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The record. (Greenville, Ky.) 1899-1???, March 06, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87060049/1913-03-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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Muhlenberg County
Costs Nothing.
J is rich in coal, iron, timber, potter's clav.
It pays for itself.
The investment is
etc., and the most inviting field in Ken-3
.i.t .r r. r 1 9
Esurc of returns. Get our rates. g
a m m x x X x iQ' xjc x.x XMXXXXXMJiM JlXWTttt
gkuv.lt IU1 III C3UIIC111 Ul LdpiUl dllU piU(.K. it
L KJf x.xXaa3fX3JtxJtx S.x x x.x.x x x x lUc k x 8 a xVx xx.
GREENVILLE. KY., THURSDAY, MARCH ii, 1013.
VOL. XV. NO. S.
50c. PER YEAR. IN ADVANCE
UTTLE GENERAL FARM PAYS
GOOD
SHKK
Profit Secured in Poultry a Well a t
Horses. Mules, Dairy Stock,
Sheep and Hog.
By W. II. XHICrAIlD)
A neighbor of oura nuiks poultry
strong iJ. Iiu of his farming. Ha
rot great vitriol y of lauts Mid
ici'ps and fo ilH a variety of animal.
His poultry Rail's amount to near
ly $"i)0 each yrcr and he feedH his
frown rhirkt-ns nothing except mhat
they pick up about the. plnr, but
through his methods of cropping and
ftvding they eerure an abundance,
hud respond accoidinply.
The same DclKhbnr keeps and grows
l.crxei and mulrs, dairy stock, vheep
rnd hogs.
From the poultry and cows be baa
a constant daily cash income.
lom the borses aud mules be sella
ri.ch year one or two animals at $100
rr more a piece.
Front the sheep hs has wool to sell
fn early cpring. and lambs later In
the summer, and from the hogs ha
lelia from $100 to 2o worth every
tvo or three months.
He trows wh-at. oats, corn, hay rnd
r variety of forage crops, besides a
j rood orchard, truck patches, and gar
ilen from which nearly all the family
eatables are grown, with some fruits
and vegetablf s to sell.
Ho also sells from $100 to $209
worth of wheat each year, and hla
dairy products amount to $400 per
year, and all from a farm of less than
"i00 acres.
Any general farmer who plans and,
executes ran grow a variety of plants
and animals on a small farm, make
.good money from the crops, and at
the aame time build up his land faster
than by special cropping.
NUB CORN BEFORE PLANTING
Carefully Conducted Experiments
' Have Proven Advantages In Prac
tice Increases Yield.
At the North Carolina station care
fully conducted experiments have
demonstrated that It is advisable to
nub corn before planting, for It has
been found that, when seed from the
tips and butts of cars are placed In
one plot, and by the side of It another
of the aame ears, there Is a larger
percentage of dwarfed and barrel.)
atalks on the plot planted in tip and
but kernels than from the other, and
hence Ices yield of shelled corn per
acre.
As both plots werejjanted on the
mbm type of soil, and treated In the
same way by fertilization and cultiva
tion. It Is strongly probable that the
decreased yield of the plot sown in
butt and tip grains was due to the
seed, as all other conditions were as
nearly identical for both as It was
possible to secure.
CONVENIENT AS A NAIL BOX
Anything in Shape of Pan May Bs Di
vided into Compartments to Hold
Bolts and Screws.
Anything from a half gallon baking
pan to a six-gallon dlshpan nay bo
used Is making a very useful and
convenient compartment box in which
to keep nails, screws ana bolts. The
pan may be divided into four, six or
right compartments.
To make the divisions, get the dis
tance across the bottom and the top
of the pan, secure a piece of board
juet as wide as the pan is deep, and
long enough to make the piece, an-
Pan Nail Box.
other piece tvo or three inches
broader for tbe piece that forms the
handle. Cut a notch as shown at X,
this notch to be as wide as the boards
are thick.
Place the No. 1 in center of pan
and nail in place, through the sides
and bottom cf pan. Next place No. 1
across No. 1 so that the notches at
XX will fit in each other, then nail as
yon did No. 1. If more places are
wanted, these quarters may be subdl
Tided.
Early Inoculation.
It is Interesting to examine young
alfalfa plants and note bow quickly
they obtain the benefit of nitrogen-
gathering bacteria. Plants less than
four weeks old may have two or three
nodules on a single root and have a
countless number of bacteria furnish'
lng nitrogen from tbe air. When land
la first lnoculeted by the use of soil
from sti old field one may find much
tflnevenness In the sice of plants at
an early age, due to the fact that the
taller plants are getting an abundance
of nitrogen, while the smaller plants
have few or no bacteria at work for
them. It is for this reason that a sec
ond seeding on land that has been
made to grow alfalfa successfully Is
much, surer than a first seeding.
The Best Soli.
Tbe best soil upon a farm Is ona
that warms early n the spring and
;hat holds ertotigh moisture for plant
growth. A roil of this kind should
contain some pa&a, clay and organic
matter. The eand permits tbe air to
eater aud the c'ay and organic natter
aid In holding the moisture. It la
HOW TO FUMIGATE HEN HOUSE
Building Should Be Closed Tightly
and All Fowls Excluded Be
Careful of Poison Used.
Fumigation is a means of reailu'ns
germs and Insect life in the air of
Ihe room and In the cracks and cran
nies of the wood work, says the Culti
vator. The house or room should bo
tightly closed and all fowls excluded
during fumigation. A simple method
Is to burn the sulphur candles now
rold at stores dealing in poultry sup
plies. The fumes of brimstone may
also be produced by burning in a
metallic basin (such as an old Iron
kettle) a number of rags previously
soaked In melted sulphur. Sulphur
may be mixed with a littlo alcohol or
kerosene oil and burned, or it may be
r.prinkled upon live coals placed in a
chafing dish. The house or room
nhould be kept closed for Keveral
hours and then opened as thoroughly
rs possible to allow the wind to drivo
out any remaining trace of poisonous
gas. In fumigating by burning mib
etances be careful not to set fire to
the building. Remember also that in
most cases tho substances which are
used are poisonous to human life and
to fowls. Carelessness In their use or
In leaving them about where chick or
child can get at them may have dire
results.
USING A FlfiELESS BROODER
Box Protected by Wool Carpet and
Heated by Small Jug of Warm Wa
ter is Excellent.
A there are many poultrymon who
prefer to raise chicks in a tireless
brooder, we give here a plan sug
gested by W. D. Neale, which has been
used successfully for two years, says
the Iowa Homestead. He secured a
box three feet long, sixteen inches
wide and eight inches deep
from his grocer for fifteen cents.
An opening was made in one side of
the box four inches in width and
height to admit the chicks. To fit
in this box, make a frame of laths
two Inches less in width and length
than the box. The laths were placed
aV sena roof .
VVu-fl
Feed B'uw rl
Fireiess Breeder.
about three inches apart and nailed
securely to cross pieces at either end.
This frame fitted inside the box and
rested on nails, two at each - end.
driven through the box at the desired
height These nails were withdrawn
and driven higher in the ends of the
box as the chicks grew so that they
would have more room beneath the
frame. A piece of wool carpet was
thrown over the top of the frame and
pressed down beneath the lath so that
Covering of Brooder.
the folds would just touch the downy
backs of the chicks. On cold nights
an extra piece of carpet was thrown
over the box or a small jug of warm
water placed inside. The bottom of
the box was kept covered with straw.
Never harbor mongrel stock.
Don't forget to whitewash the in
terior of your houses.
Expect disease and low vitality
when fowls are inbred year in and
year out
Send to market all the stock that
you can spare, for the prices of feed
are still high.
Plump chickens are wanted in
market; remember that lousy chick
ens will not fatten.
From October 15 th to about Nov
ember 20th the best prices for poultry
are generally obtained.
New blood may be added to the
flock, by buying some choice pullets
f a reliable poultry keeper.
Lining nest boxes with newspapers
makes it easy to lift out litter, paper
tnd all. Then set a match to it
Authorities claim that the eggs
from a hen will be fertile for ten.
days after the removal of the male
from the flock.
Do not let your young birds roost
with the old hens, as they are liable
to catch diseases which old hens are
more subject to.
All hens which have completed their
second laying season should - be dis
posed of at once, to make room for
e young stock.
Save the small potatoes and imper
fect bvads of cabbage and other w aste
vegetables. They will all be relished
by the hens In the winter.
. Ion't delay any longer making re
pairs to tbe bouses or fences, viator
may be here before you are riidy.
A.t the same t!:ne. clean up tho runs
PUBLIC ROADS OF COUNTRY
Increased Mileage of Highways With-
in Period of About Five Years
Has Been 48,266.
Kven with a high powered automo
bile that could keep up a pace of 90
miles a day indefinitely. It would take
a man more than 65 years to rover
all tho public rouds in tho 1'nlted
States. A young man of twenty
starting out to accomplish this tre
mendous tank would ho cigltty-fivn
before he had covered the last mill
of public highway in this country.
After an in virilization extending
over many months, the director of the
office of public roads has ascertained j
that there are now 2.1!!t.fil." mile of
public roads In the Fnlted States.
The figures include all the now road.
built up to the year t!09. In irwt
there wore exactly 2,l."1..17f. It is
apparent, therefore, that the increased
mileage of new roads within a period
of about five years has been S.26ti.
"The investigation just concluded."
said the director. In an interview,
"shows conclusively that the move
ment for the Improvement of public
highways has obtained a firm grip on
the country'- The percentage of roads
which are really improved amounted
to 7.14 in 1904, while in 1909, to which
year statistics are now available, the
percentage w as K.66.
it is interesting to observe the
growth of Improved methods In road
construction. For instance, the total
mileage of stone roads In 1904 was
3G.S1S. while in 1909 it was 59.2.17.
The total mileage of gravel roads In
904 was 109.903, while in 1909 It was
nly 102.870. This decrease in gravel
roads, however, was due to a re-
Public Road Before Improvement.
classification of roads. Many of those
reported in 1904 to be of gravel
proved to be of some other substauce,
while exaggerations were eliminated.
"The total mileage of sand-clay,
brick, bituminous-macadam and other
Improved roads In 1904 was C.S06.
while in 1903 the mileage reached
28,372."
The office of public roads has just
Issued a table showing the states hav
ing the largest mileage of improved
roads:
1W.
I3.S77
H.4fin
S.SK
lrt.tsa
t.iiA
7.9;t
S.fi3
7.M3
1W.
I4.S.-.3
24.11
12.7K7
10.
10.1 II
S.9U
ImliHnii
Ohio
Nw York
Vlconin
Kent in ky
Illinois ..:
t'Hliforni.i
Massachusetts
ONE ROAD BUILDING FAILURE
Lack of Proper Care to Thoroughfares
Constructed by Inexperienced
Men Shows Results.
About forty years ago, Adams coun
ty. Ohio, issued bonds to linnrove nart
of its main roads. At that time very
little was Known ahout tho science of
road makiug. I'sually a local man
undertook the contract for a certain
piece of work and secured local help
as inexperienced as he. Very little, if
any, attention was paid to the char
acter of the bed upon which the stones
were to be laid and still less to the
different qualities of stones secured
from the quarries near by. Hard and
eoft ftones were placed side by sldo
as hrlck are now laid In our common
street paving, (ays a writer In an ex
change. After a few years of wear
and erosion, with no attention given
to repair, these roads were in a con
dition almost worse than before Im
provement. Adams county Is a good
example of a community that has Im
proved roads and lsai paid no otten
tlou to their up keep. A lew hundred
dollar spent judiciously on each road
would have kept tlu m in good condi
tion for many years. As conditions
are now. enough money has beeu
rprrt to bav the ,fct of roads, but
brv:tute cf k'.ek of proper caro, they
ar enly second or third class and
the ecuuty I- still heavily lu debt for
ih'-tc ro:. ls
mi wm
SYSTEM FCR MARKING PIGS
Best Method Is MaKint) Notches in
Ears and" Having E.ich Notch Rep
resent Definite Number.
Vr iKOtf!K MOUR1SI
When a farmer raises pigs for rale
is breeders, he rhould hive a definite
system of marking each llttc. Th';re
ire several methods of do!ng this, cf
which perhaps the best rongists of
making notches In he ears and hav
ing each notch reprerent a definite
number.
lty means of the following method
is many as a hundred lltu rs may be
marked with not to exceed four
notches In Ihe ears cf each pig. Kor
example: Let a notch on the lower
dp, of the loft er represent No. 1:
!ti tho same edge nvtr tho.tip. No. 10;
on the upper edgi of the same enr
near the tip. No. 20. On the right
par. lower edge neir the head, let the
notch represent No. 3: and on tha
?ame de near I'k? tip, No. SO; on
the upper edno of '0e same ear. No.
5: and on the same edt;e near the tip.
No. r,0. This systen Is easy to re
member. All you have to koep In
rind Is that No. 1 Is on the left ear
near the head and No. 9 Just above it
tfrfk Art.
KEY 5'"'
17
Marking Young Pigs.
on tbe ii per edge, ar.d that on tbs
right ear No. 3 Is on rheower edge
near the head and No. i is just above
It on the upper edge. Near the tips
tbe numbers 'are just ten times as
largo as those-near tho head.
Krch pig of litter No. 1 should have
the notch on the upper edge of the
ame ear, those, of number threo
should have the notch on the lower
edge of tho light ear near the head,
those of No. 4 should have a notch on
Ihe lower edge of both ears near the
head. My following this system any
number of combination of these
numbers may be made up to 100.
Hy studying the illustration one
may get a good Idea of this method of
marking. The key head shows the
method already described, while the
other three figures show how the ears
are marked for ltiters 5, 17 and 41.
Fach year the litters should be num
bered in the order of their birth, each
pis In tho litter being; given the same
marking. Always record the litter
Identification marks In a book kept
exclusively fcr the purpose.
Treatment for Scours.
Good success was attained at the,
South Carolina station in treating,
calves affected with scours by adding
formalin to the miik at the rate of
one part to four thousand. Eleven
calves out of twleve treated recovered
without any further attention, seven
on the second day, three on the third
and one or. the ninth. The calves were
young ones fed chiefly on skimmilk.
Live Stock
"C NOTE'S
Always use a thoroughbred boar.
Winter shoeing should be most care
fully done.
There never was a better time than,
now to start In sheep.
Epidemics among hogs are more
easily prevented than cured.
The novice should start with a few'
first-class ewes, never any culls.
Fatten the rattle-headed sow that
Is hard to hardle at pigging time.
Whoever heard of a horse getting
thrush if his stable aud feet were kept.
flean?
Wheat middling and barley are fine
nj a feed for growing pigs or fatten
ing hosa.
In all cases where perfect clean
liness ia been enforced there has
been no disease.
Fancy and well conditioned lambs
are the ones that bring home the
money frcm any market
Meats are high the world over, and
lamb and mutton more In demand by
ransuniers than ever before.
Planning to bo right on hand nnd
rerve every pig may mean many dol
lars to you t farrowing time.
With lamb hop selling at twenty
"ye cents a pound ' "le markets.
lh re ii purely "something lu sheep."
When the pis begin to eat they
become. HlmoM elf supporting nnd
K--e dcuaidlig less and Icm of the
i:o;;s do net waste corn In tho field
ers't In i'ii':!.ly woUher. They gain
nyt,r. nxr; c.enly srd more ccoiiom-
. tally !: th- :rn!! '.I than la the dry
let
BF YOU ARE TOO
r7SiCK TO WORK AND YOUR
Wire IS WcAK &ND AILING
THERE'S HOPS- AND HELP.
FOR YOU BOTH IN
They build up tho run-down; they strengthen th& vOuk; they
invigorate tired and worn-out people. They're unequalled for
dyspepsia and indigestion, constipation and malaria, bilious
ness and jaundice. They're a blessing to women who suffer
from backache, headache, fainting: or dizzy spells and a boon
to all sufferers from kidney tioubios, TRY TriESfl.
PRICE COc Af-D 38.00 PER BOTTLE
"JZmn SOLD AND GUARANTEED
Sold
DR. J. W. BARLOW,
DENTIHT,
Crvwuand Bridge Wwrk doiie at rea,untjle
ritt .
OH,-! up stairs, in (be Jonn Building.
4rrn viltt, Kj.
DR. T. J. SLAT0N,
IMiyMiv'lttti and Surgeon.
iXMcr Mam cruHHbtrctfi urar 3slatiitirrl. ih
CAM HOWARD.
hAUC H. OKAY.
HOWARD & GRAY,
LAWYERS.
flier ll Srtri UiUinJ. tppwite ljMt4e Hotel.
DRS. HELTSLEY & HELTSLEY
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN'S
Oifice at Home, Eitt Maiivcros Street;
Telephone No. 7H,
Monon
r.KTWEEN
Louisville - and - Chicago
T.KST LINK TO
California ami the
Vast Northwest
m- - -
Td train ilailv
French Lkk sad West EaJ:n Springs.
- -n
L'MON STATION'.
I.oris'U.I.E.
I r.A U Koi: X STATION".
CHICAGO.
-s
Dinintf and Parlor Cars.
Palace Drawing Room Sleerers.
E. H. BACON. D. P. A..
N". W. Cor. Ub ami Market Sts.
I.OUSVI I.I.I-:. KY.
t4j OVER 63 vr ARS"
COPYHIOMTS dC.
Ht;i tf h!M'tTt;til f)r trnit'l f.tO rrltirr r.'i
tiivc.'iil'tti I proftfthlf vli'tt! it l. Vnimi;ii 1
thiii iirftlTftrfinikMtftiil. KV-'PtWOK " I 'mraij
' lire. )!! V tr Hjcun.ilT pn('; u
tprruzln'Mv-, wtt httut chilly's. Initio
Scientific Jlnaericasi
A tmnitnmelr l!lnmM wntT. I rrrt rlr-i-uli-.liit
t ny rttjiiuUtf Jt.urr.it. 1rn. $:i .1
to . r: t.-nr rn..'UUfcL Suklbyiul n.wl-i.r.
MUKN & Co.3S,BwwaTNsw York
Very Scrieus 1
It ts a vrry sstou3 oatt-r ti Jl;
fjr enc metlicino and h:ve the
wronj eno rjiven you. Fcr this
rca-son v.-a urro you in buying to
be careful to get the genuine
LACK-DRAUGH !
Liver Mediclac
Tbff reputatioa cf thl r-U, r.j!a
tle mnJicinc. i-T cc'n-tipatioii, lr.
ti'p'ton Briil liver troLl !, ii t'rm
Iv C3!3tlihcJ. I tle53 fii;t imitate
cthir medicines. It il bctttr than
ethers, cr it wotlJ not be t'io f i
vorite liver povdtr, vith a larr;c
Silo thou sil others combiacJ.
CCLI3 US
N "VEXPCniCNCE
" n . -rTne Marks
Dcsicws
hit M3
s' . j i
brand gOTT
Sy Jarvis 5 Willimnti.
ft! A I
IMAM licrrrv n a
DKPOY. KENTUCKY
W'c announce to our trade and the pub
lic that our stocks of goods in all depart
ments arc larger and better selected than
ever in our history. We carry a varied
line of :-: :-:
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
and can supply most of the wants of the
people. In Dry Goods, Gothing, Shoes,
Hats, Etc., we offer large selections.
In Groceries. Hardware, Tinware, Farm
Implements ana such goods our stocks
arc especially strong. :-:
In all departments prices will bo found
the lowest, and your visits will be Iiighly
appreciated. :-: :-:
(?)
m
OS
1 Undertaking Department 1
W'c have just added an Undertaking Department to our 5i
; business, and will carry a comprehensive line of Cofljji, Cas-
ti htis, lioues, cuius rappers
f jy in service, on call anywhere.
f." and careful attention any hour
T a" m f
luepaoEcs: mz, m.
SHANNON,
DEPOY,
r Z;'ZZ;l-'m'l;''Jim --0 j.. 0'
f : .-.-.-..
Are Yon Neirons?
Vhr.t makes you nervous? is the weakness cf your j
wc-injr.Iy constitution, which cannot sbiid the strain cf ihe i
hard work yon cro. A a resuif, yoa break down, and ruin
your cnle ncrous system. Don't l:cep this up! Take
Cardi t, the woman's to:.:c, CarJii is ir.de frcm purely
vc.icta'olo ir.jrrcviints. It acts gently on the womanly oranj,
and helps tlicr:i to i!- t:;ir pnper work, it relieves poia.
and restores hea'ln. in a natural manner, b coirjj ta ths
source cf tz trouble and building up the bodily strcndv
t'AKE
l.rs. Grace Forfncr,' cf
iris n wM-'.t sre says' 'dnout tt: ra ri v c;:c anu
nervoi!?, I coi'M not bear to have anyone near r.;c 1 had
fainiinn spells, and I lost flesh every 'da', lb? firrt" docc
of Cardui helped me. Now I a.it entirely cured cf the
fainting spells, and cannot gay enough, for Caalui, for I
knov it saved my life." Ft is th2 bc- t tonic for women.
D' yon suffer ir-v.n r.ny of t!ie p-ins peculiar fo women?
Take Cardui. it viil l:c!; you. Ask your druggist.
Write $u: La Uri AJvi ory D--t. Clii:mrg4 MvXJoc Ca. Ctitt2Boo T.-ea.
1
Av IJrVrji Ml, .1', ".SB '
rf
j.
BY
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nun, riLKUK rx uj.
ana uresscs. Also nav a ucarse tjf
Orders in this line given prompt (f
day or nifht.
r a &
m
i wjm, no. u ita. x
MERCER S CO.
KENTUCKY
. 1-"! -I
Tho
WomerfeTGnlc
'Mm, V. Va., txk CarduL
RK0WSJ1
Battel fAd easy to work.
and will..

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