his conversion
was entitled "Lectures on the Grounds of
Faith." They are worth the patient con
sideration and frequent consultation of all
men. In 1860 he wrote a pamphlet on the
"Temporal Sovereignty of the Pope"-a
splendid statement of Catholic views, sup
ported by irrefragable argument. Four
years later he published a sermon entitled
"Blessed Sacrament, the Centre of Inscru
table Truth ;" aLetter, "Workings of the
Holy Spirit ;" and in the following year,
"Temporal Mission of the Holy Spirit."
Pastorals and letters he has also published,
all characterised by great width and depth,
all brightened with the noblest observan
ces of Christian charity. The Archbishop's
recent work and life are too well known to
our readers to necessitate our speaking of
them here. Hlow courageously he has
fought for right and truth against usurpa
tion and falsehood ; how brilliantly he has
explained the resudis of the Dogma; how
he has confuted all opponents and strength
ened all adherents, need not be told.
These, and the benefactions to mankind
which have made his lite pure and beauti
ful, will be remembered by the Catholic
world as long as righteousneess-ehllbe held
in honor. al
RELIGclos PnOFESsION OF Twv- SISTEIrS.
Recently there was witnessed in Phila
delphlia a scene at once solemn and affrct
ing-the religious profession of twin sisters,
daughters ot our esteemed friend, Thomas
llendlrick, Esq., of Penn Yan, Yattes ciun
ty, N. Y. At all tiics the recepitiion or
profession of a rclilicuse is invested with
an inlosing awe aud granlde.ur. A young
lady tearing herself away from homne and
flamily-throwing aside all thle allurements
of tlhe world's pleasure-all the essocia
tionYi, of youthful coumpanions anltd fiends
and elaooslig thi better hart," hecominig
Iat: spouse of thle tLaanbl, Iprie nts a subli
Iller slectacle of ha'oi alevotiin, taluna
could any other sacrifice ill lifet; but when
twin sisters, who lookeld ullpi oin G;d's sky
toigether to give tlheislvel s ,up a holly to
God, there is anuperudded a siubliaity of
which- none but thlios p rivih.g.d to, wit
iess thie scene, could have anly conception.
In this 'egard tile iprofessinu of the ladlies
to wliom we refer, laad a da1c, iutrcerest fior
all piresent, but in otlter resplects, the cere
uonialas andi foraiulariiws were of tihe usual
order. 'lhme I'cseictrd fatthecr, lbrithr alad
otlher eamabtirs of tile tfmily we.e iareseut.
Oera23t0 ladies precetldedl thie Iotalantis ill
pirocessiotn, tlressted inl hInt. hoods ad white
vtils ; iiland the lprtlii ain l es ft a'aenula cia
SiollIai of hle wuorld, th iI t Na iea vol'wv saS lnld
rceived to rteligiiin by ta;, lil*v. It.,ther
I apst, Sba -lea-or af thie Older of Jeuits.
Mlat-y sard a t'a 'u's if' iy oii that oiaat' ona
bat our iasliert d Iaiv.aul. Mr. lleirda ic.,
miay bl, ni-ll snail to lihave haid blath hacti.
ail a- eye iii Itrtil mit an i i-- att da eply iin
I tureating to a parent.--Erxchange.
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etc. Adapted for use in schools where only one text
bIook in Grammar is intended to be used, and is un
doubtedly one of the best works of this kind before Si
the publac. One volume, of 240 pages. Prioe, S cents.
Recently Published-ELETMENTS OF COMPOSITION
AND RHETOttIC. By Simon Kerl. One volume.
rimo, 4i0 pages. Price, 1i 25. This is a simple, con. G
cise, progressive, thorough and practical work on a
new plan.
READING AND ELOCUTION. By Anna T. Ran. 0
dall. This book conlains four hundred and fifty pages;
is printed on fine deslicately tinted paper, bound hand.
somely in cloth, and is marble-edged. Sent by mail to L
any address for I 4O. s
SPENCERIAN COPY BOOKS. Reduction in Price.
'rho retail price of the Spencerian Copy Rooks has,
been reduced to Filteen Cents, with usual diseonunts
to the trade.
IVISON, BLAKEMAM, TAYLOR & CO.,
138 snd 140 Grand street, New York.
T. LlORONEY
Care of J, A. GIIESHAM, 9" Camp t., New Orleans
;(tKEItL AOtNT
.1aI5 tf For Louisiasas, Mississippi and Tesas.
0. LE LIE VItE'S, S
CATIIOLIC BOOK STORE,
174........... .Royal Strect..........1 74
Branch 9I Itronne street. between Canal street nnd th
lsyv. Jesuit Fathers' Church. N
O. LELIEVRE begs leave to Inforni his city ani coon.
try elstuters tl;t a lranch. othli ltclk Storolias tIen ea
Ital*0bhl,d io'Baronnesestre-t, NSo. 9. where will be found, a
In tihe rotin stor.,' a eonllelet assortment of School Hooks.
in English sl1d Frencih.
iPraer Bloo.k., in the E.nglioh, French, Germsoa
nsl Stpaeninh talianages. Slttionery. Articles of Piety.
?*reathu aend Candlles for Feirt C'oinmunlon. Artiltei. 1
Fl'iwers. .listerials for mnaking Flo.wers, Fancy Articles.
Rosary Beads of! al descriptions, Ielitious Sta~tios of all
isins,. fe,7lI
\Votk.*. All tile latet Cot Iuhioc Pubhicatlonss at publish
re's prices. leadls Meslalo. Crucifixes ansI Religious Plc
tlures. (i'eerl A gnt rfr all Cathoilic Ngwslpapesre atI
Maoizins's. ilae Halls. Hots. Bases, Sfire Books and
JIFE OF ClIhttSTOPIIEI1 :t)LU~i-q.
P:sire 02. Senet-·fre by mail.
Adlrllcs P'ATYIII( I)O)NAIIOt,, I.:olton. Mssn.t
r17I;I'LY IS ESSI;NTIAL.
"-TfIt'IlG I S 1 A N 01 A Ill V 11 )C . T €A ,
,Spc.-:uitictt.-.cn tihen to t~ u r ...u.licg ii T'hhys:
ctGa' Preaoriptlonn an al hour•s. lyic ty I
SEWING MACHINES.
EMPIRE SHUTTLESEWING MACHINE
Rt ECENTLY IMPROVED AND SIMPLIFIED.
We earnestly invite the attention of purchasers to
this Machine. as it ruzna light and easy, does the greatest
range of work-using 110 cotton or 35 linen thread
straight needle. perpondlcular action. very little frictiun
and noise. MLake the stitch ALIKE ON BOITHI
SIDES, uslrg far LESS THRIEAD than most machines
in this market.
Premiums for generdl excellenee' of n aehlne and .'ork
have been obtained whir, ver exhibited, and onu of the
latest was received at trih
TI.XAS STATE I AII,
Houston. May, 8lir.
WILLIAM HlOGAN,
GAheral Agsent Empire Sewing Mtachine Co.,
Nos. 99 and 101 Canal street,
ocl6 tm NI'W (itti.cA.
THE IMPROVED WEED " F. F."
AMachine Combining in. ONI the Excellent
Qualities of All Others.
:tj
o
Any one wishing to purchase a First-Class Family
Sewing Machine. will do well to examine the WEED
"F. F." before pnrr hiacing et-mewhero.
SADDLERS and ILINESS MAHKERL will find it
to their advantagetocuil and examine our ENORMOUS
MANUFACT URtINGC MACIIINKS.
TAILORS and SitO'tAKlEI:., are also requested
to examine our U7M I'I: TWO iMachine, which is
expressly adapted to theht" s...
The Weed Machine hb lire.,, awar'ded the HIGH.
EST PREMIUMS wlwrv.er it hat beeti exhibited.
Machinesareto warrant,.i fr The Years. -
Instructions given g:t t: an,.! lMa'hines are delivered
in the city free of clhar",.
Agents and Solicitor. wv:eted
BRUNSON. TIFFANY & CO.,
stt ATE AG.Nt .,
197.............ail street I..............197
>::.V n;il.EAN.. ee18 ly
THE NEW IJMI'PIVEI)
SINGER FAMILY SEWING MACHINE.
1,
oId
Twenty-Two Years
OF POP'ULAR AND CONS'I'TA::TI INCREASING
ThiS new Family Mahl ine is adapted to a greater
rainge and variety ,r wwi k than aney othner in existence,
sewingwith ea., frma the FINES.T and LIGIITEST
FABIIICS.- TO IIEAVY C(LOTH 01: LIillATIHEtR.
IS PERFEQTLY SIMPLE,
Light Running, and -Eaiv 'to Mtanagte
andt alnmist no,-l.-es ii lTOratic,. l. st a straight
needle, andi mak pertfei.'t wtr.
Every Machin,,' (Gutar:tant tl as rlepresetitetd.
NO FA.MIIY SHlOilLi) lIE WvITIIOUT ONE OF
THESE LAIBOR-SA.VING INSTRIIUMENTS.
Singer'a No. 2 Machine, or Tailor's use, rc-' eed
to ................ ..... ... ....... .... . 80 00
Singer's Imperial Mrachine, with roller presser foot,
for fine leather work ................... ..... 5 i00
WM. E. COOPER & CO.,
General Agents for Louisiana, Texas, AlabImna and
Southern Mississippi, to whom all applicatis
for Agencies should be addressed.
Office, No. 7 Camp street, New Orleans, L
A full and complete assortment 4bf SILK TWIST
LINEN THREAD, COTTON, OIL, NEEDLES. etc.
constantly on hand, at manufacturers' prices. 1st ly
$56.................... AND............ ......$65
( Gen It. E. LEE. writing under
date of Janoarn 1ith, 1507, says:
-"Its simple mechanism, and the
exlprienche my danghters have
Wicox & (jibbs Sewing Machine
an great favoiite in my family."
WILCOX & GIBBS
SILENT TWISTED LOOP STITCH
SEWING MACIIINE,
Always in Good Orer and Ready to Sew.
The only place in the siy where all the first-class Im
del'8 ly I" t. S. IIEDRICK.
BUY THE BEST AND CHEAPEST !
Thejmproved and New
WILSON
SEWING MACHINE,
SPeretly al
d , sewing eas
saew from tns ain
and ligbtst fabrics
to heavy Cloth o
RBrad and Gin/lee in the most perfect manner
SlO Cheaper d hSn any other first eia. M
AGENT Z]IS WAJiNTED.--for luther tarO
Ill nirat ael irc I!i it, ltUF & l Oti, eniatl
l tiouqrn Agents,p 1o~9 CIanal st cre*et s
SII i:tNA I:. I, t IRT:!;I, ,ar I.:,t:pIlne¢.
Virct ,la- I'h,rca,, rihe. ,mlll tl,.e atrid Pite,*a ns
|11€"l "S nlroX. t st · , A ii in¢,t 5-r.*4.ir rl ,tr'alch. 'nittieR.
ir attention paid to cspyit g Old tictarss. dea tti
HARDWARE-STOVES-COOPERAGE.
THE /AMEBICAN STOVE.
LOOK AT ITS RECORD.
Gold Medal aatnk State  air........,
d Modal Taoe St- air ........." 0
IECS, nBL O AND AS_ H PA.......:,m0
Ge 4 M eal nec Stute  ta ..e....0... 1gm
Gold e-oIeG a State aiN r.:
The AMERICA STOVE a defeated al the le
l - Stover manufactne in the nid S
TAIES IN ONE SAR. The atla ar reOr aD
call and examine the AMERICAN before pntchatu
an old-fashioned Stove.
Particular at ention L called to the COLUMuvA
the B tS I COAL OR WOO STOVE now in this lar:
Fet-it in pg~vloned with a Dumping Grate and Aes
SDrawer. - A AGeeralAsortment of
COOKING ANI)-HEATING rSTOVES, GRATES, ODD
I PIECES, BLOWERS AND ASH PANS.
I Partcular anttntson paid to ROOFINGi and GUT.
G TEItNG. PHIL. cCABE,
1ol02 3 American Stove Depot, 100 Camp street
VTlE (ELEllflATF.
"P. P. STEWART'S"
AIR-TIGHT COOKING STOVE,
WITH ]DUMPINPG GRATE.
The STEWART COOKING STOVE, which hbs hith.
erto aaintal at .acknowledged euperiority over all
competitors, is now introduced to the public with the
addition of a DUMPItNG GIA E and ASH DRAWEr
n point of economy and general utility, it hs been
conceded tht the ~TEWART STOVE wa ahead of all
otr .thisn ddition o the NEr DUMPING
GRArTE th.heautng murface of the Oven i frstly in.
cre OOed and the capacity of the does nearly douled,
and uo dt can ecape while cleaing or dumping the
To get a genuine Stewart's Stove, ee that P. B.
Stewart's name on the Hearth-Plate.
' FULLEDI WARROEN & CO..
Excluslve Manufacturers, Troy, N. Y.
For sale b E. B. HOGAN, 3 Canal at.
Where it can be seen in operation daily. fei2Oly
J ST. AITKENS a SON,
236........ TcnoUPrrouLaS STREET ........23
Importera and Dealers in
HARDWARE
For Buildlings. Foondriee, Railroads, Steamboat. and
Cotton Presses.
Also-Palnts, Oils. Varniahes, and lWindw GOlay .
myl5 ly
, "~Th Lt EALERh IX
Builders' Hardware, Grates and Mantels,
PAINTS. OILS, VARNISH. TURPENTINE.
WINYDOW GLASS and WALL PAPER,
349 .......... Comnmon Street ............ 349
myl ly Near Claiborne Market.
. J. BEIRKERY,
COOPERAGE,
31. 32. and :t Front Street. between Bienville and Conti.
aLt:0Aa LANtDtIG,
New Orleais.
coonsatJy oPhatnd.
Particular attentlon paid to Trimming. JaI ly
TINNERS-PLUMBERS-IRON WORKERS
G EORGE CRONAN,
- (Seceesnor to Bennett & Lrges.)
Southern Ornamental Iron Works,
Corner Magnolia and Erato etc.,
Near Jackson aildroad Depot.
New Orleans, La.
Ilacksmnithing and Ifonuework in general. Vanlts
Storn Fronts, etc., made to order at the storteet notice.
otiee at the Foundllrv. aRn21 ly
DVARDI, O'IOLKER. T IATIIID SEER-i;tO
O ROURKE & EAOGHER,
STEAM BOILER MANUFACTURERS
-AND-
I LACK SM IT 1lS,
Nos. 1,3: and t13 Folton, and t13 New Levee street..
between St. JosePph and Jolla streets.
Low Pressute. Locomohive, Foind and Cylinder Boll
era.Clarilters. Filters and JuioeLBoxes made at the short
eat notice. Second.hand Boilers kept on hand.
Will make contracts for Boilers. and all iecssary con.
neetlon., such as Fire Fronts, Grate Bars, Steam and
Stand Pipe, Valves, etc. Chimneys and Breeching, all
of which will be ftrnished at the lowest foundrvprices.
All work done at this establishment will be -sran
teed equal in point of workmanship and miterial to any
in the city or elsewhere.
Planters and Merchants are respectablly invited to
call and examinne our work and prices. apl ly
JOHN X'iIrTltca. .. APPLGOATU.
McILNTYRk & APPLEGALE,
PLUMBERS.
-AND
Dealers in Cooking Ranges and Boilers, Bath Tuba,
Water Closets, Wash Stands, Kitchen Sinka Lit
and Force Pumps, Ale Pnmpse, Sheet and Lead Pipe.
Brass and Plated Cocks of illpatterns,
146................POYDEAS STREET............ 146
NEW QpRLEANS,
N. B.-Agents for Colwell', Shaw & Willard's Patent
Tin Lined Pipe.
Hydrants put up, extended, and repaired. Repairing
neatly done, fel71y
D. McKENDItCK.
IhOUSE AND S4ZIP PLUMBEB.
4114.........Magazinre Street...... .464
Between lace and Roblin, m]Lt ly
D. ItU T)Y, COPPER, TIN AND SIIEET-IRON
463.. . t..St. Charles treett....".......43
(INet to the II~rso.etation.)
Itoofing, Guttering, Stove.Piping, nnd all klnds -
•rnh work done with neatness and daitttch. .i
Pans sra Iuowers wade no oroni. Ls) Iy
TO TFLE \O]tgLCLASS.-- ' care now prepared
to filt niHh nllt lasse,, witht ttnetapt etpleytl,yeatalt itttltte.
tile wtltde of the time or rlr the spare nltmelts. IUtei
ness new, liigbtaot protitabl. Persoes of either se
easily earn irlom .e, to 195 per evettIs. and a proler
tineal sulm by devoting their wiole tilhe tI tlte bnttiese.
ltoys atd girls earn nearly as inttneb as men. That all
wto see this notice may send tIteir adJires, andi test
the buislnes. so meake this ujlparalleled otfer: To such
 nart not well tisflcl, we will seud l ttt pay for the
trobtle ot w, iting. Full particulars, a valutable lample
which will do to commence work on, nd a nopy of "Tho
People'e Literary Companion"ooe of Lite largest aniL
I,.st fumle n.-weilapers published--all Retlt free by mi
Itetltr, if ynou want ermtane ot. prolit.tbh. work atdrl=
5 itt it. C'. AL.I, & ;0.. Anllll M,iuo.
XV ILLIAM PIIXIPS'
UNION STABLES,
1J0O...........Calliopo Street.............18
Fine Open and Close CA tI:ItAES ttor hire at prim
to correspond with the timers.
Ordersfor Weddings anti Parties ipromptly a~tsndd
,. IItlNTEMI'S. DYERI AND SI:Ot'lttElt. 1,. Poydrsa
strteet. Itetwaeo (Coruntldct aud iri.,,.nt e etteets, for.
tlnerly offutlrttn street fitr a areat irutot,0r ,,I .eals.
Mr. J. llunteopns in fttrst his tretttte ontti I ptt jtattlit in
general that heha rtl.-etlblislted hlIlt,,t Itll lilat Dicingi
ousnrino slid CLat'ia,, g ttootlit,*, at fillt,. a1lt.! linte. All
irterse will Itotetsloltl it, wtth rare all.I Ilisplilath, A
talttr to altached to the retattll.itth.lt sit,) ll l.atttltd
to rt.ttalrltn tUli inetltdittl of elothiuL i l'g .-ttalty tor
to. sejstdoa

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