OCR Interpretation


Fair play. (Ste. Genevieve [Mo.]) 1872-1961, July 05, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87052181/1919-07-05/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

FAIR PLAY. STE. GENEVIEVE. MISSOURI.
1L
It
Condensed
SHORT STORIES TERSELY TOLD FOR
THE BENEFIT OF BUSY READERS.
It
It
1
MISCELLANEOUS. !
A woman's baseball team Is touring
tho first division aro In Germany and
Arousing tho wildest enthusiasm,
wherever it crosses bats with regi
mental nines of the American army.
The creation of a negro stato along
the Hlo Grande, to bo administered
llko the Indian reservations, In tho
the first divislcn In Germany and tiro
cording to Dr. M. M. Madden, negro
evangelist of Ol.iahoma City.
Police and soldiers who intervened
in food riots In the northern suburbs
of Berlin exchanged shots with mobs
of men and women. A number of
shops were plundered.
Four boys three negroes and one
white were drowned In tho Ohio riv
er near Kvansvllle when they walked
Into a hole. Tho white boy was Ilex
Uouser of St. Louis, who was hero on
n visit.
Frank Vinser, Jr., 23 years old, of
St. Louis, a metal worker, fell 90
feet inside a smokestack and was
killed at the plant of the Waldeck
Packing Co., almost opposite his
home.
Out in Kansas an army of saw
toothed giants started to drone tho
annual hymn of the harvest. And
abovo the drone of the reapers in the
$500,000,000 wheat fields of Kansas
came the cry "Send us help."
Frank L. Polk of Now York, coun
sellor of the State Department and
now acting Secretary of State, has
been nominated by President Wilson
to be Under-Secretary of State, a
now office created by the 1920 legis
lative and Judicial appropriation bill
passed by the last Congress.
Railroads of the central western re
gion are to mako an effort this week
to run without an accident of any
kind. Railroad employes are to be
Instructed to exercise unusual care In
the performance of their duties.
CONGRESSIONAL.
Senator Borah mnde it plain that he
will not be satisfied with any plan re
garding the League of Nations which
ho does not regard as meeting the
Issue of Americanism vs. internation
alism without equivocation.
Senator Spencer, of Missouri, ap
pearing before the Senate Committee
of Appropriations, succeeded in hav
ing included in the civil appropriation
bill an item of $75,000 for the estab
lishment of three mine experiment
schools, one of which, It Is believed
will bo located at Rolla, Missouri.
Senators Johnson, Republican, of
California, and Reed, Democrat, of
Missouri, have agreed to speak in op
position to the League of Nations.
The Food Administration announces
that the president him signed a procla
raation, releasing from license all per
sons, firms, corporations or associa
tions engaged in the business of im
porting, manufacturing, storing or dis
tributing rice or rice flour.
A bill granting Japan permission to
send two students to West Point was
favorably reported by the House Mill
lary Comittee.
American labor is to be warned to
distrust and fear the provisions in the
peace treaty for an international labor
organization, senators opposing the
treaty declare.
CRIMINAL.
Michael Schnurr, a merchant of St.
louis, was sentenced to two years in
the penitentiary on a charge of re
ceiving stolen property. He Is said to
have accepted for sale $5000 worth of
Liberty Bonds that had been stolen
A verdict of guilty of murder In tho
second degree wis found by a jury
in the case of Dr. Ephriam Northcott,
San Francisco physician, accused of
tho murder of Miss Inez E. Reed, army
nurse, formerly stationed at Fort
Riley. She died after an operation.
A jury of seven women and five
men will try Dr. Ephraim Northcott,
Saa Francisco physic!.-n, on a charge
of having murdered Miss Inez Reed,
an army nurse.
Soven persons, including two Ameri
can sailors, were seriously injured by
a bomb which had been placed aboard
a crowded street car in Manil. .
Singapore hi" been declared under
martial law 'ollowing serious disor
ders in connection with the native
Japanese boycott, the British War of
fice announces.
DOMESTIC.
Lucius T. Russell, publisher of the
Nowark Ledger, nnnounces that Ar
'thur Brisbane, editor of the Now York
livening Journal and Washington
Times, had purchased sn interest In
Tils newspaper.
Word of the burning of certain
French battle flag3 by the Germans
"has ; been received in Paris. Peace
Conference opinion is apparently
unanimous that this is a distinct vio
lation of the peace treaty.
i
Tho through Seattle-SL Louis pas
senger train on tho Burlington rail
road, duo at Lincoln at 15:15 Sunday
morning, was wrecked a short dis
tance east of Aurora, seventy miles
west of Lincoln. Four coaches left
the track, , but, so far as known, no
pae was injured.
It
News Items n
It
Completion of forts and housing ac
commodations along the Mexican bor
der, to ameliorate tho trials of troops
sorvlng as patrols, will give tho
United States its first real fortified
frontier.
Enough food to provision the peoplo
of the liberated countries' of Europe
until their own farm crops have boen
harvested this fall will be in transit
by July 1, It was announced by tho
American relief administration.
The suite recently occupied by tho
President and Mrs. Wilson, In the
Waldorf-Astoria, New York City, and
which has been reserved for Eamonn
de Valera, "President of tho Island,"
by his secretary, Harry J. Poland, is
In spick and span shape for the guest.
PERSONAL.
Cardinal Mercier and Gen. Leman,
defender of Liege in 1914, may accom
pany King Albert and Queen Eliza
beth when they visit tho United
States.
Burlington passenger train No. 6,
from Lincoln to Chicago, ran five
miles without an engineer when En
gineer James Edgar Johnson of Lin
coln fell from the cab a mile east of
Waverly after being hit by a mall
crane.
Whitlock's successor as minister
to Belgium has not been selected.
Thomas Nelson Pago, United States
ambassador to Italy, arrived In Paris
and called on President Wilson.
ACCIDENTS.
The body of Alonzo Brandenburg,
president of the First State Bank, was
found under a pile of debris which
marks the site of the Grand Hotel. It
Is believed that all of the bodies have
now been recovered from effect of
Fergus Falls, Minn., tornado.
Henry Bohnenkamp, 21, a bank
clerk, and Miss Edith Olcalne, 20, were
drowned and two other persons were
rescued when their automobile
plunged into Chicago river. The res
cued men attributed the accident to
a broken steering gear.
LABOR.
In an effort to avert a strike threat
ened by 1500 firemen and 3500 police
men, the Finance Committee of the
Chicago City Council -voted an increase
In pay to these men, as well as to 5100
street and miscellaneous workers al
ready on strike.
Chiefs of police of all the largo
cities have agreed to send all loafers
to the harvest fields if they insist on
remaining idle.
A bill limiting work aboard all pub
lic and prlvato vessels to eight hours
a day or 48 hours a week was adopted
by the Chamber of Denudes in Paris.
Warning that every strike or walk
out in violation of the union agree
ment with tho government was "a
nail in the coffin of collective bar
gaining," was voiced by Judge Samuel
Alschuler when he resumed investi
gation of labor difficulties in Chicago
packing plants.
FOREIGN.
Tho Dutch government officially an
nounced that tho former German
crown prince is still on the Island of
Wierlngen.
Big prices were realized !t a jewel
sale at Christie's, London, $200,000
being paid for a rope of 315 beautiful
pearls, which was offered merely as
"the property of a lady." Tho day's
sale altogether realized $S00,000.
The allied commanders have given
tho Hungarians until the evening of
June 2S to evacuate the part of
Czechoslovakia they Invaded, accord
ing to a Budapest dispatch.
Portugal, especially Lisbon, is in the
throes of an incipient "social revolu
tion." Since the first of May, when
the working classes made a strong
and peaceful demonstration of their
force by ar. immense procession
through the streets and in front of the
ministries, various threatening events
hav occurred.
Tho Italian delegation to the peace
conference hereafter will be composed
of former Foreign Minister Tittoni,
Senator Gugllelmo Marconi and Sen
ator Vittorio Sclalola.
Fifty thousand Bolshevik!, it is re
ported, are fleeing In panic toward the
Volga from tho River Don region, and
have passed Slavinansk, leaving roll
ing stock behind them.
Writing to the overseas commission
era, Lawrence O. Murray and Edward
L. Hearn, Gen Pershing stated: "I
wish to express through you to tho
Knights of Columbus my appreciation
and that of the officers and men under
my command for tho valuable services
rendered by your organization to tho
American expeditionary force.
Tho Navy Department has sold bluo
flannel cloth at a profit of nearly $400,-
000 over the average cost price.
George Ledebour, Social Democratic
leader, who was arrested In connec
tion with the disorders In Berlin In
January, was placed on trial and uc
quitted.
"We have waited 49 years for this
moment," exclaimed Premier Clem-
enceau as he opened tho dispatch an
nounclng that GermanyNwould sign
the treaty, at the meeting of the Coun
cil of Thw.
It
5
THE STATE PDLIGY
EDUCATIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND
AGRICULTURAL INTERESTS
TO BE CARED FOR.
MISSOURI HAS CASH BALANCE
4500,000 State Debt Paid The "Show
Me" State Is Now In Third Rank In
Education Illiteracy Is Approx
imately Four Per Cent.
Salient Points In Governor's Speech.
By rigid economy we have managed
to pay all tho State's expenses, liqui
dated all approved appropriations and
tho floating debt of two and a quarter
million dollars and have a clean slate,
I hope to pay all obligations of this
biennial period and have a small bal
ance left when I go out of office.
Missouri derived one-fifth of tho
general revenue during 1917-1918 from
liquor licenses. We have solved the
problem of deficit by enacting a rev
enue law, such as income tax, 'soft
drink tax and other minor revenue
laws, together with a slight increase
In tho general property tax.
For the years 1919-1920 wo have set
aside $9,G85,432, or 53.7 per cent of
the gross revenue receipts for educa
tional purposes, an Increase of $2,751,
554 over 1917-1918.
House bill 571 provides that chil
dren between tho ages of 14 and IS,
who are employed, shall spend not
less than four of the employed 48
hours per week In part time school.
The pure seed law will undoubtedly
add to the yield per acre of every Mis
souri farm.
The new dairy law places this in
dustry on an equal level with tho
great dairy states north of us.
The county memorial bill author
izes county courts and municipalities
to erect memorials to the Missouri ans
who served in tho great war.
The sum of $265,000 has been ap
propriated to cover the cost of .mainte
nance of tho Stato Guard for tho en
suing two years.
Missouri owes it to the mothers of
the State to ratify the suffrage amend
ment Tho last Legislature granted
presidential suffrage to the women
of the State; but now wo must go
farther and, by our example, point the
way to other States in the Union and
take the leadership in this long-deferred
justice to women.
Fire Chiefs at Kansas City.
Discussion of many Are department
problems, .Including administration of
tho department, spontaneous combus
tion, the methods of fighting fires and
the transition from horse-drawn to
motorized apparatus, marked the an
nual convention of the international
Fire Chiefs' Association, held in Kan
sas City June 24 to 27.
Brewers to Await Decision.
It was agreed between Government
officials and attorneys for the St.
Louis Brewing Association and the
Independent Breweries Co. that there
will bo no hearing of the injunction
3Ult brought here to prevent the Dis
trict Attorney and the Intornal Rev
enue Collector from enforcing the war
time prohibition regulation as to 2.75
beer.
A New Drink with a "Kick."
August A. Busch, president of tho
Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association,
registered with the Secretary of State
tho label for a soft drink to bo known
as "KIcko," which he is preparing to
put on the market.
Tex Hearings Start June 39.
Tho State Board of Equalization
and the State Tax Commission of Jnf
ferson City, announced that hearings
will start June 30 in connection with
assessing tho property of the rail
roads, telephone and telegraph com
panies and the bridges of the State
for 1919 taxes.
M,500,00 Theatre for St. Louis. .
The site for the proposed $1,500,000
Loew Theater for St. Louis, the larg-
sst In tho world, vill he purchased
within tho next few days, according
to Marcus Loew, who arrived in SL
lxuis recently.
River Des Peres Overflows.
St. Louis county was again stricken
with enormous damage to property
and loss of two lives by tho sudden
overflow caused by heavy rains.
Distributing I. W. W. Circular Barred
Officers aro instructed to arrest all
persons found wltJt a copy of the Ag'
ricultural Workers' Industrial Union
circular by order of Fred Robertson,
United States District Attorney of
Kansas City.
Boy Drowned In Meramec.
Edward F. Nolto, Jr., 20 years old, was
drowned In the Meramec river when
ho was attacked with cramps while in
swimming. Tho drowning occurred
at Sherman, about six miles from Val
ley Park.
Dare-Devll Stunt Costs Life.
A dare-devil stunt of threo boys who
were paddling around in a skiff in tho
Osago river near Linn Creek, resulted
in the drowning of one and a narrow
escape from death of the other two.
GARDNER
DUTUNE
July 1 National Buttermilk Day.
Washington. July 1, tho day when
tho war-time dry law will go Into or
feet, hais been designated "Buttermilk
Day" in tho following statement by
tho Agricultural Department:
July 1 Is National Buttermilk Day.
Buttermilk, the United States Depart
ment of Agrlculturo thinks, is ono of
the best drinks In the world nutri
tious, palatable and full of zest nnd
vim. Tho man who drinks buttermilk
regularly and copiously is doing a
good turn for himself. That is ono
of the purposes of proclaiming Nation
al Buttermilk Day. Tho other Is that
the dairy industry In tho United
States will bo encouraged.
Buttermilk Day, It is hoped, will re
mind many people of his drink, Intro
duce It to others and be the beginning
of a greater consumption of buttor
mllk that will contribute to the health
and happiness of the consumers and
at the same time help the dairy farm
ers to develop production.
To Insure an ample supply of but
termilk both for homes and for hotels
and restaurants, on July 1, the De
partment of Agriculture requests
creameries, milk plants and other
dairy establishments to co-operato id
the plan to popularize the drink.
Fight to Defeat Suffrage.
A movement toward the organiza
tion of opposition to the ratification of
tho Federal equal suffrage amend
ment at the extra sessicn of the Leg
islature, which will convene on July
2 under call of Gov. Gardner, is dis
closed in letters sent to largo em
ployers of labor in St. Loul3 by
Charles P. Comert a lawyer.
Land Available for Soldiers.
Preliminary surveys indicate that
Missouri has 5,000,000 acres of land
available for use for "soldier settle
ment," it is stated in a letter trans
mitted to Gov. Gardner by State Land
Reclamation Commissioner Brydon.
Sailor Drowns in 5 Feet of Water.
After serving in tho navy a year
without s. mishap, Carl Hnckloy, 23
years old, son of J. B. Hackley, a
prominent farmer of Fayette, was
drowned in 5 feet of water while
bathing in a pond on Jeff Scotton's
farm.
Fight on Compensation Act.
All local labor unions in Missouri
have been requested by the Building
Trades Council to call attention to
their members to the proposition to
refer the workmen's compensation
act to the people, and have been asked
to support the proposition.
Coal Prices to Go Up July 1.
A general increase in the retail
prices of coal will go Into effect July
1. Carterville coal is to be raised 25
cents a ton; anthracite probably will
go up 10 cents, and Arkansas coal is
scheduled for a raise of 20 cents.
Notorious Criminal Arrested.
Chester Yates, notorious bank rob
ber and hold-up man, who escaped
from Sing Sing Prison more than six
years ago, was arrestee in Kansas
City, Mo.
Prominent Railroad Man Dies.
Isaac Johnson, born in Scott County,
Illinois, in 1848, and a resident of 3e-
dalla, with the "Katy" the past six
teen years, died of cancer.
Negroes Uphold Law.
Negro residents of
KInloch Park
presented to
joined in a petition
Prosecuting Attorney
Ralph of St
Louis County, requesting the suppres
sion of Lix Park, a negro outing re
sort, and four adjacent "dives." Of
the 155 signatures to the petition 40
were contributed by negroes.
W. A. Black, Press President.
The Ozark Press Association elected
the following officers for the coming
year: President, W. A. Black of the
Mansfield Mirror; vice president, Geo.
S. Townsend, Mountain Grove Jour
nal; secretary, H. L. Gosele, Houston
Republican; treasurer, W. H. Lynch,
Springfield Norman.
Webster Man Denies Charges.
Ward Goodloe of Webster Groves,
who is defendant in a suit brought by
four of his brothers for an accounting
of their mother, Mrs. Emellne Bent
Goodloe, declared that charges that
he had mismanaged her property were
unfounded.
Wins with Old-Tlme Gun.
William (Bill) Akard of Golden City
who won tho Stato amateur trap
shooting championship at the Stato
meet at Joplin, is boasting while com
petitors wero using high-priced guns,
ho used an old second-hand pump gun
In winning the title.
University City Votes for Bonds.
The $220,000 school bond issue for
the Improvement of the public school
system of University City, was carried
by a vote of 420 to 10. Tho bond issuo
follows an increase In the rato of
school taxes last April.
Recruiting Train to Tour State.
Plans aro being formulated for tho
largest recruiting campaign ever
staged in tho Middle West to start
July 10 and continue for 90 days.
Threo big army touring cars, includ
ing a military observation machine
and 17 trucks, will travol through Mis
souri, piloted by two airplanes.
Only 15 Whites on Petition.
Tho statement that 115 of 105 were
whites who signed petition to close
Lix Pnrk, a negro resort, in KInlocl
Park, was a typographical error.
jRHLHLiHHLiiiHHHLAflHslHLflMiiiilfei
ERMETICALLY
sealed In its wax
. wrapped package, air-j
tight, impurity proof-
WRIGLEYS 1
Is hygienic and whole
some1. The goody
that's good for young
and old.
The Flavor
The First Kipling Book.
Few who are reading Mr. Kipling's
new volume of poems hnve seen a copy
of that precious Item of Klpllnglnnn,
the first edition of "Departmental Dit
ties." It was, ns Its author says, "only.
a sort of book" a loan, oblong docket,
wire stitched, bound in brown paper
nnd secured with red tape, in imitation
of an Indian government report. A
hundred copies or so were put togeth
er by the poet hmself nnd posted, in
imitation ofllclnl envelopes, "up and
down the empire from Aden to Singa
pore, from Quettn to Colombo." The
first Issue contained only twenty-six
poems, but others wero added to the
new edition rapidly called for, until
presently tho book changed Its format
und grew Into a conventional stiff-back,
gilt-topped volume. "But," says Mr.
Kipling, "I loved It best when it was a
little brown baby." Manchester Guar
dian. Xo Worms In a Healthy Child
All children troubled with worms have a
anhealthy color, which Indicates poor blood,
and as .1 rule, there Is mnr. op la .nmscH
disturbance. Grove's (titleless chill tonic
Blvcn reeularly for two or three weelts will
enrich the blood. Improve the dlcestlon, and
aci as a ueneral strenKtnenlnc Tonic to the
Whole system. TCntnre will th.n thmw nft rw
dispel the wortnB. and the Child will be in per-
itci neiiiu. i'leasant to take. 00c per bottle.
The Usual Thing.
"There does not seem to be much
fraternal spirit among your citizens,"
Mild the spectacled guest. "They ni
pear to be almost at swords' points
with each other backbiting, gossiping,
denouncing, and "
"Yep!" returned the landlord of tho
tavern nt Wayoverbehlnd. "But that's
nil on the surface. Just wait till some
stranger conies to town and gets Into
trouble, and you'll behold n united com
munity Jump onto him with both feet
and in one voice." Kansas City Star.
That Language of Ours.
"Ah, your Idioms, 1 cannot
them."
"What's the trouble, count?"
grasp
"Tho politician is happy because he
vas whitewashed."
"Yes?"
"Yet tho baseball pitcher who was
whitewashed today, he Is sad." Kun
sas City Journal.
Hard Task.
Tom Halloa, Dick, old boy! Writ
ing home for money?
Dick No.
Tom what are you taking so much
trouble for? You've been fussing about
two blessed hours over that one letter.
Dick I'm trying to write home with
out asking for money.
VValtl
"Phwut's thot noise, Mrs. Mullaly?"
' "Mary Ann's practlcln' th' scales."
"Begorrn, sho musht weigh u ton 1"
Tho wicked man gets what he desires
In n piny.
Vaiiim Granulated Eyelids,
I llUrEy" inflamed by expo.
lure to San, Dust and Wind
Wykra quickly relieved by Mirlne
lw V V!5 EyeHeBedy. NoSmartinp,
v . i Eye Comfort At
Vour DrupKut. or by mail COc per Bottle.
For Both of (be Eye free write tii
Hurlne Eyo Remedy Co., Chicago.
Lasts
Be tore to cet
WRIGLEVS
look for ttM
cam
NOT HIS UNLUCKY NUMBER
Although Unpopular, "Thirteen" Hp
Been Decidedly Mixed With This
Englishman's Life.
Superstitious readers will be Inters
ested in the following extraordinary
story, of which the hero Is Mr. F. Q.
Cordwell, the well-known and popular
Fleet street journalist.
Mr. Cordwell has been literally
dogged by tho number thirteen. It
was on tho 13th day of the month
that he went to Frnnce, that he went
Into action, got his first leave nnd re
turned to take up his commission. It
wns in the thirteenth tent, in line 13,
camp 13 that he had his first lodg
ment in France. The tent contained
13 men. no hud 13 days In hospital.
He was given No. 13 pills. And, re
turning to civil work on January 13,
he found that his old room had been
renumbered 113.
Now count up tho coincidences. You
will find 13 of them! Answers, Lon
don.
One on the Judge.
A certain judge could not control hl&
temper, nnd consequently could not
control other people. One dny there
was unusual disorder In court, nnd at
last the Judge could endure It no
longer. "It Is Impossible to allow this per
sistent contempt of court to go on,"
he exclaimed, "and I slmll bo forced
to go to the extreme length of taking;
the one step that will stop It."
There was a long silence, then one
of the leading counsel rose, uud with
just n trace vof n smile, Inquired: "If
It please your honor, from what dato
will your resignation take effect?"
The Way Around.
Mrs. AVnkeup Where did Mrs.
Tl II IV hill 1
do
Mrs. Blase That's n nroblem
Sho
bought It with the money which her
husband borrowed from her uncle, who
nail won It In a poker game from her
brother, to whom she had loaned It
shortly nftnr her mother had taken It
from her father's pockets und given It
to her for a birthday present. New
York Globe.
No Trust.
"Riiftis, aren't you feeling well?"
"No, sah. 1's not feelln' very well,
snh."
"Have you consulted your doctor)
Itufus?"
"No, sah ; I ain't done dat, sah."
"Why? Aren't you willing to trust
your doctor, Itufus?"
"Oh, yes, snh ; but do trouble Is he's
not so nlfgcther wlllln' to trus' me,
sah." Yonkcrs Statesman.
H Couldn't Read German Sign.
"No, I don't want any Insurance?
Didn't you see 'No Admittance' on tho
door?"
Agent Sure I did! The OermnnB
had "No Admittance" written in bnrbed
wire and bullets outside their trenches,
but wo got In, Just tho same. Life
Gladness Is appreciated only by Uiom
who know what Midncss lr '
I

xml | txt