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The morning star and Catholic messenger. (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, November 26, 1876, Morning, Image 6

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086284/1876-11-26/ed-1/seq-6/

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SMrfing Star and Catholic Messenger.
. aw e oaTr.A. sUDATM. NoarMBNE an Ia9s.
.IV DBBIC OZANdAM. HIS LIFE AND
JI'OlId.
MOW T1B 8OCIETY OF ST. VINCENT DE PAUL
WAS STARTED.
The London Tablet of the 4Lh, inst., con
Iaae the following notioe of the "Life of
Frederic Osanam, professor at the Sorbonoe,
by Kathleen O'Meara," published in Edlno
barg recently by Messrs. Edmonston and
.mglss :
Twenty-three years have elapsed since
me death of this eminent Catholic French
arn who sank at the early age of 40, pre
materely exhausted by literary and intel
lesteal labors undertaken in the cause of
veligion and true culture. In his short ca
mear he did great things for literature, for
elarity, and for the Catholic faith. He had
afatber who was himself one of the most
oemarkable men of the period, and to whom
he owed very much of the distinctive
egoellenoeof his character, an indomitable
beat towards moral and intellectual superi
slity. Like so many eminent men, too, he
ead an admirable mother; a model of de
voted piety, charity, and good sense. The
blestry of his name and family is so re
amarkable, that it is best given in the words
a-st lia biographer :
The Osanams would seem to be one of those
eas where virtue and science are an entailed
.4srltance, descending like heirlooms from
asD generation to another. For more than
ithee centuries every generation produced
imes distinguished man of science, and iova
dab counted one, fretqeutly several, mem
Ste service of the sanotuary. Toere is
s reed amongst the family treasures a
EMc of our Lady, in Gothic charactere,
umlnated with delicate skill, by Ellza
beth Ossnam, a nun of the Ursolineconvent in
he fifteenth century. In the last pages of the
booek the genealogy of the elder branch of the
Qsasam ito recorded, each generation insorib
Sag its name and dates individually. Not
eatisied, however, with this poble family tree,
"-'e Osanams trace back its roote to immemo
ela tradition. In the first page of the family
reeerds we read that one Jeremiah Hozasnnam,
a praetor in the 38th Roman legion, came over
to saul with Julius Casar, after the conquest
of Segavia-a country situated between the
Jura and the Alps-and received as his share
of be conquered territory a canton called
elligeum, lying north of Lyons, and known
itee as the village of Bouligleux. Jeremiah
dselaimed this waste land, which was covered I
with woods and swamps, and founded there a
little Jewish oolony. He died in the year 43 I
before Christ, the same year that Ceasr was
masssiaated. He had many ehildren, but the I
elddest i the only one whose genealogy hasI
-eeme down to us. He starts the long ancestral
Yae i whioh Jacob Ishmael, Elias, Abime
,lek, Jehaebaphat, Shem, ete, pass on like a
i. oon . iof witnesses vindicating the pure I
wish origin of the race. The march is unio
terrupted rtil the beginning of the seventh I
e~otary, w, e St. Dider plaoing the arose in i
bfsway 1s6p it. The saint having denounced
Qisen Brunhaut's wicked manner of life, was I
aesnesa by that sanguinary princess and fled t
4r scurity to a forest near Boulignieau, where d
4lamuel Hosannam, the then chief of the'tribe,
sheltered him with native hospitality. B.
1ein the true faith, and hencsforth we see
ilds*. John, Peter, and other Christian
mes, intermingling more and more with the
.eld Hebrew ones. The saint was seised at last I
the emissaries of Brauhant, and strangled
thebanks of a little stream called Renom, a
,wbes, in course of time a village arose, and
 ws ealied St. Didier de Rebom.
Betee be was eighteen, he wrote, in the
Intervals snatched from the occupations of
a letrk in an attorney's office, a treatise
ag"leet the sect of St. Simonians, for
wrbih he received the congratulations of
Lamartine; and it was at that early age
that he was inspired with the desire of op
pseaig the rampant Voltairianisn of the
age, and of devoting his life to Christian
Jiterature and to the work of reviving reli
lion through the agency of the college
lectrre-room and the periodical press. He
a lso became a proficient in science; for, as
his biographer tells us: "lie always had a
• eet horror of becoming simply a man of
-etters, and nothing else: a man whose
mind only worked in one way and on one
mubject like a machine." These tendencies
oeon brought him into intimate friendship
with the friends of religion, then few and
Ear between, and into animated conflict
with the leaders of infidel thought. Whilst
attending the lectures of a freethinking
professor at the Sorbonne, one iM Jonffroy,
be so posed that pundit of unbelief with
questions nd objections on the side of re
lion, that the philosopher was surprised
nd disconcerted, "confounded himselfin
apologies, declared that he never meant to
attack Christianity in particular, wh~ich on
the contrary he held (he said) in the
highest veneration, and ,promised to e.n
deavor, for the future, tot to wound the
faith of any of his Catholic hearer,,." And
the result actually was that a notable
change was thenceforward obeerved in the
tone of the teaching at the Sorboune, and
the change was attributed to young
Oganam's influence. With the same in
fuenee also may doubtless be connected
the gratifying fact, that this same Professor
Jonffroy, "on his death bed, ten years later,
returned to the faith which he had spent
the greater part of his life in attacking.
His dying words to a philosopher friend,
who stood beside him, were, 'All the sys
tems put together are not worth one page
of the Catechism.'"
Another still more distinguished "con
vert of the Sorbonne" was M. Lenormant,
who wasre the intimate friend of Osanam,
-at whose adheslon to Christianity was the
Ssignal for noisy demonstrations amongst
-haetudente, egged on by the private agi
·ttion of MM. Quinet and Michelet. On
o oceuastion an emeute at the lecture of
. 0 Lenormant was quelled by the courage
e .Osanm, who boldly stood up beside the
'ilesarer and pleaded in eloquent terms with
St~h rioters, and suacceededt innducing them
o lgive a fair bearng to their teacher.
Osanam bhad by this time himself become
- n supplementary leoturer at the Sorbonne,
in the captoity of Asesitant Professor of
Foreign Literature, for which he had al
ready proved himself eminently qualified;
and the turn which this appointment gave
to his studies led to his travelling in Ger
many, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, and
Eogland, of all which literary tours many
maost interesting details are preserved. But
we must pass over these in order to p:ace
before our own readers some aecount of
what we consider to have been the chief
P religious event of Osansm's life, namely,
the leading share he bore in originating the
SideS of, and in founding, the great obarlita
tle ormnisaton of modern Frane that
oble soeleny of . Vaneeat de i
world as a means out only of onocournog the
poor, but of promoting the personal eancti
ication of the members themselves:
One day, after taking part in a more than
usually fiery debate on some blstorioal ques
tion, he left the conference hall in company
with two friends, M. Lallier and M. Lnmache;
they walked on to the Hotel Corneille, where
the latter reselded, discussing as they went what
could be done to stir np the Catholic camp to
more strenuous efforts, and to the necessity of
utilising these weekly meetings for some higher
purpose. They went to Lallier's room and held
a long consultation as to what could he done.
It was suggested that the leaders should con
trive to meet at the bouse of one or other of
them every week, so as to discuss more ex
haustively the points it was essential to bring
out agaloast their adversaries, that they might
thus arrive at the meeting armed soffiolently,
and prepared all along the line; by this means
also they would gradnally bring back and
maintain the debates within the special sphere
they desired. Ozsnam mention.d asneully, in
the course of the conversation, that in discus
sing the matter with a friend the day before,
it had occurred to them it might be possible to
organize a meeting where they would occupy
themselves not with discussions, but with good
works, and thus oppose a practical denial to the
reproach of the St. Simonian*. The soggestion
met with no immediate response from his two
companions, but it had in reality dropped un
awares the seed of the future Society of Lit
Vincent de Paul. Nothing particular was de
cided that day, but the trio partsd with the on
derstandnog that they were to convene the
heads of their party at an early date for the
purpose of arranging some preparatory diecse
sions for the historiol'debates.
In the interval, none of them could say why
or how this.notion of an exclusively practical
meeting, which had been incidentally thrown
out by Ozanam, grew in their minds, while, on
the other hand, the importance of the proposed
preparation for the debates insensibly dimin
Ished. They communicated the coincidence to
each other, and of one accord went off to con
sult Pere Bailly. He saw at a glance the value
of the idea, and once more placed the office of
the Tribne Catholique at their disposal.
There, in the month of May, 1633. they held
their first meeting. They begged M. Badly to
take the chair, which the dear old man of
course did, together with the title of president.
He had as yet only eight members to preside
over; the scheme seemed quite Utopian to the
other party, who stood aloof and contented
themselves with wishing success to their more
sanguine and energetic companions.
It was settled at the very firat meeting that
their work should be the service of God in the
persons of the poor, whom they were to visit at
their own dwellings, and assist by every means
in their power.
"If you intend the work to be really eflioa
dlons," said M. Balily, "if you are in earnest
about serving the poor as well a, yourselves,
you most not let it be a mere doling out of
alms, bringing eaeh your pittance of money or
food ; you must make it a medium of moral as
sistanoe, you must give them the alms of good
advice " (I aumone de t directfos).
A portion of the very greatest misery of the
poor often proceeds from their not knowing
how to bell themselves out of a difficulty once
they have got into it; they fall Into distress
through accidental circumstances arisiog from t
their own fault or other people's, and they are I
too ignorant to see their way out of It. The
law frequently has a remedy ready for them,
but they don't know this and there is no one to
tell them. Their one idea when they fall Into t
distress is to hold out their hand for our alms,
asystem which generally proves as ineffectual
as it is demoralizing. M. Bailly suggested to
bis young friends thatthey should try to remedy
this lamentable state of things by placing their
-eucation, their intelligence, their special 1
knowledge of law or science, and their general
knowledge of life, at the disposal of the poor;
that instead of only taking some little material
relief, they should strive to win their confi- I
dence, learn all about their affairs and then a
see bow they could best help them to help
themselves. "Most of you are studying to be
lawyers," he said, "some to be doctors, etc., go e
and help the poor, each in your special line, let
your studies be of use to others as well as to a
yourselves; it is a good and essy way of com- I
mencing your apostolate as Christians in the t
world "
Ozanam was sitting at M. Bailly's right hand, i
and one of those present recalls vividly the
expression of his countenance as, with his
black eyes alight, and his irregular expressive
features quivering, he listened to tle Presi
dent's words and then burst out into joyons (
assent. The idea of the auemone de la direction I
was all the more welcome from the fact 1
that 'the young men had very little else
to give. They were somewhat perplexed at
frst from not knowing any poor people to
visit. This diflioulty was, however, easily
compassed: M. Bailly advised them to go off to
that beautiful grand soul, boeir Rosalie, and
ask her to help them. She received the young
apostles of charity like the motoer that she
was, was overjoyed at the idea of the moral
help they proposed, gave them mnch valuable
advice as to the way of dealing with her be
loved poor, and a list of needy and deserving
families to visit. The society was of coursn i
too poor to have bone (tickets t ,r fnod and fuel)
in its own name, so tse Ir Rosalie sold them
some of hers 'Iae members placed ti .emelves
under the protection of St. Vincent tide Paul,
whose name they adopted, and this done, they
were fairly affoet. Each member had a poor
family to look itfer; they met every week to
report tl .r t xperiences, discuss the wants of
their p, ot, ges and the means of relieving them;
the imre;tug began and ended with a prayer,
and a collection was made to pay f.,r the bone.
Thire proceeds of the collec' io; were, as may be
imagined, exceedingly small; hut by and by
the members were mn3stitled by finding four
five franc pieces amongst the soiu and rare
little silver cotis that were dropped into the
leather bag. Who was the Cic.un in disguise
who contributed this magnificent sum I M.
Bailly, after enjoying their curiosity for a
while, disclosed the secret. He was in the
habit of asking Ozanam and one or two of the
others to review- books for the Tribune Coath
lique, and as they nat'urally scented the idea of
being paid any thing by that most disinterested
of journals, the editor took this way of remu
nerating them according to his slender means,
knowing they could not reject it.
The roles of the society were simple but
stringent. It was forbidden to disuonss politioes
or personal eunoerns at the meetings; these
topion were not to be mentioned indirectly;
the society was never to be made use of as a
stepping-stone to worldly advanoement.
The practical working of the new society
is well and characteristically exemplified
by an incident that occurred soon after the
brothers commenced their charitable
labors;
Ozannam's first personal experience was a
striking illustration of the wisdom of M.
Bailly's advice as to the way they shbould
practice charity. There fell to his lot a poor
miesae, composed of a hard-working nmother
wlthflve children, and a drunken bunband,
who best them all rounood, though, as the wife
conscientiously explained, "not every day,
only from time to time." But what he never
failed to do was to drag every penny of the
poor creature's earnings from her and spent it
at the tavern, while she and the five children
starved at home. She was in the last stage of
misery and despair when Or scam found her
out. He quickly discovered that the supposed
marriage was no marriage at all, and that
mother and children were free to leave their
brutal master if they chose. Her astonish
ment on hearing this was only equalled by her
thankfulness; at first she uould not believe it;
in her complete Ignorane of law and morals
sahesw no reason why it shosld be so. Osasem
had to to the 'eesrer do Ret (&ttewag
,.atl ba~rrr asathaslate
hie statingtbs fact in legal form before her inort
ti- dolity was overcome. Sbe then gladly ac
cepted her protedtor's offer to remove with her
balf-starved family to another room out of the
ea house of their tormentor.
Ay And here we most break off for to day
ie; our review of the remaining features of
are Ozanam's biography, reserving for another
tat opportunity some brief noticeof his literary
t" works, his controversies, his friendships and
of his peaceful and holy death. But we will
d not defer our tribute of approval for the
Do. manner in which the author has performed
in- her part. The work, both as regards style
of and the judicious selecting and grouping of
ix- materials, and the sympathetic tone that
ng pervades the whole, is admirable, and forms
be a very valuable and welcome accesion to
Iy, Catholic literature.
us
od
ire JUGGLERY VS SPIRITUALISM.
in
is (Boston Pilot)
re, The denouementas of the past few mouths
t have not been favorable to the cause of
D Spiritualism. The same spirit of inquiry
he which delights in wandering after occult
)n phenomena, very naturally would know
ro the causes of these phenomena, and this has
n- brought about a scrutiny of seance, thatt
it threatens to unsettle the crazy contexture
e- of Spiritualism. Some monuths ago the
Katie King personations were shown to be
e an open fraud. Exposures of the E ldy
,. brothers, Mirs. Fay, Mrs. Hardy and others,
have followed in quick succession. Though
y acting apparently without coicert, and in
a! varioun placts, the inquiries havo been very
n succe-sttul and thorough in unmasking the
rn impositions thiat had previously passed cur
d rent as manifestations.
In Albany the spirit was caught on the
3. platform, and shown to be the medium her
e self. In another case a trap-door attacked
>f to the cabinet, furnished a secure mode of
transit to an assistant imp of substantial
d proportions; but in London Dr. Slade, the
o Spiritualist, has fared worst of all. This
individual, an American by birth, professed
to procure messages written by the spirit
, friends of patrons, which he sold for a guinea
d a seance. He was visited by Dr. Lankester,
*e who discovered Mr. Slade himself writing
the messages on the slate before it was sub.
it mitted'to the spirits. Thereupon Dr. Lan
e keeter prosecuted Mr. Slade for swindling,
t and in evidence produced Mr. Maskelyne,
an expert, who fully explained the "slate
trick;"and Mr. Slide has been sentenced to
t three months imprisonment.
A, At a lecture delivered in Boaton Music
f Hall, on Saturday evening, 4sh iost, Mr.
r Irving Bishop, of New York, went through
- the whole range of spiritualistic tricks,
fully explaining tht they were all neither
more nor less than eats of jugglery. Some
of the tests to whirb he submitted, such as
the playing on instumen's with his hands
and feet tied in the cabinet, were very se
* vere, but were all successfully performed.
s Since then Mr. Bishop has made the round
a of the Boston mediums whom he exposes
with his usual ability. He is doing a useful
work, for which he deserves the thanks of
the public.
M. 8imonin, well known in this country as
r an indefatigable scientific traveller, has pub
1 lished a careful paper on the Puiladelphia Ez.
1 position in the latest number of the BRevs des
Desn Mondes. M. Simonin's criticisms are as
keen and in the main as just as his observations
seem to have been close and accurate. He
sums up the main results of the Exposition by
D saying:
t "Two phenomena of an economical clf9racter
o are brought out into clear and impressive re
lief by the Phtiladelphia Exposition. One is
e that an indiSect blow has been struck at the
sale of European products with which America
I, is learning daily to dispense in proportion as
e she makes and copies them better. This should
a teach Europe and especially Franoe to ward
e off the threatened blow by expending more
i- skill and care on the fabrication of goods des
e tined for Ambrica, and also, let us say it plain
a ly, by showiung more honesty in Sealing with
it the American market. The other is the actual
Souselessness of the American protective tariff
.t and the ease with whinb Amerioa may compete
0 on fair terms with Europe, at least in the
y American market. The United States cannot
0 much longer hesitate to abolish, or at least to
d gravely mcdify, this tariff. " " " Its only
g results have been to favor a privileged few, to
e raise the prices of all products, and to bring
il about the disappearance of particular indus
e trids, such as ship building, in which before
i 1~6O Americans led the world. In a word, it
g impoveriehbes the nation instead of enriching
" it."
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C. CONkY. 5 CoNRT, JL
E. CONERY & SON,
IEstablished in 1040.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Dealers in Western Produce,
0033 or0 CARAL AND DILTA sITmaTs,
nMeW 1 aw oam. ass.
INSURANCE.
F ACTORS' AND TRADERS'
INSURANOE OOMPANY,
37. ......... Carondelet Street..3.........
Premiums for the yearendingApril3') 1816, 666,6054
Loses paid wltbihn the yer................. 577,.47I
Bes, reed for unterminated risks. Apil 30,
1176 ...... .............................. 86,500
Net Profits for the year..................... 13i.0t 1
- Cash Dividends for the year s
Interest (setmlmna ally)........... .TEI PrL C3EN
Premiums .....................TWENTY PER CEH"
ASSETS, Aptil 50 1876..................11,398,655 4
This Company continues to mune policies on Fire
irver and Marlle Risks, at cunreat rates of premium
E. A PALFREY, President;
JOHN CHAFFp, Vice Iresident;
THOMAS P. WALER, Secretary.
TRUTVWBZ:
W A Johnson, W C Raymond,
John I Noble, T Lytlt Lyon
John Chafo, R HSnowde,
Richard Millken, S H Boyd,
John I Warren, Joseph McElroy,
It 8 Buckner. 3 B Wheelock,
Samuel Friedlander. (yrus Busey,
A A YaTea. Wm J Bebhan.
John I Adaer, B F Ranbelmran,
Isaac Scherck. W 0 Black.
R M Walmsiey. Charles Chafe,
A H ay, I (C Jurey,
bel]i 6m Wm artwell.
HIPERNIA INSURANCE COMPANY,
Office, No. 37 Camp Street.
JOHN HENDERSON, President.
P. IRWIN, Vice President.
THOS. F. BRAGG, Secretary.
Earnings..... .................$213,424
Losses Paid............. 74,741
Net Profts.......................... 68,438
At an election held on Monday, the let inst., the
followirg named gentlemen were chosen Directors of
this Company to serve for the ensuing year:
P. Irwin. John Henderson,
Tbomas Slng. John G. Ryan,
Thea. Gilmore. W. J. Castell,
John T. Gibbons. Jas. A. OGirdner,
William Hart. Kmle OGauche.
David Jackeon John H. Manna,
F. J Gasquet.
And at a meeting of the Board, held May 8th, JOHN
HENDERSON, President, P. IRWIN, Vice-President,
and THOS. F. BRAGG, Secretary, were unanimously
re-elected.
The Board declared out of the no. profits of the
Company for the past twelve months 10 per cent I-.
terest; also 4 per cent dividend on the paid up eapital.
and 45 per oent dividend on premiuma paid by stock
holders (making, with the rebate, 40 per sent on pre
mirums). Said Interest and dividends to be plaoed tothe
oredit of the stook notes
Interest and dividends on full paid stock payable ti
each at the offoe of the Company on and afterJune 15th
pTHO.. . BRAGG, Seretary.
New Orleans. May 12. 187L myI4 7 ly
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Portable.Gas Light Co,
OFFER TO TBE TRADE
THE FOLLOWING LIST OF THEIR
SUPERIOR AND POPULAR BRAND
Insurance Oil.
The Insurance Oil Is the beet Family Safety Oil, and
is urgently recommended by all our Insurance Com
paniee a. a substitute for common Coal Oil or Keroeene.
It may be used in ordinary lamps
Without Change of Burner.
THE NEW ORLEANS BOARD OF UNDER
WRITERS SAY:
"It is our opinion that the general use of
the Insurance Oil would greatly reduce the
number of lamp fires and explosione, and less
en the risk of destruction of life and property."
It will not explode or Ignite in a lamp ; and the price
has been so reduced as to place it within the reach of
all classes of consumer.s, and make it the great
FAMILY SAFETY OIL.
As an illuminating oil for family use, or for general
use in ordihnary Kerssine or Coal Oil lamps, the Insu
rance Oil has the indoreement of the Noew Orleans Board
of Health. the Fire Commissloners, and all the Amerl.
oan sand European Insurance Agemaiee as
PERFECTLY SAFE.
Refined Carbon or Coal Oil.
THE WELL KNO WW COCROWN BRAND
This is a pure. high Are-test Kerosene or Coal 011,
generally known as the Crown 01, and recommended
to the trade and to consuemer who buy. CHEAP
OIL as the best and safest of all the LOW-PRIOZD
ILLUMINATING OILS In market In Ave years' ex
perience no accident from its use has ever eoonrrbd.
The Puroline and Portable Gas Light Company have
the exclusive agency of the Crown Oil for the States of
Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Texas.
PUROLINE FLUID.
FOR METALLIC GAS LAMPS AND PORT
.BLE GAS BURNERS.
Manufactured and Sold only by the Puroline and Port
able Gas Light Company and their Agents.
This celebrated Fluid, prepared by a proeeu known
only to the proprietors, is the beet and most reliable of
all the produots of Petroleum fur use in Metallio Port
able Gas Lamps and Lanterns. It burns clear and
bright is free from smoke .r unpleasant odor, and does
not char the wick or gum the burner. No other dutd
or oil should be need in Portable Gas Lamps or Lan
terns. Paroline is especially recommended for use in
Portable Gas Lamps and Chandeliers, in Street Lan.
terns. Eugar-House Lamps, Cane-Shed Lanterns, and
In Torches and Gas Burners for SteamboatLandings.
Moonlight Picnics and Street Processions Giving a
light equal to the beet city Coal Gat. it enables the
people of the remotest villages to illuminate their
Stores. Warebhones, Saloons, Hotels Churches, Streets
and Gardens as brilliantly as the favored re Identa
of a great metropolis.
GASOLINE FOR GAS MACHINES.
DIstilled expressly for the Puroline and Portable
Gas Light Company, and with peculiar regard for the
changes of temperature so common in this climate.
Unequalled for generating gas or for carbureting coal
gas. Proprietors, patentees and owners of Gas Ma
chines cannot overestimate the importance of having
their Gasoline of reliable gravity and quality, as suc
cess depends so much on these conditions.
The P. and P. G L. Co. distill and refine a complete
line of ILLUMINATING OILS and FIlIDS, and
also sell, at Agent's prices all the popular brands
manafactured by other refiners.
Their BARRELS, CANS and CASES are all of the
beet material and workmanship, and when empty
command the highest prices in the market.
COAL OIL LAMPS,
PUROLIHE GAS LMPS,
STREET LANTERNS,
SUGA.-HOUSE LAMPB,
CANE-SHED LANTERNS,
METALLIC BSAFETY LAMPS,
- And all kinds of -
LAMPS, LANTERNS, CHANDELIERS,
Lamp Burners, Chimneys,
SHADES, FIXTURES AND TRIMMINGS,
Received direct from the Manfacturere, and
Sold at the Lowest Wholesale Prices
sT THE
PUROLINE AND PORTABLE GAS LIGHT
COMPANY,
95 and 97 Gravler Street 95 and 97
HOUSE FURNISHIEG G001."
A. BROUSIsAU & SON,
17............artre Stree....... .
IMPORTER AND DEALWR IN
Carpetings,
Cornice., anea Plus. humpsLe.e" s e.
TABLE AnD PIANO COVU0
WIuOmw SHADES.
CRUMB LOTHI B UDus
CURTAIN MaTURIALC --Lane.  hn.
Hair Cloth, Plush, Bed Ticking and e .
BURLAPS. by the Bale and Ples ce .
CARPETS. C&RPI,
ELKIN & CO.
160...... ........ Canal treet..._..
- Are offertg -
NEW AND CHOICE PATTERyt I
MCQUETTEj$ V TLVETTHR PL
and INGA IC CA52e
AT GREATLY REDUOIED PBIO.
FLOOR OIL-o TI
COCOA AND CANE MATTINGS.
CURTAIN thOODS IN REPt. IERRYB. ETC
EMBROIDERED PIANO AND TARLE COVgIs
WSBDOW SHADES. NEW STrVLES oc5s
FURNITURE ....... .. ...... FURNITU
HUGH FLYNN,
167 aod 169.....Poydrae Street.....167 and I
Is now receiving a LARGE STOCK OF Bal
FURNITURE, of all deecriptions and qualltke, sit.
able for housekeeping, and will sell it at pnores as -
as any other house in the city.
Parties about purchasing Furniture will and it it
their advantage to call and see for themselves beW l
purchasing elsewhere. oA00E4
Respectfnlly informs his friends and the public ti.
his new storp,
144............. Camp Street ........MI
He has a fresh and well-selected assertment a
BUILDERS' and GENERAL HARDWAR
Carpenters' Tool.. Orate. Stove r ad Hons Fld
uing Goods cf all kinds.
e 18 better preared than ever before to do Ce
Tin and Sheet Iron Work. ad will furnish e.sun
to Builders and others, and guarantees seat
F URNITURE.
H. UTHOFF,
FUBNITUBE AND MATTBRE&BES
155................Camp Street. ...........
The undersigned has a larg stock ef h
which be lnl d pseofat prees that will is.y..
liom. Give wma celland st rtL
Frniture taken on Storage. Repir m at
rates. Ar Furniture and Bddlag put La pse
paIr and delivered to order. Movtnl. Paokie et i
fol uee aIt tbhe LOWEST POSS IBL rVMtIU
appliation to HENRY UTHUFp.
my776 ly 155 Camp stne.
E STABLISEI ED 1857.
G. PITARD,
IMorarri AND DAI.ALE I
HARDWARE, GRATEB,
PAINTS. OIL., VARNISH. WINDOW GRAB
WALL PAPER. ETC.,
221 and 223...... Cnal 8treet......221 and 9
Between Rampart and Beala treets,
ap1t em paw orn.sas.
Bl. B. RINGROSE,
FURNITURE DEALER,
172................ Camp Street. ............17
Now occuplee the large and epsocone store I1n -e
street, between GLrod and Julia.Jst above St. Pab""i
Church for the purpoe of TAMING JURITUII
ON STORAGE ast the loweet rates
FURNITUR E EMOVED. BOUGHT. SOLD AD
RYCHARGED.
Al--I kinds of Upholstering and Varnlhling dose #i
dispatoh, and Mattreeses of all kinds made to orde.
ver thling at lowest rat.,. and 11 work garaseied
Country orders eollotted and promptly attended Is.
Call and examine before purchasinlg eiswere.
ap9 7 ly
TO THE PUBLIC.
JOHN BOIS,
FURNITURE DEALER,
;.52.............. Camp Street...........15
Now coupies the stores 152 and 154 Camp sei
bthe purpos of taking FURNITURE ON 510156
at the cheapeest rates.
LOANS MADE AND SECURED ON FUREHI
SPORED.
He will alMo contlnue to 1BUT'. SELL. REPA1.S
MOVE, PACK end SHIP FURNITURE, wlth L"
...... ere.. ,lo ss A V-11 StN4_
MUSICAL.
BUY YOIUR ORGANS AND PIANOS
At the Popular Muelc House of
LOUIS GRUNEWALD,
GREUNEWALl) HALL, NEW ORLEANS,
General Agency o the ccl, brated "GE A. PBCIS
& CT) s ORANe." of which over
55 mm are now in useo.
Acknowledged to be the BST. Win heat instsea
not liable t o gt eorda ld a
monthly pa menU. Bond for-A Wait
Sole Agency of the favorite PIAI08 oS
SCo, Paris; Steinway, e.ab.H lnlasa.ra
mayer and other f8rt-c'ses Plaaeor io n arwn im
menta, Stringl. Aoeordelonsi, a .' a Ittsbel
tatlon. Cheapest Boune isn ab"
terms. Call or send torestlmsgw LD
0015 .6 iy 14 15. 108.1 d a0nn
pHILIP WERLEIN,
Nos. 78, 80, 82, 90 Baronne Street,
The Leadlig Piano and Organ Dealer 80set
MUSIO. eta Ha keeps none but the best
prios belowthese asked by o.at ,,,,  -
equdlled ICoorZ NcopriseP the alenb t ý
A"a bs ' Pianos. tre reseable an3O'Pir,,
-oti bt ZtkC. HPasd m an sa I
sadJ. ! C sarlssa
ý1M ý saa samlsi ýfaebýwR

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