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The morning star and Catholic messenger. (New Orleans [La.]) 1868-1881, June 02, 1878, Morning, Image 6

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86086284/1878-06-02/ed-1/seq-6/

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. Maw US ARrP. iUDALT. JUNW s. irs.
UWlaALL DISTRIILTTv OE WEALTr AMONG
THiE ir'O(LE.
Ali travellers in France unite in repro
seating the French people as grrt eoono
mista. With them not only doeo a very
little money go a great way In sipplying
,their wants, bat the soms saved, even out
of the slenderest Incomes, represent a
handsome surplus. In England there is
see man in every five who spends all he
gets, but in France these is not one in forty
who spends his income; the other thirty
nine lay something by.. Profusion and
waste, which characterize the use of the
means of living in England, and more con
spicuously atilt is the United 8tate,"*are
quite unknown among the French people.
Of what nice families oat of every ten
would. here throw away, a French family
would make a variety of appetizsing dishes;
and it is literally true that the French men
and women would live, and live well, on
the mere waste of American families.
These habits of economy enable the people
to lay up their little savings year by year,
audit is well known that the public funds
are the most favorite means of Investment
with the peasantry. The French rentes
can be had in denominations of 100 francs
($20) and upward, and have always been
highly popular with the masses. The prin
ciple of popularizing the loans of the Gov
ernment has worked admirably, and has
been borrowed to advantage in the issue of
- f Sted-- States ,oends~, -whic-atre-owt
Lad in sume as low as $50.
Here is a fact which speaks volumes in
favor cf the French system of public laws.
So long ago as 18(7 the debt of France was
held by 10 3.3 tii: persons, who averaged
10200 each. It is now still more widely
distributed. In England, on the other
hand, her gfeat public debt of $3 860,000,
i00 is in the haLds of only 126,331 persons,
thus averaging more than 830,000 to each
bolder. It is, unfortunately, impossible to
ascertain how many persons hold the
public debt of the United States, because
so large a proportion of it is In the form of
coupon bonds, 'which pass from hand to
hand without registration. In France all
the rentes are inscribed in the name of the
holder on the books of the Treasury. To
have their names in the "Grand Livre" of
the public debt is an honor eagerly sought
after by the mass of the people.
During all the recent enormous drain
apon her resources, which has nearly
doubled her national debt, there has not
been heard anywhere among the French
peeple the slightest hint of repudiation.
The French look upon their public debt as
as obligation pacredly due; and it is due
in the larger part to themselves.
Another striking feature in the prosperity
of Prance, which aide in enabling her to
,,ear the extraordinary fiscal burdens im
posed upon her, is the fact of the wide dil
tibution of real estate among the citizens.
Ytatstirs establish the fact that there are
6,000.000 of hosesl in France, and the ma
jority of them are homesteads belonging to
their tenants. Three-fifths of the entire
population are inhabitants of the rural
districts, while in England the proportion
is only one-fifth, four fifths being residents
of towns.
Finally, one conspicuous element in that
national prosperity which has brought the
world to a wondering recognition of the
vast resources of France is the recent dev
elopment of her commerce. Since 1855
She foreign commerce of France has been
considerably more than doubled. Her
mastery of the finer mechanical arts and the
perfection to which processes of manufac
tare have been carried are well known the
v-ntd u-n-. Tm,, faugaury of hter people
's only uwatched by their industry. The
-sbole wotli teemsr with her productive
ness. F'rench fabrics aret found in almost
enulless profusion and variety in all the
-aarkets of the globe. It is this constantly
;rowing fertil.ty of p:oduction, joined with
she causes previously enumerated, which
has enabled the French people to bear with
such marvellous ease a burdtlen which it
was almost unuversally predicted would
crush and overwLelm them.
.segress of the Church in the Metropolis of New
England.
A writer in the N. Y. World, referring
te the late rumors of a distinguished con
ats to Catholicity, says :
"That so strange a story should have
met with general credence is remarkable,
to say the least, but thile surprise because
of it would be very much lessened if one
would only carefully and dlispassionately
glance over the religions field which oen
tres at Ioston. To-day in Boston the
Catholic Church is first in power and
numbers. Is one parish, St. James', there
are fully 15t(Hl) communicants, and in
every section of the cit), its churches,
massive and beautiful, are too small for the
songregatinss which throng to hem. Ten
years ago the lit demptorists first appeared
.n Boston. 'I hey were few in number and
rt.hout mnioniv. Their Church, just dtedi
:atl d, cost $3;00,1thi, and it is two-thir ls
paidfor. It tos always open, and every
s rvitc ia crowded, and that, too, without
appaiciitlyi dliuiniishing the attendance on
she palishl church. The niuiic is always
br;e, anild tltor this cause or some other,
arge numntle-rs of l'rottslantlj uin in aswell
ig tht, nlthtlih crowds. It is estimated
-stt fully o:ne 1i umth of the vast audit-nce
whichll Ililedl the Cathedral at the celebra
iron of Hilgh Mas Eseter Sunday were of
Shis class. The name cf the converts is
legion, andthe mass of them are not from
the Epiecopal Church, but Methodists,
_aptists and Unitarians. Someol the most
prominent positions in the Church here are
illed by converts. Father Mqtcalf, Chan
sellor of the Diocese, is connected with
someaeotf the proudest families of the Com
amonwealth. Father Welch, of thI Immsc
alate Conception, became a convert at Har.
yard COllege. He is a Jesuit of the deep.
set devotion, a ripe scholar, and connected
with the best of Boston society. Rev.
Phillips Brooks is his intimate friend, the
two benlog much together. Father Bodfish,
a curate at time Cathedral, is from 1May
An'ur stock, and his kindred are still pi
ta's of the Church from which he has de
;r-ted. The late Father Haskines, who
d-moted himself with so much zeal to the
n~tarests in sla charge, was changed from
lProtestait af by listenir'g to the late Dr.
iLyman Itercher's setmlnol npon the Cath
olice re!,go't. And the list mlUght be
extendid vetry greatly by enumerating the
'eser lights who have entered this cornm
mlnion, a niece or r reesor soogretitr
being among the latest.
HOW' A MILLION MEN LIFE AND Dig.
A writer in an English magazine studies
from birth to death the march of an English
gene-ration through life, basing his remarks
on the annual report of the Registrar
General. The author singles out, in im
agination, a generation of one million souls,
and finds that of these more than one-fourth
die before they reach five years of age.
Daring the next five years the deaths num
ber less than one sapenth of those in the
first quinquenntum. From ten to fifteen
the ev-rage mortality is lower than at any
ot'.lr period.' From fifteen to twenty the
number of deaths increases again, especially
among women. At this period, the infl-.
ence of dangerous occupations begins to be
seen in the death-rate. Fplly eight times
as many men as women die violent deaths.
The number of such deaths continues to
'lse from twenty to twenty-five, and keeps
high for at least twenty years. Consump
tion is prevalent and fatal from twenty to
forty five, and isa responsible for nearly
balf the deaths. From thirty five to forty
five the effects of wear and tear begin to
appear, and many persons succumb io dis
eases of the important internal organs.
By fifty-five the imagined million has
dwindled down to less than oneohalf, or
421,115. After this, the death rate increases
more rapidly. At seventy five there re.
mains 161,124, and at eighty five, 3d 565.
Only 202 reach the age of 100. At fifty
three the number of men and women sur
viving is about equal, but from fifty-five
onward the women exceed the men.
"Mr. Chas. Wiliiame, Champion Extem
pore Artist of the World." is singing at a
London music hall, his speoialile being the
'Greatest War Song on Record." If any.
body doubts it. he has but to look a little
farther down the bill and find this certifi
cate :
"BUCKIN;UIIAM PALACE
'L'e"tenant-General Sir T. M. Biddulph has
reoeived the Q ieen's commands to thank Mr
bharles Williams for the appropriate verses
,ontained in his letter of the Id h inst., and
lter Majesty fully appreciates his motives."
After this there does not seem to be any
room for doubting that Mr. Chas. Williams
a, as he advertises himself to be, by special
appointment purveyor of "appropriate
verses," to Her Majesty the Queen and the
nembers of the royal family. His "verses"
oven if "appropriate" and patriotic in the
extreme, can hardly be said to enter into
:ompetition with those of the other Inure
ate, Mr. Tennyson, belonging to quite
mnother style of literature. Here is one
verse :
fo A uantis' dirty slurs, with Servian wbelpe and curs,
I-av helpd to Iats the plueky little bird;
Bat a voice to beard at last suite forgotten an the past,
And the Lion stands aret to say a word."
THa LtRTa RFSTArTaS AtD THE TITLu.
-It really appears mege than probable
that the eccentricity of the late Lord
beltrim actually bordered on insanity. In
addition to imposing a tax on seaweed
which formed the principal article of con
sumption of a large portion of his tenants
-he has left, it seems, the whole of the
property which he was able to dispose of
away from the title. The greater part of
the estate-valued at upwards of £30,000
a year-goes to a sister, and the present
earl inherits little more than £1,500 per
annum. This is all the more cruel as there
bad been no oquarrelling between the
brothers, and Lord Leitrim had actually
repented of his intention, and caused a new
will to be drawn up in favorof the present
peer when be was shot, but unluckily be
had omitted to sign it. This being so,
there is no truth in the report that the new
lord has offered a reward of £10,000 for the
splirehenslon of the murderers of his pre
-ecresor.- Van'iy Fair.
Ml 'uIc ANI, (ATRIMONT.-YOuOg man,
choose a wife by the music she plays and
he way she plays it. If she manifests a
predilection for Strauss, she is frivolouse;
fr Beetho#en, she is impractical; for
Liszt, she is too ambitions ; fr Verdi. she
a sentimental ; for Offenbach, she is
ridly ; for Gonnod, she is lackadaisical ;
fr G(ottschalk, she is superficial ; for Mo
ctrt, she is prudish; for Flowtow, she is
omruonplace ; for Wagner, she is idiotic
rlie girl who hammers away at "Maiden's
Prayer," "Anvil Chorus" and "Silvery
Waves" may be depended upon as a good
:ook, and healthful; and if she includes
he "Battle of Prague" and the "White
•ockade" in her repertory, you ought to
snow that she has been religiousty and
strictly nurtured. But, last of all, pin
ihon thy faith upon the calico dress of the
rirl who can play "Home Sweet Home."
Saraniah Musical News.
'If thou observe any vice in thy brother,
torrect him secret'y ; if he will not hear
hee, correct him openly. Fot such re
)roofs are _good, and often better than
silent friendships. And though thy friend
leem himself aggrieved, do thou yet cor
ect him ; for the wounds of friends are
Easier to hear than the kisses of flatterers.'
-S. Amnbrose.
"Life and death are wrongly named ; for
that is this lift but the mother of corrup
on aid. thliet.rfore, a constant dynlog is
he trutn, way to the life of thto blessed.
Ihir e is but one trne life--that which leads
o life eterlnl ; ibut one real death, the loss
f the sol."--kt. Gregory 'aziaonzei.
Eer the mist piopular as well as the best of
rowiog Mdachiber, as has 3early been proved by oLe'at
returns of the number sold and by the numerous cre
moine anLd prizes awarded it at sil State fairs ard c.
ibttilons. the celebrated INona FlMILT MACIliNE hlai
again come to the forefront as being cheaper th an ay
other, or even than the ngus imltationso of itself offered
for sale in some quarters. Durlg the paut twelvemonthb
ihe c mapny bhave so reduced their prices as to put
thetr michines within the reach of all, and as home,
bowever hnmble. need now be without so inatima
ble a treare. Care sheuld be taken by. the pur
chseer not to be imposed by parties stlling imit~tiuts
of the Binoer The best safeguard that we know of
aapiat this danger. is to call at the O(lpany'seplendld
store. CO Canal street. where the very eMickent and
eourtecuo agent, IMr. B. E. Rundle. and hblspolmte as
sistants, will see that you get what yOUea wish and that
at the very lowest prices
Fl-NERAL), MARIIAut e, xTC.-Attentlon is
called to thebo card of Coroner J. O. Roche, which we
puobilb in our abtcrticing columns He will take
chare, oef IuerIale and theembalmingorfbodies. Having
bern railed In tihe tunines and having stuadled it
thorotgylly i C'oronor never f.iil to give perfect sat
factionu. He ha carriageasequal In all re pect. to asy
in the laId, ar.d empNloys hono but experienced and
p llme drlrars. ill. coarges are invariably leer. Call on
him at 23 and -2J4 MIgagine street.
THE GBREAT PRESIDENTIAXL ELECTIOJ
FAd UDS.
The Committee That s to Investiate Them.
BIOGRAPHICAL SKkTCHES OF THE MEMBESS
As the committee for inquiring into the
frauds in Louisianaand Florida is, in manc
respects, the most important that was evel
appointed in the House of Representatives,
brief notices of its members will not be on
interesting.
Clarkson Nott Potter, the Chairman, rep.
resented the Westchester district in Con
gress forsix years previously to his present
term. He w ~born in Schenectady in 1825,
and grdouated t Union College, of which
his father was one of the Professors, and
his grandfather, Eliphalet Not,, D. D., was
the President. Dr. Nott was a distinguish
ed clergyman of the Presbyterian Churchb,
and famouasas a pulpit orator. Professor
Potter was an Episcopalian, and after
leaving the college became Bishop of the
Diocese of Pennsylvania. The Rev. Dr.
Alonz Potter, the Bishop of the Eastern
Diocese of New York, is thie uncle of the
member of Congress, and Dr. Potter. the
rector of Grace Church in New York, is his
brother. Mr. Clarkaon N. Potter, though
res ding in Westchester, is a prominent
lawyer in New York. He argued the case
before the Supreme Court at Washington,
lh which certain provisions of the legal
tender act were pronounced unconstitution
al, and reargued it at a subsequent term
when Judges Strorg and Bradley had been
added to the bench for the purpose of re
vm IngtLh previons deciiois _Mroul9tter
was the leadl:.g.competitor of Lucius Rob
inson for the nomination for Governor in
the Democratic State Convention of 1876,
and received more than one-third of the
votes. He is a gentleman of fine presence
and great respectability, is a good lawyer
and a vigorous debater; and it is believed
that he will not shrink from a fearless dis
charge of the high duties now imposed
upon him.
William R. Morrison of Illinois is the
second on the list of the Democratic mem
bers. He is a native of Illinois, is 52 years
old, was liberally educated, and is a lapwyer
by profession. He has been a Democratic
leader in the Illinois Legislature, and
Speaker of the lower House, and was a
Colonel of a regiment in the war of the re
bellion. When Mr. Kerr was chosen
Speaker of the last House he appointed
Mr. Morrison chairman of the Committee
of Ways and Means. He was also chair
man of the Special Committee which vis
ited New Orleans a year ago last winter to
investigate the election frauds in Louisi
ana. He is therefore somewhat familiar
with one branch of the subject that will
come before the present committee.
The next Democrat on toe Committee is
Eppa Bunton of Virginia. He was born in
that State in 1828, and is a lawyer of solid
attainments. He was a member of the
convention that carried Virginia out of the
Union, and a Brigadier-General in the Con
federate service, fighting at Gettysburg
and on other sanguinary fields. Captured
at Sailor's Creek, he was a prisoner for
three months in Fort Warren at the close
of the war. He has been four years in
Congresa previous to the present term,
and was a member of the Electorial Com
mission. Hess regarded an able, judicious,
candid man.
William S. Stenger, member of the com
mittee from Penneylvania, is a descendant
of the old German stock of the Keystone
State, and one of the younger members of
the House. He stands among the leaders
of the bar at Chamberebnrg, and has here
tofore served one term in Congress.
John A. McMahon of Ohio is the Demo
cratic RIpresentative from the Dayton dis
high honors aat St. Xavier's College in Cin
cinnati, studied law with Clement L. Val
landiglanm, ar.d subsequently became the
partner nft thint fnamous Democratie politi
cian. Mr. McMahon was a delegate at
large from the Spate of Ohio to the Dem
ocratic National Convention of 1872 which
unanimously nominated Dr. Horace Gree
ley es the Democratic candidate for Pres
ident.
The next Democrat on the committee is
Thomas R. Cobb of Indiana. He is a law
yer, resides at Vincenncs, has been eight
years in the State Senate, and a candidate
for the nomination for Governor, and wasa
delegate to the St. Louis Convention of
187G, where he labored zealously for his
friend, Thomas A. Hendricks. This is his
first term in Congress.
The last of the seven Democrats is Jo
seph C. S. Blackburn of Kentucky. He is
40 )ears old and a lawyer. He served in
the Confoderate army throughout the war,
and was in the last House. He does not
believe in the validity of, the Hayes title.
On that dark Friday night when the elec
toral count was completed, he denounced
the Fraud in burning words of indignation.
At a serenade in Washington, after the
Ohio election last October, he said : "Tihe
Bible tells us that Belehazzar read his doom
in words of fire. There was a man here
he who rests unetsy in the White House
who has read his doom. Ohio had con
demned the usurper in the White House."
Gen. Benjamin F. Butler heads the four
i-npublicans on tle committee. Having
been born in 181, he is its oldest member.
Hl is so well known to thie whole nation
that no sketch of his life is needed. The
matters which lie is to irquire into will
afford a rare opportunity for the display of
that shrewdnoess, tact, energy, professional
learning, and experience which have given
him a conspicuous place among the lawyere
of the country. lie never had so good a
chance to make an honorable and enduring
mark in $he public annals as now.
Thomas B. Reed of Maine 9epreaents the
Portland district. This is his first term in
Congress, of which he is one of the young
er members. He graduated at Bowdoin,
and, was three years 'Attorney General of
the State.
Frank Hisecoootf the Onoodaga district,
is amoeg the goa· lookling members of the
Heusee, and one of the ablest lawyers in
Syracuse. He has been District Attorney
of Onondaga, and was a member of the
State Constitutional Convention of 18678,
having been elected to that body in the
place of his brother, L. Harris Hiscock,
who, it will be remembered, wase shot by
Gen. Cole in Stanwix Hiall the evening ie
f,re tine Convention assembled. The ecb
sreouent acquittal of Colt on an indictmenut
toe murder, upon thie ground that ie wao
iosiane at thi n mniomnnt of the shninting,
thtnrgl perfectly osame tle instant before
and the Instant at~er, was one of tihe last
and greatest pslafessitOal achievements of
Jamrs T. Blrady. Mr. Frank Hlscock was a
Liberal in IS72, and supported Dr. Greelel
for President. He is serving his first term
in the Jouse.
The lst of the Republican members it
Jacob D. Cox of Ohio. He was born in
Montreal, and is 50 years old. He was
edeested at ObeElin College, where the
celebrated revivM preacher, Charles G.
Pinney, was a professor of theology. Mr.
Cox married a daughter of Mr. Finney,
He was distinguished as a schohlr, and,
after leaving college, was admitted to the
bar, where he won a good reputatlon. He
served in the Union army all through the
war, roee to the rank of MaJor.General,
and was in many desperate battles. He
was Governor of Ohio in 1866 and 1867,
and Secretary of the Interior under Grant
from March, 1869, to December, 1870,
when he resigned from the Cabinet in dis
gust. He his always been aRepublicas,
with rather independent proclivitIes, and
has suficient talents to make a valuable
member of the committee.
e WATCHES, JEWELRY, LTC.
TYLER'S.
GEORGE E. STRONG
Begs to announce to the public that he has
purchased the fixtures of the store and
good will of the business of E A TYLER,
and is now open wit-n es ETrre new stoE
of
DIAMONDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY,
SOLID STERLING SILVER
AND
PLATED WARE.
This stock has been selected with great
care, and purchased at bottom prices, and
to it will be added from time to time all the
I new patterns and novelties as fast as they
are produced in the New York market.
The favorable conditions under which these
new and attractive goods have been par
chased, enable ns to offer the same at
prices lower than ever before.
The Manufacturing Department as here
I tofore will be in charge of Mr. Henry Good
win, which is sumclent guarantee that all
Diamond work and the manufacture of any
article of Jewelry wiV be executed in a
manner that cannot be excelled in any city.
The Watch Making and Repairing De
partment will be in charge of the most
3 skillful and reliable workmen.
A Designer and Engraver has been em
ployed, and all goods purchased can be en
graved on short notice.
115-----Canal Street-----115
S p23 Inm
MONEY TO LOAN
on
DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, WATCHES. SILVER.
WARE, PIANOS, LOOKING-GLASSES and
FURNITURE of all descriptions, and all other
personal property, Gnes, Pistols, etc., etc.
On STOCKS. BONDS. and other Collaterals, in large
and eball seme, at sa low rats of inter.st as any
chartered institution in this city.
PLEDGES KEPT ONE YEAR.
Hart's Loan Office,
43 .......... B eroune Street............43
(Opposite the \0 Gas Co.)
*AURICE J. HART, Agent.
N. B.-Parties not being able to call in person. will
receive prompt attention by communicating with the
ALL BUSINESS STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL.
The bsilnesa of 48 St. Charlee street. known as
" Hart's Brokers' Offic." will be continued as bereto.
fore. mhl7 78 ly
JOHN P. ROOBE,
Jeweler and Optician,
Watches and Jewelry Carefully Repaired.
SPECTACLES AND EYE-GLASSES
Of Every Description.
Particular attention paid to suit the eight accurately.
No. 98 Camp Street,
- e30 77 ly nW O sAes.
LADIES' DEPARTMENT,.
LADIES' HAIR STORE
AND
Fancy Goods Bazaar,
159..............Canal Street..........159
The proprietor of thbis establihment (GO.A. SCHIL
LIN(.). hab constantly on hand atI stylee, shadee and
qualities of HUMAN HAIR. He I. also prepared to
repair and make goods to order at short notioe
Being constantly in receipt of roods from the North
and Europe be can at all timee offer the most complete
asoortment that can be foound tooth of
JE WBLRBF,
in GOLD. SILVWR, PLATED. ENGLISH GARNET,
RItLL SEIEL IVORY, CELLULOID,
COITAL. ETJ., ETC.
TO FANS
is also given particular attentloa, in sch qualities as
JAPS. SILKS. SATINSB. EBONY and
PEARL HANDLES. RUSSIA
LEATHER, ETC.
All Country Orders promptly attended to.
do23 7 l7y Imp
LADIES', MISSES' AND GENFLEMEN'8
UNDERWEAR.
The Sisters of the Good Shepherd
have established, for the convoenienee of Ladic. and
Gentlemen. a depot for the ea'e of Laie~'. Mirsse and
Gootlemen' Ut'nderwear, Iutan:s' Robes and thildren's
Dresses. at thr I set:,t;lshment of Mrs. K. O LOGAN,
14 ttaronne street. where a full ine of their goods wll
be kept and sold at the most reaoooab'o prices
Orders g'so rec! eel. oc77 ,ly
HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS
Stewart's New Family
SEWING MACHINES,
Imud upwards. Russ lighter. makes less nose. Is
the cbheapest and moot kadu ome (Slngef style)
machine In the maiket.
J. BOOTH, GNEr.AL Ao INT,
614............Magazine Street...........14
maw O0LZABS. LA.
AGENTS WANTED my t 7d ly
E-S"TAL"KrD 18s7.
G. PITARD,
Imoirra AND DEALEJ IN
BAD WABE, GBATEB,
PAINTS, OILS, VARNISH. WINDOW OLABS
WALL PAPER, ETC.,
221 and 223......Canal Street...... 221 and
Between Bampart and Basin streets
apac ly SEW ORLEA.
The Cheapest House
IN THE CITY.
THE MOST STYLISH AND DURABLE
OF ALL KINDS. .
Parlor. Bedronm and DIlninroomI Sets at very low
Agur•a, and allt warranted o be of the best material
and workmanship.
Call and see. You will save money by doing so
before buying
Special attention paid to Country Customers.
W. B. RINGROSE,
ait21 78 ly 178 Camp street.
V- BIRI,
Importer, Manufacturer and Dealer in
WILLOW WARE. WAGONS, CRADLES,
MARKET BASKETS.
Work Baskets. Chairs. Clothes Baskets. German an
French Fancy Baokets, etc.
120. 283 and 253 Chartroe Streets,
ja0 78 ly saw OsILls.
House Furnishing Goods
AND
KITCHEN WARE.
In order to do a PLUMBING and GAB FITTING
business EX LUdlVELY, I offer my entire *ook of
the above named goode
AT OOST PRIOES.
ladies who want BARGAINS In STOVES, dbrE
ING UM SULS, etc.. should call aid ezamiae at
once.
THOMAS McKENDRICK,
Practical Plumber and Gas Fitter,
625............ Magazine Street........... 625
Abolmve Josephine. Jla3 78 ly
NEW CHINA MATTINGS.
ELKIN & CO.
168 .............Canal Stret.......--...168
Are receiving new
CANTON MATTING,
WHITE. CHECK AND VANCY P TTERNS, in
various qoutites a id at very LOW PRI,'ES.
* We have a large steek of
OARPETS,
RUS S. THREE-PLY and ING7RAIN.
Aio, OIL CLOTHI' in all wiltb
NEW PATTtENSi OF WI NOW SdADES.
0021 77 y
A. BROUSSEAU & SON,
17.............Chartres Street.......... 17
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN
Carpetings,
FLOOR OIL-CLOTHS.
OJX.A AND CO(COA MAlTTING,
TABLE AND PIANO COVERS,
WINDOW SHADES,
CRUMB CLOTHS. RUGS. MATS,
CARRIAGE. TABLE AND ENAMEL OL-CLOTTS
WHOLgESAL AND R.TA IL.
OCURTAIN MaTERIALSB- Lace. Reps. Damasks
Cornices, Bands, Pins, Gimpa, Loops and Tassels,
Hair Cloth, Plush, Bed Ticking and Springs,
BURLAPS, by the Bale and Piece.
Prices as low as those of any one else in the trade.
ocSI 77 ly
FURNITURE
IT
HUGH FLYNN'S,
167 atd. 169.....Poydras Street.....167 and 169
You can find the
CHEAPEST BEDROOM SETS.
THE CHEAPEST DINING ROOM SETS,
AND
THE LOWEST PRICE PARLOR FURNITURE
IN THE CITY.
A large stock, and anxious to sell. oc4 77 ly
Respectfnlly informs his friends and the public that at
his new store,
144........... Camp Street ............144
Ho has a fresoth and well-selected nesortmuent of
BUILDERS' and GENERAL HARDWARE
Carpenters' Tools. Grates. ftove and House Furnish.
leg Goods rf all kinds.
Ee is better prepared than ever before to do Copper,
n Bd Sheet Iron Workh, and will furnish eatimaten
to Builders and others, and guarantees astlafaction
oWall. je17l7ly
GRAND OPENING
(F TUE
Largest Stock
EVER EXHIBITED IN NEW ORLEANS
or
MEN'S, YOUTH.S AND CHILDREN'S
CLOTHING
AT
Nos. 81 and 83 Canal st.
From tbl day. I will cioat one my Entire Stook of
RIdy-Mlade ULUTI[UtiU. PURN1SIUTG GOODB
and hAt'4 at
LOWESI I'CEIOS EV.ET SOLD
IN NEW ORLEANS.
LEON GODCHAUX.
ded Cm ,
JPUOIUIONAL tR i.
G. ' .WnI
DERTAL %UHGEON,
156.........8t. Chre Streht...es
m-se 78 17y oi.er ot.
M. B. KLEINPETER,
NOTARY PUBLiQ
COMMISSIORZE OF &EZDB,
61............. Camp Street ............61
mueS 77 ly Cot-o.of Ofm eolaidl Ps1e
CARROLL'S
rAndlord.' Merchants' and Balaei Men's
OOLLEOTINb BUREAU.
P. P. CARROLL, Lawyer,
SOLICITOR IN RANKERUPTY.
U. S. CLAIM AND PATErNT ATO.RN -
2 ............Carondelet Soreet...*.-....'
Prsetloe. In all the State sad United States Courts,
and ga prompt attention to all bulia plaee 1
hia band.. 1aal 7It
DE T - I'.......................DENTIB
JAB. 8. KAPP, D. D. 8.,
15.............. Baronne Street........... i
jel0 77 ly New Orleans.
W. B. LANCASTER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
40.............. Camp Street............40
Between Gravier and Comeon;
TRAVELERS' GUIDE.
€ PLANEER' AND MURCNANTS' LINE.
ThrongrE to L rsrVelalefy you ed fuAi i s -.
Semi-Weekly Passengex Packet
In place of W. J. Pottel ens.
U. D. TERREBONNE, Master. TOR E .N*. Clerk.
Leaves every MOhDAY at 5 o'clock and THBURSDAY
at 5 o'clock p m
Returning, leaver Thbidanx every Tuesday venlag
and Iatorday Morning
For freight or passage apply on board. A Clerk will
boat the iandinC every day to roeeive freight. Pays
particolar attention to way bosinees. hp14 t
For Liverpool.
The Al Br:tlsh Steamshlp
COLOMBO,
(1930 tons,)
W. M. YOUNG, Commander,
will sail for the above port on. or ab)ot the -th lest.
Has superior aconmmotiatons for a limited number of
saloon pasaengera
Saloon Paeag............................. 75.
For pasage apply to
FRENCII . CO. Agents,
29 t, alon street:
or ZUREGA & CO.. Ship Brokers.
The sew steamer EUPHRATES. to toes, and other
flrst-cls" steamers, will follow. apl4 3m
INMAN LINE OF STEAMSHIPS.
From New York to Liverpool and Queens
land.
The great object of tourists going to
aope is to prEcure the saUeat. qulckest and moeet
comfortable aeoommodations. The Steamers of this
tiee, built in WATER-TIGHT COMPARTMENTS,
are amng the STRONGEST. LARGgEST-nd FAST
EST on the Atlant~c. Luxuriously fareished, well
lighted and ventilated, replete with every comfort and
all the modern improvements.
For passage and other inform ation, call at the Paseen
ger Agency of
P. F. GOGARTY,
151.............. Camp Street ............. 151
NtW ORLEAhr.. e&31 7 ly
BOOTS AND SHOES-HATS.
PONTCHAB TRAIN CHEAP STORE.
J. A. LACROIX,
Corner Frenchman and Victory Streets.
LADIES', GIN'TS'. MISSES' AND CHILDREN'
BOOTS AN$. SHOES
Of all descriptions.
ALwayson hand a fn! massortment of firstlclass good
at prloe which defy competitioa.
(all and exadine my stock before purchasing els.
whore.
MY MOTTO = "Quick sales and small profits."
Jackson Kailroad oars poss in front of the store.
D1475 ly
(GOTO JOHN FRIEL,
54--............St. bharles Street........... 5
(near Graier) for your
"W . P 3 U .
A fine stock of FASHIONABLE GOODS, in all grader
and at all pric s, always on hand.
HATS CLEANED AND PRESSED. mhl7 6m
J. D. CRASSONS,
CD
26.. .......Frenohmen Street... ....2.
n2677 ly NEW OnLEAN. .
* * ** -.- - * - - ***
LAHRRIAGE MAKERS.
J, THOMPSON & BROS.,
Importers and Dealers iu
Carriage and Wagon Makers' Materia
And Manufacturers of
LIGHT CIRRIAGES & SPRING WAGONS,
ALL AT REASONABLE PRICES,
68 and 70...South Rampart Street...C8 and 70
fo24 78 ly Between Common and Gravier.
JOSEPH SCHWARTZ,
IMROITIS AND DEALEI IX
Carriage, Wagon and Cart Materials,
3prizgs; A.les, Bolta, Ready.Ma4 Wheels, Blga
. Bodies, Wood Work. Trimmings,
PAINTS AND VARNISHES.
SARVBN PATENT WEEL.
Agent for the Celebrated
BLAOKSMITH'S FAN BLOWER.
Carriage and Wagon Maker and Repairer,
- Salesrooms and Factory -
Nos. 43, 45 and 47 Perdido Street,
kear C 77 rondet Bw e
dea3 77 ly 3wW osLar l.Jl- _ _
ANDREW LEO,
CARPENTER AND BUILDER,
459 Magazine Street, near Race.
All orders left there orat PIo 9h4 Meeban c' aud Dealer'
xchbnge, (ir~vler and Bt. Charles streeta, wil be. as
UsOal promptly attended to. no4tl

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