OCR Interpretation


The Coconino weekly sun. (Flagstaff, Ariz.) 1891-1896, February 04, 1892, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062054/1892-02-04/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

.!," -r?
jtJMggMf "PTffV
. ?t ""
rjjjfjfafp - i jp'S'-'t!f -
t"
wTFPTf'V w 'c " . - yp'lgff3r5r'"v
-& 'A a "
s
Cocouimi llVchli) Jtm.
YOTT CAN'T
Reach The Sun readers by adver
tising in any other newspaper.
The subscription list'of this paper
is increasing with each issue.
Till: VKUUHT
Of reader and wlvcrtUer is that
Tb Coconino Weekly Sun is
the leading newspaper published
iu Northern Arizona.
' A',
FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1892.
NUMBER 21.
VOL. IX.
--" T$i
yk its
)
i
!.
)
'r.. VAN 1IOKN ATTOKXKY
iJa'UlM.i't rlwn:i.
C I'MVAitr nor
T mitXKYH
O u
La'v. O'ilcetuotlooia west of tlio llni
hotel. I'lnKMair, Aiizoua.
E
tiif
M. SAM'OKIl. ATTOliNEY A I' I.AV.
PrciNiit. Arlinnn. Will macllco In m
if courts of llu1 Terrltoiy.
PO. COKNISH. PHYSICIAN AND KU1
. peon. lWtntf. Arioiiu. Will iinsvu
culls on tin' Vtlnntle . r.icllio Hnlliuari.
DENTIST
Offlco In th
fctoro. riij- uir.
without iaiii-
f ir liraniu'ii's Dm
Jim TeUi ixlrnctu
"H
It. D.J llUANM'X, lMUhlCIAN.AM
u. .......... rifultiir Arlyntill. Will
MhumI promptly to all mllslrom n'O'P""
on thV Atlimlli'S PaeMe Itullroad. OlUc
MHIII
t
inn amp store oiipumw uu' iit-pui.
f" s.ucmsT sctTn:s.
T o. o. r.-i'i.AcsTArr lohoe. no. h
I . nisei eery Saturday cvcnlii In Odd
lellims' Hull. YUlilns brethren coidlall)
dirtily United.
J. L. Tiie.vt, Secretary
7 JM.AGSTAr'F I.OlKiE. NO. T. 1'. iA. M.
JL Kftsular iiieetlnss on fourth Mond.i
! Iii..".'ri Mil'-"' " ''ilifd !"" '
lugs every other Monday night for work
iijun,,,. i , ... 1 li.uu, .MiisUr.
Max Hai-zxias. S'cmtury.
OUUT F(H ON1NO. NO. NW. INDEl'KND
lit Older 1'oresters ' lds regular meet
lugs In Odd l'dlowi,' 1 nil, Klncstalf. oeiy
Tuurdny otenliK. Vis. K brothers and ni
i,.o.,iltrs In good standlrj; arocoitllally In
illi'd to attend.
J W. rNCls,C. It.
C. I. Rrrrscn. It. 8.
T O. O. T. ri.AOSTIT LODUa NO. II
1 , meets batiird.iy evenlneof each week at
Masonic Hall. All C.'ocxl Templars In goou
staiulluxcordliill) welcome.
VV.L V.vxllon.v, C T.
W. U. XoiW.vs. U. S
CliriJC II IlIKKl'TOItY.
T7IltS.T M. E. tlll'ltCH. COKNEIl 01'
L Church and Lateu Streets. N if. Norton
l'astor. l'renchliiir lit 11 a. in. and 7:atl p. in.
siuuday'st Sunday kIkkiI at 10 u. in.. .1.11.
Hosklivs Jr.. Suwrlntendent. CIiim nieetluRs
at IMS n. in. l4iortli I.eacuo 6"VO p. in
l'ravcr meetlini Diurkduy oieiilnjr at 7:'J).
Evcrjbody lion.i.
TTlltST 1'III.snYT
1 I'ranrWc o avemi
ST. D., paxlorr abba
fTEKIAN CHL'ItCll. HAN
Mine. Itcv. Hobt. Coltinan.
ST. I) naxtor, abbath Setiool. 10 a in.: inorn-
lnff scr leo. 11 a in.: vouin: iK'onle's mcetltiz.
C:lp. in.; ot piling er he. :Jp. in.; weekly
prnjur meeting and llible study, Tlmrsdn)s.
itt 7:30 n. in. Seats fn- Eiery one luvlttd.
Cordial welcome for all.
MlSCl".LLAN"I:Ol'.
JOUTHItlE SAVAOE. lNlTEDSTATf
, (oiuinlssloneriif the District Court In the
Kourtli Judicial DNtrlet of the Territory
of Arizona. HKti let Court Commlsslimer In
nndfortlm (oiiniy of Coronlno, In said Ter
ritory, and lT S. lVn.slon Notary. Admlttid
to practice tiofore the various bureaus. of the
tilep.utruent. Offlcv two doors north of the
Hunk Hotel
T."I,AOSTAIT LIIUtAKY AND EEADINO
I Hooni AKsuclutlon. Iteadlnc room open
tally noin u n. in to rj p. in.: mhiuiijs, .
19p.m. Cordial neleoiuu to all vUltom.
A. 1. (Iiiikon. Llbiarlan.
to
170H SALE - ) SPANISH MKK1NO
1 bucks, by McMlllunA. Oomlwln. I'lapstii'J.
Arizona. feL3
UNIVEH-IT F AIII.ONA. -SESSION
ticsliisru-ptiiiilKi JU. Tuition free. Ax
rlrulturnl colleye m IkkiI of mines and prepar
atory eour. 1 01 ntalosue addrewi Secre
tary of I'nlver-h) Kucutt). Tik-mii. A.T.
Lingo & Whitlosk,
Blackmithing
AND
Horseshoeing.
IInitig luasi'd tlio Wilcox shop, on
Ilutnpltrfy Street, littwucn Railroad
nvcnuo nntl Church street, wo In- it
thoso in nM'cl ol work in ot:r lino t
gio us a trial. .
ALL WOltK GUARANTEED,
Atlantic &. Padflc R. R.
(WESTEKN DIVISION.)
TIME TABLE NUMBER 32,
IN EF1TCT
WEDXKSDAY. NOV. 18, 1891.
. tijiesiih:i)11.k.
EAST.
hTATIONS.
No. 3 J NO. i
I . I'llll'Min r
sao'a
I Wp
-.W. .V....r-. I
in ia?i iiii .u
I. I, A JpNTAAr!
li Cup
12 20 a
tl 1.1 p
.1 if II
a liu lv AlbuiienU0 ar,
n r.n it
Coolldgo
720p
It Wp
10 1.1 a
10 SO a
t Iniriitu
Oallup
Nniajo Sprints
Holbrook
Inslow
riiiKstnff
William
IYomcoU Junction
Teaeli'Sprliips
a :r p to 37 p
aoipliomp
up
IMP
-u
J Wp
4 p
7 S3 P
U U1 III f 0.1 p
to m a 2 in p
J1 ! S0p
.1 M a 10 10 a
3 Ma 8 W)a
1 27 n n SOU
10 30 p 3 23 a
o lip
n p
llll
r uyu
4 49 a
Kin.'iimn
KWll
The Ncnllui
I't nncr
10 111 (i
a At p i .nn
C.7)pll 30 p
3 SO p 8 27 p
3 2311 8 0.'. I)
11
i ai ji ltazdad
Hffliv 3PI lB-Kt ,
.. ,n. ainiir irii-siow iv
v . .TIQiiar Mojaio Iv
Sifn Ar IxwAiitrelesTiVi
12 lip
1-i 2Q p
7IJa
- (ft, Ar San Dleiro" I.v
.JTiTp
Arsan l'l-an'ro I.v
)p
CONNECTIONS
Albunlwrauo-A. T. &b. V. It. 1!., for all
nnlnlii east and Miirih. ,
1'iWott Juiictlon-I'i-eseott and Arlrona
Hallway for 1'itit Whipple and l'rt'hcott.
?,".inwf,nliriiriilaSniitliorii Itnllwav for
w
T"Mt. JAMFS M.MAltSHALL
"1 u
Witfr.
No. 3 NO. i
a .j, a s JO u
1 lua
7 50 a
S 11 n
d I'.a
10 :ji a
11 Ha
1 10p
a Mp
it aJu
I .VI II
mod.
I osAimele.Saii Ulejto and other Southern
r'nllforJil.'i polntH.
MoJuo Southern I'aelflc for San I ran
cltcot fc'acrniuento und Noithern California
iiuliitK
UliLMANPAI-ACESIiEEl'INO OAltfl.
Voehinutols made by Kleeplia Car. l'as
rii"Oii between San lianclseo mid lvaiiuut
City or t'il" 1"0K( uihI i'h Augclvn and Chi
l"fliO Grand Canon of tho Colorado, hitherto
lii'irowwaule to tourists ciui Iki rvaclied by
iiluInT tl'ls Uno Ua lVach Springs mid a
itnenililufroiii thenco of but twenty-three
iiilleo. This Caujon Is Die mandest and most
wonderful of nauiiOHHorkx.
stop at 1 lafrsliilf mid hunt deer, bear and
lld turkey in tho inaxulllceiit pine foivr,t
,Vi "itioMin Vmiiclsco mniintaliis. or lslt tho
' iinelonMiilus of thoCaoniid CHIT Dwetlets.
""p. It. jtAiiiiu General ni'iierlntenilent, Al-
'"jlfftsn ' H'-TCir, General Agent, Albu-
'illVr"KV liiHi:t.r- General I'smciuTer Asent,
Alijiejuvnjue, N. M.
ARIZONA
CBRULIUK
FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA
Tho 01dt Bonk In Northern Anion.
Interest Paid on Time Deposits,
Collections a Specially.
IMertncMi W. II. Btrong. Prctldent A.T.
B. F. llailniMl Compunyj UlU WalnwrlghU
Manalna Director Arizona Cattle Comnnoy,
St. Loals, Mo.; Hank of California, ban Iron.
Cisco.
Your Banking Business Solicited,
J. II. H03KIN8, Jr., Ciuhler.
J. DERR,
FLAQSTAFF, ARIZ.
iltlie FasbUle anil Latest Style!
IN
CLOTHING
M4.DE TO ORDER.
A GOOD FIT GUARANTEED.
FINE ASSORTMENT OF
rV,il)S AND CORKS' REWS,
A SELFCT LINE OF
Imported Goods
ALWAYS OMH'wn
GEORGE RAGNALL,
(CHEAP)
BOOT and SHOE MAKER.
Ucpairin Nuttl iloiu, ami Lailies'
ami (ii'iitliiiiu'n'.s I'ino Work a Spoc
ialtj. A piod stock of Solo anil Upper
Leather, Heel Braces ami all kinds of
Shoo l-'imliiipi for sale, Con hoy .Boots
mil tho fitting of Deformed Feet a
Specially.
Shop opp. M. E. Church, Flagstaff.
Coconino Bakery
Everything usually kept in a first-class
bakery, can bo had.
BREAD, PIES,
CAKES,
AND BUNS.
tgrjuOiilcro left at tho Hawka Hones
ill bo promptly filled.
J. Ff. HAWKS, PROP.
J. H. HOSKINS, Jr.,
Representing tho Largest Lino of
Reliable Fire Insurance Go's.
IN NOItTHKItN AHIZONA.
PnOPEKTY lSSUITED AT LOWEST IlATES.
DEAFNESS,
ITS CAUSES AND CURE
Scientifically treated by an aurlt of world
wide reputation. Deafnes.ii eradicated and
entirely cured, of from 20 to 30 years' stand
Ins; utter all other treatments liavo failed.
How tlmdltllculty is leachtsl and the causo
leinoiid, fully explained In circulars, with
atlldavlts aiuf teiitlinoiilals of cures from
prominent people, mailed free.
lilt, A. t'ONTMNK,
Tacolllrt, Walill-
Your Stock
UV rURCIIAHINCJ
BERKSHIRES
OF THE
Finest Quality and Breeding.
ADDRESS:
H. FULTON,
KlaRStaff, Arizonci.
eTAILORe
I I IM III III IIW lllHll MIIIMMI IMI
MPROVE
3
ONLY
A FEW
LEFT!
We have a few gentlemen's
California Flannel undershirts
that we will close out at the
very low price of
75c EACH.
They are goods that have sold
for 31,25 and S150 each
"all over town," but
WE WANT to CLOSE OUT
the few we have on hand, and
shall do so at the very low
price of
75c EACH.
RIORDM
MERCANTILE
COMPANY.
C. B. TAPPAN,
Assistant Manager.
" v
fi
'. . j "
WORLD'S FAIR NOW.
'reparations Being Made for the
Great Exposition.
V Dedlcntlon Ilnll Mnnngers Ilulld-
IriB to bo Erectod I'lnoOeolog-
icnl Collection.
Tlio nine Grass League of Iowa, cm
bracing tho south western counties ol
tho state, has ileeiiled to construct n
"Ultio Grass Palace" at tho Exposition.
Tho Hon. W. C. 1'. Ureeklnsidgc, of
Kentucky, according to present plans,
will deliver tho oration dedicatory of
the Expositions buildings, on October
12, 1892.
Tho ftno geological collection made
by the late Prof. Wortheu, State Geol
ogist of Illinois, will form part of tho
Illinois exhibit at the Exposition. The
State World's Fair Hoard has purchased
it fot $8,000.
The United States Potter's Associa
tion lias applied for 31,000 square feet
iu the Manufactures building, and an
nounces its intention of making an ex
hibit that will not be surpassed by an
showing made by tho famed potteries
of Europe.
The colossal statue of tho Kepublie
which will stand on a pedestal rNing
from the basin iu front ol tho Admin
istration building, Is bolng modeled in
Paris by Daniel C. French, the New
York sculptor. It will bo tt female
figure seventy-five feet high.
The London Poljtcchnio Institute
expects that its pl.t us for bringing aiti
niamii! others of limited means to the
Exposition will result iu enabling 1,600
or 2,000 such persons to visit Chicago
at tt total expense of something like
$ 125 or $180 each for tho round trip.
Tho Chemical National Hank of Chi
cago has been grautcd tho pri ilego of
establishing and operating a bank on
tho Exposition grounds. It vtill afford
to exhibitors and visitors all the conve
niences and safeguaids of a metropoli
tan bank, including safety deposit
vaults.
Tlie Columbian Navigation Company
has been incorporated with a capital of
$500,000 for tho purpose of running
steam boats to Jackson Paik during
the Exposition, for tho accommodation
ofIdtors. It is belioted that many
thou sands of visitors will prefer the
lake i mite in reaching tho Exposition.
Tho Lord Mayor of London, it is an
nounced, will form a committee to
raise tho sum necessary to send to tho
Exposition a selected number of reprc
sentativo working, nicu from London,
with a view of their making reports on
tho industrial exhibits there. Similar
action was taken iu caso of the last
two Paris Expositions.
Indiana's building tit tlio Exposition
will be French gothlo iustxle, and con
structed entirely of Iudiaua material.
It will measure 100x170 feet, ami In
reality will bo a $100,000 structure,
though, on the' account of tho donation
of a largo part of the material entering
into its construction, its cash cost will
be only about $30,000.
A collective exhibit of sanitary ap
pliances and methods of sanitations,
and of all that pertains closely to them
is to bo made at the Exposition. Tho
various state and municipal boards of
health will work in conjunction to that
end, numerous representatives of those
organizations having so decided at a
recent convention iu Chicago.
Secretary Dickinson estimates that
$125,000 will bo necessary for the ex
penses of the National Commission for
year ending Juno 30, 1893, divided as
follow: Two meetings of tho Com
mission, $30,000; salaries, $50,000;
rent, $5,000; board of control and com
mittees, $10,000; stationery, printing,
etc., $10,000; expenses connected with
admission of foreign exhibits, $20,000,
It is the intention to liayo ono room
in E'elawaro'sExpositioji building fitted
up in colonial style, with hangings,
pictures an 1 furniture of that pciiod.
Among tho exhibits in this room it is
proposed to show jnodols of tlirto cele
brated colonial churches the "Old
Swedes' Church" iu Wilmington found
ed in 1C99; 15a watt's Chapel near Fred
erica, which was founded in 1780, and
where, in November, 1781, Rev. Dr.
Thomas Coke, Francis Asbury, after
wards liist Methodist bishop in Ameri
ca, met with several others and planned
tho organization of the Methodist
church in this country; and Christ
Church, Broad Creek.
A grand dedication ball, probably Iu
the Auditorium, on tho night of Octo
ber 13, 1892, will conclude the exer
cises dedicatory of the Exposition build
ings. Many representative? of foreign
countries aro expected to be present,
and the event l be, to tm extent,
international in character. Tho com
mittee on ceremonies has selected tho
following patronesses and managers:
I'ulrouesvc Mrs. Potter Palmer,
.ihs. licurgu L. Duuiap, Airs. George
M. Pullman, Mrs. Nelson A. Miles,
Mrs. W. W. Kimball, Mis. A. C. Mc
Clitrg, Mrs. Heaton OwsIe, Mr, Ar
thur C'aton, Mrs. Emmons Hlaine,. Mrs.
William Armour, Mrs. Hobait C. Tay
lor, ami Mrs. Kobcit W. Patterson, Jr.
Managers Mr. N. K. Fail-bank, Mr.
Mr. Marshall Field, Mr. Norman Wil
liams, Mr. Franklin McVeagh, Mr.
Lambert Tree, Mr. Hobait C. Taj lor,
Mr. T. Harvey Bradley, Mr. F. M.
Wlntehouse, Mr. Huntington W. Jack
son, Mr. A. C. Hoiiore, Mr. Aithtir
Itycrson and Mr. George Armour.
Tliu National Association of Woolen
Mauufactureis has decided to make a
united exhibit at-tho Fair.
Japan has" appropriated $035,705 fol
ds representation at tho Exposition. A
splendid Japanese exhibit is assured.
The Thomson-Huston Electric Com
panies aro planning to make a united
exhibit at an expense of $500,000. They
want to occupy 20,000 square feet of
"Page.
Nearly $1,100,000 of insurance is
now carried on tho Exposition build
ngs and electric plant. Tho amount
will bo increased from linio to tinio as
the construction proceed'.
On the three evenings during the ex
ercises dedicatory of tlio Exposition
buildings, October 11, 12 and 18, fire-
oi ks to tho value of $25,000 w ill be
displayed, The contract has ahead
been let.
Tho Chamber of Commerce at Salt
Lake City, Utah, and the National
Commissioners and lady managers of
the territory hae circulated a petition
asking that the legislature appropriate
$100,000 in aid of an exhibit at the
World's Fair.
A project has been inaugurated to
have an international rifle shoot at Chi
cago at some lime while the Exposition
is in progress. It is proposed that
picked teams from tho U. S. Army and
natioual guard compete witli teams
from other nations.
Chew Yu Ling, representing com
mercial parties in China, has arranged
to conduct a tea p.i iliou on Midway
Plaisance, and has applied for 1,000
square feet of space iu the Manufact
ures building iu which to exhibit Chi
nese silks, embroideries, etc.
Water for the exposition grounds
will bo supplied fiom two pumping
stations liming a combined capacity of
G 1,000,000 gallons a day. The largest
of the two has a capacity of -10,000,000
and constitutes the exhibit of the Wor
thiugtou Pump Company, which puts
in tho entire plant, costing $250,000,
ftee of expense to the Exposition.
Tho Wisconsin World's Fair Board
has issued a circular to the farmers of
Wisconsin asking them to exhibit the
very best products of their farms at
the county fairs and State fair of this
J car, as the exhibit lor tlio Worlds
Fair will be selected to a considerable
extent from the cereals and other farm
products which are awarded premiums
at those fairs.
Visitors to the Exposition can, if they
choose, drink Waukesha water on the
Fair grounds at one cent a glass. A
conip.iuy owning one of tho peincip.il
springs at Waukesha has been awarded
the contract for furnishing tho water,
which will be piped from that place to
Chicago, about 100 miles, and be
served at 300 places on the Fair
grounds. Plenty of Lake Michigan
wa'er will bo obtainable free, of course.
The World's Fair Board for Kansas
is promoting a plan wheieby it is ex
pected that tho expense of erecting the
Exposition building for that State will
bo borno by school pupils. Tho propo
sition is to have all the schools in the
State observe a "Woild's Fair Day,"
by holding all enteitainmcut with mu
sic, recitation'', tableaux-, etc., to which
a small entrance feo will be charged.
The proceeds arc expected to be sufil
cient to pay for tho state building.
Over tho main entrance of the struct
ure it Is proposed to hae tho words:
"Erected by tho School Children of
Kansas."
The ceremonies attending the dedi
cation of tho Exposition buildings, Oc
tober 11, 12 and 13, 1893, aietobo
very elaborate ami impressive, me
committco Inning tho matter in hand
will dooto $300,000 to that purpose.
It is expected that tho President of tho
United States and his Cabinet, many
of the Senators and Congressmen and
Governors of the States, numerous reji
rescutatives of foreign governments,
and 10,000 militia and several thousand
regulars will bo present. A dedication
ode and inarches, written for the -occasion
will bo rendered with full choral
and orchestral accompaniment. Pati i
otic and other music, a dedicatory ora
tion, u pageant of symbolical floats
representing tlio "Procession of the
centuries," and magnificent displays of , broad sympathies, lias fillo-1, this posi
h'roworks will bo among tho chief fca-.tiou in a way to attract the attcutlou
Hires of the programme. I not only of this country, but of loading
MlilLESi HUSBANDS.
They Lot Thoir Partnora In Life
Do The Work.
The Wife ituns the Itnnch, While
tho Husband "sxvnvts Lies" nt
home Convenient Grocery.
In these dajs when woman's sphere
is a rapily growing one; when her claim
to the right of voting has iu pait been
conceded: when she is an actit e pai tie
ipant in preparing for tho greatest ex
hibit the woild has ever seen, and has
shown herself capable of success iu
man vocations from which she was
barred for centuries; when sho is prac
ticing law and preaching tho gospel,
healing the sick and nursing the atllct
ed, the boast of A. C. Couitney, a res
ident of Clay county, Mo., comes to us
like the dim inenion of a departed
age.
This gentleman says in nn exultant
and ever exuberant way that his wife
has spun more thread, wo en more
cloth, dropped more corn, piled more
hazel brush and burned it, bound more
sheaves of grain, loaded more wagons
with the same, done more chores, seat
ed more babies on a boaul while out at
woik, and at the same time kept the
household machinery lu active opera
tion than any other woman on earth.
No one is as xet leported as baring
taken up the gage thus thiowu down,
and it is not to be expected that many
will accept the bold challenge; but Mr.
Courtney's statements are of a nature
to inspire widespread curiosity. It
must be conceded that his wife Is a
paragon, lint what was Couitney doing
nil the time? If she cleared away the
obstructing brush, tilled the soil, bar
tested the crops, made the cloth and
shaped it for the family wardrobe, at
the same time looking after her usually
accepted duties, how was the husband
putting in his time? It is not in evi
dence that he did so much as looking
after tho row of babies, for the good
wife had them perched on a board un
der her own w atchf til e e. Was Court
ney simply boss of tho job or was he
down at the corner grocery spitting
tobacco juice, drinking "moonshine,"
spinning ) arus ami occasionally throw
ing out a complimentary, notice of the
wonderful prowess shown by his better
half? It w ould be well to hear w hat
she has to say about Mr. Courtney.
But giivtcr thoughts arc suggested
than those first adduced by hearing
from the Clay county boaster. In
every city and etery community aie to
be found the faithful, patient, loug
stilToring women, who toil without
ceasing to support themselves, their
imfoitunatc offspring and their worth
less husbands. Detroit is a favored
city in this respect, jet a lifting of the
vail would show mail' such a sad pict
ure as wo have painted. Hard won
earnings are often seized upon for
drink, brutality is the return for undy
ing love and au existence of unbroken
suffering; mothers work wearily on till
kindly death relieves them; children
weep, feel that the brand of disgrace
is their heritage, and arc too often
driven to wickedness and crime.
Homes are ruined, bright Jiopes arc
wrecked, the beautiful visions of the
bride are lost in the hideous, heart
breaking, life-crushing realities of af
ter x cars, and the poor victims mourn
unceasingly through the deepening
shadows that tell of approaching eman
cipation. Woman's love passeth all
understanding.
Men may fail iu honest endeavors.
They may fall far shot t of the ambi
tions that inspired their youth. They
may have their shoitcomiugs and make
tho disastrous mistakes which at times
bring poverty as the result of the
brightest prospects, but if their love
be loyal, if they boldly confront adver
sity and do what within them lies for
home and w ife and little ones, her hap
piness is at least assured and his honor
is abovo the reproach of meu. Would
that the world could be delivered of
w orthless liusbauds. Free Press.
3Ir. Hoxvell's Xoxv XVorlc.
The announcement that Mr. Howells
w ill leave Harper's Magazi ne, to take
editorial charge of tho Cosmopolitan,
on March 1st, calls attention to tho
process of building- up tho staff of a
great magazine. Probably iu no
monthly has the evolution been so dis
tinctly under the eyes of tho public as
iu the caso of tho Cosmopolitan. The
first step after its editorial control was
assumed by Mr. John Bris'ben Walker,
was to arid to it Edward Everett Hale,
' tt'lirt ffiiL" rtlinwrn rf n ilnixn titintif nnllnjl
M JV fcV'n, ,uuijjV U4 t tivitituivuivaiitvi
"Social Problems," subjects concern
ing which the greatest number of peo
ple aro thinking to-day. Mr. Hale,
who js a student, a fair minded man,
a thorough American anil a man of
European journals. Sonic mouths la
ter, a department was established call
ed "The Review of Current Events."
To take charge of this, a man was
needed who should bo familiaruot only
with the great events of the past thirty
jc.irs, but who knew personally the
leading men of both the United States
and Europe who could interpret motives
and policies. Murat Halstead accepted
this position with the distinct timier
stauding that his monthly review
should be philosophical and never par
tisan. The next step in the history of
the Cosmopolitan, was the placing of
the review of the intellectual move
ment of tho month in the hands of Mr.
Brander Mathews, who for sometime
has been recognized as one of the two
or thrco ablest critics in the United
States.
Finally came the acceptance of the
editorship conjointly with Mr. Walker,
by Mr. Win. Dean Howells. Mr. How
ells, who is recogni7eil universally as
the foremost American of letters, upon
the expiration of his contract with Har
per Brothers, on the first of March
will take in haud thedestiuicsof a mag
azine w Inch promises to exercise a share
of influence with the reading classes of
the United States. His entire services
will be given to the Cosmopolitan, and
everything he writes will appear inthat
magazine during the continuance of
his editorship.
Arizona And Statehood.
The admission of Arizona into the
charmed circle of statehood seems still
to be a somewhat remote contingency,
notwitlistauding the "single-handed
fight" of its delegate in Congress and
the presentation of several bills looking
to that end. The conditions imposed
upon this favor for such it is regard
ed not only require the mental, moral
and physical ability to maintain (.elf
government, but its future political
status must bo clearly aud unmistaka
bly defined. The certainty of demo
cratic domination is a fatal defect in
the estimation of a republican senato
and president, w bile the elimination of
that ceitaiuty is regarded as a lack of
qualification by a democratic house.
As a bone of partisan contention, there
fore, the remaining territories seem
doomed to suffer ct awhile, and their
unfortunate position is an unjust denial
of the common rights of -ery many
American citizens. It is really a grave
error that congress has, not fixed cer
tain rigid and inflexible conditions as
a standard for the admission of Terri
tories to statehood, the attainment of
which would require but a formal re
cognition by the government to start
its automomical machinery iu motion,
regardless of pal tisau interests. Ari
zona is fully capablo of self govcrment
and its people have expressed them
selves satisfied with tho organic prin
ciples they have formulated; it con
forms to all the requirements of tho
national constitution aud what more
can be asked? Arizona Enterprise.
A La aiodc.
Pretty enameled jewelry is made to
imitate rosettes and bows of ribbon.
Plaids and checks are very large at
present, and various colors are blended
together to give a gay effect.
The newest cut of skirts is either the
umbrella shape or the make with a
crossway seam down the center of tho
front.
Trimmed silk blouses for evening
wear arc very popular, also low necked
ones iu pale shades of surah or benga
line, trimmed with chiffon to match;
these aro adapted to wear w ith any
skiit.
Bonnets made of tweed, Bedford
cord, cheviot, cloth or any other wool
fabric matchiug the tailor costume aro
still iu high favor with stylish women
both here aud abroad.
A new idea iu jewelry is embodied
In a bangle suspended from the wrist
by a fine gold chain. The latter is '
fastened to the wrist by a slip knot.
Tho bangle is generally a largo peail
or other stono elaborately set.
A "Columbian Catholic Congress"
will be held at Chicago at tho time of
the Exposition, beginning, as now
planned, on September 5th, aud con
tinuing fivo days. It is expected that-
fully 5,000 delegates from dloccsesiii-'
the United States alone willbe present,
and that tho number from European
countries will be very largo ami will in
clude many noted dignitaries of the
church. It is hoped that Pope Leo
XIII himself, xvill accept an invitation
to be present, and to open the" Con
gress. It is believed that the gather
ing will bo tho greatest axd most rep
resentative in tho history of the church.
Tho progress and standing of tho Cath
olic church in America and throughout
tho world, and tho social aud economic "
questions embraced iu tho Popo's recent
cucj-clical will be presented aud dis-piird.
skA
?X
i
JfoiLftiw 'infc .Jmt
:.j?
!
-'"'--uritwMpiaw-w' '
Uhrrt1.t
MttftlKNlMhftL. "

xml | txt