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The morning star and Catholic messenger. (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, February 04, 1877, Morning, Image 3

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086284/1877-02-04/ed-1/seq-3/

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* "*RaI Catholic Messenger..q
saw i t 1A. 4ws v aAr a . Z
811t L NXBW ITZBB. O
aeh.
wbore there is a soaroity of coal I
and . heep machines have been Invented d
for twlet ig ste*wand hai intoompsot sticks iI
for fuel. - 11
orenah tourlet, on etis t tho rCetentul ft
AsNani.', wrote home: "AJmerIoan> live
well up to their income, and iMsere their lives 1i
for the balancea"
The eatoher of the Harvard bell nine will be e
* gqasee.lbkiog~iellow on the ball-ground, as
he iba invented 'a brase wOO ack to prevent 7
blows La the face.
+A _ rllt juror rwoe g.got exo0sed by Mr. h
, ' at Oax, of ah 1ddlsex Seasions, be
a u hie was o agd er With a large small
le uade. and hbe il ure that he was carry. D
the infeetion about with him. The Judges
was more reluoosnt than the other jurors, but
nally let him go.
There were built last year in the United wj
States 9,442* miles of new railroad, Texase ad ti
C-lifornia being the leading 8tates. having w
rupeettnlly 3871 and 3501 miles. In New York ha
there were bOilt 69f miles, in New Jerse) 84 i,
and in Connectiont 7. an
It is eaid that the railway ofloials in Eng.
land are annoyed at the bad example of the
Marquis of Waterford in riding bhird-olaes. tb
They tried to break him of the habit bygiviog en
a sweep a eat beside him. but he simply ro;
ght a Aret olass ticket for the sweep, and dn
oree do his former seat. ad,
Hooepathy appears to be making headway all
a Franoe. ,Prom etatistios just publisbed bybel
he Academy of Science we learn tha&there are
bomemopathic doctors in regular praotiee in
Is and ever 300 in the provinces. Bine 1869
bosopatbio hospitals have been founded C
two in Parts and one at Lyons tra
A remarkable painting, "The Dying Sa- fro
leer," has been placed on exhibition at Leil- ion
o by the artist, Prof. Emil Pisohan. A peculiar Cal
Stre of the work ia that near by toe eyes Lie
m closed, as required by the conditions of Sta
e soene, but that at some distance they ap. Job
open and turned to heaven. con
The most expensive newspaper published in PlC
aril is the Art, the yearly subscription to dia.
hloh is 124 gold, and the cheapest is the of
Boss. Peusee, a religions weekly, whioth costs tak
only twelve cents a year. The oldest of Parisian und
journals is theJournal General des al io i, which tim
as now in its 247th year of publioation. T
The protracted financial depression in Aus. ren
tro-Hongary continues unabated. Daring the re
put year 1,5561 rms became bankrupt, besides was
41 lImited liability companies, representing 20
eapital to the amount of 64 000,000 dories. At fro
a recent Cabinet connel in Vienna the finance Bar
ministers of Austria and Hungary urged that the
no further demands should be made upon tax. rol
paper unless the necessity was overwhelming hu
The ether day, in pulling down an old house I17C
in Yorkshire, England, the following bill was that
found: Cap
a. thad
17b7-Fept. T. Beef, e n 7 ...........t......... at
Do. I5 . ........................ ..
Oct. A beast's hea...d............. .....1 O mor
Showing that beef was then about 33. per the
pound. Now it is 1ails. 2d. mail
Valentine, the Virginia sculptor, while at the
Staunton last fall, was abarmed with the sing. 80
lug, by a little blind girl, of a song in whioh Cap
oourred the line, "When shall I behold thy five
face I" The music, the words, and the tonuching and
presence of the little girl, with her hands put nnm
up as if in mote appeal, made a picture upon host
the artist's mind which he has reproduced in then
marble at his studio in Richmond. dian
A French weekly journal entitled L'Echo de first,
-Deu Monder is now published in this city by refer
Mr. Alfred M. Cotte. It is a sheet of twelve and
pages, of convenient form, Catholic in religion aai.
and conservative in polities Its issue of
Saturday last announces that Mr. Cotte has re-. wa
celved through the obliging intervention of his nd
Eminence, Cardinal McClookev. the apostolic an
benediction which was sent fronm Rome on Dco. o
9, 1876.adop
he farmors, wro usually complain that their to r
oldss is den id adeqiate representation in legis- trie
lative bted.e and tnat the lawyers monopolize r
all power and honor, have no cause for achWar
omplair in Maineatlesat. A mejoriryor efect
members axe farmers, merchants and manufec
turers. There are only two lawyers in the could
Senate and nine in the House. Seven Senators army
out of the thirty-one and seventeen Represen- of the
istives out of 151 are college graduates.
A German professor, Dr. G. A. Fischber, of Thi
Barmen, is about to undertake an exploring relate
expedition into the interior of Eastern Africa,
and will make the experiment, which he will Kuc
be the first of African travellers to adopt, of rabbit
taking carrier pigeons along to convey mes- teenti
sages and reports of his progress to Germany. has be
The station for sending the birds on their coats
"omeward flight is to be located at Za zibar. The c
e pigeons are of the flnest quality, and have which
een tested in dying matches, tug of
s, James Gordon Bennett could not have been thein
familiar with military statistics, when he de- thei
honed, with a shiver, May's proposition to bode
tle affairs with cavalry sabers. He did not printu
now how very harmless these weapons are. ,,,re,
e surgeons' reports of the casualties of the h n-h,
ancoPrussiau war says that though thou- which
ads of gallant men, armed with sabers, once a
god at eaoh other with the mostsangulnary puseiri
ntentions, there was, all told, but six men who prot
et their fate at the edge of the sword. an infi
The Netherland Association for the Promo- phurol
tion of the Publio Welfare offers a prize, com- when
petition to be open to all the world, for the you w
best treaties, in popular style, with especial to the
reference to the laws and present condition of geese I
the Netherlands, on the question, " What is
the best mode in which the State, the Church,
menioipal corporations, charitable institutions, Most
and individuals may give relief and supportto the ahi
the poor " No treatise is to exceed ten octavo Pope,
Epages, and it may be written in German, Dutoh, dimin
Wreach, or Enghlsh. The eessaeys must be sent may n'
in before August 1,1877, and are to be addressed ooosio
to the BSoretary, P. M. G. von Hoes, in Am- Pope
sterdam. Honse,
At the close of 1876 there were published in not, w
Paris 836 newspapers, as against 754 at the end er e
of 1875. Fifty-one are political dailies, being tene e
an inorease of 15 in the year. There are 85 In
weeklies dealing with questions of political lodly
fnauoe, 74 journalsof travel and adventure, 74 offoer
medical and chemical, 68 fashion journals, 66 rom, a
devoted to law, 54 to illustrations, 52 to liters- to lk
ture, 49 to religion, 43 to solence, 31 to agrioul- ",
lure, 2-2 to tbe army and navy, 20 to geography "letthe
and history, 20 to edouctIon, 16 to sporting, 9 hae i
to architecture, 8 to musieo, 7 to theatre, 4 to Th
cheoglogy, 3 to photography, and 17 to mia- volome,
Ceolneous information, There are also 14 re- tion h
views and u'agsznes. t t
'the egblatt comments at length upon the the sori
ber polritical sooty which it boasts of interrol
ling trecently unearthed at Mouow, and intelligi
f hhi gage,,s s spresd itself in many parts Pope I
Is te r cssan Empire. The title of the society right;
t- remy ralelt The main objsct of this Insti- Greek ti
ll toa is to drestroy the Imperial throne, expel coat at
u.t ne princes f the blood and the principal bitter tr
Iptionaries of the State; to establish a re- " And
Sbtalio, and divide Rnssia into five independent terrogat
bhee, to be sutject to a federal Constitution. " An
o hramyarlet (the Red Grooms) hadintended officer, a
>eerabe urond up their programme at St. poet fr
stueberg, if the treahers~ of some of their look, " ii
terst or the keeness of the police, had no;
sted their pu . Th polios have tat
Jl th mlade . gUrt iSI1rts to worm out Foun
-eta -, Mdsbeescceeded sa·ariw
The erisl in the watch trade is the main
question occupying public attention in 8wit
zerland, as 150,000 peraone obtain a living by
watchmaking. One of the ohieft anues of de.
cadence le the division of labor, which has al
most reached te limits, a repeating wath
passing through 130 different hands before
d being delivered to commerce. As some of the
branohes are easily learned, many unskilled t
person soughbt work at watchmaking, wloh i
thas led to deterioration in workmanship and a
d derease In wage. In 1864 there were imported I
,k into America 169 000 cheap rSwiss watches; in u
1872, 366,000; in 1873,204 000, From that time t
Isa forward, in consequence of American home
ye oompetition, the hgures have fallen off to
roe 187,000 in 1874, and 134 000 in 1875. The
Wal ham Watch Manu&cketring Company now
be employs 1360 hands, turning oat 425 watches
as daily. France also has, dturing the last few Oi
nt years, become a competitor. o
Most persons who have any acquaintance ti
r with the literature of chess have heard of
the games said to have been played in the "
bIl Middle Ages with living chessmen. Lord Lytton ai
. recently revived this amusement in India. t
a During hid visit to Mooltan, last month, his
ft lordship, after receiving and replying to an ad
dress from the munioipality of the city en- i
gaged, we are told, "insa novel gams of chea t
with Col. Millett. The ohms board, if such a vi
d term may be allowed to a carpet of red and ot
k white aalico with oheokers a yard square, t
'k having been spread in front of the hall, .ches- F
men, meb and boys, dressed in opposing red y
and white uniforms appropriate to the variona hi
. pieces, were marched in and took their places.
ie Then by word of command each piece moved to
. the square indicated, and a very lively same
g ensued, ending in an eamy victory for thbe Vice- i
y roy." An Emperor of Morocco who onus in- th
du lled in a similar amnaement is said to have lai
added a terrible realism to the game by causing ve
ial the piecss taken during its progress to be Di
beheaded. Co
ONE FOBM OF GBANTISf. ar
on
One of the strongest arguments in favor of we
transferring the management of the Indians de,
from the interior to the War Department is
found in the facts set forth in the report of "ur
Capt. B. E. Johnson, of the First Infantry, to
Lieut.-Col. Carlin, commander of the poet at set
Standing Rook, Dakota. In August last, Capt. tat
Johnston, in compliance with orders, assumed wil
control of the agency at Standing Bock, dis- do
placing Mr. John Burke, the agent of the In
dian Bureau. Immediately upon taking charge ol,.
of the agency. Capt. Johnston had a census
taken of the various bands of Indlans coming R
under his control, which was repeated at the ion
time of issuing annuity goods. on
The result was that the number of Indians pat
receiving rations at Standing Rock after the con
census of Oct. 6, including men, women, child- Tw
rea, half breeds, and likewise returned hostiles, par
was 2 344, and at the date of his report, Dec org
20, including retuarned hostiles and Indians aOn
from other agencies, it was but 2,397, while tot
Burke, the deposed agent, had been reporting
the number at 7,000, and had been drawingand woI
professing to isue rations for that number. ant
Thus rations of the estimated value of over sO
$170,000 annually had been drawn for more Ret
than 4000 Indians who had no ezistenee. Am
Capt. Johnston says that he is fully convinced sho
that there has never been, at any time, at that liti
agency more than 3 500 Indians; probably not
more than 3000. He also says that he is of the
opinion that about ninety lodges, numbering
500 men, women and children, are absent with
the hostiled, where they will undoubtedly re
main until Sitting Ball is brought to terms by a go
the military. few
Boon after taking possession of the agency, cavi
Capt. Johnston sent out a Blackfoot chief With of n
five of his young men, who induced Kill Eagle the
and Little Wound, with their respective bands, frigi
numbering 141 persons, who had joined the the
hestiles. to return to the agency ana surrender
themselves as prisoners. Although all the In- cam
diane exhibited an intractable disposition at bud
first. sine0 tha s i-n C r h.r ,, .. .. ..1,,.,. I -,
;y by referred to, they have appeared to be cheerful
relve and contented.
glon It is not to be supposed that the condition of
i of affairs at Standing Rook when Barke was agent
Sre- was an exceptional case. There has been
f his abundant reason to believe that iassing rations
eolio and annuitles to paper Indians has been one
D. of the most common methods of swindling
adopted by the Indian Ring, but it is not easy
heir to estimate the amount of money that has been
stolen froim the Government by this moans
gze Transferring the care of the Indians to the
ach War Department would, at least, have the
the effect of breaking up the existing Illdian Ring,
fac- and it is not probably that so corrupt a one
the could be organized among the officers of the
tore army, even with Don Cameron still at the head
tane of the War Department.
of This is the way in which a Parisian paper
lug relates the robbery of a hen roost:
will Know to-day how operated the stealers of
of rabbits and the stranglers of fowls of the Six
teenth Presoot. A sweepereass of this quarter
ny. has been foond, the underneath of her petti
eir coats 'garnished of pullets like a sideboard.
tar. The opulence of her farm proved the thefts
are which gave to her her procurers at the follow
ing of their expeditions nootnrnals. She has
denounced them and we know the detail of
'en their offenses. These amateurs of the chickens
do to the pot and giblets, esoaladed the walls, I
to shabode with golosbes of caoutchooc. The pro- t
not prieturs, asleeps, heard not their steps. The e
ire. more, in making to born the snlphur in the
the titn-honses, they asphyxiated the gallinaceons,t
on- which let themselves be taken without resist
!re, aucs and felt themselves out the neck without
pushing the slightest sigh. A yard has been i
protected by the cry of a duck. This fact is
an information. The dock resists to the snl
no- phorous emanations and cries like a peacock
m- when we sieze him in the glooms. After this
he you will say to me that the ducks are cousins
ial to the geese, and you will allege that the
of geese have saved the Capitol I
is _
n Most of our readers have doubtless heard of
to the sharp rejoinder once made to Alexander
vo Pope, whereby a pointed hit was made at his
ih, diminutive and ill-shapen figure, but many
at may never have heard the particulars of the P
ed occasion. They were as follows: a
n. Pope was one evening at Barton's Coffee p
oonse, where himself, and Swift and Aburth- c
in not, with several other soholars, were poring a
over a manuscript copy of the Greek Aristo
phanes. At length they came across a sen- ii
tence which they could not comprehend, and
al as' in their perplexity, they talked rather
74 loudly, they attracted the attention of a young c
offioer who chanoed to be in another part of the f
room, and who approached, and begged leave al
to look at the passage. in
" O, by all means," said Pope, saraostically, lI
"let the young gentleman look at it. We shall 13
have light directly." at
The young slicer took up the manuscript
volume, and after a little study and considera
tion, his countenance brightened. re
"It is but a slight omission on the part of OP
e the scribe," he said. " It only wants a note of 1?
f interrogation at this point to make the whole
d intelligible.
s Pope saw in an instant that the officer was m
y right; but the thought of being outdone in i
i- Greek translation by a mere youth, and a red
il cost at that, piqued him, and with a sharp, te
bl hitter twang, he cried out:
" And pray, young sir, what is a note of in- Pi'
t terrogation fI' de
" A note of interrogation," answered the an
d officer, surveying the wizened, hunched-backed pit
poet from head to foot with contemptuous ha
r look, " is a little erookcd thing that asks questions." en
be
t FovunD-MoxzY.-By having your first-class Sa
I detal wsrk do sby Dr. L. Tharbsr, esr or Conmma w!
at Dsglgay satre. ha
CRCCHERS IN PARIS.
y For extent, cost and mgniflcenee the
churches of Parts rival, if they do not ex
Stceed, the palaces. The Metropolitian Ca
thedral of Notre Dame stands at the head
of the list, and ever must and ever will, for
i the simple fact that it was built honestly.
You can see plainly that it was a work of
faith, not a Job by contract. Built In the
Middle Ages, it was evidently erected by
men of genius who had conseerated it, not
to money making, but to the glory of One
who esan see thronhy artfiee, and reward
what Is done through supernatural motives.
The exterior plainly shows, in all its storied
simplicity of statueand pinnacle, thegrand
conceptions of former times, as to what
ought to be a temple of the Most High; but
the interior is overpoweringly grand.
r Unfortunately the Cathedral bas been
" restored," which gives it a very flashy
and modern appearance. The modern ar
tist has evidently taken the inspiration n
from the theatre, so we are treated to acres v
of gilding and miles of ornamentation I
the grandest colors, the effect of which IT¶
very suggestives of boxes and the green
ourtain. The high altar is in the middle of -
the Church (as is, indeed, the custom in
France), which has the effect of lessening
the sizo of the building. On the other J
hand, as pews are unknown, the edice, as
a whole, shows to great advantage.
In the sacristy adjornilg is shown the
rich treasures of the Chapter containing
the sacred plate, valued at millions of dol
lars, evesy article of solid gold, while the
vestments are prodigies of art and taste.
During the Commune these articles were
concealed by various membersof the parish
-some of them very poor-and yet not an
article was either lost or injured. It was
on the altar of this church-a magnificent
work in marble and bronze-that the God
dess of Reason was seated during the wild Cl
orgies of the First Revolution, and from it
Napoleon I. seized his crown in the pre
sence of Pines VII. But as this very sano
tsary is full of wonderful recollections, I
will simply refer to another church, and
close.
The most deeply religious parish-form
erly the very worst-of Paris is that of St.
Sulpice. It is a magnificent building in the
Roman-Corinthian style, about 400 feet
long by 200 wide. It counts about 16,000
parishioners, and on All Saints' Day, 5,000 E
communicants surround its eighteen altars.
Twenty uriesta carry on the woink ot th
il Twenty priests carry on the work of the
les, parish. The music is peculiarly fine-the
'eo organ being one of the finest in Europe
Itn and costs $4,000 per annum, while the
total cost of "running the cburch," as we
nd would say, is a little over $20,000 per
,r. annum. You can rely upon these flgures
rer as authentic, as I have them direatfrom the
ore Rector, and you can, if you please, compare
oe. American "prices" with those of Paris,
ied should you ineline to the weakness of stat
Sisties.-Cor. of Connecticut Catholic.
A THRILLIANG SCENE.
re* The following incident occurred during
by a general review of the Austrian cavalry a
few months ago. Not far from 30,000
ty, cavalry were in line. A little child-a girl
th of not more than four years, standing in
tie the front Tow of spectators, either from
I, fright or some other cause rushed out into
the open field just as asquadron of hussars
- came sweeping around from the main
at body. They made the detour for the pur
ee pose of saluting the Empress, whose
eI carriage was drawn up in that part of the
parade ground. Down came the flying
of squadron, charging at a mad gallop-down
t directly upon the child. The mother was
o paralyzed, as were others, for there
ne could be no rescue from the line of specta
tor'.
y The Empresc uttered a cry of horror for
,n the child's destruction seemed inevitable
and such terrible destruction-the tramp
e ling to death by a thousand iron hoofs.
'1 Directly under the feet of the horses was
g the littie one-another instant must seal its
1e doom-when ae talwart bussar, who was in
the front line, without slackening his speed
or loosening his hold, threw himself over
by the side of his horse's neck, seized and
lifted the child and placed it in safety upon
r his saddle-bow; and this he did without
changing his place or breaking the correct
f alligument of the squadron.
Ten thousand voices hailed with raptn
rous applause the gallant deed, and other
thousands applauded when they knew it.
Two women they were who could ocly sob
forth their gratitude in broken accents
the mother and the Empress. And a proud
and happy moment must it have been for
the buzz:sr when his Emperor, taking from
his own breast the richly enamelled Cross
of the Order of Masria Theresa, hung it up
on the breast of his brave and gallant
trooper.-London Standard.
I)DRUNKENNBss IN ENGLAND AND IRE
SI LAND.-tl alleged increase of drunkeu
s ness in Ireland bas lately been the theme
upon which many Englishe public men and
a English newspapers ba°e preached elo
quent sermons, and it is unfortunately too
e true that the consumption of intoxicating
liquors in Ireland is not decreasing-"we
own it ; we deplore it; we condemn it"
but it is at least some consolation'to know
that we are not so bad in that respect as
some of our neighbors. During the year
1875 it appears that no less than 203989
persons were apprehended for being 'drunk
and disorderly" In England-a far greater
proportion of the population than the same
class of unhappy people in Ireland. It is
also stated that 450,000 out of the 600,000
paupers in England have become pauper
ized by excessive drinking, and that 2,
500,000 men, women, and children are re
corded as being members of drunkards'
families. The number of gallonsof pure
alcohol contained in the liquor consumed
in England is estimated at 84,000,000 gal.
Ions, which is valued at £130,000,000 !
Biesides these tremendous figures the
statistics of drinking in Ireland appear, by
contrast, almost insignificant. Tae latest (
return gives the number of gallons of
spirits consomed in Ireland as 6,176 501.
Irishman.
Tni PAPAcr.-Like a fair, unshaken
marble monument, emblazoned with a
Listory of the past; amid the wrecks of
temples and palaces; amid columns and
idols that have fallen from their pride of
place, and crumbled into the sand of the
desert, the Papacy stands to.day in power -
and beauty, amid the tombs of dead em- i
piles in the desert of the world. The
hauds of Christ's Vicars have rocked the
cradle of many a nation's infancy. With
hearts that borrowed their love from the
Sacred Heart of their Master, they have
watched over their tender youth; they
have seen empires grow into mtiabood;
they have consecrated their Sag with the
riebhet of blesing.; the have seen tbase
flagl, to which their benediction gave
strength, wave in supremacy ever the
world. They have watobed the victories
that crowned these banners, and they have
lived on through the unbroken three and
thirty years of Christ, to see these banners
droop and fall, defeated and dishonored.
They have seen them serve at last for a
winding sheet to cover the ghastly corpse
of many a nation, stricken from existence
and eopeigued to the correption of the
grave. Still the Papacy has lived on.
The New York A am says of the anoiest
Greeks
They were a wonderful people, the most
wonderful we have ever had on this earth.
Their thoughts and ideas still mould the Intel.
leots of the world. They were skilful politl
olans, marvellous architects, the greatest seolp
tors of all times, rare logloiian, astute diplo
matists, subtle dialeotioilan, poets of cloudless
vision, brave in war and powerful in peace,
restless agitators and enterprising merobhants.
They had the most perfect of language,, and
Athens, their chief city, was the Intellectual
centre of the world.
GROCERS-COMMISSION MERCHANlh.
BE OF GOOD CHEER.
TIaring the New Year
P. H. BOYLE
will continue to sel
OR1- oet e I
FINE WINES, LIQUORS, ETC.,
at his Store,
COB. .MAGAZINE AND ST. JOSEPH STS.
AT ASTOIBSHINGLY LOW PRICES
FOR OASH.
NO AUCTION GOODS!
Every Article Guaranteed Pure and Fresh.
Call and examine my stock and prices.
Goods delivered free of drayage.
Don't forgot the place.
P. H. BOYLE,
de3I Im Corner Magazine ard St. Joseph streets.
ESTABLISHED THIRTY YEARS' AGO.
J. D. REEL,
779 and 781..Tohonpitonls BStreet..779 and 781
Near Sorprapr Market,
First-Class Family Grocery;
The very best of goods as the very lowest prices.
Polite attention given to all, and entire satisfaction
guarasteed as to quality and weight. de31 74 ly
PETER ELIZARDI,
DeafLNR ID
GRBOERIES, PROVISIONs, I
TEAS, WINES AND LIQUORS,
Corner Burgundy and Mandeville Streets,
j Naw osaiass.
Country orders promptly filled, d all goods delivered
de3l 71 y free of obarge.
WM. H. SHEPARD,
MANUFACTURERS' AGENT
WHOLESALE DEALER
TEAS AND SPICES,
58.--.------Customhouse Street ...... 58
MJu NOW ORLEANs, LA.
B
- DR. PRI'CKS
gas CREAM BAKING POWDERS.
its
in STElLE & PRICE'S
ed
rer RELIABLE BAKING POWDERS.
nd
on SIEPARD'S
tit
act IMPROVED HOP YEAST.
DR. PRICE'S
er LEMON SUGAR.
it.
ob DB. PRIOE'S
id ESSENCE JAMAICA GINGER.
or
m DR. PRICE'S
SPECIAL FLAVORING EXTRACTS.
DR. PRICE'S
AMERICAN PERFUMES. 5
LA VINA'S
d EXQUISITE FLOWER ODORS.
o TOW'NSEND'S
e COUGH TROCHES.
vBIXBFI'S
r MUCILAGE, SCHOOL INK, DRY AND
LIQUID BLUE. STOVE POLISH, SHO
DRESSING, BEST 8HOE BLACKING, ETC.
a CORKS.
VIAL, WINE, FLASK, EODA, JAR, CAB
BOY, BUNGS, ETCs S.
Common, X and XX qouallties. 1
ILA S. P
OOLONGP, ENGLISH BREAKFASTS, GUB
POWIDE$., IMPERIALS, YOUNG IYSON1S,
JAPANS, TWANKAYS, ETC.
All kinds and grades. Du
GROUND SPICES.O
BLACK PEPPER, WHITE PEPPER, ALL- ma
SPICE, JAMAICA GINGER, AFRICAN
GIN8ER, CLOVES, CINNAMON, MACE. U
In quarter pound oans and in bulk.
All of the above goods in store and for sale by 1
WM. H. SIIEPARD,
dt3 3m '5 Custombouse Street.
NEW STORE.
FRESII GROCERIES FOR FAMILIES.
WM. T. SCANLAN,
DILLE=R IN FANCY AND STAPLIE ROCEURIS,
lnue Wilne mnd Liqaors, fee,. 142 d 44 8. Ad lu
. eetn. eorner New Coamp. me square ftro Ibe ar.
ne.'2*.w Oerlsao. AUll 4I eisbred ofle darq
e• ly3
INSURANCE.
SFACTOS' AND TRADERS'
INSURANOE OOMPANY,
37 .......... Caroadelet Street.......... 37
R ner foer nanterutlnaed duke, April 3.'
i ip.......h ...
1676 ..... o.. ............... 5 .ha a
Net p tfrthe ymar .. .. 13at 76
- Cash Dividend for the year .
Sstereet (eemianueally). ........ .TIN PUR OUNT
Plemlame ............. ........TWUSTY PR CUNT
AUSETS, Apl 30, 187 .. ................g.{i,3gs.66
This Company eontlnuae to lease poelee ena Fire.
River and Marine Riks, at Mrreat rates of premium.
E. A. PALRNY, PreJident,
JOHN CHAFrI, Vies Freaident,
THOMAS P. WALKER. Secretary.
TRUSTIE:
W A Johann. W C Raymond,
John I N, ble, T Lyti Lyon
John Uhaffe. t Senowdm,
lobhard Miltken, d,
i a Buckner. A BWheeloch.
Samuel Priedlandr, WYr. Bolay.
A A Ta'". J Bder.
John I Adao, Ii F Vrelman,
lese acoberek. W O Block,.
It M Walmeey, Cbarlee Chaff.,
A May, I C Jury.
aelU em . Wm BHartell.
HIBERNIA INSURANCE COMPANY,
Office, No. 37 Camp Street.
JOHN HRNDERSON, Preident.
P. IRWIN. Vice Preldeat.
TOS. F. BRAGO. Secretary.
arninU5 ... .................. 1,4
La Paid......... .................. 74,741
Net Prot ................. ..... . 63,48 2
At an election held on Monday, the let last., he
following named geontlemen were ehosen Directore of
this Company to eerve for the enenuag year
P. Irwin., John Rendero,
Thoma King. John (i. Ityan,
The. GOllmore. W. J. Casntell, I
John T. Gibbone, JIa. A. OGrdner,
William Hart. Emile (anehe.
David Jackson John H. lasnno.
F. J. Gaenet.
And at a meeting of the Board, held May 8th, JOHR tI
HENDERSON, President, P. IRWIN. Vloe-Preeldet, hi
and THOS. F. BRALQG, 8ecretary, were unanmously It
re-elected. 91
The Board declared out of the ne. profitl of the
Company for the past twelve months 10 per cent In.
terest; also 4 per cent dividend on the paid up capital,
andes per cent dividend on premiums paid by stook
holders (making, with the rebate, 40 per cent on pre
mlms). aild intereea and dividend to be placed to the p
credit of the stock notes.
-a orro ineou - rotanaa patlSla Mocpayable Is
oush at the oeto th Compuany on and after Jane o I
prot.
THOS. P. BRAGG, Secretary.
New Orleans. May 19. 1876. myld 768 l
FINANCIAL.
NEW ORLEANS SAVING IEBTITUTION,
156...... ........Canal treet ......... . 156
o- omci :
D. URQUBART. Preldent.
THOS. A. ADAMS, Firns Vice Prildent.
THOS. ALLEN CLAIRKIE feecd Vice Preldea
CHARLES J. LENDS, ilrd Vice Presldent.
CHARLES KILSHAW, Tresurer.
ToUSTeeTn q
Thomu A. Adam. G1org Jonae,
Thomas Allen Ilatke, John G.Balsee.
Chbs. J. Leeds, ChrietiLn Schneider,
8aml. Jamleon, Carl oh.n,
A. Moulton, T. L. Bayne.
E. A. Palsrey. alvd Urquarut.
T lterest allowed on Dpalte. o001 76 ly
LOUISIANA SAVINGS BANK AND SAFE
DEPOSIT COMPANY,
51 Camp Street,
Capital ............................ 500,000
J. C. PALMER, Prelident.
JAMES JACKSON, Vie Preldent.
ED. CONERY, FREDERIC(K WINQ,
J. H. KELLiER, W. H. TOMAS,
W. i. SCHMoIDT. JAMES JACKBSON
E. O. PALMER.
This Bank Insures agalinst loos by BRURG.AR,.
THIEVES and FIRE at low rates.
Deposit. of FIFTY CEIETS ad upward reetvwe
and is Per Cent allowed. pavable Juan. lt and July I,
Its capital and the character of ito Directors gnarr
tee its Ilepoeltors ga:ost i oe.
Jyll 76 ty JOHN S. WALTON. .Culet,
HIBERNIA NATIONAL BAP.,
laid-Up Capital................... SwO..e
J. C. MORRIS, Presldeot.
. OGAUCIIE. Vice President;
JOHN G. DLEVERAUX. Cusier.
J. C. Morrl, John I. Adams,
J. C. Morris, John I. Adams,
Zmile Gauche, P. Irwin,
Andrew Stewartl Thomas Smith,
Adam Thomson.
ZXCHIANGE ON LONDON AND DUBmrIJ
payable in all parts of Ireland. for any amount fRes
1I upward, sold at ourrent rates. Is30 75 It
CISTERN MAKERS.
M AITIIEW IIENRICK,
CISTERN MAKER,
Corner Franklin and Erato Streets.
TH1E O.LD.0T 0TABLl8.HM5NT 1N NRW OcLFArN.
A lot of new Cisterns of the I~bt material and work.
oanshlp kept constantly on band, and for ale at
prices to suit the times. ocOS 6m
IýI BRODERICK,
CITERBN MAKER.
Noe. 1:U, 1:14 and 136 Joulia Street,
Between Camp and Maastne, New Orlean a
Constantly on band an aasortmenJ of New and
Second-haud CGiterno. All orders promptly attended
to. -- ape 7e l
p. A. MURRAY,
Cistern Maker,
191. ...Magazine street.. .191
(Between Juola and 8t.Joseph.)
DtrLOUx AWAD · D IS II 7 ANoD '73.
Oatern made to order and repl red.
All work warranted. A )ot of fri.
ters. frod: I00o to 0.u", gallons.
made of the bslt materiJ and work.
manmhlp. kept constantly on band
and for Jgoe at price to senit the
times.
Order promptly attend.d to.
mbhl 7 I
' --ICKS.-........ I1- CKS......... BRICKS
Roy's Brick Yard
Sr. BERNARD PARISH,
Four Biocks Below the blaoghterbonae.
The uodertlised reaewtfrnly informs tha Bulders.
Planters. and all ronsumers of Bricks, that he Is este.
sielyy manuoacturing Bricks at bhis old Brickyard. near
the blaghbt-rhoause. wher be has alwayJ on bhand a
lare qoanutiy of oounlry made Brioksand KettteTItsL
ready 1n be dellvesd wIthbeout deention.
FREDERIC ROY.
Orders left w:th . ROY. at 0. cevareo & n'
Alenmts. Ne, 3 lDeotur street, e at tkjlIrltohtlt, will
be p.9pVj0 siten' ed i ~Z 71·a
LATEST STYL
37
76
6.
SADDRESB
THE SINGER MANUPAqTUPI
r *DaP76*1
No. 91 qptStreet.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
DR. L. A. THUR-ER.
D&NTIST
S 79 ctommonattet, oorle
Ieepeelfty ul ollait bhe patreseag a1
the publie In general. Palltullar
tt .afeod.er... p.. e. bae reearelet
D-NTl-RlV. tie eapeame beian -r7 
him to make bai. ahiar lower thenm t11 e
In general ' b vry beet mat all
guaranteed ur.k done one3ly gUl,.
man apnkra- e41.
p. . . ,AIOLL.
A TTO liNE Y-4 T-LAW*
;.......... Bt. Cheatree BStron. -.
Gluarantee• prompt attentlio to alt lape
placed In his b ,ene.
WM. B. KLE[NPETER,
NOTARY PUBL.IO
coSIusoNxuJ orF DEBD* 6
61.............. Cam Stree ...
au 13 76 y ere 1 of Oinm
DENTIST ..............
JAB. B. KNAPP, D. D. M.,
15............. Baronme 8tres ......
myt 76 ly New Orleans.
G. J. rIDIUtICHS,
DENTAL SURGEON,
166...-..S..Bt. Charles trst...
_my7. I.Ly eCmAr
ATT'ORNEY AT LAW.
122....... .... rOnver treet........
dael I. .et-Mae "ae ashde p. flheela
S BELLS.
.IoI4--.hIiA~ -.
no5 7'6 _ B. J. WEST. Aaes. Now
. . e.. 761 ,
McSUANE BELL POUNDRY
CHUoRCUrr. ACADBMISI, T0. -
Price List and Circulars sent Oee.
HENRY MoSHANB & 00.O
502774 ly g o
TE BL ONDI, Tro LD ISTA1 1
Ifactors tboea sapertor Bolla wlct fe v Qtly
celebrated throughbout the wolrld. All SlJ
satisactory. Partiuolr tentla en a Iv. E
Bell., ('hinee and Peals cf 3.11.
Ill'tratd Catalosue pot free. l.  ,
BOOTS AND SHOES-BATn.
JOHN FRIEL,
Fashionable Hatter,
54........... . t. Charles 8treet........ ...
Two dors from the corner of Graver, i
motj3m erw rau.sa.
pONTCHAItrRAIN CHEAP STORE.
rJ. A. LACROIX,
at Corner Fronohman and Victory SBtree,
LADIES,. OENTS', MISIES' AND ORILDm
BOOTS AND 8HOE8
Of all description.
Always on band a u, aa.ortmeat of ert.el-s- g
at gprloe which defy competitio.
hallnd uenamine my stock before parehsaegg
wher.
id MY MOTTO a " Quirk sals and s.i"l pesi'
Ladle', .ntlimeu •. and Chfldrean's Ueble i
rder rat low priop.. "__ I_74_1_
J. D. CRASONM,
26...........Frenchmen Street............
an) 7d ly NEW OsLtue.
H. KELLER.
MAN L'ACe" OP -
off 0
ALL KINDS O LA D
myS r I,

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