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Fair play. (Ste. Genevieve [Mo.]) 1872-1961, June 28, 1919, Image 6

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FAIR PLAY, STE. GENEVIEVE. MISSOURI.
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Condensed
SHORTSTORIES TERSELY TOLD FOR'
THE BENEFIT OF BUSY READERS.
It
It
3
MISCELLANEOUS.
The Pennsylvania senate has passed
the federal suffrage amendment by a
Vote of 39 tro 6.
Announcement Is tnado at the Rus
sian embassy at Washington that the
"new 'Russian government at Omsk has
decided to place In American markets
the greater part of orders for military
supplies, which aro estimated at $104,
"OOO.OOO for tho next 10 months.
Secretary TJaker says U. S. war snp
jilies in Europe will be sold to France.
Equipment Is worth $1,500,000,000, In
cluding warehouses, docks, railroads
and other improvements.
William K. Vanderbllt's Techad won
the French Derby at the Lonichamps
course. Lazard's Hallebardlcr was
- second and E. K. Nayan's Master a
good third.
The Germans destroyed or carried
out of France printing machinery val
ued at $100,000,000, which must be re
placed chiefly from the United Statsa.
said J. Radiquer, type manufacturer
and editor of La Typologie, of Paris.
Night delivery of morning newspa
pers by airplane was inaugurated by
the Chicago Examiner and irerald
when "airplane extras" containing the
news of the successful nonstop trans
Atlantic flight of the British plane
piloted by Capt. Alcock, were carried
to Kankakeo and Aurora, 111.
The army is only two-thirds de
mobilized, the War Department an
nounced, and It will take more than
hree months to complete the work at
die present rate of 357,000 discharges
a month.
Phillip M. Houcke, 49 years old,
president and general manager of tho
Ste. Genevieve Lime Co., and general
manager of tho Kolb Coal Co., died
i it his home in St. Louis.
CONGRESSIONAL.
Washington announcement was re
cently made that Secretary Baker
-had authorized tho recruiting of 26,
450 men for service on the Mexican
border. They will replace men en
listed for the war emergency and now
eligible for discharge.
American labor is to be warned to
distrust and fear the provisions In the
peace treaty for an internationnl labor
organization, senators opposing the
treaty declare.
Senator Spencer of Missouri has
been formally requested to permit the
Missouri Republicans to launch a cam
paign for him as the presidential can
dldato next year.
Senate leaders at Washington drew
their lines more sharply for the next
phase of the treaty fight, to begin
shortly around the resolution of Sen
ator Knox, Republican, of Pennsyl
vania, proposing to put the Senate on
record against accepting the League
of Nations as now interwoven with
the terms of peace.
Appointment of Denver S. Dicker
son of Carson City, Nov., as Superin
tendent of Prisons and president of
the Board of Parole of the Depart
ment of Justice, has been announced
by Attorney-General Palmer.
The senate foreign relations commit
tee has subpoenaed .1. P. Morgan,
Frank A. Vanderlip and other big New
York bankers as witnesses in the in
vestigation of tho "treaty leak."
CRIMINAL.
Ten labor leaders in Winnipeg, Can
ada, were arrested for complicity in
a strike.
FiTe armed bandits held up the West
Cleveland 3ank and obtained $65,000,
and escaped in a stolen automobile.
DOMESTIC.
Although foreseeing "no reason to
ioubt that war-time prohibition will
become effective July 1," tho Internal
Revenue Bureau, in accordance with
an opinion of the Attoruoy-General,
will continue the sale of tax stamps
for intoxicating beverages after that
dato.
One American soldier was killed,
two are dying and more than 100
others were Injured as the result of
the collapse of the Knights of Colum
bus hut at Pontanezen, France, while
a boxing match was in progress.
"The return of tho railroads to pri
vate ownership would inevitably start
n riso in prices, the apex of which no
inan could truthfully predict," said
Robert W. Wooley of the intereiite
commerce commission to tho Virgin
la Bankers' Association.
The United States government has
not decided upon plan of action with
reference to the default of payment of
,$50,000,000 Russian credit duo now
and on July 10.
1 William J. Flynn, in charge of inves-
,,-tlgatlon of bomb outrages, expects
more bombs to corao."
William J. DIngeo asserted under
.oalh In a deposition taken in San Fran-
.claeo, .Cal., that $400,000 had been paid
iyierick W. Hcnshaw, then Justice
v .of (the State Supreme Court, nfter
ilenifiuaw told him he would see what
ho cp'Bld do In regard to reversing n
decision of the Supremo Court so as to
effects breaking of tho trust clause
tin the 422,000,000 will of James G.
Fair. .
-j Germany's answer to allied peace
(terms tnuot bpprtfsented to the peace
Iconierenco at rrvhefore 0:49 p, m
ITarJfi Uuip, JloBdoj;, Juno 23" r
3C
News Items n
DC
Right of tho Ohio voters to approvo
or disapprove of tho action of tho
State Legislature In ratifying consti
tutional amendments, was uphold by
Judge E. B. Dillon.
Liquid shipments on railroads by
express companies after next Friday
literally will be nothing stronger than
milk. The railroad administration has
notified distillers that no whisky will
bo received after that date.
Jewels valued at $15,000 were taken
from the residence In Chicago of Mrs.
Nellie Magnus Loeb, daughter of the
late Adolphus Busch, of SL Louis
during a party.
PERSONAL.
Viscount NorthclIfTe, newspaper
owner and former head of thb British
mission to tho United States, under
went an operation In London.
The Princo of Wales will visit St.
Louis during the latter part of August
on his tour of the middle west, ac
cording to Washington dispatches.
King of Alphonso of Spain is slight
ly indisposed. He is remaining In his
room on tne orders of his physicians.
Mrs. S. W. Brlttain, of Center, Tex.,
was convicted at that place of violat
ing tho local option laws and sen
tenced to life imprisonment in the
state penitentiary.
President Wilson has approved of a
plan for General Pershing to come
back to America as chief of staff.
President Wilson has written a note
to Thomas W. Lamont, who supplied
Henry P. Davidson with a copy of t.ie
peace treaty, practically exculpating
him from blame.
President Wilson, on his return
home, will tour the country speaking
in support of the League of Nations.
Secretary Tumulty has completed a
tentative Itinerary for the trip.
Bernard M. Baruch has been urged
to accept the American chairiaanship
of tho high reparation commission,
to sit on the German claims, but he
is anxious to retire to private !ii and
will decline.
LABOR.
A strike of priests, which is with
out precedent, has just occurred at
Loretto, a celebrated resort of pil
grims, whither, according to legendry,
tho House of the Virgin of Nazareth
was miraculously transported by
angels In tho year 1294.
rlther
A resolution asking President Wil
son to remove Postmaster Burleson
was adopted unanimously by Amer
ican Federation of Iabor.
Five meals a day and wages of
$2.50 and $2.75 are offered by St. Clair
county, III., farmers in an effort to ob
tain harvesting help.
A resolution asking President Wil
son immediately to remove Postmaster-General
Burleson from office was
adopted unanimously by the American
tederation of Labor in convention at
Atlantic City, N. J.
Ten strikers were arrested at Win
nipeg, Canada, and taken to some
place in the country by government
officials.
E. J. Ryan of Boston was re-elected
president of tho Railway Mail Asso
ciation. Tho votes were received by
mail and tabulated at the convention
of tho railway mail clerks at the
Planters Hotel, St. Louis.
FOREIGN.
The German cabinet met informally
to discuss the new summarization of
the peace treaty, but no decision was
reached, as far as could be determined.
Postmaster General Geisberts, ono
of tho member of the main German
delegation, said frankly without any
qualification that he would not put his
name to the treaty In its present form.
The general striko of members ot
tie Commercial Telegraphers' Union
is gaining in strength. President
Konenkamp estimated that 27,000 men
are out.
President Wilson and his party ar
rived in Paris after a two-day trip to
Brussels and the war zone in Bel
gium. Tliero was no formal reception
and President Wilson drove immedi
ately to tho Paris "White House."
Martial law has been proclaimed in
tho entire zono of Hamburg harbor as
a consequenco of an increaso in raids
upon food depots.
The Italian Government resignod
following an adverse voto against it
in tho Chamber of Deputies.
In consequenco of difficulties cre
ated by tho popular movement against
pro-Japanese members of the Govern
mont, tho Pokln Cabinet has resigned
and President Hsu Shih Chang has
also intimated his intention of quit
ting office.
Majority of members of peaco con-
forenco believe that Gormany will not
sign tho peact treaty, according to
Marcel Hutln, of the Echo de Paris
who mado a canvass of tho number
of tho leading personalities.
Harold Gilbert, 20, and hi3 wife, 19,
Alton, III., were killed by lightning
Tho political upheaval in France,
predicted as an aftermath of, tho war,
nppcara to have begun. After tho
modification of factloual Hues In the
Socialist party, tho former extremist
minority has Lccorao the majority.
HE
UNITED CAPITAL
RECOGNIZES
LABOR
REPRESENTATION IN MANAGE.
MENT CONCEDED BY U. S.
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
GIVEN THE RIGHTT0 ORGANIZE
Strikes Will Be Avoided Lessons
Learned from World War Bears
Fruit In Cementing Friendship
of Capital and Labor.
Washington, D. C. The right of la
bor to organize wns conceded by mem
bers of tho United States Chaaibor of
Commerce, In a referendum voto
taken among members of the organi
zation throughout the country, ac
cording to announcement from tho of
fices of that organization. Tho cham
ber members also approved the sug
gestion that there should be adequate
representation of all parties interest
ed in industry and that members
should study existing form of repre
sentation of employes and employers.
Tho right . of workers to organize
is as clearly recognized as that of any
other element or part of tho com
munity. Whenever agreements are mado
with respect to industrial relations
they should faithfully be observed.
Wages should bo adjusted with duo
regard to tho purchasing power of tho
wage and to the right of every man
to an opportunity to cam a living at
fair wages, to reasonable hours of
work and working conditions, to a do
cent homo and to the enjoyment of
proper social conditions.
Industrial harmony and prosperity
will be most effectually promoted by
adequate representation of the par
ties in Interest. Existing forms of
representation should carefully be and
availed of in so far as they may bo
found to have merit and are adapt
able to the peculiar situations in tho
various inlustries.
WHEN FIVE MINISTERS FAVOR
ACCEPTANCE OF TREATY.
Extension of Time Will Be Asked
Lloyd George, Clemenceau and
President Meet to Consider
Grave Situation.
Weimar The Cabinet, although It
has rosigned, will continue In office
temporarily until President Ebert has
been ablo to form a now ono.
Gustav Noske, the minister of de-
fenso, will succeed Phillip Schelde
mann as head of the German minis
try. Mathins Erzberger of the Ger
man armistice commission, will sue
coed Count von Brockdorff-Rantzau as
hoad of the German peace delega
tion. It is understood hero that tho fall
of tho Scheldemanu government en
tails the fall also of President Ebert.
The National Assembly probably will
ake measures to select a successor.
Tho Council of Three, composed of
Premiers Lloyd George and Clemen
:eau, and President Wilson, met and
It Is understood discussed the Ger
man situation and the Italian Cabi
net crisis.
OIL REFINERY FOR ST. LOUIS
Tracts Purchased by Vhlte Star
and Tidewater Companies.
Tho purchase of tracts of land in
the St. Louis district for tho immedi
ate erection of two largo oil refiner
ies, one by the White Star Roflning
company of Detroit and the other by
tho Tidewater Oil company of Bay-
onne, N. J., was announced by Edgar
Gengenbach, Industrial commissioner
of tho Chamber of Commerce. Tho
establishment of refineries by tlieso
companies in this district will mako
St. Louis ono of tho greatest oil re
Uulng centers in the United States.
President of Brazil Arrives.
Dr. Epilacio Pcssoa, President
elect ot Brazil, was welcomed to
Now York when tho transport Im
pcrator arrived In the harbor.
To Settle Wire Strike.
Officials of tho Klnloch Telephone
Company and International Brother
hood of Electrical Workers will meet
Wednesday to settle dispute.
Mississippi Suffrage Session.
Tho Mississippi Legislature will be
called in special session "this, autumn"
to act on tho suffrage amendment.
Food Ships Sail for Germany.
Eight American stoamcrs ,wlth car
goes of provisions for Germany, that
havo been detained, have proceeded
for Gorman ports. There was a re
port that they would bo hold .up pond
ing tho signing of tho peace treaty.
Missouri Judge Scores Jury.
Judge J. E. Glllham in tho Madison
County Circuit Court sovercly repri
manded a Jury for returning a ver
dict of acquittal In favor of Ercy Bas
(nger of St. Louis nnd Edward Dill
ot Madison.
TH RC
CUT FROM TAXES
THIS WOULD LEAVE TAXABLE
VALUATION FOR 1919 AT
ABOUT $2,275,000,000.
INCREASE OF 20 PER CENT
Democratic Majority Will Reject the
Recommended Valuation of $4,
132,000,000 by the State
Tax Commission.
Jefferson City. The state board of
equalization, after a delay of nioro
than 10 weeks, will meet to pass upon
real estate and personal property as
sessments returned by assessors at
$3,033,114,407.
The Democratic majority on the
board, probably with the sanction of
Gov. Gardner, will reject the recom
mended valuation of $4,132,000,000 by
the state tax commission, and will
strike more than $750,000,000 from tho
sworn assessments returned by as
sessors to the tax commission for this
year's taxes, It was learned.
This would leave the taxable valua
tion for 1919 taxes at $2,275,000,000,
approximately. This is slightly less
than $380,000,000 in excess of the as
sessment placed upon Missouri real
estate and personal property by At
torney General McAllister, Secretary
of State Sullivan and State Treasurer
Mlddelkamp for taxes In 1918. That
was $1,898,085,530.
The increase is about 20 per cent.
McAllister, Mlddelkamp and Sullivan,
who control the state board, after ne
gotiations with the governor, agreed
to a 20 per cent Increase over their
own asessment of Inst year to mako
up the deficit of between $750,000 and
$1,000,000.
State Auditor George E. Hackmann,
Republican member of the board, and
the governor, are on record for the full
assessment of property, the governor
having supported a resolution by
Hackmann when the board organized
last February to equalize property at
Its true value in money, as section
11412, Revised Statutes, 1919, require.
The increase allowed by McAllister,
Sullivan and Mlddelkamp will produce
in state revenue this year about $570,
000. If the same taxable valuation Is
maintained In 1920, the increase in
state taxes will be. about $1,140,000
for the biennial period. This will be
enough, with tho heavily slashed bud
get of the state eleemosynary and edu
cational institutions, to enable the
governor to get out of office in Janu
ary. 1921, without leaving a big debt.
Tho McAlIister-Middelkamp-Sulllvan
assessment, to which Gardner is said
to have agreed, proposes the equali
zation of bank stock and money, notes
and bonds at 60 per cent of face value.
The old basis for bank notes was 50
per cent of full value.
Insurance Increase Denied.
Jefferson City. The 147 fire insur
ance companies doing business in Mis
souri lost their suit in the supreme
court, refusing them the right to raise
rates a flat 10 per cent.
Woman Elected Chairman.
Kansas City, Mo. Mrs. Hugh Ward,
of Kansas City, was appointed as
chairman of the Woman's Auxiliary of
the Democratic national committee for
this state.
Liquor Dealers Abandon Hope
Jefferson City. Central Missouri is
getting ready for prohibition at mid
night Juno 30. This city has been a
Mecca for the wots ever since local
option became popular in surrounding
counties.
National Opera House.
An effort will be made to obtain for
St. Louis one ot the five national con
servatories of music, which are provid
ed for in a bill recently introduced in
congress.
Church Opposes Dry Law.
Carthage, Mo. Missouri Christian
Church convention sends resolutions
to President Wilson and congress pro
testing against repeal of war dry law.
Flat River Editor Arre6'.ed.
St. Louis. Narre C. La Chance was
arrested for obtaining money under
false pretenses while managing a
newspaper in Flat River, Mr.
Terminal R. R. Asks Bond Is&uo.
Application was filed by the Ter
minal Railroad Association with tho
public servlco commission for author
ity to issue $1,000,000 in 4 per cent
bonds under its general mortgage. The
application was set for a hearing.
Vice District Clooed.
Hannibal, Mo, Sheriff J. Will Met-
ford has issued an order closing Han
nibal's segregated district as a part
of the vice crusade.
State Finishes Its Case.
Greenfield, Mo, Tho state has fin
ished Its caso in tho trial of Mrs. Maud
Lynch, mother of Jay Lynch, who is
charged with being nu accessory in
the killing of Sheriff Harlow of Barton
county, and his son, Walter Harlow,
at Lamar, Mo., March 3. Jay Lynch
was hange'd by a mob at Lamar. Fif
teen witnesses were examined. The
stato bases Its case on tho contention
that Lynch's mother and wife smug
gled the revolver Into tho cell which
caused tho death.of Harlow and hla
ion.
nnn
nun
wriiiuiw i io io i,.... .w ku -
Jcfferson City. Twenty-one chll
dron's code bills hnvo boon signed by
Governor Gardner and will become in
fective In August.
The measures which were approved
aro almost one-halt of tho number
recommended by the children's codo
commission, which was appointed by
Governor Gardner. Twonty-flvc bills
were passed by tho 50th general as
sembly, but Gardner was forced to
veto soveral because of the financial
condition of tho state or because iho
legislature failed to provide appropria
tions to carry them into effect.
Far-reaching mensurea In behalf of
delinquent, dependent and defective
children were enacted along with edu
cational, labor and general moaaurjs
in the interest of the younger genera-
,tfon.
Former Circuit Judge Rhodes E.
Cave, of St. Louis, was chairman of
tho commission, and Mrs. Lucille B.
Lowenstein, of St. Louis, was secre
tary. The educational measures were
among tho most Important passed and
approved by Gardner.
The compulsory school attendance
act, requiring full time attendance
throughout the state for children be
tween the ages of 7 and 16, unless thoy
have completed the eighth grade, is
the keynote of the educational meas
ures. Missouri Champion Walnut Grower.
Missouri, for the year 1918, as was
tho case during other years of the last
decade, holds first rank among all
states for quantity and value ot black
walnut lumber and logs placed on the
market, the production amounting to
13,373,000 feet of lumber and 420 extra
cars of logs, which commodities had:
a combined total market value of
$2,204,138, announces advance in
formation from the 1918 Red Book of
tho Missouri bureau of labor statistics,
released for publication by Commis
sioner William H. Lewis.
Missouri's walnut lumber that year,
at an average of $117.77 per 1,000 feet,
plus of walnut logs, 420 carloads, had
a total worth of $030,000.
Missouri Officers in Navy.
The Missouri men commissioned in
the navy are: Robert W. AndersCaJ,
Hancock; Walter W. Graves, Jr., Jef
ferson City; Lloyd W. Howard, Cham
ois; George B. Lester, Humansvil'te,
Stephen M. Paine, Klrksville; James
E. Thomas, Joplin; Charles H Ma
hony, St. Jo3eph; David M. Simmons,
Advance; Rex. E. Deuhlrst, St. Louis
and Ray E. G.iugh, Moberly.
Webster Groves to Attend Opera.
St. Louis. Mayor Kiel, president of
the Municipal Theatre Association,
was advised by Mayor Holckamp of
Webster Groves that he would like to
have the July 10 performance at the
Municipal Theatre, when "Fra Dia-
vola" will be produced, set aside at
Webster Groves night.
Girl Kills Wolf and Cubs.
Richmond, Mo. Rose May Bowers,
16-year-old Richmond schoolgirl, made
$1C bounty. She crawled into the den
and killed the mother wolf and five
cubs.
J. P. McBaine Appointed Dean.
Columbia, Mo. J. P. McBaine, for
merly of St. Louis, has been appointed
dean of the school of law In tho Dnl
verslty of Missouri by the board of
curators.
Kemper School Is Honored.
Boonville, Mo. Word has been re
ceived here that Kemper Military
School has been placed second on the
list of the 10 honor schools in the
United States by the war department,
being the only military school in the
Missouri valley so honored.
Wheat Yield Reduced.
Whiteside, Mo. The wheat harvest
In the north part of Lincoln county
has begun. The crop is not as prom
ising as a few weeks ago, yet if
nothing happens there will be a large
yield.
Fulton Defeats Phone Bonds.
Fulton, Mo. The $50,000 municipal
telephone bond proposition was de
feated at the election by a vote of
280 to 235. Fulton is the first city in
the state to votfe on the proposition.
Fayette Schools Have New Head.
Fayette, Mo. Prof. L. H. Strunk,
principal of tho Mexico, Mo., high
school, has been elected superlntena
cnt of tho Fayette public schools and
has accepted. "
New Job For James Y. Player.
James Y. Player, former comptroller
of St. Louis, and n member of the state
tax commission, was appointed special
agent for the commission.
Commercial Clubs to Meet
Jefferson City. The Stats Fedora
Xlov of Commercial Clubs will meet
here Juno 25, to discuss educational
outlook In Missouri.
Accidentally Killed by Husband
Clinton, Mo. Mrs. Estalino Hiiynle
was killed by her husband while he
wns cleaning a pistol.
Kansas City Plans Control.
Kansas City, Mo. Democratic poll
ttclans at tho capital aro exhibiting
marked interest in a scheme which
had itn inception here and is looked
upon a3 an effort to control the next
Democratic nomination for governor
for a candidate to be backed' by Wil
liam T. Kemper, a Kansas City bank
er, and tbo Pendergast faction in Kan
ras City, presumably Mayor CowglH,
though In some quarters there Is a
feeling that It is to be Kemper himself.
SCRIPT GAME BACK
Librettist Writes Humorously of
His First Play.
Producer 8eemlngly Had Forgotten
All About Work He Prondunced
"Great," and It Was Finally
Returned to Composer.
"I never shall forget," snld Bide
Dudley, author, "the first time I tried
to write for the stage. It came nbout
llko this: J. J. Rosenthal wns stug
lng a musical show with the Intention
of taking It West. Juke and I had
come Into contact often, ns I liked his
brand of cigars. At tills particular
time he needed u lyric for his show.
We met on tfrondwny and he gave me
a cigar.
" 'Bide,' he said, 'can you write rue-
a song?'
"'No,' I replied.
" 'Good ! Jake almost yelled. Tou'r
the very guy I'm looking for. All the
others suy they can write mo dozens
of songs. Thnt's the troublo with
them. They're too cocksure. When.
you get home tonight write me a lyric
on 'Love.' Do I get it- tomorrow?'
"wen, yoir know, Juke,' I replied,
'originally I was u telegraph operator
and then a graiu buyer out in Kansas.
However, if you want to take a chance.
I'm game. I'll write the lyric.'
"That night I fixed up a couple of
rerses and the next day I hniuled the
finished product to Juke nnd ran. He-
phoned me Inter to say it wns great
and that it would go into the show I
niedintely. It did. The show went
broke on the second stop out.
"Juke didn't put all tho blnme on.
the song that Is, he said It might
have been something else that explod
ed the show. At any rate, he didn't
lose faith In me. Three months later
he handed me an old mothenten com
edy script and suggested that I make It
a musical piny. I demurred, but ho
gave me a cigar, and so I went to
work. A widely-known composer call
ed In to do the score, nnd we labored
together a month. Then wo submitted
the new musical comedy to Juke.
" 'It's great,' ho said. Then he threw
tho script In his desk and we went
forth expectnnlly. For n whole year I'
Inspected the billboards closely, but
saw nothing that would Indicate that
Jake had produced the piece. At tho
end of six months more I received the
script In the mall. A man had bought
the desk nt nn miction and found the
piny In the drawer. All he nsked of
me was that I return hlin the price of
the postage.. I thought that reason
able enough, so he got his stamps
back." Sunlight Not Good Germicide.
Sunlight ns a germicide proves to bo
loss efficient nnd reliable nt least In
temperate regions than hns been com
monly supposed. In his experiments
In Algiers, M. de Lnroquette has found
that only prolonged or direct expos
ure to sunlight destroys bncterla, and
thnt Its action Is chiefly confined to
dry surfaces whero the bacteria nra
fully desiccated. Bncterin in liquids
are affected only by very Intense light,,
nnd this only ut slight depth. Whlto
light Is more effective .than colored,
blue being slightly more powerful than,
other colors. Bacteria are chiefly
killed by luminous rays, nnd ultrn-vlo-let
rays have fulled to show the bnc
terlcldnl action so generally credited
them the ultrn-red nlso being Ineffi
cient. At best, sunlight acts only at
tho surface, while layers of fnt or
muscle prevent even the slight ordi
nary penetration.
By Naval Precedent.
It Is n curious nnomuly of the senior
service, says the London Dully News,
thnt nn officer who attains, us Lord
Jelllcoe and Sir David Beatty have Just
attnlned, the rank of admiral of the
fleet, Is required by precedent to retire
from nctlve command. The rule may
have been designed to eliminate old
seadogs who had become too ancient
to bite, but It seems singularly foolish
to permit its application to men like
Jelllcoe nnd Beatty. By the unprece
dented rapidity fit his promotion, Sir
David hns finished his sen career nt
the ngo of forty-eight In the prime or
his life. The army Is free from this
senseless precedent, for the rank of
flnlil ninl-clinl wlilnH Io lir. mtlhnm.
..v... ............. ,, . ..... ..IK.IUIJ,
equivalent to the rank of ndmlrnl of
tho fleet wns, of course, held during
tho war by both Lord French and Sir
Douglas Unlg.
Someone Is Lying.
Excerpt of n conversation between
Jim Neiil nnd his brother "Juicer,"
Pike Euing of the C. R. ynrd. "The
fool kid didn't hnvo senso enough to
ld go of the bar he had on his shoul
der when he felt the floor dropping
nwny from his feet nnd, of course,
when the old mngnet added the bnr
to tho under side of the plute It wns
carrying down the shop, the kid went
with it. The worst of It was tho
crnnemiin couldn't turn off the Julco
and release Uie kid without dropping
the pinto on top of him nt the same
time, so "
"I s'pose they lind to let the kid
hung there und starve, huh?" Heuve
Together.
Swinging the Ax.
Uncle Joe Cnnnon wns commenting
on u certain governmental bureau.
"It's n mighty polite bureau," he snld
thoughtfully. "Why, they never firo
n limn In that dennrtment. They ask
. ,.,1AH l.lr. Mt.l...,-n tin.. .
(lnr-Iru- vnn lmnu " kiiiiI TTnpli .Tna
smiling, "tendering makes It less
touuh."

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