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The state journal. (Jefferson City, Mo.) 1872-1886, December 27, 1878, Image 1

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VOL. 6.
JEFFERSON CITY. MO.. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27.1878.
NO. 52
1 iie
WEEKLY STATE J OURNAL.
Published Every Friday
BT
N. C. BURCH.
Term, of Subscription:
Single copies, per yeai 91.50
Clubs of ten per year '. 1,2(5
Clubs of twenty, per year 1,00
INVARIABLY IN ADVANCK.
TO CASH BUYEES!
Great Reductions in
Dry Goods,
Groceries
and Liq nor
Largest clock in tb city at
"Wholesale and retail,
DALLMEYER1CO
208 and 210 East High Street.
aus31'77 wly
CASH PAID FOR COUNTRY PRODUCE
JOHN T. CRAVEN
30J EAbT HIGH STREET,
Is again in the field, and be will always be glud
to see his friends and customers.
GROCERIES RETAILED
AT WHOLESALE PRICES,
FOR CASH.
Go and See Him.
You will find a full stock of;tbe
CHOICEST GROCERIES,
Consisting ol
BFST COFFEES.
TEAS,
SUGARS.
SYRUPS,
1 MOLASSES,
All kind of Canned Goods, Wines, Liquors, CI
gars, Tobacco, Ac.
Choicest of Candies.
' A ten per cent, package will be delivered as
cheerfully as a $50 purchase.
"Fair and Honorable Dealing," is my motto,
,
a
having removed our Branch Bindery back from
Sedalla to
THE OLD TAND
on High Street, Jefferson City, Mo., we would
respectiuiiy lnlorm our old and new
patrons that we are now fully
.prepared to do all kind of
BOOK BINDING and BLANK BOOK
MANUFACTURING
on short notice and reasonable terms. Our
Dinaery is nrst. class, ana none but first
class material will be used. Give us a
vail. Full satisfaction guaranteed.
JOHN WALDE,
Manag
A. J. Shockley,
DEALER IN
Hardware,
ITOYE,
AC. AC. &C.
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS AND
FARM MACHINERY.
No. 107 High Street Jefferson City Mo.
iFRED ROMMEL,
Dealer in
v s
Books & Stationery i
'jCht'Omo8. Witll PariM- Mini' Pint ii
BOOK BINDERY
TINWARE
ktu.o Fraa.es made to order. Aent tor
tairehild'a Gold Tens. All orders, will
receive prompt attention.
HIGH STREET, JEFFERSON CITY.
Mr. Bolter's Thanksgiving.
'Til be blamed if I have anything to be
thanktul for' said Mr. Bolter.
"You can all go home and chaw away
at your gobblers, and sine hymns if you
want to; there'll be nothing to do in the
storo anyway. Everybody'll have to stuff
themselves to-dav, aud of course business
must stop. I wish the man that invented
Thanksgiving Diiy had a turkey gobbler
tied round his neck, and had to sleep and
eat with It."
And then Mr. Benjamin Bolter, mer
chant, kicked over a stool, and yelled at
Peter, the office man, to look to the tires
and lock up tor the day.
The six men employed nbout the cstab
lishment silently left, except Peter, and
while the latter silently earned out his
employer's instructions, Bolter sat down
and thought it over.
"Such an idiotic custom." said he to
himself. "It don't matter a cent's worth
what the times have boon, we've got to
have thanksgiving reg'lar, and go on pre
tending we've been blessed, no matter
how we have been persecuted. The whole
country might be on the verge ot starva
tion, and, d n it, they'd appoint one day
in which the provisions should be ail eaten
up."
"This year has been the hardest one
I've known. Everything's shrunk. I've
worked day and night, and it I get through
and m-.ke both ends meet at the end ot
the year I will be lucky. Yet they talk
about thanksgiving !'
And then Mr. Bolter got up and paced
about lor a moment and saw Peter stand
ing by the stove.
'VVhat are you standing there lor?'
said Bolter.
I've closed up," responded Peter.
"Well!" exclaimed Bolter.
"If vou haint got no moro for me to
do." said Peter, "I'd like to get off."
"Oh. you would," replied Bolter, "I
'spose you've got a turkey to eat, too, aud
thanks to giver'
"Not turkey, 'zactly," said Peter,
scratching his head, "but we has a pig
eon or two."
"Humph," growled Bolter. "Well, go
on ; but mind you, you be back bright
and early in the morning, and ready lor
hard wors."
"Yes, sir," said Peter, and he slipped
lightly out the back door and went on his
way cheerily.
Then Bolter sat down and reflected for
a while, and grew more bilter at the hard
times, and grumbled at the slow pace
which he was compelled to keep in his
march toward riches. By and by he grew
sleepy, and he thought he would go
borne, and he went lor his overcoat and
shoes. Someway he didn't seem to rec
ollect anything alter that, until he stepped
off the street car3 up town and walked
away toward bis residence.
As he drew near his home, liolter was
surprised to see a carriage at his door and
a crowd collected near it. Two men were
carrying a burden of some kind up the
steps, and glancing at the doorway he
saw his wite and daughter Florence wring
ing their hands and gazing at the moving
figures.
Bolter darted forward and in a moment
was met by some of his neighbors who
broke the painful news to him.
His only son, Paul, his pride, his hope,
on whose life centered his ambition, hud
been thrown. Irom a moving train and
feartully mangled. Life was not extinct,
but the breath came slow and painlul aud
the end was nigh.
They laid the bruised form on the
snowy bed, and Bolter threw himself on
his knees beside it in helpless ngony.
The physicians rame and looked and
turned away. There were whispers in
the parlor, in the corridor, sadness every
where, for there was no hope.
"Save him!" cried Bolter; "save my
only son, and take all I have everything,
everything." But the doctors only told
him to bear it raantully, aud shook their
heads.
"Dead 1"
Bolter never realized how much that
word signified until he. stood there and
gazed into the lace of his earthly Idol.
All night he 9al halt dazed, nor could
he be induced to leave the room
Morning came, and he walked bewil
dered about the house, noticing here and
there the preparations for tne luneral.
tie opened a chest and saw before him
a coat worn by the boy, and then he broke
down again and wept until the tears
would no longer come.
I be next day came, and the funeral
service was read.
Old Peter was there, bis sober, solemn
lace tramed between others Ir in the
store, but looking out always pitifully at
his grief-stricken master.
At last came the lowering ot the cot
fin. the fall ot the clods, aud the old, old
words.
"Ashes to ashes, dust to dust."
Bolter stood till the last clod tell, and
then followed the others away, back to
the silent home, back to communion with
his bruised heart, back to the weary round
ot existence.
His wife and daughter were left him,
the lormer a paiieut, noblo woman; the
latter a sweet, modest girl : but the idol
of his heart was gone, aud he seemed to
have little to live lor now. . .
"I do not care to get rich," he said to
himsell time and time again, "now that
he is gone. Business may take care of it
self Nu misiorluue that can belall will
affect me now."
But Bolter was mistaken. There came
sudden reverses. At first bo almost
smiled at them, but then came otheis. and
he grew anxious. .
Finally affairs became desperate, and
he thoroughly roused himself. But it as
idle. His goods were seized and sold ;
his very home was levied upon, and soon
passed Irom his possession. He gathered
the 1 ttlo remnants ot property he had
saved and moved his family into modest
quarters. Soon he was forced to leave
these for humbler rooms, nnd necessity
at last drove him to the filth floor ot a
tenement house, and started him out on
the streets in search ot work enough to
save himsell and family from starvation.
Oh, how he looked' back then to the
bright days when he had abundance, a
cheerful home, u happy family; and how
he wondered that he could have 'repined
at such a lot. r
So the days went by; ami another
Thanksgiving day came around. Sitting
by the dying embers in his bleak quar
ters, looking upon the pinched laces and
shivering forms of his wile and daughter;
seeing no hope for the morrow, the strong
man broke duwn completely, and threw
himsell on his coarse bud in utter despair.
Laying there, convulsed with the great
sols which shook his frame, he heard
footsteps on the stairs, and theu there
came a knock at his door.
His wile opened it, and there stood old
Peter, with a blasket of vegetables on his
arm. and in his hand a brace ol very fat
fowls. ,
Peter took off his hat in the old fashion,
and stammeringly said: "It hain't tur
key, 'zactly, you see, Missus, but it's a
pignon or two for Thanksgiving." i
Almost his very words of a year before,
and Bolter hushed his breathing as he
listened.
"You see," continued Peter,"! got a
little work to do this week, and bein' a
to-moirow was Thanksgivin,' 1 thought
I'd bring 'em around."
"Bless his noble soul," thought liol
ter. "Could I speak to the boss a minute ?''
said Peter, glancing toward the bei.
"He's asleep, poor mau," returned Mrs.
Bolter. v
"Well, then, you can tell him win n he
wakes up,' said Peter, "that train's a
good place open tor him now in Carson's
warerooms. and they told me I rmylii call
around and say he could begin right
away."
Mrs. Bolter caught Peter's hand in
hers, Florence began to cry. and B her
lay perfectly still a minute, aiu ost aiiaid
to breathe, but thinking that to-morrow
would be, after all, the happiest Thanks
giving he had ever seen. Then he sat up
on the bed, and, wiih the tears streaming
down his face, held out his hands to
Peter, and said, "God bless you, my laith
ful friend. God bless you t"
And Peter grasped the proffered hand,
but in a mome.it more begiMi shaking him
most vigorously, and crying out: "Rouse
up, sir; rouse up! VVhat can be the mat
ter with you P"
Then his wile and Florence cameuand
there was more shaking, and at last Mr.
Bolier stood up and gazed, in a stupitied
way, around, not at shabby ten mont
rooms, not at dying embers, not at Peter's
two pigeon's, but at three astonished,
though laughing faces, and at the wcll
turmslied office ol his own store.
"Why will you never wake upP" said
Mrs. Bolter. "Here Peter has been tor
five minutes trying to rouse you. and the
dinner will be cold. We came alter you,
fearing you would be late, and Paul is
waning in the carringu for u.'
"Paul !" exclaimoo Mr. Bolier. "Paul!"
"Ves, Paul ; but we should never have
lound you if old Peter hadn't. been going
past with his pigeons and let u in. Come ! '
And was this indeed aii a dream P Was
Paul spared to him as well as his home
and his business P
Mr. Bolter sat down in his chair once
more and buried his face in his hands.
"I thank God," he said, "that all these
blessings, so undeserved and hiiheito so
unrecognized, have been spared to m.
I his shall be a day ol thanksivinir. in
deed, for me."
This is not a true story, but it ought to
be, it might be, it may bd yet to some
who read it, and it will not be amiss to
repeat the prayer of Bolter, and say :
"lnatiK Ij on that all these blessings, so
undeserved and hitherto unrecognized,
have been spared to nie."
The ladies sing "in the sweet 'buy' and
buy' we will meet in that beautiful Kiore."
and we certainly can raise no objection.
But remember the little ones at home and
not leave the nurse without a bottle of
'. Bull's Baby Syrup.
TEST OP THE POWEIt
MASONRY.
OF
By J. It. JJoyce, G. M. of Mon
tana, Formerly ot Co- .
lumbla. Ml8Mouri,
(Voice of Masonry.)
1 have read to-night in me October
number of the Voice, Irom ilie pen of that
'old man eloquent,1 Cornelius Moore, an
article headed 'Alasonic Reminiscences.'
1 loo, have Reminiscences of the past in
Masonry, and although I cannot so graph
ically describe the scenes, nor so lorcihly
tell of these past reminiscences, with jour
piemission I will relate one which made a
deep and lasting impiession.
The sceno is laid in one of the then
quiet villages ot Missouri, (Columbia,)
now a thriving and flourishing town,
boasting of being the seat ol the State
University. I was then a young mau but
was the Worshipful Master of the Lodge.
A gentleman and myself were standing in
front ol a store on the street, and two old
masons, both members ot the same Lodge,
passed, not together but in full view.
These brethren were both members ol the
same church, and both keeping hotels, as
rivals and under some circumstances they
had lallen out, and wore bitter in their
denunciations ot each other. The church
ot which they were members, through
their pastor, also a Mason, had tried to
heal the breach between them; but, in
lieu thereof, they were more bitter than
before. The one could say nothing more
bitter and malignant than the other. The
case was a desperate one, and nothing
but their obligations keut them Irom per
sonal violence. As Masler, I lelt my
position keenly; knew it was my duty to
do something, anil yet being the junior ol
both of them in years as well as in Mason
ry, I felt the delicacy el my position, and
timidly cowered under it. But as these
two brethren pased in view, the gentle
man with whom I was conversing, not
then bvn; a Mason, u marked to me, in
substance :
I once had a very high opinion of
M isonry, but my mind has undergone a
change.'
I said to him : 'What has produced
this result P'
He responded: 'Look at thoso two old
Masons how they viilily and traduce each
other. I once thought Masonry had pow
er over its votaries, and that the tie be
tween them was so strong that all breach
es could be healed ; but I see it is weak
like other institutions, and has no vitali
ty.' I said nothmg, but determined to test
its strength, and it it was powerless to
accomplish its great mission of 'peace
aud harmony,1 that I should teel my idol
had lallen. With this purpose lully ma
tured,! ordered the secretary to issue sum
mons for all the membeis of the Lodge,
giving no reason therefore nor did I state
to any the purpose ot that summons. The
appointed time came on. The Lodge was
fully represented, and all looked auxious
ly to the East for an explanation. All
knew there was no work to do, and reg
ular business could not come up. Both of
these belligerent bretheren were present
I arose and said I had called the Lodge
to test the strength and power ot Masonry
over its members, and dwelt sometime
on the importance ot unity and brotherly
love, and closed by a personal address
to these two brothers, reminding them
their mutual vows and duties, and said
that I demanded ol them both, in the
presence of God, the Lodge, and with
their obligations belore them, to advance
to the altar, one at a time, and as they
both prolessed to be christian men as well
as Masons, to kneel at the altar and there
ask their God to enable them to state
candidly and carefully the cause ot their
ouiicuuy, ana to Dear in mind that no
language unbecoming them and the
place i hey were in would be tolerated
mat- i neio in nana tne emniem ot power
ami mat i stiouid use it promptly it they
deviated.
Silence, deep and profound, prevailed
One ol them approached the altar, knelt
remained for a few Moments in silent
devotion, and rose with tears in his eves
i ..i. i i . . ...
i asKeu nira to proceed, out ne was so
solteued he had little to say in accusation
ot the the other, and sat down. I called
the other to the altar, addressed him soft
ly, kindly, but firmly, asked him to kneel
and offer his prayer belore he proceeded.
He ditl so, arose in tears, and had nothing
to say criminating tho other, spoke kindly
ana soitiy. ana sat down. 1 arose and
asked them it they could not advance to
ilio altar and there extend tho haud ot
friendship and brotherly love to each
other, and bury their animosity so deep
mat- mo nana ol resurrection could not
resuscitate itP They .,imult.neously arose,
met at the altar, ami instead of extending
hands, fell up m each other's necks and
wept
While they were thus standing, I soun
ded the gavel and called the brethren
around the altar and asked them to kneel
in a circle, ana tneso nrotners in the cen
ter. Among the brethren present was a
minister peculiarly gilted in extempora
neous prayer I called upon him to pray,
and sueh a prater. 1 scarcely ever heard
from the nps ol mortal man. When be
said "Amen," l looked through my tears
around, and nearly hall ot the brethren
were b'iwed with their laces to the floor,
and nil in tears. 1 stepped back to East,
uncermoniously declared the Lodge
closed, and the. members commenced
grasping hands, and some the necks, and
uch a scene ol rejoicing you seldom see,
except at an old f islnoned Methodist camp
meeting, and all thanked God for the
'Power of Masonry.1
The brethren thus restored to each
oil er's affections ever afterward lived in
love, peace and harmony. The gentle
man iiforementioiied hfierward changed
his opinion ol Masonry, sent in his petition,
and became an honored member of the
Order
The most assidhms parental attention
will frequently tail to prevent coughs,
cnld croup, etc Dr Bull's Cough Syrup,
is a most valuable remedy to have con
venient when needed
The Government p tper mills at Glen
Mills, Delaware county, haye closed.
The e u trad lor revuuuH paper, which
the mill started to supply, is filled, and
as Secretary Sherman is resolved that the
lowest bidder shall herealter secure this
work, it may be that this kind ot work at
Glen Mills may be stopped for some
time.
NlXANS
PHOTOGKAPHKK,
All kinds ot Pictures. (!nivinr. fin
.hing.
Jefferson City Agricultural Works
Manufacture the celebrated
DOUBLE ROTARY FORCK FEKD
Mtsouur
I GRAIN DRILL!
The best, the cheapest and the only perfect one
in tne world.
don't fail to 8kb tiik missouri bkforr
purchasing.
DALLMEYER & FISCHER
Tronrietors Jefferson Citv Aa'l Works
7-wtf
-:-CALIFORNIA-:- 1
ARBLE WORKu
W. P. HANDLEY,
Manufacturer of Foreigu and American
Marble Monuments
GRAVESTONES AND TOMBS,
California, Mo.
Monuments nnd Gravestones delivered and
set up.lreeof :harge. inai"29w'781ynda
F. J. MAYER.
DEALER IN
Itoves, Tinware Etc.
SI
High Street, (opp. Pratt's Auction Room
Jefferson City, Mo.
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF PARLOR
and Cooking Stoves, Cooking Uteusils,Tin
Ware, etc., always on hand.
Tin Piping and Guttering, and all . Tin
pa.te made to orde, with neatness and dis
Watcb deo.27.27t
HENRY NITCHY
REAL TATE A6ENT,
JEFFERSON CITY. MO
B
UYS
AND SELLS LANDS ON COMMIS
sion. I'av Taxes. Redeem Lauds Sold fol
Taxes, Procure Patents. &c.
Olhce over White . Janvier's store. TTipb
Street. dc.27 72hf
Zuber's Marble Worns
TTICTOn ZTTBEIt,
MANUFACTURER OF
Foreign & American
MARBLE MONUMENTS.
GRAVESTONES AND TOMBS
North side of High steeet.
Between Jefferson and Washincton Sts.
JKFFEItSON CI IV.
Dr. J. G. Riddler,
DEALER IN
DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
Prescriptions tilled with certainty and dis
patch at all hours.
Pure Wines and Liquors for Medicinal Pur
poses.
HIGH STREET.
JEFFERSON CITY
Jan8'76dly.
Joseph Meyer,
MANUFACTURER
and Dealer in
u
bus bought out the shop recently occupied by
John Antwelller, aud will at once
open a first class
IAUNES3 & SADDLE SHOP
at the same stand.
The stock nurchased ot Mr. Ainillnr win
be sold immediately at less than tot.
A full assortment of everything In tho line
constantly on hand.
Repairing ueallv done, and all work
ranted. . ,
S.
ADDLES & HARNESS
JOSEPH LIEYEH,
213 High Streett
i

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