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The bee. (Earlington, Ky.) 1889-19??, October 11, 1900, Supplement, Image 16

Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87060004/1900-10-11/ed-1/seq-16/

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11
AYPAG41 I I V V J
rI tVV
NStistetSSSSSASNsf S V SIltl eSSSIS fi
e e
j Theodore Roosevelt ill s
eSSSISr A
p a Many Sided Man 5
SS tlSSSNISSSSSS t
t1jriTHEODORE ROOSEVELT
I I
To the majority of Americans the
mention of the name of Theodore
Roosevelt will conjure up memories of
f Rough Riders and the fighting at San
t
Juan A few will talk of the days
when Roosevelt was a Police Conimis s
r
stoner In New York City and then a
blank i
blankTheodore J
Theodore Roosevelt In the East and
the Theodore Roosevelt of the West are
a > i
sunk totally distinctive characters one
disrtlrla ct
a characters that 4 ref erelfcci < io thia
mous GovernorRough Rider colonels
J V career In the cattle country may bo
V of Interesti
InterestSomething
Something less than twenty years
ago there appeared on tho border land
of Western Dakota a studious young
man wearing eye glasses who In com
pant I WWftarfrTend lSSught a cattle
4 rantihe In the lowlands and deliberate
° ly set out to be a ranchman The cat
tIe industry was then practically the
only business in that section and its
s profits and perils had attracted many
wealthy young men from the East and
from England ijls arr1r 1iJ1 no WRr
excited the locality which had already
jrown accustomed to the advent ofo
tenderfeet with money and which
1
was very strongly disposed to para
phrase the Scriptural warning that a
fool and his money are soon parted by
substituting the tenderfoot for the fool
It must be recorded however on be
I half of Theodore Roosevelt that he
went at the cattle business earnestly
andworked Industriously Whether he
worked successfully or not Is not Is not
known In that locality a successful
tenderfoot would have been a wonder I
and probably Roosevelt was that kind
das
of a wonder Certain it Is that ho was
several other kinds
For instance he wore glasses This
t accentrlcity was almost as much at 1
a1source
source of astonishment to the cowboys
as to the Indiansthe fonder declaring
c that they could not understand how a
man could see through glasses that It
must dim his sight etc Tho ItI
es
lon the other hand regarded the glasses
4 as medicine a word best explained
by its equivalent in African fetich
Now the cowboy the genuine na
tiveborn cowboy of the West never
reads and rarely considered anyt1C
of sufficient Importance to be read His
horse saddle chaps blankets and
pistols constituted his household ef
teeth easily transportable and of small I
compass Roosevelt bad books As tho I
cowpunchers put it In wonder and
amazement he bad books by the yard
by the mile And read em
Now the wearing of eye glasses and
2the reading of books wore eccentrioittcs
K fairly referralble o he fact that ha was
a tenderfoot But strangely the man
could ride To ride in cowboy parlance
p means much And when your cowboy
says a man can ride ho does not by axb
ii means refer io tho ability to balance
I ones self on a gentle cob during a ca n
ter in tho park It meanswell it I
t means to ride as the cowboy rides att y
N where everywhere on any sort of aI
horse with any sort of gait at any
rc speed
And then with many Western ex
I Njgtives they were forced to own th CI
r guld shoot shoot deer and anteIJ
N rnat 1 bear running standing com A
d1 fHtp 1f This was not to hare 1
haybed
iw of a young man with
q yid a boyish beaming smile of a
J o
vjtfttt neredhelea Not only f P
r
ff
i
I I j
j 1J t n HI r I 1tL tt
or
t l i
Jy
lyd
n c 1
A i > to
f1f r J J 4ir7 11
J J IJii
o i 7
f r 1h
could foe shoot but he would hunt for
0da sand nights for a chance to shoot
preferring If he could find It the great
grizzly bear of tho mountains whom
anovert one else sought to avoid
All this was astonishing enough But I
there remained the most remarkable
thing of all Ho would fight
Balancing his Western virtues that
Is to say his ability to ride shoot and
to fight against his vices that Is to
eSM his tendency to reading and his
habit of wearing glasses and the bal
ance was found In his favor He was
voted all right
By persistent work constant hunt
ing and honest dealing Roosevelt made
his way with the rough Western ele
ment In which bo lived and came to
e respected and admired The round
ups brought him into contact with
thousands of cowboys from the ranges
of the South as well as those of the
North and his fame helped Along bye
story and legend soon spread over the
cattlo country His horsemanship in
particular won Mm commendations
And the ability to ride In a rough
country on rough horses for long dls
tances may be considered a fair test
of human character At all events hetile
succeeded in endearing himself to tho
cowboy element and in learning its
Vaiue It was the knowledge there
gained that enabled him to seek tho
rough riders of the West when w stirone
Colonel now General Wood he prgan
ized the famous regiment that saw ser
vice in Cuba And it was the cowbo yesthe
knowledge of him and of Wood a slm
liar character by the way that Induc
ed them to flock to his standard
At that time Roosevelt had already
alreadyl
been In politics in the East and as
asnearly as the writer remembers had
served a term in the Legislature at Al
Inis
every ones mouth either as P01r
Commlsisoncr defying Tammany as
asAssistant
as a
IRough Rider Colonel or otherwise Yetor
Roosevelt was tho child of luxury and I
of wealth who took to the tense h Adp
snips of plain and mountain from in
nate desire from Jove of sport from
ames
fightIng
ing political battles from thence to
fighting departmental red tape In his
office of Assistant Secretary of tho
ragNavy from thence to tho actual war in
Cuba the transitions were simple andcats
Janatural His robust pugnacity was
ndeverywhere preeminent It is told of
Roosevelt for Intsance that shortly af
ter his arrival In the West he throw and
eflectunllylwhlpped onos submisata
effectually
whipped into submission a
bully of great local renown who was
neighborhood
hood His motto that the highest typo
of success in man was tho result of
strife had already been exemplified in
IncOllege
As the Western
story goes tho scene
was in Mpntana during the big round
roundup
bullyknown was
witho hisby
hisshooting
langUageand ago i
and his
reputation His
appearance
bore out his reputation He was tall I
broadshouldered and extravagantly
extravagantlym
hadtaken
isIt the
place which was likewise the only
place that afforded
shelter Ike swag
gered over to where the meeklooking I
wasa warming himself by the
himselny I I
stove and demanded that he take a
drinkIn
In these days and in that locality an
i
localitynvitation
invitation to drink
was equal to a com t
mand There was but one alternatlveT <
and that was fight Rooseveltrefused
refusedA
tofum P
todrlnki and Ike who could scarce
bring himself to believe that the
yo
w vw youngtJ
stranger would fight stood stunned for
0of moment
Insult interladod with
1VlthtrontJeret r
rpleUves
l
i t
grasp of the young athlete and in an
other despite his struggles had meas
ured his length on tho floor
tThen Roosevelt dragged the bully to
his feet and ran him out of tho door
removing Ikes revolver from its hostler
as he did so
Ike promptly returned white with
rage and was treated to a repetition of
the unexpected tenderfoot tactics This
time however the force with which he
was thrown stunned him and it was
several minutes before he recovered
consciousness When he did ho arose
walked out of the camp and never re
turnedmuch to the satisfaction of all
handsI
I
handsAsa S
Asa Western ranchman and hunter
Roosevelts work was more thnn the
more securing of meat or trophies thve
veadorn
naturalist wont to classify the beasts
of the prairie and the canyons In sere n
tine fashion He Identified all the
groups of bear in plain and hlll > and
showed that species long regarded as
distinct were in reality the same varyI
ing in appearance and condition with
the season Ho destroyed the reputation
of the grizzly bear as a man fightm
killing him without stint at long range
and snort and making Jils position gen
erally untenable It nevertheless re
mains true that mountaineers and
Interviews
terviews with Old Ephraim as the
grizzly is known among hunters
Some sixteen years ago while Roose
velt was riding with one of his cowboys
in the Dakota wilderness the latter
called his employers attention to a cu
rlous formation of rock just ahead of
them While they were looking at the
rock a low growl owns heard and a huth
head reared up from behind It TIst
cowboy Instinctively leveled his rifle at
the head and was about to fire when he
heheard
heard his employer ordering him trt de
sist
sistThats
Thats my bear said Roosevelt If
you shoot it Ill shoot you
The cowboy turned to look at his em
ployer and found the latters rifle lev
eled at the bear
Incidentally the cow
cowboys
muzzle of Roosevelts rifle and the head
of bruin showing above the rock There
was incidentally a queer and now
gleam in Roosevelts eoa11 ot which
facts Impressed themselves upon the
rapid cowboy intelligence at a glance
1He lowered his rifle and Roosevelt s but
shotthe
eatthe bear
I
It turned out upon examination that
it was the record Dakota bear weighing
welghtngit
bleyoung millionaire ranchman with the
eyeglasses was the bearkilling hero of
localitythat
When the bear had been duly and
accurately skinned and his hide was
tostretched in tie sun the cowboy recW
0ered his senses and explained that his
ISobject In aiming was out of regard for
his employers safety and that ho had
no idea of spoiling a shot for the lat
ter Then Roosevelt repented oft
harshness and to make amends later
presented his employe with a ally terer
ratmounted Winchester rifle and a pair of
indestructible corduroy trousers ihoto
elatter the finest
ele vetof
known
In the same locality Roosevelt shared
in an experience which would make
18the average Philadelphia fireman start
He aided in extinguishing e
a prairie
hefire
efire by the unique process of dragging
the halt carcass of steer
a over thee
burning ground at tho end of ropes
ThismcthOd
method the adaptation of the resource
tth o
East where prairies are merely names
Csd1s
and where steers
cost money In a
atrough country over chasm ridge de
tile canyon and coulee from one fringe
ofo
fighting fire assumes novel and trying
aspects and rarely is successful Dutn
dlcsdown
ihodowit the simple contrivance of split
1tlng the carcass of a steer tying it by
one foreleg to the saddle post of one
oga a
second one man riding on one side of
the flames and another on too opposite
aide thus forcing tho heavy and bloody
mcarcass over the lino of flame Is some
times effective II is dangerous and 1
difficult work for horses like all other
otherbrutes
odybrutes have an extravagant fear of
asflames and rear and dance in their
presence
s
ae a
hunts
comingL rag
from T > i 1
rom Roosevelts
own pen seven
ucars
ucarst
lor more ago now seems almost eAOS
proi
prop
The Wilderness Hunter ho says
saysItt
It is worth noting otyelse
many of the leaders among our iiiS
men and soldiers have sought strength
and pleasure in the chase or in kindred
girtsports pastimes Of course field
sports or at least the wilder kinds
which entail the exercise of daring and
tne endurance of toll and hardships
1and which lead men afar Into the for
csts and mountains stand above ath
letic exercise exactly as among the
latter rugged outdoor games like foot
ball and lacrosse are much superior
to mere gymnastics and calisthenics
calisthenicsWith
aWith a few exceptions the men
wasamong us who have stood foremost In
political leadership like their fellows
pewho have led our armies have been of
ofstalwart frame and sound bodily
bOdilyhea1th
inhealth When they sprang from the
iliefrontier
frontier folk as did Lincoln and An
drew Jackson they usually hunted
much In their youth if only as an In
Incldent
wasddent in the prolonged warfare waged
wagedby
by themselves and their kinsmen
agoagainst tho wild forces of nature Old
aceIsrael Putnams wolf killing feat comes
strictly under this head
tqeI
chairman of the convention that nomi
nated this same young man for the
Vice Presidency was once upon a time
a hunting companion of the youthful
nominee Jloogevelt by the way is a
youth as a Vice Presidential candidate
he is but 42 years But in Roosevelts
ofgym
Genesee
valley where Mr Wadswortas famous I
famousP
oftee
one hunt with its jumps over stiff Um
Umber
ber its falls and scrambles ho notes
that out of a field pjt twentyfive riders D
pnth t occasion but four survived the
Cathe iI
bot Lodge and himself being two of it
I
r
I
<
1
wt PIO
1
l
the lucky ones It may be fairly sur
mlsed that as the two men sat on the I
platform together last wok both mayo
In odd moments have reverted back to
that longago scene and even thought
of themselves as two of the lucky ones
who seem destined to be in at every po
poh
i
eAfter n stormy career in tho office Of
Police Commissioner of New York
City In which he sought to strictly
enforce an excise law with which he
was avowedly not in sympathy Roose
velt remained In private life but n
I1PPolntedI
Assistant Secretary of the Navy This
dignluer d
erclerical position underwent a sudden
shaking up In his hands Ancient and
atnerable attaches of pompous mien
promptly found themselves at work
The now Assistant Secretary hadp
extraordinary habit of asking ques
tions demanding reports Issuing or
ders and generally hurrying things c x
cccdlngly painful to the political flu n
kles of the bureaus broadcloth ed
thchief clerko whose thoughts had ol
onwn + s been Of receptions dinners pro
motions pert tona or increased salo
ries discovered that they were expect
ed to work discoveries which needless
to say were exceedingly dlstnteful
ndxcuses were no longer accepted and
when naval officers asked for permis
sion to use ammunition In target prac
tice they were met with orders to use
1every ounce they had and then call for
Ysmore Various tottering dodos the
errelics ot previous administrative op
polntmenta looked up drowsily rub
bed their eyes yawned and execrated
the young man who was dletrubl rag
their slumbers But Roosevelt went
me
atmorning before most of tho clerks ore
herived he remained late adding to his
official dutlllcs a punctilous attendance
at those functions which make Wash
Ington the dread of tho busy man Hav
Ing quickly exhausted the npproprla
1tlOll of 800000 for target practice ho
owcalled upon the appriatlon committee
mornt
eMembers
Members of tho committee were
adaghast What fort demanded thoso
from the Mississippi Valley and else
where inland where navies wero un
known and unnecessary
For target practice remarked the
remarkedbut
He got the AMAMAAM and It nIl went
t
reath alt
atwas can be read in the naval haft lea
hafte
heBut just as his success in the office
of Assistant Secretary of the Navy
ndwas acknowledged there came the dis
tant rumbling or the war with Spain
ovand Roosevelts thoughts turned ails ld
With prompt oluntness ho resigned his
Secretaryship and proceeded to organ
Ize the Rough Riders
In company with Leonard Wood for
ismerit an army surgeon they invited
the wild characters of the West and
erthose of the East as well to join them
In a unique organization of cavalrymen
to serve in the war with Spain An act
of Congress was necessary and he
caused It to be promptly passed It au
thorized the formation of two such reg
iments but a part of one only and that
the one of which Roosevelt was Lieu
tenant Colonel actually saw service in
servicee
Many of tho Rough Riders on the
other hand had been cowboys and
watts absolutely at homo in tho saddle
andsti
walked with difficulty and with that
shambling uncertain gait which marks
tho lifetime horseman when set nfoot
They were however absolutely car
less and absolutely undisciplined bar
ring the confidence they felt in Wood
and Roosevelt When the army was
disembarked in Cuba they mare bedand
with the others from Daiquiri to Slbo
aDut trly
in tho direction of Scvllla but fell into
p11t ace
named Guasinms All accounts agree 1
that Roosevelt in the face of this fierce
fusllade never lost his presence ot
mind but cheered urged and encour
aged his men It was tho first taste
of death in the Cuban campaign and
Roosevelts command had the post of
honor
There rang out at Guaslmas the one
command prward It rang out
again at San Juan There the Rough
Rider glaring through too fierce heat
and drizzling damp over the slope to
ward the Spanish trenches rushed for
ward at the head of an assemblage in
which representatives ot commands
raggiber than his own abounded Pro
Cessional opinions may differ as to the
eAOSisdom of this rush and Clare are
many who believe it to have been p Q
mature But it succeeded and nothing
else succeeds like success Frederick
Staunton Gore in the Philadel girlsmen
imesgth
andTHE SAME OLD SIGN
a
a
BRYAN CANNOT PAINT IT OUTJ t
I I q
The Democrats Populists Silver Re h
publicans and antiImperialists have lu
formed a trust with a view to destroy p
Ing all competition and electing Will cJ
lam Jennings Bryan President c I
I
P 4J
dq
DOLLIVER ON THE ISSUES I
1
V
Senator J P Dolllyer of Iowa has
a vigorous article in the October Forum
on The Paramount Issues of the
Campaign Ho shows what are real
ly the issues of tho campaign denies
that tho money question is dead and
rkmalntalna teat tho election of AIea
Bryan for tho ensuing Presidential
aterm is fraught with as much danger
as It was in 189C Following Is nn ex
tdract
tractIs I
It will be admitted by every one whose
nAmind is at all adapted to tha consldcra
ilea of such a subject that the last four
Ieyears have played sad havoc with then
prophetic literature of Mr Bryans last
campaign Jf the patriarch Noah hail
predicted a drought Instead of a deluge
wx
Uon Instead of building an ark hi g
edriends and relatives would have hi d
less reason to complain of him than Mr
Bryans disciples now have to complain
goldt
standard were continued prices would
still further decline But the prices of
11all products of labor have gone steadily
up He said that wages would decrease
and the employment of people even
then precarious would still further Can
But wages have Increased until If wo
may believe Mr Carroll D Wright they
have reached the highest mark yet
known in our industrial history while
the employment of the people is now
universal and uninterrupted Mr Bryan
gsald that the burden of debt would be
multiplied by the increase of interest
rates and the scarcity of money But
money waa never so plentiful and In
terest rates tending still lower were
never so low before
galav
cotla t d
toh say
bettco sr
than Mr Bryan predicted that the g en
oral confidence In him as an apostle of
antto
the national deliverance has quite gen
erally disappeared Nobody doubts that
brea
his opinions on tho subject pt tho free
coinage of silver were sincere and that
jt
oftoo tills
compalgn There may bo n wIde dif
oft
the present prosperity of the people but
there is one thing which cannot be dinup
ISputed and that is that tho standard
andile
of value upon which tho whole tab ile
of American business rests cannot bee
disturbed or even puts in serious jcop
yardy without producing results fatal toer
the employment Investments and enter
prises ot the whole community Tho
Democratic party has not put aside the
silver question because it has recanted
its faith in the platform of 1896 It hasof
begun talking about something else i
simply because tho old subject has become
adhof
come tiresome and becauso the audi
ence is so scattered that It is beyond
oven tho eloquence of Mr Bryan to
bring them together again
If any man doubts the real purpose
that Is In the minds of Democratic lead
ers and the real motive that would con 1
trol Mr Bryans administration It he
hatwero elected President let him recall
tho fact that while In the Kansas City
Convention was sitting Mr Bryan staked
his political life on a demand tclc
phoned from his home at Lincoln that
the platform of 1S96 should be reiterated
in the exact terms which ho invented
for use in the last Presidential cams
Paige His success therefore whatever
else it may mean forshadows tho exact
legislation and administrative policy re
i
gaited to overthrow tho old gold stand
ard and plunge tho country Into news
agitations fatal as onco to industry
and commerce It is In vain for men
who have a stale In the national prosy
perlty whether they work for their iiv
ing by the day or enjoy tho prosperity
whether they work for their living by
elthe day or enjoy the divIdends oC Invest
ed capitalfi to silence their appre hen
slons to believing that tho financial law
J
of 1900 enacted by the Republican party
against the protest of tho Democrats in
both Houses of Congress has made it
safe to vote the Democratic ticket again
The Secretary of the Treasury has given
to the business world a timely adrnoni
tlon that notwithstanding the now pro1ST
visions of law a single act of executive
folly may even now throw away nil
the fruits of tho victory of 1896
IV
dsBRYANITE FILIPINOS
theRecent developments in tho Phll
ippiues will go far toward discrediting
the Bryan campaign Captured cotyor
respondents found on tho persons of
iImen high in the confidence of the Tanot
gals and their leaders which is made
public from time to time by the 1 Vat
Department shows conclusively that
thoso Filipinos who arc being paraded
by the antiImperial Bryanltes as pat
riots of tho George Washington stripe
are a band of cutthroats and murder
ers It has been shown that they
would enter tho city of Manila and
burn down the town and destroy not
only American but foreign property
and do this for the purposo of making
It appear that tho United States Gov
ernment cannot protect the lives andI
property of all people there Several I
attacks have been planned which take I
the form and nature ota massacre I
and which resemble more the plans of J
band of savages rather than of men
supposed to bo a band of organized I
soldiers fighting for their liberty Loot 1
not liberty Is what the Agulnaldlsts 1
demand anarchy not government t
blood and butchery instead of peace
I
and prosperity
I I
The anti Goobel Democrats of Ken
tucky are not only supporting Mr
Yerlcos for Governor but thousands of
them remembering Mr Bryans un f
qualified Indorsement of Goebollsm
have declared their intention of votIng
ing for McKinley and Roosevelt The J
prospect for a general political houso t
cleaning in Kentucky this year la ex t
cellent > Lift
J
6
t 4
A DILL OF PARTICULARS 1
i
Mr Bryan sneers at the declaration
that Republican policy brought pros
mparity to laborers or to farmers In c
his speeches In tho West he calls for
a bill of particulate Most of tho men
who listen to him can answer his quca
tlons point blank Thoso who were
ifr
In 1894 and 1895 saved nothing Those k a
siftr
Yproducts and who have been earning
good wages under Republican pOIlC 7i
can point Mr Bryair to their savings it a f
In 189i there were 1124966 dcposlt >
ors in our national banks C02756 Inf y41
y41e
State and private banks 203368 in 1io 1
and 3113 io
loan and trust companies
477 in savings banks In 1S9D thoro
were 1901183 depositors in national f
privetshi
banks 443321 in loan and prlvatoI
panics sail 4254516 in savlngtf banks 4
ldIlero Is an Increase of 2100547 in tho 1
nnmbcr of depositors in basks Thor
value of deposits in 1S94 was 2874 t 1
1r
608096003 an increase of 1733506
599 The average deposit In balnta i
Was J j52Q in 1894 and 602 in S99 <
As if in direct answer to Mr Bry
Ilesens insinuations the figures in Now
breaks Kansas Colorado and tho Da
kotas are particularly significant Tho
Increase in deposits in North Dakota
Is over 100 per cent or from 2275726
in 1894 to 5050000 in 1899 In South
Dakota there has been nn Incrcasn
from 2958463 to 7042915 or an in
dcrease of 4084452 In Nebraskat
there has been an increase from j22
428240 to 35726103 In Kansas thorns r
1has been an increase from 17147160
to 33605101 or an increase of16
457941 When Mr Bryan tells tho
pcoplo ot any of thcso Slates that their
Republicans
Crulo as under tho administration ot Y
Cleveland tho men women and child
button with their savings in bank will rise
up against himId
I r
rl
IeIIEARST WARNS BRYAN 1
Mr W R Hearst of tho San Fran
LOcIsco Examiner tho Now York Jour
aaril and the Chicago American is ono
of tho greatest of American cxpanslon
Ists Ho gavo Mr Bryan a few words
of advice in San Francisco Examiner
April 27 1899 r
Wo trust that Mr Bryan will yet
rango himself in lino with tho Nation
al aspirations for expansion Tho
1tlmo has come as It comes at Intervals
to every vigorous nationwhen tho
callold boundaries are too contracted for
tork
when the health of tho body politic
demands that room The popular in
ntecdlatlnct understands too need for these j
mIsorlodlcul expansions and every ccn
ulno statesman understands it too
Tho popular instinct of a nation
cannot bo changed in sixteen months
IVnor can n creature of expediency bo
coverted into a statesman by an np
peal to thq truths of historyI
ISiiv
iivCLOSE TO THE PEOPLE AND THAT
btHIS SILLY TALK ABOUT IMPERIAL
ISM MOVES THEM BUT HE WILL
SOON FIND OUT THAT AMERICANS
rtyARE AS MUCH IN FAVOR OF EX
PANSION TODAY AS THEY WERE
WHEN THEY APPLAUDED THE AC r
QUISITION OF THE LOUISIANA TER
RITORY BY THAT NOTED IMPERIAL
1ST THOMAS JEFFERSON
uvre L
11Never before In the history of Pres
Identlal campaigns have tho support
ers of it candidate been asked to bo
llcvo that the platform means too ro
verso of what It says Tho Demo
doflag
flaganything to advance tho causo of sll
vor as ho has promised to do They t
farc also being convinced that he would
not retire tho army from the Phlllp
adopines as he has promised Such anr
anomalous condition should not beget
begett r
hatconfidence 1 ±
4
Tho black man In North Carolina la
10a
denied his liberty and participation in J
tho government but as ho lives in tho 1
tboUnited
United States ho docs not excite tho
sympathy of Bryan or get a word in his
speeches
I
HJH M <
Tho development in tho Philippines
of two islands which will produce +
tblJI
country but tho
world will bo
grettrtRke
thing tor the United States Wo
now
nowcro
send abroad about 30000000
annuallyV
annuallys
for rubber If all of this V V
can be
produced
duced in our own dominions
besides
heBldeosending
sending an equal amount to foreign
Corelgnnations
theUnited
United States and this is also a CurI
Curther
that proof that there
shoUld
bo po f c
scuttling policy In the Ph11J1I11nes
i
Bryann J i
to
know that in case President Me
Ktalejr is reelected times will bo
for tour good
years mora
and ho can add
still further to his pilea
The Democratic J
manage
have at
readY carried all of i I
the
States the
they want but it1s understood es tt th i o
understoodthey f
n
j Jew rattles in oitl t i
ta xeep Mr Bryan in I
Bryan PraStlce IlJI
t IlJt

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