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The record. (Greenville, Ky.) 1899-1???, October 10, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

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"Record" Advertising
3 Muhlenhertf Conniv
Cost Nothing.
cays for itself. The investment is
9 is rich in coal, iron, timber, potter's clay, 3
jJctc., and the most inviting field in Kcn-3
Sit
sure of returns. Get our rates.
tucky for investment of capital and pluck.
GREENVILLE, KY., THURSDAY, OCTOIIER 10, 1912.
VOL. XIV. NO. :ts.
50c. PER YEAR, IN ADVANCE
,
'1
r
POOR ROADS ARE EXPENSIVE,
O-ity 7 Per Cent c." 2.100,003 Miles of
Public Thoroughfare in This
Country Are Improved.
Time are J.liiit iiml tulip of public
rri. ,1s lii tJiin oiiiiti y. Only lr.O.OiiO
li:i! s. or 7 ur jvul, ai Improved.
AM tlio K-sl i ;.u h liitrly i1i-hm il-d nx
1" ! road. The ;ist of our ti.i t it (: 1
r' (.urevs!, roi'kles. :is it is. Is notli
ln coiniiiroil to ilu nionoy waste
l i-..i;i;lit al out ly this romliiion of our
! waysr
i ost:i the IYi-tkIi poasHtit uu av-j
of 12 rr.ts a mile jut ton to J
1 his protttitc to ia:ul;it. It rost
Aiiirricuu f.ii iiuT n:t sivpra;', of ,
1
t!.
outs a iu;lf j.i-r ton, or loo jior 1
vrt more tli:i:i t'.io l'i n. huan. 1 i:r
if, I!ip jonr 1.1 rw hii-iling of farm
'-i'i:ict to iiii'in: Mitits iil.iomitid
to 'Ttswa I'ony jiii-I fort-llvo million
l.irs weight The avoraup luril :is
V I liiilos. If the farmers eouhl have
'..no llioir hauling over Fri-m-h road,
in read of thrir o :i Inferior ones,
t!i-y would h:.ve netted $.".S,!i0.0ii
C'.'to o:i their i ieps.
lii't all the hauling to shlpplne;
roint-; Is n.it done 1-y farmers by any
moans. The interstate commerce
connr.l-'t-ion tell.; ns that In all Bome
thlns like 2.yi,:iil,iiirt tons ar hauled
for hhlpnient every year. The willlni;
noss to move this lainieiise volume of
freight over xor roads, as against
Rood roads such as France enjoys,
costs the country a cool unnecessary
f 3nr.,fl(WV(M a year.
These figures and fads come from
the office of Ixijtnn Waller PaRP. the
United States director of public works.
USEFUL AS GRASS CATCHER
Device Fastened to Back of Mower
fv'akes Use of Rake Unnecessary
How It Is Made.
A rake wiil lie uni.eccssary to the
man who mows grass with the device
shown here attached to the back of
the mover. This In the invention of
a Minnesota genius, and It Is said to
leave a clean sward in the wake of
the lawn mower, catching; the loose
KTass that flies up in the rear before
it has a cham e to fall agniu. The ap
paratus is made with a galvanized
Ft eel bottom and heavy duck sides
and 13 easily detached and emptied
when it becomes full. Two hooks are
fastened t, the ends of the roller of
the mower and circular wire piecps fit
Hsndy Grass Catcher.
over these at each end of the catcher.
A third piece of wire hooks over the
handle of the mower to keep the
coop in po-I'kn- Another wire con
trivance comes with this device by
means of which the catcher can be
mado wider or narrower or In some
other way adapted to the size of the
mower.
Manure and Silage Corn.
Twenty to is of corn silage an acre
were harvested last fall by George
I.. Ilyslop of Ohio. He uses it for fat
ten Ins cattling and hogs. The most
interesting thing about this yield is
that it Is the result of proper utlliza
tlon of barny.itd manure. The ma
nure shed has an important place on
the farm.
&a-d JRoads
Weeds multiply from year to year.
'. Weeds are easily killed if attacked
when quite femall.
Reading good farm papers will in
terest people in better farm condi
tions. Ono of the worst pests with which
the grower cf onions has to contend is
the onion maggot.
Fall plowing of field areas will often
be of service in controlling cut worms
that are affecting field crops.
Rotation fallows or assists Nature to
repair her waste places and Incident
ally facilitates the war with weeds.
Liifferent crops for different years
on the same soil will produce the vari
ety of elements which insure fertility.
The grain grower should have tho
cows freshen in the fall, In order to
provide an Income while the fields are
Idle.
A border of nasturtiums or some of
the late foliage plants all around the
vegetable garden produces a fine ef
fect. Do not be nfraid to apply air-slaked
lime to the cabbages with a blow gun.
It will destrcy the worms on the head
of the cabbage.
A garden cultivator does much bet
ter work Ihnn a hoe. It is easier,
quicker and keeps the soil In much
Litter conditions.
We cannot bring rain when It Is
Heeded, but we can keep the cultivat
ors golns Curing the worst drought
that vr happened.
11. ''ill, .w f .
"
JEFFERSON COUNTY SCHOOL'
Kentucky Out of Step With the March
of Education.
If you iuul not driven twelve miles
from I'ic. thn-l-l-ihi:. pulsing Louis
ville nlouc Ix'iftvt r.iadwnys sprinkh-d
with oil vtiu would think you were far
out in sonic rural miiiiniiiity when
oil K.-i.e nt Kinky Hill s Ikm.I It
nii-iiis iinNssilile fur sin li a MrliiMtl
lioiise to In- tolerated in a county :s
lii h and prosH'roiis as Jeflersou.
lis Klvle of mvliilii tun- Is severely
lKM'Kr HILt. W'llOUt
simple. This idiii of extreme sim
plicity is cnrrietl out in the veranda of
red coiTimated iron supiorteil oil plain
J ly I sliuliliui;.
If Hie liiiililiim. the main buildiiiK.
ia-ks iH'auly. the old oml house Is
liiiii li whim'. It looks ns if niter years
of wear and tear the neihlMirs hud
felt sorry fir it ami had had some
thint; of a doiiaiioii party. This, of
course, is merely a surmise, but it is
the only possible solution to the ireii
erai makeup of the liuililiui;. Kvi-ih-utly
one iieiirhlMir had donnlrd
some old rsl riHiliuj; tin. Another
ueiulilHir. sii-iiiK the mill of a door,
had sent oer one that had Ini'U ut
"kinder whopier Jwsl" and would
I'ilKIMMM WAS "KINlBH W HOl'tEH JA H'
not tit anywhere then, having no
hiuses. it hud been tacked on anyway
and left KtitudltiK wide ok-ii for the
wiisls to grow IlllOIlt it.
IciTcrsoii comity, with its trolley
lines, its splendid roads. Its wealth,
should Im an tibjwt lesson to the rest
of the stale in schools n lid school
equipment, but she is just where the
others nre.
The whole state is out of step with
the march of education.
MOVED THE LECTURER.
Church Too Good For Him, but School -house
Was Just the Place.
The inn n who was to give an lllus
( rat til lecture at Ieer Creek sat on the
ntew of the leer Creek church with
his grips and gas drums iiIh.iU him.
rVven-t hilly came and went; the early
summer twilight dec'iicd while a fatu
lly of screech owls discussed their af
fairs nniler their breath: 8 o'clock came
mid still no aiiiliein-e. A buggy rattled
on tlie road lclow, and a voice called
shrilly:
"Hello! AiiyUnly up there';"
"Yes, and I want to get in to put my
liuiterii In place," answered the lec
turer. "liidn't you hear that we had
chniued the place?" queried the voice.
"No."
"Well, wo did. You lictter get your
things in your wagon and come down
to the tuiionlliouse, half a mile down
the road, for the folks is there waiting
for you."
"How did you lui 'i -en to change the
place of tlie lecture at the last uio
uient 1"
"It was this way: Yon see. we knew
you had to have a bis light in your
lantern oil or numtliiii' er other
and we knew-, too, that you hail to
have a sheet or sunithln' big and white
to thro'.v the pictures on to and it
would have to be tucked oil to thi- wall.
We have just had put down a oraiul
new carpi on the church and piiiered
the walls, so we were afraid you would
spill oil on the carpet or punch holes In
the new wall per tacking up your
sheet. You see, we were afraid you'd
hurt the church some way, so we mov
ed you down here liecausp yi u ciuililu'i
hurt the schuoihouse at all."
The Boy Understood.
One of the eilm-atio-ia! committee in
Louisville hail pinned on his hut ton
mid went out onto the street for a pa--er.
While the lsiy was counting out
the i-eiinies in clianue he cuulit sight
Wt IUt
Wt WANT ,
of the whiie mid blue button
11c
smiled and got onto his tiptoe uul
rend slowly:
' "My $ fur improvement Kentucky
schools."
Again be xiuilcd and. leaiiiln oi:t
a grimy paw. exclaimed:
"Iut It there and shake. I'm with
you tellers, all Hsht"
J; wr
Aon IMPROVEMENTS.
I3OTJET
FEW LESSONS WITH TURKEYS
Breeder of Twenty-Two Years' Expe
' rience Finds Business More Profit
able Each Year.
I have raised turkeys for sale 22
years, and find it a more profitable
business each year, says a writer In
the Farm and Fireside.
I have hud to learn many lessons
by quite an expensive route. One
year I failed entirely by too close In
breeding. Another year I let my tur
keys wander at their own will and
roost whero they pleased. Again I
allowed some to go up In the trees
a hard storm blew them out and
drowned 21 beauties. Since these les
sons I have worked differently.
I change, either breeding hens or
toms every other year. I usually bur
a thoroughbred bronze from some un
related flock. I keep old hens for
breeders, and find their poults more
healthy. One early turkey Is more
profitable than three late ones, so I
use the first eggs and sell the later
ones. Chicken hens are set on the
first laying and the poultry given to
the first turkey hen that becomes
broody. Largo, airy pens or coops
with rainproof roofs are built quite
a distance from the house.
The hens are kept up two weeks,
and then turned out every morning,
unless the weather becomes rainy.
They have learned to come when call
ed, and will answer me from ever so
far when I call "Pee turk! Come on!"
I am never too busy or too tired to
get them up at the approach of a
hard storm, and at four o'clock in the
evening. They soon learn to come
home. After they are five or six
weeks old I never feed at noon.
I feed no sloppy feed, but have good
luck with wheat or corn bread, crack
ed corn, cooked soft, wheat, mashed
potatoes, etc.
The first two weeks are the most
particular. I give each poult a grain
of black pepper when It Is 21 hours
old, and a stroke of lard or vaseline
from bill to top of head.
Then a feed of hard-boiled egg, shell
and all, crushed fine, mixed with
bread soaked soft and squeezed dry.
Fresh water, sand, lime and ground
charcoal are kept handy. They eat
of all; I never feed too much. - I
never fee-i aver tour limes a ear,
and that often only a week. More
turkeys die from overfeeding than un
derfeeding. I use a flat board to
sprinkle their feed on, and keep It
clean. It pays to be cleanly with tur
keys.
LEGHORN HENS AS MOTHERS
Although Called Nonsltters Occasion
ally One Is Found and Will
Cover Many Eggs.
Although the Leghorns are called
nonsltters, they do sit occasionally,
and I like them very much as moth'
erg. It would hardly seem possible
that a Leghorn hen would cover more
Single-Comb Leghorn.
efs than a Cochin, but It is a fact.
say a writer in an exenange. The
Cochin's wings are short and stubby,
while the Leghorn's wings are lont;
and she will spread them over a big
nestful. Last summer a Leghorn In
cubated 20 eggs for me and hatched
19 of them. It was, however, in the
month of July, and her nest was care
fully arrangei in a basket; but I nev
er give them less than 15. They take
.excellent care of their young; being
light weight, they seldom hurt
chicks by stepping on It, and they
will fight intruders fiercely,
DOEWW
Kep your stock healthy, clean and
comfortable.
Not all the failures of poultry life
ere due to the hens.
The first duck eggs of the season
are hardly ever fertile. "
Don't gorge the growing chicks one
day and starve them tit next
Any fowl la liable at times to pro
duce an egg containing blood spots.
Well grown ducklings very often
will begin laying at five months of
age.
Chicks like heat, and It Is good for
them; but there Is a difference in
heat
' Don't let chicks squeeze through
slated coops until their bodies are de
formed.
Poultry breeding as a pursuit ts em
phatlcally a labor of love, but it Is,
nevertheless, a labor.
WORLD'S GREATEST CANDLE
A giant candle, mado In Harlem, N.
T., and destined for St. Peters, at
Rome, was blesesd before the altar
of St Rlaglo by the Pope and will
bt.rn without drip for six long years.
Standing over 11 feet high, weighing
over 200 pounds, and costing nearly
$1,000, the candle is made or sweet
smelling beeswax, dipped with 200 dip-
lngs about a marvelous wick. From
within a foot of the top to a foot ol
the bottom It Is embossed In gold.
The centerpiece, of cunningly wrought
gold and delicately carved wax, shows
lilies of the valley and a lovely sacred
picture. The manufacturer will not
tell the name of the person who or
dered the candle, saying:
"When one has prayed 1 long and
ceaselessly to th saints for health he
does not parade his generous attitude.
He lays what he has upon the altar
and goes silently on his way."
St Ittaglo Is the patron saint ol
those who suffer from disease of the
throat. It is the tradition that be
miraculously cured a little girl of
throat disease while on his way to
martyrdom In the early days of the
church. ,
GIANTS OF THE FOREST
Australia lays claim to growing the
talles trees in the world, whilst Cali
fornia trees are noted for their girth
and diameter. The tallest Callfornlan
forest giant discovered was found
by actual measurement to be 340 feet
high. Hut Australia's record gum treo
beats this by 140 feet. Raroa Mueller,
who was formerly government botan
ist in Victoria, said that the Austral-
Ian gum trees attained a height of
600 feet, but the tallest that the baron
ever mcisured was a prostrate one
on the Rlack Spur, ten miles from
Healesville, which was 480 feet high.
This tree was SI feet In girth near its
root In 18S9 a civil engineer, jour
neying from Gippuland to Mount Rore,
measured a tree 471 feet In height,
though tho same tree had previously
been estimated at not less than 500
feet
EARNS LIVING EVERYWHERE
Cecil M. Hargreavea, here depicted.
Is spending a part of his life in dem
onstrating that It is possible for a man
to earn his living In any part of the
globe. He started from London eight
years ago and so far has been through
thirty-two countries, covering nearly
180,000 miles. He still has to do China
and Japan.
KANSAS LEADS IN STUDENTS
Kansas boasts of having more col
lege students per' capita than any
other state. Her next door neighbor.
Missouri, has the fewest only one in
381 Inhabitants, and next to the foot
comes Pennsylvania with one for ev
ery 308. The states at tho head are
all western, the first seven and the
number of people for each college
student being: Kansas, 113; Utah,
121; Nebraska, 135; Oregon, 130; In
diana, 162; Iowa, 184;. Illinois. 199.
The eighth is Massachusetts, with one
student for every 209 people.
FISH FROM THE NORTH SEA
The North sea Is Great Britain's
most profitable fishing ground. Last
year the value of the fish landed on
the n ortheaBt coast was 3,740,614.
over a third of the total value of the
fish landed In the whole of England
and Wales, and 100,000 worth more
than was landed In the whole of Ccot
land and Ireland combined during the
same year. The increase over 1910
was 178,584, and, compared with 1891
the total value of fish landed In 1911
showed an Increase of nearly 2,000,-
000.
LONG AND SHORT NAMES
Elkhart, Ind., has within its borders
two men who probably bear the dis
tinction of having the longest and
shortest names, respectively, in the
United States. The first is the pro
prietor of a Greek canJy kitchen.
When time permits, bis surname ap
pears thus: Pappatheodorokokouin
mountaourgeotopolos. In a hurry
he signs his name Speros Michaels.
The man with the short name Is Ed
Ek.
CHINESE WOMEN DOCTORS
Forty young 1 tiinese women are
qualifying for the medical profession
In American universities through the
Influence of Dr. Yamel Kin. the first
woman doctor in China. Dr. Kin. as
the bead of the hospital for women in
Tientsin, has also for the last ten years
been training Chir.ese womeu for the
nursing profession.
JIM
TmflblNT
FTfl TTTI TT
W 1QU&
UaHI
IF YOU ARE TOO
rjSICK TO WORK AND YOUR
WIFE IS WEAK AND AILING
THERE'S HOPE AND HELP
FOR YOU BOTH IN
lEGTBie braiid
They build up the run-down; they strengthen the weak; they
invigorate tired and .worn-out people. They're unequalled for
dyspepsia and indigestion, constipation and malaria, bilious
ness and jaundice. They're a blessing to women who suffer
from backache, headache, fainting or dizzy spells and a boon
to all sufferers from kidney troubles. TRY THEM.
PRICE 60c AND Sl.00 PER BOTTLE
T SOLO AND GUARANTEED BY i
Sold
DR. J. W. BARLOW,
DUNTIBT.
Crown ami llri.lu-i' Work dune l reasonable
prices.
4t,U ; up slaira. In the Junes Buiiilinjt.
Grernvllle, Kj.
DR. T. J. SLAT01N,
I'HyMici.in and MurfC.il,
OOicc Miin-cruiHlre- nr Maia.lrc.1. I
CAM llOVMtD.
AI)t U. 611 AY.
HOWARD & GRAY,
LAWYERS.
like In Grn-i t:Uie. eopesilc LMce4e IsttL
ORS. HELTSLEY & HELTSLEY
r5!W.I(!jcjMS!Cuas.LSiL
Office at Home, Bt Min"cros Street.
Telephone No. 7H,
Fi.on.on Houte
IIKTWEEN'
Louisville - and - Chicago
WEST LINE TO
California and the
Vast Northwest
Two trains daily
French Lick and Vest Baden Springs.
-m -B - -
1,'XION STATION',
LOUISVILLE.
DEAIfltoRX STATION,
CIIICACO.
Dinintf and ParlorCars.
Palace Drawing Room Sleepers.
E. H. BACON. D. P. A..
N. V. Cor. 4th an-1 Market Sts.
LOU1SV1LLK. KY.
tl&444 ovrn YCAns
Cop y rights Ac.
mil- '.( fcrrt i;ii fnir ot'r.H'H ifee wliwU'-r p i
1. T, -mi in I'f'fcBhlT .!tMrnM Cofm-thm-tl-.i-i.
tricllT Ttl Vntt;il. HWDbGnK on l'nl"li:i
cci'l iicn. OM'-'t n.wwY fur ft-urinif uf .
r.ifuta tan-n ?hrorh uiii Co. icCwi-e
tjv- it' -t without cbrgg. Uitb
Scientific American.
A fcondfomelt iltiirll wwS'r. I rmt rtn.
ruhU'.n .l m-r t. j rr.-.L IVm-.. 1 1
n-ir: t- iir ni -.iU, lu belli lyail rewxi-ir..
HUNN&Co.8B,KewYcr
Uraucb ufflot. FS K M Wuhicistoo, U. t.
i get the genmae
Slack-DraugHT
liver Mrdicisa
The reputation cftl.ia olJ, re:io- 3
t.i . i : . I - E3
a
digcsiion sr.d liver troulite, is firm
ly established. I: ioc3 not iraitaie
other medicines. It U better than
oiherd, cr it would not be tb.2 U
vorite liver powder, r-ith a larger
salu than ail ethers combined.
SOLD IN T0W1I
I Very Serious 1
jl It is a rery set loos rnitter to V jg
II Ir cne rrcilitiiie ir-J have tlie a
O wronj cue c'.verj you. Tat tbia g
M tcoccn v-3 vrta you ia tcjing to N
B tc careful tc
--. - ix: . 1 1" .'' 11 ' '"-v 'Yii ty
by JurviH 5 Williams.
SHANNON
DEPOY.
VVc announce to our trade and the pub
lie that our stocks of goods in all depart
ments arc larger and better selected than
ever in our history. VVc carry a varied
line of :-: :-:
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
and can supply most of the wants of the
people. In Dry Goods, Clothing, Shoes,
Hats, Etc., we offer large selections.
In Groceries. Hardware, Tinware, Farm
Implements and such goods our stocks
are especially strong. :-:
In all departments prices will be found
the lowest, and your visits will be highly
appreciated. :-: :-:
Undertaking Department
We have just added an Undertaking Department to our
business, and will carry a comprehensive line of Coffins, Cas-
m Dwines, ami win carry a tomprencnsive line 01 comns, v.as-
kets. Robes, Suits, Wrappers
ft in service, on call anywhere.
W and careful attention any hour
(ft Tail AA ll AM A riftfA Uft f
(ft
(ft
(ft
(ft
(ft
ititpiiuiin. Mm, nu.
SHANNON,
DEPOY,
IsiSSn.tp snoM 5jsy noX dpq m ) ppJK) aJ.
uatnoM 6 jBiinaad stiipd aijj jo Xu uiojj jans no oq
"uouioav joj oiiio) jscq ctrj si j M'0j!i p3AC3 5J AO'JTf
I joj 'jnpjBQ joj iiSnoua bs jouucd pue 'sni3 unu;rj
9m jo pajna djnua vis 'Avojsi -ota padptj jnpjTQ jo
aenri ictrt ntif Arr tin? i-cnit t-:ni t rtr? 'cuarfc rtintrrr-i
pcij -om jE3u ouoXu? o.vBtj oj jroq :ou p;r.ca i 'rr.o.visu
pus spa.'A os sea t., :;j jr.oq? s.rs o;;s ;?qA sj srjj,
inpjcQ ytocj '"V f v.vyi jo 'jo'.'joj odbjq tij
in3?.')' !p(K otj) da Suipimq pnr? s-qnojj oq) jo mjt.cs
ain o I?ujo3 Xq 'jouucui jEjnjcu v in 'ijiicdij sojojsaj pue
Utrd SDAOtpj tjjo.w jodojcl ji-nj) cp oj uiaij) siljaij pue
'sutfjo jvruioA oi;i no X)ito5 $;.-b j s;uoipo.i3i!i 0qr)33aA
Xp.ind uinjj oppiu si inpr t:.!C) s,irpuiOA t;n "inpirQ
jefa fiiji doa?j j.hoq nuojsXs sno.usn sjkus jnoX
umj pus 'uMcp r5jq no.t jjnssj b sy cp no.t jj.?om pipq
aqj jo u;bj)s oiji ptirjs jouucd qjijM i!onrutjs'dOD Xubuioav
inoX jo SS0U5JH0M aq) si isnoAJOu no.t sojrui ien
VICTOR
Ti
Sf
ii
tii
lii
Ui
li
it
4
U
Or
Jh
iv
Oi
&
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Ji
ElSlg
, MERCER & (0.
KENTUCKY
ili
and Dresses. Also have a Hearse
Orders in this line given prompt ()
day or night. (jj
If'llll I?A sT7 Mai &!m
i. nii, nu. u ui nu. x &
MERCER & CO.
KENTUCKY
Mi
aV i
RECORDS.,:,
in
Be
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.

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