OCR Interpretation


The morning star and Catholic messenger. (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, January 28, 1877, Morning, Image 2

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086284/1877-01-28/ed-2/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

ng Star and Catholic Nessenger,
OWZANU tN'd1t AT, JANUARYs2 UlT.
S GAnd I. Wanne dear, I that am his mother,
sswell all11 that's going on in my poor hobild's
haert, and I can't nad it in mine to be hard
pea him. YTo cannot understand it, Wanen;
w,re no two of ne jast alike in these things;
sad I dare say I shouldn't understand it myself,
J I hadn't once in my life had occasion to see
what love can bringa man to when it's orossed.
int's of a nervonu constitution, eust like his
Sthber. Well now, Wanna, would you believe
tlb tyour'poor father, before we were married,
lay at the point of deatb, so as already to have
seesived the last sacraments, because our pa
eoats had separated as and he wasn't allowed
to0 se me?"
"Graeious heaven I" exclaimed Wanna, in
sadden terror; but added, almost immediately
tseovering herself, " well, but father got well
ever it in the end, for all that; didn't he,
mother ?"
" o he did, Wanna; but how ? Our parents
bad quarreled about a right of way acseross a
Said, and things bad come to such a pass be
Swoee them that they were at downright dag
gre drawn, and couldn't bear to hear one au
4her'a name. Well, I wasn't allowed to see
your father; and be, poor fellow, who was more
ia love with me than I knew of, pind away till
be lay upon his death-bed. Thanks be to God,
fhe good priest, out of pity to the poor ynong
sallow, reconoiled nor parents, and I was al
lowed to visit him before he died. The tears
some into my eyes when I think of that day; I
wrOn't speak of it; but; a month after that he
was able to go to church with me and our pa
seoat for no to be promised together."
Wanns ire looking hard at her mother, with
glistoning eyes.
Look, yon, Wanno," roaetned the latter,
"your father was just a poor peasant, such as
we are now; but sure and certain it is, thete
Sas that in him that made hinm one of a thli,
send, and so it may well be with our poor liart
The maiden shook her read in thou.ght, with
eyes fixed on the gronud. After a fu.v uno
"aents the looked up aaitn.
"Its strange emonlIh," she said. "that one
n should pine away out of Ihking f"r un
er, just becan', hg's ot a elrvots lt Itperat
aat; for my part, I don't tee how it can he".
Net, mother, toy pior ;father das at I ttu f1r
y ou; so that was*.'t Coont-of-the-way Vi:th
.Bart and Cecilia the mnatter's quite d fiercme,;
that can never cone, to any good. A:i so )'I
. must just knock the foolish thought out of hi.
head."
Mother Ann meanwhile had sunk away into
a deep reverie; she paid no attention to wanat
Waana was saying, and guz it d despairingly
upon the ground. After thus sitting a while in
silence, she sighed heavily, and began to speak
as to herself alone:
"He suffers like a martyr! Kate told him
something yesterday that made bhi e3es
light up with joy; but she told him something
too that made him grind his teeth with vexa
tion. And last night in his sleep he talked and
orled and called out-it quite gave smea fright
aslistened to him I And bow this morning he's
all languid. and paler than ever, and his eyes
look so dim and dead. Alas, alas! my poor
Beast! my unhappy child I"
In the same moment that these last words
*1ll from her lips and sounded through the
room in a tone painfully expressive of heartfelt
grit--juot in this same moment. Bart came in
through the back door with a rake in his hand.
lt k by the tone of his mother's voice, he
Mtood still, and for a while fixed his eyes stead.
ast- y on hers, from which the tears fell fast.
hen, slowly going up to her, he pressed his
to her forehead, and as from his eyes two
im drops fell upon it, in a sweet and almost
Ldible voice:
"My poor deir mother !" he raid ; "ab, for
ye me ! indeed, I cannot help itt"
And again turning about with hit head
bowed and one band before his eyes, lie passed
on out of the house.
Even under the brightsunlight and amid the
universal gladness of nature which surroundoed
him, Bart still could not lift his head. With
stooping gait and apathetic air he dawdled on
along the footpath like an old man bowed down
under the weight of years. One might almost
have tbought that as he was walking ho was
ocooopied in looking for something among the
grass.
From time to time be stood still, muttered
something to himself, plucked a leaf from a tree
- qr bush, rubbed it to pieces in hls i atnd. antd
then, still niurumnring, resntned his course; or
he unconsciously dismembnered the petals of a
dower or listened to the answering call of the
birds.
What it was that. all this said to him he very
likely knew not himself; but. for all that, the
effect upon hin, was profound, and threw Lim
off into a deep reverie, till, waking up again,
he slowly resnamed his onward way.
But all at once, as though suddetrl seized
upon by some more potent thought, he catle toI
a distinct halt, and fthixtg his u)es uponi the
- ground at his feet, in mluch eomtotion nurinutred
out:
"Cecilia, since yesterday I know what you
auffer:-how you are ill trettcd even wi i i
blows how youn are p)iinig awe.y with dtesola
ion tiof heart! And all tbh while, Sot love mtle!
Oh, how cowardly and how w*:tk doe sorrow
make one! I have neither spirit nor strength
morel I'm nervous snd afratd ; I know not
what to do; I can't oollect Ihyself; tmy
thooghts are alloonfused; l'n sick in body and
seol."
A sad and bitter smile dietorted his pale
eo6ntenanoe.
"Bick! ~ ick I" he crited; ".es, lput a line
name on your owardie! But I . i t hlbt. stpirlt
or power to act, what, sthoul.t d t.t. Let her
diet Her that loves tue T 00, tlha: would tie ill
done indeed I BInt-but what. then 1 Kill hiin ?"'
And at this question he starred banck, as if lhe
had udldenly perceived a poi~otouse serptent in
his way, reoady to spring upon httn with opeu
Jaws At. iiarticul.to grotin tf horror broke
slowly fotin hius lsoo ; teene ih renmi ted:
"Ab I there 1." a itio aUboe i!--I y ltuinlOr
alsoul! and thten, itiy nttilther! N., nti; tti,-r..'
so help f,r it, but, to how im,. tueck antd waste
away with orroi ; ito bear tin co.s, ber it oi
to the chutcb3y antll. Ah ll u tii nit !'
SAnd again he purered his Coi'iet', i,t d antlil
spiritless as bofort,, iieoasiig hu hrind to Lti
brehead a.tholgh hie fearert its borahulng.
While the yonug )teasaunt, thua f*11l ot a lltler
lng and of despair, was nmakiing his way t,-i,.l
the shady footpath, whioh attrn every step he
made was briltgug himi nearer to the Aibioy
farm, without, hewer, r, his ing sllate to
eatoh a glmnpse of it, there was p.issi:g ii that
'habitation a bcene of t)pprerasltil Itolt crnel
still than any he could have had the heart to
SImagine.
The door opened. On the threshld appear
-d a young girl, Iale and thin, wi:h a heauvy
bundle nuder hetr art anrd the other b:ttdt
pressed to her eyes. A Ittilt with an otlous
smile upon his countenanc: kepit tbrustiig her
on from behind ttll sha was two or threeo ,eps
forward from the door sil!.
Therefor a wuile the poor girl stood still, as
though it was dtflionlt for her toI leave this
,.apot; neverthelaens, urged on bty lthriatening
words and gesturce of it)e man, she at lIst p)r,
eseded alowly along the path, and turnedl
oaenos the cidsa beside a plantaaton otf )otng
aks. whlcu soont concea ed thebo Abboey ratn
hom her view. She had not yet raised her lihtad,
sad still held her haond bfore her eyes. no
doubt to conceal the tears which trlckle-d
.rm them down her cheeks.
- resently--whetner it was the warmth of
ube son, or the bright light that sunrounded
be, or the voices ofjnbilation that struck her
from every eide, or rather all of these to
that f- oaed her nervous system-she
still, and dropped-her hand Iroe before
ean admiration that seemed partly the
.a of movelty se gased ino the sky
sad let her eye waeder with more and
over more delight over the wide creation. By
degrees sn indescribable smile shaped itself
upon her oountenecoe; her bosom swelled;
ber bead set itself ereot upon her delicate
neck; her eyes sparkled with a new light;
she lifted both her hands aloft, and, in a low
but thrilling tone, exolaimed :
"Liberty I liberty I"
And she made a motion with her arms
through the air, as though seeking to olutoh
with her hands the inflnitespace itself.
For some little while she remained thus
rapt out of herself, till her eyes had wandered
over and enjoyed every object that was within
their reachb. Then gradually her self-con
scoouseass returned. Her head sank again
slowly upon her breast, the old sadness chased
the smile from her oountenanoe; again she
bent her eyes upon the ground and her
thoughts upon her sad lot.
Again a little while, and she proceeded on
her way along the footpath, dreamily musing
as she went. But soddenly, as she turned an
angle of the plantation, a cry of astouiashment
burst from her breast.
" Bart !" she exclaimed ; and even he it was
that stood Iaralyzed with surprise before
her.
The first impression of this unexpected meet
ing called up, a smile of heaven's own bliss
upon the contrenance of each; but a glance
at one another soffiled in a moment to cloud
it over with an expression of sadness and
even affright. Without spaking, they both
bowed their heads and wept bitterly. Bart
was the tirst to raise his eyes again and to
fitud his voice for an exlression of sorrow and
condolence.
'" C(-laha, poor girl, bow thin and palo you
are! '
" And you, Bart, I hardly know you again !"
the maiden sobbed ot., still without looking
np|.
I l" exclaimed the yong man, desperately ;
"whlat does that mattert But you, Cecilia,
that are gooltnei.s aand kindneso itself, an natgel
err upont earth,-that you should have to
.~ifler ho! tilat 30ou sbonldl die, like a poor
.lu ii, lamb, nn,!er that false villain's hands!
It twakes my Wood bil to thiick of it. G.d
be nae:ciful to eoo, or I sball surely one dayl
crush thnat vinoltousi beast's head I But that
tun.l., Cecalii I where are you going to I
'IT wy'v tuarril uie out of door-," she
si 1.i , wi:h a ft ii h i.sat, of tiars.
"' ,.red yo i ti 4. t! 'nr,, !" ia xclairni.il Bart,
aii, it ,'.:igne.ti,., a.d ai -t l b iu L ciut .te,
l;t, this first impulse was noon gone, hy, a"w
G'r;:dalliy ti.o xpr.r'-siobi of his coltnite.su! l-c"
ch:a.ug'd ainto Olie o:f growing sat.,if.iction, :iL d
even Ileasure, till at last, buginutag to 'ie
c'eariy irini the nmatter, he exclaimed, with
trnlusport :
" Tl',rned you oat of doors! What! for good
and alll" "
" Yes, for good and all," was the sad reply.
"Anti you weep, Cecilia?" he cried. "What l
you've been mn outhb long sitting stourning in a
gloomy prison, you've been at, the mercy of a
jailor that has beaten you and tormented you
to death; and, just as we were both in des.
pair, as there seemed no escape for us but the
oburchyard, God gives you your liberty again
-yon're free-and you weep over it I Oh, see,
see bow I take it"'
And lie threw himself on hisknees upon the
gronud, lifted his hands aloft to heaven, and,
with a voice as of one inspired, exolaimed :
"O0 God, Thou bhast released her I Thanks,
oh thanks, for this thy merciful kindness !"
lHere his voice failed him; but be still re
mained on his knees and nurnmured on an in
audible but doubtless still lntenser thanks.
giving.
As tfor Cecilia, she gazed upon him at once
in surprise and admiration. For he was really
a sight far admiration as he knelt there, his
mild sonl showing forth upon his eountena:tce,
his glistening eyes raised up to God ! 8o in
tesan was the expression of thankfulness to
heaven that beamed upon hiT features, thlat
Cecilia., rap- into a sympathetic transport, far
got for :i monent her own circmiuistanens,
while an instinctive feeling of gladlness sunk
into her bosom.
And now, rising from his knees, Bart instant
ly perceived the changed expression of Cecilia's
conntetance : no smile, but something of that
Iine'tah.le srenity which tells at. once of peace
of Iait:d, of happiiesa. lie sblZcal her !y the
haud.
"C(nom', co:n" hlie ex.iaimtid; "my poor
mother w :l ho a, glad! Ctt,,u, it's oI well to
live tu ouiir i Lse! At.id your chair is sta:nding
just in the old pliee ; not: a soul hsss:t in it
siuce. And everytuiug tioe i nmoorulionug altLC
you. q tick, come at~ug !'
oBt sele resisted Lim, at ,1 would not follow
in the direetion he songht to liad her.
" What is It now, Cecilia?" at last he ex
claimed, unneasily ; "won't you come holme to
our house, len T"'
" I must gn on to the town," s':e replied; "I
have a cousin there who is a dresemake ; I
shall get a ark from her, and so earn nmy
bread."
" Bread? work I What does all thant nmeal: '
cried 11 rt; "why, niow-now that I can ust
youn itagill, look into your eyes., im'air youi
speak, tow I feel my spirit doutle; an? if I
aolkl the tlia"grs tff my hands for i:, i a.re stall
be eno'4ai aaad t.o spare for us all. CoLne, coaae
along !"
" For lHeaven's saake don't ask tIO e t III, lthat,
BUrt! It can't be!" answered tlhe maidn,,
un airnful ly.
lie looakd her in the ltac with yes foill at
-o ec'.,a ir w s orrow a ld l ri itd.
"Ah, no, that can never be!' sihe -ep.tated ;
" he Isure of that, dear H rt."
A sudhien chainge srerd to take place in the
Iyoiing laaan's feellu ; agatin a lth downacast
ciunel,lnor he droaiet)i bhis head, while caluily
and t.\llgy ho repliedtl:
'" Ah I)t!'nit seck heart was too full of joy,
andtl I had fa,rgitten. 'o'-be-enri,. Cectla .
I atr tr all I aIIm but a poor peasant lid. anld youi
will oie day ho a rich young Laliy. I see I'm
daontiid to lie!"
li pii.ous atul. plaintivi was liTti tonl inl
ihitch ithi last w ,l rid s wern nilteriid tIhat they
perurdl dl eeply :.-ld pi arf ily intoi C-e',il:t's
l e latrt. nd ' it ' . oe e t., the lt'itg of tli,itl
ienly re ere whi..la ! ailI :hurll to hbeatna ul ir
toiist'i it. ,';,i sti ied ai yii g i, aa n liat's halnd
alaal aih'lrld ii, ihat ajire wvsad a,.p xliu ssuSian
el t'. t i-es i hatr ViiCO
u"lit, , It) t, dear ift 't l,"'' bhe s id, '3,tI'rI
all iii a mtanstk O. aly i, e hiii' clas tr , ra'ate d
lit'; hb's  ail* his Wsill antiod girvii e .aryahiing
to lhirs; I Sal1 aivcir have a stiver lin the
world ."
Ih e younig tIas. t !d l'td ipa his hboad aia
graz ia al her wal-in :lar onii i tcrediulaty, Walle
itentc fr aled ai| , lie laps..
" Yes, yxs, dt'.: it a rt,' Chi ri'|t'te ; t Iea
our uio-ast poor 'a i aiili lf, ev'ery lit."
"' A. ,o r as uilysJfi'" it*u.ate.t. I art iin lais
rirn, tao. uagaiai out of himiia'f flr j.y; "an
ior.)r a n a ir mother it| siater! heavens,
Slisat hattpiiuass! Well then, a'.,,ioas alting; let
tho ,vill kee) bt o neels i ey;i Ia l llnakei yata
rich, lacalms., wit l a wile treaiurme of trietd
hsp and klud f:elangis iand love. Ciotie, cOte
Aud again he seized her hand amd sainha to
alraw Iher oU along with him ; but still ste an
swered sadly :
"No. Ba.rr, it catinot be !"
" Int, aor God'as sake, why not ?'
A crirsion blush of confsiton spread over
ther face to the vory rote of her hair- With
dow)acsst eyes, she inquired:
"l)id mason Jan's widome say nothitag to
you yesterday afternoon y"
" Ai !" he cried; *so she spoke the truth,
then f I didn't dare believe it."
" What would people say of us, Bart ? You
mowst cee yourself that it can never be.i
" And so, Cecilii," he replied, despondingly,
"you're going off into the town, and away
from net and all perhaps to meet wito now
troubles, and to be ost off again there! And
you'll let me die, and my poor mother go siok
with rief, just for the poople's idle talk's
stke 9n
He waited for an answer,.bat shabe neiter
spoke nor looked up. After a while he re
asmed, in a still more urgent tone :
" Come now, Cecilia; you ean sleep with my
mother, and always be with her; and I will
surround you with reepect and love, as though
you were my very guardian angel in person.
And I'll work-work from early in the morn
ing till late at night; and nothing shall be
wanting to make us happy. And you shall
get well again, and strong and blooming, and
bring a blesaing upon our house, as you did
before. Oh, come, come I be a sister to my sis
ter, and a child to my mother."
And with folded heands he seemed to beseech
an answer. The maiden looked at him doubt
folly.
"Oh, Cecilia," he cried, "speak! Think
that there's one up there above us all who
knows best whether what we do is right or
wrong."
A smile fall of meaning gleamed upon Ce
cilia's countenance; she drew her breath
heavily, like one that is struggling with some
weighty resolve.
" Well, teen," she replied, "so be it: your
mother shalt be my mother! I'lI come home
to her as ifI was her own child."
A cry as shatp as if it bhad been the expres
sion of severe anud sudden pain burst from the
young peasant's breast; he clasped his hands
together over his eyes, while two gushing
fountains of tears burst forth from under his
fingers and trickled down his cheeks in oupione
stremos. The maiden was at a loss to compre
heud this violence of emotion, and essayed to
calmn hiln with soothing words.
'" Ah ! ' lie presently sighed out, at the same
time LJigbhing nervously through his tears,
"there's i.ain in j)y too! A strong sudden
'lose of it tries both heart aod hetid sorely;
bit it's over now. Come, dear friend, come
along!"
Tuey now strack into as:itrher path. As for
Bart, lihe was totally a ohanged Juan. On he
walked, with head erect and looking proud
ly about him as he wunlt; his cheeks glowed
with quickly-circling blood; his eyes spark
led with blis-ful excitement ; the motio-ns of
his arms antd legs wereof a somewhat exc:e-ive
eiiergy, as thlinug~, jlst awikLoning from a long
slioibt.r, he wao hbaking off from them the ut
fects of ir; ever and anon broken ejaceltiouos
ait (,tli .1 huts"' trIom hie. lit s.
'O 1 G,,d ! oh God!" at last he cried, "what
a blh ve .. l ti:.tg lite ie! Loik you, Cet il, 1'1
-ithk haiui on the liru, to|d itate hoopt, ii ti
.tard ; you shall duos yout d:d btfore-- ia l t
l, t ore-.ta:king fur the ueigihbors;; :h
w:ll look ttier the cow; niither wi.t .: iy a'
hbute 1itt: 3ty anid a ,l for us ; and wi a;ever
i:ly of its c(:,t i got, wi.·'l put it all tIugetihr arti
so iiJako a s:tt u'gs'-tox. Theitl well b:ty " tr
otlher cw,e, and t,.k a b; Iti, tool: land; ar:t wt'
kouiwsa w-Ly, i: time perhaps we may r.aue so
far as to Lirea servant. And perhaps it tim-'
the little Chapel farm will beest lappy a house,
and. with God's lileesiaog, so prisperoui,, that
you'll nover think again of that ginm ugly
prison 3 under and all you've sol',:red there."
"Oh Bart, how beautifully yon can talk!"
murmured the maiden, in deep emotion; "it
will be a heaven upon ear'h I"
' That's just what it most be" pursued the
youth, in the same joyous strain. 'And I'll
plant our garden all lutall of the nicest tlowers,
with foot paths between the beds; and I'll
make bird-cages to hang up here and there
and everywhere, that there may be nothing
bnt singing and merry voloes all about; and
'itl learn all sorts of new songs to sing, and
stories to tell, and dances to dance, and thank
God on my knees every day of my life that he
sent you to ue. lleavene, heavens, what a lif +!
dear Ceoihia, what a life it will be! Ilatlook
yonder by the draw-well: there stand my
mother and Wi.nna."
And as lie uttered these last words he left
Cectlia:, and started off toward the cottage like
all alrrow trothl a how. Nevertheless,. with all
his haser, h1 fonnd breath to keept shonting, as
he ran, " Mother! Wanna I" in a voice that re
sounded fir and wire over the tields.
his miot eric turned about at the sound in no
little ,is oniabhtut, which was greatly in
creased when ase beheld the speed with
which lie came coursing on toward her. As
for Wanua, his strange gestures a: d unintel
ligible cries so dticonuertnd her that she stood
with mouth wide open looking first at. Brt and
thou at l Itnr motuer, as aslki.g our a ,solution of
this songular enigma.
lBut befote Mother Ann habu fouind time or
words to express her autotirhleut, on came
Bart, InshiUK, paltlng, and exnilting, till he
was close to her, and proceeded at once to ex
plain tie tertier as well as his want ol breath
would let Lim.
"Mother," he cried, "dear mother! sister
Wanta!. l'u oared ! Laugh, siug and bemerry!
Here's CecClia:! yonder she ',atimes: they've
Stl nued her out ot doore; she's as poor hs we
are, she's disinhetrted, shl'll come and live
with us atlun be your ohill, mother. Look, look,
there she is! Already she's sniling to you, the
dear creature. Ah, now yon sha'n't have tosit
cryinig any m'.ore; I'tm so strong, and so well,
and so tiserry ; hais, ha!
" Iwn with care. and away with sorrow!
dupry to-dat auid happy It-morrow!
The poo(r moth.er looked upon her son with
eyes beaming i t til unspeIakable joy. At the
Ii s, momenet she hid bIeen in fear for hissenme ;
hbt the tone ot his voice speedily reasseured her.
and the alppaeratcs of Cecilia. who now carum
rlllUinug p with hastenid tep, ,so)on lefst to
further rnoo for any dolubt a. all.
IBy a sin'ultanins nilvemout Mother Ann
slud Cecilia exterl.d their arms toward one
sllother, t;ie one io deep emlotion, the other
hibeamin, g with iew-found happiness. The
maiden oilsp.d ,t-er adopted mother around the
eeck ; the ulotther pressed upllti her second
dalg:itiers' cheek tile kiss of welcomne, glowing
as a hsCiti'lattio f'ritom theeuunl's inuost, holiest
dern~ri of love.
II Art lookid on the moving spectacle q'iivor
ing with buas. fears trickled down hius ceeks;
he raised hlis eyes :to pi:y,'r to Heaven, and
then, as ivlirc inle by Lat ritelin rS, liaed his
he:it aoili .tie drawinlg-macti-:i. u: the well.
As f.,r WV.mtca, sheu dalincl ifor j ,y, clapping her
liatiils exui tgly, ti.d 'xeli , ~ii u --
"' h t I i! oi t ;l! t i'n Ail Lntio '!ight at
cAs· o bl i t hlI i lt?'!us r'iiOvt" red hil-h
iis i r.fe-. . f i oitsiie i , ig . g in l ito ing n r,
~. Icnla lild Wmit al towa iRd ti door f lthe
. Coni' ! tu) e li '!t e ti id. it
T''ey ditI iii ii' caid. antt IIu was alout'. to I
ilhuit , i 'i ist : biut as It' was ilig sio b e ue t
,tivieil t, 5 ln.r aildow lK ti, tiastetiag utt wi tI
iher child lotig ,lie of tie f'itpiths. Is hetld
his liind, an ll with hisII he iltit of the door
Si ntil nltlitig urgent 'gus to her to hasten all
iIse cusli. As ltre eutcreit the forecourt, he
cl a it mrt ised :
• tll ck, it ick, K te; it's all j y now! Ce
cili it tietol ! quitck!"
Aid, hitllyltug hier in, he close t the door.
CtiAPTER V0I.
Since ('ecilia ba I taken up her abode at the
Chapel fara, the humble cittags had become
indeed a plae of j y and pleasatlness, even as
Birt in his uistr ourat f delight had pictured
Eviverl ithig theire was happinss and peace
Brt worketd away heartily the whole ,iy long
and sauig witihout ceasing alt his work; tle
freshness and t vigor of oth came bacn to
hiun: a continual smile shone ution his coun
tenauce, accmpatited by the rosy hue of re
tnrunog heahl h; every word that fell from his
ltps was full t-f life and spirit; he was the
very living; image of light-herirtedn~iss.
Wriat gove hlui the most pleasure of all was
thre co'ovictiin that Croelia did not regret her
oad bome. T'ue enough, sbe not unfrequuntly
lapsed into a tit of silent sa ness when abe
thought upon her aged uncle and piotured to
herself with same alarm all that he might so
easily have to endure in the solitude of the
Abbey farm; but these oocasional painful sur
mises coald not weigh for meet againat the
eonstant happines which aem found in the
tender good will of Bars and his mother, nor
against the undieturbed serenity of her daily
life. From her cheeks, too, the ash bhue of
suffering gradually disappeared; and while
habitually quiet and even reserved in manner,
yet she would ever and again light up into one
of those fairy smiles which can only proceed
from a heart at peace within iself.
Cecilia worked at dressmaking for the neigh
bors, at which, being an uncommonly skilful
band, she made a very pretty bit of money, not
a little to her gratification and to the enoonr
agement of Bart and herself in their ambitions
hopes and plans for the enlargement of the
farm. True, the savings-box received but a
few stivers a week; sometimes indeed even
nothing at all, but sometimes, on the other
hand, a piece of silver. Still its contents in
creased; and when Bart came to his mother's
chamber and merrily shook the box which held
the collected savings of their love and indus
try, the sound it gave was pleasant to the ear
and fall of promise to the heart.
The young lover had made it his especial
business so to dress and decorate his mother's
house as to render it a pleasant home for its
beloved guest; and for this purpose had tasked
to the uttermost his powers both of invention
and execution. In the little garden behind
the little yard he had laid out little beds,
divided by little footpaths and edged in with
ever-flowering thrift. Quite behind, close by
the hornbeam hedge, he had put up a trpllie
and ever it trained a bower of honey-suckle
and clematie, with a bench on either side-one
for his mother and Cecilia, the other for Wanna
and himeelf-where on Sundays after service
they would all come and sit together, and sing
and tell pleasant tales, and rejoice in calm di,
coarse over the sweet trauqaility of their life
and GOdil's manifold mercy and goodness.
In the garden grew all kinds of flowers; not
only the well-loved lowly plants that are native
to the heaths and thickets of the Kemrpen (or
Campii.e, al extensive moory district in the
neig'aboo:t,.,d of Autwerp) but also many of
thte whichi btve been qaturalizod from other
regiots,-rhe l3t a oweeatnt to Bart from Frank,
the undler gatrdener at the Manor-honee.
Agaitni ;hio house itself unug several bird.
cage., fromn which inctd-rltily reso1nnded the
..rp, clear no tes of their temoatee; and pigeons
tn tanio tlt.t they would cone and take thtir
food ot of Ciciliu's haeDl ad tthe r :oaises in
It!, roof. ad strut.ed with p turtir bt,:aso
i alt: t io pa:trh. At :he tcrtler- of thre
,beds wele i, 'e1id uptightt stick,, ittanrrig n:i
- aii': ".,:rirnt :i:1r1 tll- t ih wLtc:t turrnted witih the
whit:, et fi..urs o'f tfencers in at trtiod or gamne
h ot~s Tai 'tg attl, wbhone ws o.'n. ever ~, tnut
Ie in "La, directiont froi, t whichi it bltow: all of
iheui matters whichl irtr had devised and
exit.atdil for CecilA's plianure and aot of love
ful her.
Wauna had her full share in thle common
bappineza, which she entered iur'o with the
calleslhht bh artedne.a ofa chld, like achild
too rejiciig in the felicity of the rest.
As for M,tth-r Ann, she was overwhelmed
with attentions and demonstratious of afnlc
tion ; and as she saw her children's eyes beam
ing pleasure upon her at every glance, she
certainly would not have changed her lot with
that of the lady of the Manor. In fact, the
poor little cottage of the Chapel farm was a
very paradise upon earth.
Very different was the state of things afthe
gloomy abode from which Cecilia had been ex
pelled, and which since her departure had
been so solitary and so silent, so deathly still,
that it stood there among the trees like some
fated building smitten with the curse of
heaven. Sometimes for two days together
would the laborers who were at work in the
fields about not once see the door open. The
mysterious house, with its creviced walls and
broken window-panes, inspired all the villagers
with an uneasy fear; it was only the most
citirageons among them that would willingly
after nightfall have taken their way through
its vicri LJy.
And now, for the last two Sundays Uncle
J tn had not even been oiut to church, aud
I'hys, whllt, asked alter him had replied that
be was con tintd to hils edi with the gtot ; but,
thoughi it was very well known that he had
occasionally soatered ft,in this co:nplaiat be
fore, yet, c:,minu fromn Ttre, this explaination
hardly obta.nted universal credii:. However,
old Jan' ii nierly way of life had mnado tim so
uttpopular tint no one semei t,. troli,:o tilu
self any turt-er ab*,nr tih:n---it, onie bItiL uniy
Cetcilia. whoil hi wept bittet tears a.t hturtug
of his illeesn,
(To be continued.t
THLE -UINVS OF C.i TI.TI l;E.
Mr. W. E Robertson, a Sotish gent'lemtan,
haviug recently visited the site of this once
proud antd fsuious city, givens an ccoulnt of
the present condition of its rains, and ,x,,reSets
regret at the wholesale destruction of the few
but beanutifl remaining monuments of its de
parted glory. Mr. Rbtersorn writes:
Landing at the li'tle town of Goletta, which
is the portl of 'l'uni-, and distant fro:n it about
ten miles, I pitt upe at the hotel there, kept by
an Italian. A wide ih't suallow lagoon stretches
ont toward the uio,lernt city on the lef., with
whmich conuttnn iteistn i- kipL In;i by train,
which run at intervals during the tday. A mile
or two out fromt the st.iil uitl, ,.n a wider pla.teau,
we coule upon the foullal.tilltrsn of a wa:!l soonre
three feet in thickness. '.1,lolwing this for
three mrileo we comne to a ,:nt t! -ugihel ground
covered with fragments of broken marble
coaumiis, with here and there a heai of ruins
fast crumbling to decay. Seated atloig these,
we conternplate the history t f a city which
was once toe rival of Rome, atnd to -ards which
the eyes of the civilized world were turned.
liere liannihal, a lien a litr unint years of age,
was led to rlst altar bty .tis fitiher lIainllear,
and there, a ith his hanitt upon it, made t.o
swear eternal ht-itility to the lvtitan people
an oath i it:ch lis :iftr-lito proved bu'I not
been fiorgotten by hi,n. 0I r this hillldoe, in
lat:'r .e:tll$, the R.)llti; t etlvnl.Y stot 1; andi one
of ittne,. atlt ressting the (Urrlttnagnian oriettate,
said, t, gl.eg his t.o ,i over his ure,, li this
fold nItty piaOe it" war-; ctohtIse 5tn wtevich
3on will have."' "(tive u which nu will," is
tti) ret!,lI. " L'r on tailk wilr," .n,a it IR)-Oman
ertvoty, lt.tting his togn: ftrll ].,.::; and war,
lit-rce ail litrg.c.tottiuued, a.in ot.to toTre
wageitd t.'tweei these boat'ie fircoes. Loe ronly
I tenlin- 111 ally way cortrlpl rp t itt. tie reservoirs
and the h(lq ,tdnct. lTUe ftrmor are in ag )d
state oe' Ip.eaerviation, anl are ctusructtctei on
a :ale of grtint u3n'ulicence. They are
calculated to ttld a rrg, asnpply if water.
'l'nTsn, have all lrbeeni arc .ed over, but some
otf the arches are beginning to give way,
andrl have tunthnled it:, the tanks. Round the
ularg!l of these poit'I pIaths extend, iavedl with
nutall pieces of prali.lhed marble abunt an inob
sqnare. All around may be picked up the
fraigiments of ,rokeu pottery, broken j.rs, eto,
which, doiub:less, have bhun in use for the
carrJiing of water by tbe maidens of the city
The lively titration of tlte city, etandiing on
that 1,rotinrlet., hleadlanud against which thu
waves of the Muditoaranean beat, as in days
when tht Roman flHet went down beneath
them, went far to captivate those who ultima
tely bec.tune its conquerors. Thatit might not
be a - itc-tsible to loreign invasion acoottuta
in all Ir:triability for the change of situation
io the it,,re modern city of Tonie. Irwai with
rertr I ftonted among the material collected for
bntldinpg purposes at the town of Goletta parts
of mtrble columns with carved work of the
most niagnificnt description, all of which are
being broken up to erect some humble stead
togs. The Italians and Spaniards o" the Mid
die Ages onve adorned their places with mar
bles frco Gartrhage, atnd the Veuetians have
their freitis and c,lunmns. which were once
the admir-tion of Dido and Hannibal.
&l hinds of fancy and etsple dry goods at
I lowest eshb prices at B A W. Croeasrs, 147 OCaUsl st.
' WESTERN PRODUCE, LIQUORS, ETC.
SDRY SALT MEATS, ETC.
E.ooo IbA D SAY SALT' HULDEES.
411,0 0 ib DRY SALT CLEAR BIBS and CLEAR
811lDE4.
In ouns BAOON SBOULDER9.
4"A0 bble HEAVY 1Y. P()RK.
StleureeCebols8.g OANVASED HAMS.
I tiUeroen P.&It( s). 0. HAe.
150 kegns PIGS' PElT.
75 balf brrels PIG8' FEET.
a For ,le byolale M ATr COMPTON.
Jl441 W Ghoalero s 1e(3 i and 10,5 poydra st.
FLOUR, MEAL, BUPTER AND WHISKY.
500 bbl. Chuoe ExUtra AMVILY FLOUR.
20 blta Kiln.Dried MEAL.
75 nrklne Uhoioe GOSHEN BUTIER.
50 flerkn Chot.g WS*,ERIN BUTTERL
1.17 bla MAG.NOLIA WHISKY
1511 bb'n ORANGE VALLEY WHISKY
110 bhOl PAuIL JNIN is IOURBUI WtISKY.
75 bola Oboice Old BOURBON and RYE.
SEED POTATOES.
9(10 hhbi Boston JACKSON WHITES.
210 bise IlO(TO2 EARLY ROSE.
2iO bble PEERLERS.
21 hble. PE&:1l BLOWS.
1,0 bb'e PI4K EY YES.
ALL STAPLE AND FANTlY GROCIRIES.
For sale by McGIR&TH & OOMPTON.
Ijal4 m Wholesale Giocere, v3 and 1(5 Poydras at.
WESTERN PRODUCE
AND
2(0.000 pounds Dry Salt SHOULDERS.
150,I0) pounds Dry Salt CLEAR SIDES.
10,0o(0 rounds Dry Salt CLEAR RIB SIDES.
25 casks BACOY (LEAR SIDES.
40 casks BACON SHOULDERS.
210 bearele Standard New MESS PORK.
5) tierces Sugar cared HAMS. various brands.
50 braxe Sugar cured NIIRAKFAST BACON,
canvased and uncanvased.
100 tlerces Choice REFINED LARD.
It0 half-barrela Choice REFINED LARD.
319 kegs Chuico RI;E INED LAED.
15' buckets Choice IKPINED LAIRD.
200 packagea Spicod PIGS' FEEI, barrnle, halves
and kegs.
l10 poakages Pickled SPARERIIBS. tiarces and
barrels.
23 barrel. Pickled PIS' TONGUELS.
50 parka;eu Cho:ca T'estern BUTTER, firkina
and tubs.
:0 barrels Old CHICKEN-COCK WHISKY.
25 half barrels Old CHICKEN-COCK WHISKY.
Ii bbl. Baltiore RYE WHISKY. very superior.
I1)0 barrel, Western RECTIFIED WHISKY.
50 half.bbs. Western RECTIFIED WHISKY.
In store and to arrive.
BYRNES & BRO.,
a7 Im 66 POYDRAS STREET.
E. CONER(Y. E. CONERY, JIl.
E. CONERY & SON,
(Established in 1846.)
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
AND
Dealers in Western Produce,
CORNER OF CANAL AND DELTA STREETS
dell 71 ly NEW ORLEANH.
J T. GIBEONS,
UIEAI.I IN
GRAINt, CORNMEAL AND HA',
37, 59, 61, 63...New Levee Street...57 50, 61, 63 1
auI3 76 Vl Corner Poydras.
,J' McCAF'FREY,
DEALER IN
JAY, GJIA["' CORNMEAL, FLOUR,
West,-rn Produce Coneta:rtl on, Hand.
Ht and :30.... . .Poydras Street-.......28 and 30 T
Corner of Fulton. p
u1376 Iy NEW ORLRAInS. at
NEUTRAL SP;ITlFS. Ii
I am Reetitfing and Intend keeping on hand a very
pure article, utlhrely d.,)nid Iof flvor
Besides tie Choicrt and Medium qualities of
French and Domestic Brandies, ¶
I have on hand vrrv choice IRISH WHISKY, also
the chboicet. of SI;OTCl1 WIIHIKY. pure old Bourbon
and Rye Whiskies, te " all the melulnm qualities of
Whisky. F&tILY 1IITgtS on draught, equal if
not superior to any of the bl,,tle). and at lees than half
the price. Holland G,n Sbchu:pps on draught, better (I
than the bottled; J,e.ea c Rurm. Krug Champpgne,
Cordial., and ,every had of goods in rey hlneat the
very lowea t prcoes. It would he well to call before
buying elsewh1uro. EDW. BIURIRr.
mvn Iv Il1. I-6 snd 1- T"honnton Ico street.
MISCELLANEOUS.
NOW WE'VE Gor IT.
- it
OUR YOUNG FOLK'S MAGAZINE,
]BLAUTIAF'LLY ILLUSTRATEtD.
Ioued mnonthly. Contains 44 pages. Siont by maIl,
pInt'-:;ail. it l f, per p tiarr . : tu C c,,rlcja 15 celttd.
..Tr e .!e i"- t: o '\t ow .lolr . Saluco l toLpi a Ili.
2 Agents olt.o [ Adllrro
OUK YOUNGJ lOLIC') S MAGAZINE.
1 14 Iml 1ox 3 "t. Bccuo n. lMan.
STRICTLY F'1i lIDI)EN
AT
COGAN'S
CLOTHING HOUSE,
19...........-...Canal Stroeet.........., 19
It it stricty for biddon to allow anu ill.Sttirg garuoent
to It vo the hI to'
Our splendid and completo etckh of
Fall and Winter Clothing
in.ll of our own tnilke, beiug cut and made in the
hoore by flrs-c:l o 'altloro Irols tIe n'rweat patterns in
Cloi, L)laLunls anld Ca,"tlmor.ie
We pride our.trolv upon thd ELEGANT MAKE.
EXtIEL.LLENT GUTU. li, stIIL" M'ATEILIL and
LOW PRICEY of our Castom Made Clothing for men,
youths anli boys.
A- FEW OF OUR PRICES
Durable IBUSINES SUITI, from Ii tio to 1,.
FALL and WINt'FiR etll't'i. Irom SI' to 415.
Elernt DIAGONIAL SUITS. fron. $13 to $19 5.
Drea ICLACK SUI t'S, from $15 to S't.
Square Cut1 SACK COA'S, from $3 to 19.
Prince Albert FROCK COAT4 Irom 4w to 614.
Black Cloth FRO)I:K COAT:/, from S.) to $15.
St.lish CAiiIMERE PANTS, from $2 75 to $3.
Black DOESKIN PANTS, from $4 to $,i 5.
Fine JEANS PANTS. from I lo50 to $2 75.
Fashionable DRESS VESTS, from 1 50i to 1' 50.
Boye' SCHOOL and I)RESS SUI L'US, ftrom 64 5 toe10.
Also, a special litne of Fal aend Winter CLOTHS.
DIAGONALS. etc. from which measouree are taken to
order at equally low prices.
COGAN'S CLOTHING HOUSE,
19 Canal street.
Between the Customhbonu nd the River.
Open nntil I o'oloek P. ML on Sundays. fe m76 1
£lSCELLANIE0AiE
Don't Spare Printer's Ink'
There's Millions in it!
NOW IS THE TIC,
Betw. Camp & Magazine, NEW ORLEºt
A. M. MILLER, Proprietor.
Expressly fitted sip for expeditious work in the
following line :
FINE BALL OUTFITS,
Pamphlets, Catalogne Sales,
By-Laws, Bill Heads,
Letter Heads, Show Bills,
Dray Receipts, Business Cards,
Tags, Notices,
Account Sales, Hand Bills,
Dodgers, Envelopes,
Labels, Certificates,
Cotton Sales, Ftuneral Notices,
Druggist's Labels, Election Tickets,
Annual School Catalogu s,
And in fa't everytv ing in the shape of Printing.
Folly supplied with the latest
NEW TYPE
 PRESSES I
And gt:ur(:.tt-e g'ool work at lowest rates.
Ruling and Biudin2 in a!Wils various Brancha
,lCountry Orders Solicited.
Cheap Printing!
o ': OOK and OB p
PRINTING OFFICE,
i 112 & 114 Fogaras Street,
Near Camp, New Orleans, La.
We are prepared to execute with dispatch, In
the very beat style, all kinds of
PRIN'IN'l-,
PRICE CURRENTS, BUSINESS CARDS,
S MERCIIANTS' CIRCULARS, CHEOCKS,
DRAFTS, PROMIISSORY NOTES, 0
I. READINOS, INVOICES, P
ACCOUNT SALES, DRAY RECEIPTS,
STEAMBOAT, RAILIIOAD, STEAMSIP,
AND SHIP BILLS LADING,
MANIE5TS, LABELS, CATALOGUES, a
WEDDING AND VISITING CARDS,
IIANI) DILLS, SHOW CARDS, PO.TERS
B1LLS OF FARE. ETC., ETO.
Cheap Printing
OUT-S-SELLING IIMMENSELY
CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION
DELIBBD D A ILLUSTM.ATA.
The only complete, ricdly illustrated, lows prig work.75
page., tely 12.55 'lto,aI of tIe enrie netory, gd
buildings, wonderfol exhibits, crourtetle . great days,
etc. Tue best obest' of 1Is years to coin money fetM
s everenody wanes his work. 1,00o Sag.tt spolnten
Hnt lour weeks, ,LLtO wanted. For fail particulars
addeas qu cklv
HUBBAIRID DBROTIRRS Pabliahbre,
,33 Sansom street. Philadelphla. Pa.
CAUTION-Be not deceised by premature booka
aenutuing to be " , flicial," ete. dol03m
THE NEW ORLEANS
SANITARY EXCAVATINU COMPANY,
(Incorporated by an Act of the Legislatuors, w
Exclusive Pllvileg. of
EMPTYING VAULTS, PRIVIES. SINKS, ETC.)
Are now in full operation, and are prepared to perfor
the above work with promptness and dispatch.
The advantages derived from the use of the
.Odorless Excavating Apparatus,
as used by the Comtpany, are that the work ca be
performeedat any hour of the day or night, the thorosh
manner in which the deposits are re removed. the sabe
of all offensive odors, the short Sloace of time re9ar1
to(an ordinary sink beig emptied i from ten tore'
mlnnsel, and, above all, ITS CIiEAPNESS.
All orders left at the Company's ,fio, N o. 153 Io"
mon street, or nent t, the Iostfice, Box No :,, wmll
receive prompt attention. ..6
OFFICE AMERICAN COTrlN TIE C.
LIMITED.
47............ Carondelet HIrrect.----.
NsW OeLKtNt.
IRON COTTON TIES
We beg to inform the publie b .atSr~ ,
through our regular establiabhed agents to a1
trade in any quantity with the following c
TIE8:
The Arrow and Open Side Slot; Beard & B"
Lock Tie; Branch, Crookes & Co.'s LeAk TIe
We alao beg to asononco that the inD l-- ae s
Beard & Bro. and Branch, Crooke a o. i00
merged into the Amerlsan Cotton Tie Co. rIe _
The Company's New Orleans agene ardd
Btone & Toti Ogdena & Bel, chis _
BFrhad, Win. Dulo, D L. Baadeii La o l.
For the Amerioan CottonTie Co Lmt
l 3 t. W. AIsssNL. 00o.
S;l21'!:;·sihlkLa~" i6;,, ~ I

xml | txt