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The morning star and Catholic messenger. (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, February 04, 1877, Morning, Image 6

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086284/1877-02-04/ed-1/seq-6/

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I_,g Star and Catholic Messenger.
_-=--=- ------ _ _ _
E3WaO3L3res. 4t1NDa? yIZVrU Int.
RESIGNATION.
O ed whboe thuder sbahs the sky.
hos oeo tos. atom ¶0Lo. smrreys
Ta Tb.O, mym onl roeek.- rly
Thy meroy In Tby JN s. praise.
Tbe mysto maes of Thy wll.
Tbh shed.., of celeetlal 1134.
Aie wttbh lOIets of humn shill;
A rw the Nterl setls I right.
o teach . sthe trying boar.
WT. s ayish s wells whU o dewry teut,
To sIlI my omrr owsm thy7ewe
rThy gooda* lws, thy Jsee far.
IS i this beesn uglt bnut thee,
Zn-srosobla mug a booadleee sway,
OmniosieO co0l4 1th dasger meI.
d eroyl blook the oms away.
The why, m sel., dost thou eompl i
Why dropnug auk the dark rotese
srnae off th lanal own,
NOW God oteatrd all to bbl s
Bu. sk I my bese Is human stll,
The rislig slg, the fallin tear,
Mlanggnid vitals' feebOl wl.
Tbe scLknes of my soul djoshe.
But yet, with fortitude rwesn'd.
rlkt~haah the infiolton of the blow,
•gb. eIIpoe Imy vIod,
lor IN W gush Io II low.
Teab I mns of the nIght
Wwm!_I my ,aking in hstews,
Will .a tb at the most g ligh
NWhie God, my sat my ue., revoea.
IMO Mosoluog"of the ghed Hart of Jeans.)
8P1i.X OUT.
Me aehm.e to bs mums andlet habblers do the talking.
Oaoe, in times of old, a certain wise
bilosbpher was teaching ib his school, and
the world flooked to hear him, his words
so wise and true. Bat another man,
- t--- alkative and as gay as a but
popob a school across the street.
wemme a rhetoriean, as they called him
hI' he showed how to talk in grand
V11. The young mba's ers' were tickled;
tbought it a great thing to learn how
ps k, with words that sounded so very
PooA they left the wise old philoso
'. 'oew, certain friends of his stood by
FIth folded arms, and smiled saying:
Pooh, pooh I give up " But a tear stood
a the old man's eye, and his heart was
11. He said: *"Tis a shame to hold
ay tongue and let barbarians talk ! Listen
-me, my young men! I will give you
ilk and truth besides I" Then he opened
d- month and began to teach his old
tlthW in a new way, with rhetoric anad
hat$not. And the young men looked back
steaished; and they left *the talker
laes the way, to hear the wise old man
gan. For he talked very well now and
ptU truth besides.
lb it not a shame to keep silence and let
larblrians talkt The other day, one of
hem was invited to come across the
ae-, and help us to ivangarate a univer
_ here. The distinguished stranger
,-ed himself quite equal to the occasion:
~alew hoar to please his hosts and came
h bhis best codipliments on his lips.
-G he regaled us with a few lectures; the
-ellty of which his hearers applauded
vehemence; the rest they took on
$s had guaged us well-he had. He had
Ian our measures and knew how much he
Ibld feel at. home among us. There
was already in the country a horde of his
kith and kin, who have shown themselves
ftLen enough, within the last forty years;
whether it was a political agitator, like
Lossuth, cr an apostate cleric, like Gavaz.
d, or any other sign of the times that came
Co stir up in the mob an effervescence anti
Catholic or infidel.
The stuff of barbarism is here amonet
Es-not one school only over against the
thareh of Christ; not fifty schools alone
that feed our minds and ears with errors.
It is not one doctor in each, nor a hundred
ur two in all,-lat keep the ball a-rolling.
But, you have universities and high
schoolse ; you have ohurches and temples,
meeting-hoosoa and pantheons; you have
speakers and writers, orators and poets;
oua have newspapers and pamphlets,
sermons and reviews-a huge NBbel
round us, not merely here and there,
but everywhere against the one truth,
sod the one Church and the one Christ,
who has said, " I am the Truth."
Each man is talking to a knot of his
neighbors, and the loudest is convincing
most. Now and then, a voice happens to
dlstinguish itself, like that of the strsnger
mentioned above, and rising above the
habbub it commands a momentary lull,
which only breaks again into a loader con
nerd of unpoar and commotion. Whose
was that voicet It was the voice of a
scientist, like Huxley, or a statesman, like
-ladatone, who had just caught up theex
mt key of the prevailing excitement, and
had rung it out with a louder ring on the
one subject wherein alone they all agree,
and than one is what it ever has been
trying down the Truth and always saying
the same thing.
Catholics are in the midst of this world,
are part and parcel of it. Can we flatter
ourselves that they are altogether free
from its contagion; that using the world
they are as though they used it not; and
having so much to do with non-Catholic
neighbors they are as though they had no
thing to do with man, or his errors or his
vicest Can we flatter ourselves, that
walking in the sunshine, we are not suna
burnt, or, touching pitcb, we are not defiled
thereby ? Is it not, for instance, a certain
ot that the same news-carrier who sup
plies the profligate and the scoffer, the
athest and the infidel, knocks at the Ca
tholic's door, or walks into his store, and
nets the very same newspaper right down
there, to feed the children of Christ's
householdt And behold! when the hour
if evening comes, the boy of fourteen years
stiage returns from school, and he takes off
his coat, and in his sbirt-sleeves stoops
wer- the counter to devour all the news
hem police court and ap-town and down
town and high life and low-all in one
mems of pottage. 8urely we are reminded
Sthe prodigal, who "would fais have
tied his belly with the husks the swine
lid at."
No wonder thousands yearly are lost to
be Church not only by proselytism and
'seeping" among the children of our poor,
long the orphans and the destitute, but
-oandes of others are ruining themselves,
sglng by inches the faith of their fathers,
amd becoming practically infidel by a pro
ess of deliberate self-destruction-self
_lososing. This is a part of the loss which
be school of Truth is made to suffer from
he-barbarism which goes about. The loss
rdleb the wise old philosopher deplored
ds notalg to this. Our youth, our noble
,1*b Catholio and Protestant, are n
ta tbe bsrblaaas of whom w'e
peerverted by
, the common press and the oomelon school,
- before the good wheat of their father's faith
has had time to groi" green. Protesteat I
youth with theb fair promise, their beau
tiful instincts toward religion, and their
gropleg after truth, are poisoned in the
atmosphere, and the common mind is do
fraunded of its common sense to sic that e
, truth most be somewhere, that an answer
to their yearnings must be bad under the
suon, and a rest has to be found in this 1
warfare upon earth, or else-everlasting
woel "0 Truth, thou has made our heart
for thee, and they cannot rest till they
repose in thee!' This is the cry of our
wandering brethren-this the yearning of
their soul, naturally Christian, naturally
religious and devout. And to them it is, t
and to this beautiful cry, so touching in I
the ear of God, that an answer is given, not n
Ly preachers whom God has appointed, e
not by teachers of the old Gospel, but by c
babblers of a new one-by throats and by s
tongues and by lips, of which He hath said: ii
"Their thloat is an open sepulchre; with a
their tongues they have cheated; the C
poison of sasps is under their lips. De
struction and unhappiness are in their w
Sways; and the way of peace they have not b
known." b
II.
Can Truth keep silence and lt the bar- w
barians talk I Our readers know what we Ic
mean by Truth. Christ hath told us: " I w
am the Truth." Can His Heart refrain and p,
His tongue keep silence I The eyes of the w
wise old philosopher filled with tears and to
his breast heaved with emotion, when an C
a empty talker robbed him of his disciples. fo
I So our Lord has had to weep more than ii
a once, and His Heart iore than once has to
beaten fast for us out of love and out of a
desire : " Oh, how am I straightened," he tb
exclaimed. " until my baptism be accom- be
plished." He came to cast fire on the earth, b
and He yearns only to have it kindled. He
chose Apostles and set them to goand bring as
forth fruit, and fruit which should remain. is
He sanctified Himself that His little ones to
might be sanctified in Truth. He offered to
Himself up for ns, to redeem us from all to
iniquity, and purify for Himself an accent- or
I able people, a pursuer of good works. Will es
His Heart admit of His keeping silence, of S
I His holding His peace, now, in circum m
a stances such as beset us, when there is, as di
the Wise Man says, not only " a time to of
I keep silence, but also a time to speak ;not A
I only a time of peace, but also a time of sa
I war " as
We do not indeed mistake the character ri
of Our Lord, who is the Truth, if we say bl
that He loved silence and sought retire- se
I ment. He lived during thirty years in the a
little house at Nazareth, and then when His w
time was come to shine forth during three i
years, it was only to the house of Israel. "I at
am not sent except to the lost sheep of the gi
house of Israel." And in that house He am
spoke chiefly by actions : " He began to do of
and to teach." "He will not cry," said b
Isaias describing Him, "nor will His voice b;
be heard in the streets: He shall not be sad Is
nor troublesome." He is sweet and mild, it
I reaching from end to end mightly, dispos- ol
ing all things sweetly. His spirit "one is
and manifold" is "subtle, agile, active, T
I sweet." Though in Him all things are P
made and subsist, yet nothing comes into h
collision with Him. He is irresistibly sweet. m
"While one in Himself He can do all things; as
while remaining in Himself the same, He tl
maketh all things new; And through nations a
conveyeth Himself into holy souls, making d
them friends of God." This is His personal it
character. Without doubt He is a silent d
Truth, a " hidden God." e
But since a voice must be heard on the m
t housetops and in the streets, and Heo resides n:
silently in the Tabernacle all the while, t
does it not seem that He is making ioom
for us. and inviting us to speak in His be
I half, and It nd Him our voicet St. John
the Baptist 'was the first to do so: " I am
the voice," lie said "of one crying in the
desert." And we know what Oar Lord
thought of him. "Amen, I say to you, T
among those born of women there hath not
risen a greater than John the Baptist." p
I 'I hen the Apostles were the next to lend A
their voices : "Their sound hath gone d
forth into all the earth; and their words c,
unto to the end of the world." And what ti
did Our Lord say to them T "You shall
sit on twelve thrones judging the twelve '
i tribes of Israel." Lastly, His preachers ti
and HIis teachers will be His voice unto fi
r the end of time-and ' they who guide el
e others to justice shall shine like stars for ail ri
eternity." tl
The question which interests us at pres t,
a ent is, shall we lend this voice of ours T u
Will we epeak out t judging it a shame to a
e keep silence, when so many are ranged y
against' Christ and His Church, when the r
i Gentiles rage, and barbarians devise vain o
e and evil things. g
, First of all, there is the voice of our
actions, which speaks most eloquently of ft
g Him. He covets them, saying: "So let p
your light shine before men, that they may a
I, see your good works, and glorify your a
r Father." " In this shall all men know that c
e you are my disciples, if you have live for t
d one another." a
d In the second place, there is the voice of fi
our prayer. " Pray for one another, that c
you may be saved.,' says St. James. Our ti
Lord bids us to pray al-ways. He points a
t to the harvest which is always ripe; and ti
He asks us can we not pray one hour with p
SHim. Less than this required by theApoe- r
tleship of Prayer. Let only the works you c
do, and the words you say, and the thoughts
Syou think, be offered up with an intention. r
It is enough.
S In the third place, there is the voice of c
the tongue and of the pen. To the faithful b
s who can use either, whether by speaking
r or writing, Pineus IX, the Vicar of Christ,
addresses exhortations, and adds encour- C
Sagement. " By the pen," he says, " we
amust destroy the work of the pen." He b
Shas oftentimes commended the great Catho
lic champions of the press; for editors and r
writers are the voices of Christ, each in his ,
Sown degree.
e-- I
If a man gets a reputation in Persia for ex
cellence of skill in a bandioraft, the Shab, it is 0
o said, sends for him to work for the oonrt at
starvation wages. Some time ago a potter in
Khorassan succoeeded in manufacturing a sort
of porcelain resembling china, and his fame a
soon reached the court. When the Shah sent t
I for him, the poor fellow, knowing his fate, sold h
I, all he had, scraped all the money together he t
could get, to raise a bribe for the Prime Minis- a
ter, and entreated him totell the king that the t
h right man had run away and he had been put f
under restraint by mistake. The Minister
pocketed the bribe, and hkd the potter re
Sleased, who vowed he would never make an- t
other bit of china, or attempt any kind of im- I
Sprovement.
SAll kinds of fanocy and steple dry goods at
Slewst eamsh prices Ba. W. roseras, 14T Omal st. a
.A DroDEL MINoAcPrarEZ3
I THE ROMANCE OF 00MMI*CE AS SHOWN IN
THB CAREER OF SIU TITUS SALT.
(Loedon Telersapi Dee. 3T.)
With the death of Bir Titus Balt, baron
ends a career which may not inaptly besaid
to belong to the romance of commerce, for a
the story of how the owner 8altaire made t
his fortune is indeed singular. Many years v
ago there were consigned to a firm of mer- t:
chants in Liverpool several bales of some b
strange hairy wool from Australia. No- r
body had ever seen the like of It before; no- a
body thought much of it; and thus it lay n
stowed away in a shed at the docks as v
though it were so much lumber. It hap- e
pened one day that Mr. Titus Salt, a small a
manufacturer of Yorkshire, was in in Liv- a
erpool, and, wandering about the docks, he a
chanced to come across this neglected con it
signment of seeming rubbish. He exam- t
ined it, ho ever, and asked if he might be a
allowed to take some of it away with him. p
Of course he obtained permission to carry w
off as much as he pleased. What he did a4
with the samples thus procured need not tl
be told. Suffice it to say that he came tl
back again, offered to purchase the whole m
of the " rubbish," and became its possessor at
for a merely nominal sum. This hairy ill
wool, this trash which no one would even tt
look at as marketable commodity, and of di
which Mr. Titus Salt secured the mono- in
poly, was alpaca. Such was the way in w
which the fortunes of the great manufao- fe
turer and millionaire, who died at his seat, ki
Crowanest near Halifax, yesterday, were he
founded. For years Mr. Salt and his fam- el
ily were the sole makers of that useful ma- ni
terial which has grown to be something like 114
a rival for cotton ; ao on the strength of ni
the valuable patent they thus acquired they cc
built a factory which, with extensions, has at
become one of the largest in En and.
This huge hive of industry, conspicuous
as It is to the eye of, the passing traveller, Pe
is not, however, the most remarkable fea- O0
tore of Saltaire. Surrounding the vast fac- en
tory is a large village or small town, con
taiing many thousand inhabitants, every
one of whom of working age is s)mehow .
employed at the big alapaca mill. Sir Titus
Salt was the sole landlord of this busy com
munity, and the manner in which he
discharged his responsibilities as such is
one of the most notable facts of his times.
At his own expense and under his personal
supervision he provided everything that
seemed necessary for the moral and mate
rial well-being of this little kingdom. He
built for his people baths and wash-houses, 1
schools and places of recreation ; he erected
a mechanics' institute, the appointments of
which will compare with those of a fash
ionable club; and he also caused to be con
strucnated a chapel attached to the Congre
gationlist body, of which all that can be
said in the way' of objection is that it is c.
only too splendid. Saltaire, in short, has
been established on what may be called a C
basis o' practical philanthropy, while a
laudable attempt to guard the morals of its B
inhabitants has been made in the rigid ex
elusion from the place of all public traffic (
in intozcating liquor. In these things Sir
Titus Salt both meant well and did well.
Personally he was an intelligent, kind- 1
hearted man, a progressive politician, a
munificent contributor to public charties,
and a zealous promoter of popular educea a
tion. His life has been usetul in many
Ways. He made his fortune by the intro
duction of a useful and valuable commod- 1
ity, and be spent a large portion of it in c
doing substantial good to those he at once E
employed and served. In the history of the "
manufacturing industry of England few i
names will have so high a place of honor as
that of Titus Salt.
An English Editor on American Railways. 14
Mr. Walter, of the London Times, has
been interviewed by a New York paper
The report sayS:
" Mr. Walter di not feel himself com-,
petent to judge of the cxomfort of ordinary ti
American railway travelling. lie had rid- p
den so luxuriously in the special Pullman
car which had been placed at his disposal
that he was unable to form an idea of the
way in which other people travelled.
'The palace car,' he exclaimed enthusias
tically, 'is fit for the Queen to ride in ! In
fact, it is much handsomer than the one
she uses.' The liberality with which rail
road directors carried him to and fro over E
the land was a cause of great astonishment
to Mr. Walter. It was a courtesy entirely
unknown in England. The Queen herself E
was obliged to pay immense sums every
year for railway conveyance, and no rail
road company in all England would think -
of offering a coach for the free u-e of any I
gentleman, public or private. The Ameri
can car, in Mr. Walter's estimation, was
far superior to the English carriage. The
possibility of being shut in with thieves or
madmen (it had fallen to his own lot to be 1
shut in with a madman); the close,
cramped quarters which, in their very na
ture, stifled all the cdmfort out of the r
unhappy traveller; the partitioning a man n
from the sight and society of his fellow
creaturs ; and above all, the shortness of
the carriages, which caused them to sway
and jerk about so violently that conversa
tion became a torture and reading an im
possibility-all these things combine to
render a journey in an English railway
carriage a matter of something worse than
nopleasantoness. The 'permanent way,' or
road bed, of the English;ailroad was much p
more substantial than that of the Ameri
cans; but the English carriages could not
be compared with the American cars." 2
WATER VERSUS RAIL.--The New York
Ocal Trade Journal says : "The actual cost
of transporting coal by rate between Pitts
burg and Louisville is as low as one and
three- quarter cents per bushel, including the
return of the empty craft, equal to forty
seven cents per too, a distance of 600 miles, I
while the cost of transporting coal from C
Louisville to New Orleans, a distance of
1,400 miles, is two cents per bushel-fifty
five cents per ton. At the lowest rate of
railroad transportation fifty-five cents
would not transport a ton of coal sixty
miles. There is no such cheap and speedy
transporation elsewhere in the world for
bulky freight, the passage from Pittsburg '
to Louisville requiring less than five days,
and from Louisville to New Orleans less
than ten days, under circumstances at all
favorable. Bridge obstructions between 1
Pitteburg and Louisville increasing the
trip one day. and the same at the falls de
laying tows more o- less at that point." L
SAvaD--20 Pza Car,--By calling on Dr. L.
A. Thurbsr, neare Commoenad Derbiay strets, Sr
anl de. oepesenoes.
MAE'S ALLOM2WT D 2?MZA
From the elaborate tables drawn up b
Dr. Farr. it would seem, as it as can b
made out, there are certain very criticl
eriods in our career. A baby for instanto
as a very small chance indeed growin
up. But on the other hand, the perlo
between the teeth and fifteenth years excl
rely is that in which the death average I
the smallest. At about thirty five we mue
begin to take care of ourselves. At this p.
riod oonstitutional changes set in; our hal
and teeth begin to fail uas our digestion ii
no longer what it used to be ; welose the
vigor of youth and neglect out-door exer
cise; above all the cares of life begin t:
nake themselves perceptibly felt. It is
at this time that death from suicide takei
a marked place in the returns of mortal
ity, and there is also considerable reoas
to believe that babits of intemperance an
apt to suddenly develop themselves. The
picture, however, has its sunshiny side. I1
would take, of course, a professional
actuary to deduce from Dr. Farr's table
their exact result. It appears, however,
that if a man tides over his fiftieth year he
may make tolerable certain of living t
seventy, while if he reaches his seventy.
fifth year there is very asong presumption
that he will either turn his ninetieth birth
day or very near it. A still more interest
ing question is opened by a series of tables
whicn show the average mortality in dif
ferent professions and pursuits. Game
keepers are, for obvious reasons, the
healthiest class of our whole population
clergymen and agricultural laborers come
next, and are followed by barristers; so.
licitors and business men are less fortu.
nate,'while at the extreme end of the scale
come unhealthy pursuits, such as printin
and file-griading.
If a man would keep both integrity and inde.
pendence free from temptation, let him keel
out of debt. Franklin says, " It is hard for an
empty bag to stand upright."
HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS.
'/" BIRI,
Importer. Man afacturer and Dealer In
WILLOW WARE. WAGONS. CRADLES,
MARKETi BASKETS,
Work Baskets. Cbatrs. Clothes Baskets, German an(
French Fancy Baskets, etc.
120, 288 and 253 Chartres Streets,
deIo7 76 ly NEW ORLIANe.
A. BROUSSEAU & SON,
17............. Chartree Street............. 1,
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN
Carpetings,
FLOOR OIL-CLOTHS.
CHINA AND COCOA MATTING.
TABLE AND PIANO COVERS,
WINDOW SHADES.
CRUMB OLOTHS. RUGS. MATS
CARRIAGE. TABLE AND ENAMEL OIL-CLOTH.
WHOLESALE AND RETAI(.
CURTAIN MATERIALS-Ioe. Reps, Damask
Cornices, Bands, Pins, Claps, Loops and Tassels,
Hair Cloth, Plush, Bed Ticking and Springs,
BURLAPS. by the Bale and Piece. oel5 76 ly
CARPETS. CARPETS
ELKIN & CO.
168.............. Canal Street...-.........161
- Are offering -
NRW AND CHOICE PATTERNS IN
MIOQUETTE; VELVET,
BRUSSELS, THREE-PLY
and INGRA IN (` tRPETS
AT GREATLY REDU'OD PRICES.
FLOOR OIL-LOWTHS.
COCOA AND CANE MATTINGS.
CURTAIN GOODS IN REPn. TERRYS, ETO,
EMBROIDERItD PIANO AND TABLE COVE^S,
WINDOW SHADES. NEW StYLES. oel0.1m
FURNITURE ................ FURNITUR
HUGH FLYNN,
167 a.. 1609..... Poydra Street. ....1;7 and if
Is now receiving a LARGE STOCK OF NEM'
FURNITURIE. of all descriptions and qualities, sult
able for housekeeping. and will sell it at prices as to.
as any other housane it the city.
Parties about purchasing Furniture will find it te
their advantago to call and see for themselves ibfor,
purchasing-elsewhere. ocde6 ly
Respectfully Informs his friends and the public that a'
his new store,
144............ Camp Street........... 14.. j
He has a fresh and well-selected assortment of
BUILDERS' and GENERAL HARDWARE
Carpenters' Tools, Grates. Stoves and House Furnishl
leg Goods ef all kinds.
He Is better prepared than ever before to do Copper
Tin ant Sheet Iron Work, and will furnish estimate
to Builders and others, and guarantees satisfactio.
toall. jelll 76 ly
FURNITURE.
H; UTHOFF,
DEALER IN
FURNITURE AND MATTRESSEB,
1itS...............Camp Street.... .... ......1
The underasigned bhas a large stock of Furniture
which he will dispose of at prices that will defyFompeti
tion. Givle me a call and oee for yourselves.
Furniture taken on Storage. Repairs made at lowes
rates. All Furniture and Bedding put In perfect re
pair and delivered to order. Moving. Packing. etC., I
lull done at the LOWEST POSSIBLE PRIUES. o
application to HENRY UTHOFF.
my776 ly 155 Camp etreet.
E STABLI SHED 1557.
G. PITARD,
MPORTER AND DEL ER IN
HABRD WARE, GRATES,
PAINTS, OILS. VARNISHII, WINDOW GLASS
WALL PAPER, ETO.,
221 and 223...... Canal Street......221 and 22
Between Rampart and Basin streets,
apI6 ly EW ORLalNS..
WM. B. RLNGROSE,
PURNITUREB DEALER,
172............ ..Camp Street..............17!
Now occupies the large and spolous store I71 Camj
street. between Girod and Julia, jusC abohe St. Patrick
Church. for the purpose of TAILNG F]BUNITUB
ON STORAt at the lOwest rates.
FURNITURE REMOVED. BOUGHT, SOLD ANI
ECHARRED.
A11 kinds of Upholstering and Varnlhing done wtrl
dlspatch, and Mattresses of ail kmnda made to order.
EverJ thing at lowest ratml, and all work guaranted
Country orders solicited and promptly attended to.
(Jall and examine before purchsing elewhere.
ap97e ly
T° TIlE PUBLIC.
JOHN BOIS,
FURNITURE DEALER,
152.............Camp Street..... ... t1
Now rccpies the stores IIIJ and 154 Camp street, f,
the purpose of taking FUR.NITURE ON STORAGI
at the chapest rates.
LOANLS MADE AND SECURED ON FUBRIITUhE
STORED.
Re will also oentlous to BUY. SELL. REPAIR, RI
MOVE, PAOK and SHIP FURNITURE, with gus
.135W iy Bm. 1 usad 154 Osmp Sre
ILLUMINATING OILS. I
TPUROLINE c
Cal
Portable Gas Light Co.
OPFFER TO THE TRADE 13
TN FOLOWING LISBT OF THEIRB
ExI
BUPERIOR AND POPULAR BRANDS
C0
Insurance Oil. J.
The Insurance On is the best Family Safety Oil, and 68 a
is urgently recommended by all our Insurance Com
panies as a substitute for common Coal Oil or Kerosene. Rem
It may be used in ordinary lamps
Without Change of Burner. the1
orre,
THE NEW ORLEANS BOARD OF UNDERB
WRITERS SAY:
"It is our opinion that the general use of
the Insurance Oil would greatly reduce the
number of lamp firet and explosions, and less
en the risk of destruction of life and property."
Gen
It will not explode or ignite in a lamp ; and the price
has been so reduced as to place it within the reach of
all classes of consumers, and make it the great
FAMILY SAFETY OIL.
As an illuminating oil for family use, or for general
use in ordinary Kerosine or Coal Oil lamps, the Inan.
rance Oil has the indorsement of the New Orleans Board
of Health, the Fire Commissioners, and all the Ameri.
can and European Insurance Agencies as
PERFECTLY SAFE.
Refined Carbon or Coal Oil.
THE WELL -KNO WN CRO WN BRAND
Ach
This is a pure, high fire-test Kerosene or Coal Oil,
generally known as the Crown Oil, and recommended Sole
to the trade and to consumers who buy CHEAP
OIL as the beeat and safest of all the LOW-PRIOCED m
ILLUMINATING OILS in market. In five years' ex
perience no accident from its usee has ever ooorred.
The Pnrollne and Portable Gas Light Company have oc
the exclusive agency of the Crown Oil for the Btates of
Louisiana, Alabama, M i.isaippi and Texaa.
PUROLINE FLUID.
FOR METALLrC GAS LAMPS AND POBT
ABLE GAS BURNERS.
Manufactured and Sold only by the Puroline end Port
able Gas Light Company and their Agents.
This celebrated Fluid, prepared by a process known The
only to the proprietors, is the beet and most reliable of I
all the products of Petroleum for use in Metallic Port- MtJ
able Gas Lamps and Lanterns. It burns cleir and MU
bright is free from smokeor unpleasant odor, and does gun,
not char the wick or gum the burner. No other flutd equt
or oil should be used in Portable Gas Lamps or Lan- pt
terns. l'uroline is especially recommended for use in and
Portable Gas Lamps and Chandeliers, in Street Lan- Al
terns, Slgar-Honse Lamps, Cane-Shed Lanterns, and
in Torches and Gas Burners for Steamboat Landings,
Moonlight Picnics and Street Processions. Giving mat
light equal to the best city Coal Gas, it enables the
people of the remotest villages to illuminate their
Stores, Warehouses, Saloons, Hotels, Churches, Streets
and Gardens as brilliantly as the favored residents
of a great metropolis.
GASOLINE FOR GAS AaOHINES.B o
chia
Distilled expressly for the Pnroline and Portable Gov
Gas Light Company, and with peculiar regard for the woe
changes of temperature so common in this climate. BSg
Unequalled for generating gas or for carbureting coal the
gas. Proprietors, patentees and owners of las Ms- n,
chines cannot overestimate the importance of having sa
their Gasoline of reliable gravity and quality, as snc
cues depends so much on these conditions. se
The P. and P. Q. L. Co. distill and refine a complete K
line of ILLUMINATING OILS and FLUIDS, and
also sell, at Agent's prices, all the popular brands
manufactured by other refners.
Their BARREL4, CANS and CASES are all of the
best material and workmanship, and when empty M
command the highest prices In the market. Mac
and
Stor
Dry
COAL OIL LAMPS,
PUTROLINE GAS LAMPS, M
BTREET LANTERNS,
12.,
SUGAIR-HOUSE LAMPS, Is
sodl
CANE-SHED LANTERNS, Gr
METALLIC SAFETY LAMPS.
- And all kinds of -
SA
LAMPS, LANTERNS, CHANDELIERS,
Lamp Burners, Chimneys,
SHADES, FIXTURES AND TRIMMINGS,
c
Received direct from the Manufacturers, and 170
Sold at the Lowest Wholesale Prices J
PUROLINE AND PORTABLE GAS LIGHT Ro
COMPANY,
95 and 97 Gravler Street 95 and 97
- aatnse nEw O3Lnana, r
CARRIAGEA A145.[
JosEPH SO WA 3T-S,-.
ml0rome a ats DaULae 1
Carriage, Wagon and Cart'laterhM
Springs., AxL., Bolts, ea.arde a sas
Bodes, Wood Work. Tam.attap
PAINTS AND VARIPIU N
Cr a ARV PA2TNT "BZ
Carriage and Wagon Maker and fl
- Salearooms and hTatory
Nos. 43, 45 and 7 Perdido Stee
Opposite treet
de17 76 Iv w81W On3za
W F. CLARK,
134 and 136..... Rampart Street-...134 sa4e
Between Toleouse and 8t. Peter,
NNW o3L3Ass.
- Manufacturer ot l kinds of
Carriages, Barouches, Buggies,
Expresa Wagons, Platfo.m and Elliptio 8aply
Wagons,
8ZWING MACHRLN WAGONS, z2T.
Agent for Jas. t.ununatbam ado Son's oeletred o
rlagee and Hearsee.
Country orders promptly attended to. M10 .._
J THOMSON & BROS.,
Carriage and Spring WagolWakers,
Ssand 70...... Rampart 8treet ......68 and
Between Common and Graier,
Received Highest Premiums at 8tat latira of u1; m
t873 and 18e for beoss aml Phteo. Vietr4,0g
and Top Bugies Beer Wagon. rooe's
Wagon. xpre Wagon. ote.
Beian practical workmen, 3and Salpl aam-
he bet meobaniee, we are p p _pIe ie te
ir repair Corriage., Bugsir . Spring WeLae, ele
refer to many Boe e mua ne in the oty UladgL
vir marutaltra All wob rara,tad. fei7le I,
MUSICAL.
BUY YOUR ORGANS AND PIANOS
At the Popular Music Hooes of
LOUIS GRUNEWALD,
ORIUNEWALD HALL, NEW ORLREAR8.
General Agency of the celobramed "GO. A. PI33"
& CO'I OROANt." of which over
55 0100 are now in use
Acknowleed to be the R ST. Will klsp iasass.a
not able to set otof orderesy. Sold eeq
monthl praymnta. Send for cato .
Sole Agenoo o the hvorite PIANOB _of.kye Wd
a Co. Parts Stelway, Ness, Blalue W.eim
mayer and other. Irst-,ol Plans.; Mudeilltu.
menote., String.. Aeodeeno, oeta. eon row laqps.
tation. Cheapest Roose in the South. weiillhud
terms. Call or send for estimates
LOUIS OBUUIWALD.
ol05 6 ly 14. 16. 18. S0 and S BatresaseatmI
pHILIP WERLEIN,
Nos. 78, 80, 82, 90 Baronne Street,
The Leading Piano and Organ Dealer South,
invites the pubilic to exrmlie hil immtose toCk of
MUSIIA. i$ur dRLPUkN2S.. PIam)OS, ORGANS
IMUSIC etc. Fe kceps ,ono but the bet., and @ie
prices belou tt,, ., a.kod oy other bouseso rIn--
goods. lit a .ek cotprieo the elebrated and n.
equalled (, lKktIYItt Pioco. the eleoant endd-
tonod Dnnham Fian s. the reliabiesad low.priced Hal
Planoe. the u ortht Zte.ler. Hardmau and PleyelPtlbl
and J. Estey & 0o uun Mamo n l-a mlin'e Or5 ts._
Aleo oum. hundred emeomd.ansd PIANOS and O .
OA€, from In5 upward.. Pc, oft PooTa5 tltttsgblt
repaired and warrantedl at ll1,.
Pianorreplrrig d,-ne at hatf the usnualatea 4 1..1
i"ates trrlbm trme. ami14 he lyf
MACHI lN EtY-FOU I uOE S-EA..
LEEDS' FOUNDRY,
(Eotaollaued in 187",)
Corner of Delord and Foucher Streets,
neW OULgtS.
We are prepared to manufartur Stea. m ..ps
Boilers. Sugar Mll.. Sugar HKetse., 1raninag
chines, Saw Mills, Cotton Prses ll awOdllM,
Gin Gearilng. i ,snsoe aMouths, Grafs Bare, Judi's
Governors and all kinds of Plantadrn and Streambn
work, and ever desc rptio of Machinery for thei
We be g to sail ppetool attention to our large Iekd.
Sugar K1ettlee. HSPvig purctaleed th e entire atekt
the Stalker Iron Works of Ten, eeese for whlachYl
_. F. Lavillebeuvre was fouretly agent, and theb
genuine Tennesaee Kettle n the , market,) welt -
same for sale, as well as those of our own masuoin
at rednced rates, pice lists of which we will bepiS-sI.
to furnioh on application.
set 76 ly LEEDS & 00
KILLEEN & ALLEN,
IRON FOUDERS,
Corner Magnolia and Erato StreetS,
THIW OltLy U.
LManufacturers of every varlety of Ornmental a.
Machinery Castinags Sugar Kettles, Furnace MleOtS
end Grate Bars, Curves, Frogs, etc.. for Bai11
Store Fronts, Columns, Sash Weights end VeotllS'
Dry Sand and Loam Castings a spelalty.
All work 'ne at Northern prices. J4 11
M. MALONE,
Gun and Lock Smith,
AT il15 OL. TrAlo, -
12......-- .... Commercial Plaoe............
Is now prepared to do all kinds of work n hi
such as  .enerl hioueem.ltbhig. Door and W°d
Grating, Iron Safes, Store and Vault Looks, I- -
lnugs, Office and House Keys eta. le18s
Personal attention to all orders.
MARTIN WEYDIG,
Manulacturer of
SADDLES, O HAsESS A.ND HOST,
Firemen's and Military Equipments
MADE TO OBDEB.
Dealer In all kinds of Leather and lubbr B> .
Leather and iubber Plpes Suetlonoulnd nd
eta, Horse Shbeets and Blankets, LPP .
Buggy Robes, Ply Bate and
ani all kinds of Sddlery Ha-rd
Country orders promptly attended 10 ." .i
170............Poydras Street ....---.
au13 76 ly 5ltW OSLiAfO.
J, LINCOLN m
REMOVES ALL KIDS OF
All oommnniatloue should be a r, o .i
Mechaneos' end Traders' LExroksa , _.d
Hotel, elw Crlsan s. -,In
Oo Ctitt orders ADwetuitlaa d tdr.
GLASS STAINER`

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