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The Coconino sun [microform]. (Flagstaff, Ariz.) 1898-197?, December 02, 1905, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062055/1905-12-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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dbe Coconino Sun
Vol. XXII.
FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA, DECEMBER 2, 1905.
No. 48
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MEMORIAL SERVICES
The Elks Will Hold Their Annual Ser
vice Tomorrow Afternoon at
McMillan Hall.
Flagstaff lodge No. 99, 13. P.
O. E., will observe their annual
Memorial which occurs on the
first Sunday in each December.
Tomorrow being the first Sunday,
services will be held in McMillan
(Shall at 2:30 o'clock p. m.
The following program has been
arranged for the occasion:
- Prelude, a "Oh Fair Dove, Oh
Fond Dove," b Grand March, H.
Walters; Messrs. Barnes and
Ehrke.
Ritual Work, Members.
Quartette, "Angel of Peace,"
Misses Bury and Perkins, and
Messrs. Blair and Raines.
Ritual Work, Members.
Opening Ode, Members.
Prayer, Chaplain Breen.
Solo, "The Vision of Heaven,"
William Leander Sheetz; Miss
Lola O'Brien.
Address, Keese M. Ling, of
'""'Prescott lodge No. 330..
; t : Jv, II ...Fi I TM.-I... f -
-Eulogy, JamesIi. Bvrues. '
Quartette, "Sleep Thy Last
Sleep," Messrs. Blair, Raines,
Moyer and Amundsen.
Address, Edward M. Doc.
Intermezzo, from Cavalleria
Rusticana, Messrs. Barnes and
Ehrke.
CLOSING CEREMONIES.
Ritual Work, Members.
Doxology, Members and Audi
ence. Benediction, Rev. F. G. Reid.
The public is invited to attend
the. memorial services tomorrow.
Gone to Rest.
Miss Stella 1. Hanna, who had
been sick for several weeks, passed
away Sunday night. She was
afflicted with lung trouble, and
came here over a year ago to try
this climate. The first few months
she grew better but the past two
months marked a decided change
for the worse. The deceased bore
her suffering patiently and never
realized before her spirit departed
that the Death Angel was so near.
She was barn and reared in
Washington county, Arkansas, and
was nineteen years of age the 17th
of last March. Deceased was a
member of the Christian church.
The near relatives left to mourn
her death are a brother and sister
here, Everette Hanna and Mrs."
DeElmer Jones, and a father and
brother in Askansas.
The remains were laid to rest
Monday afternoon in the cemetery
south of town. Gem.
New Mexico's New Governor.
President Roosevelt has ap
pointed Herbert J. Hagerman, of
Roswell, governorof New Mexico,
I at the expiration of the term of
Governor Otero, whose term ex
pires in anuary next. The ap
pointment is satisfactory to New
Mexicans. He is not connected
with any of the factions which
have disturbed the politics of New
Mexico.
Herbert J. Hagerman was born
December 15, 1871, at Milwaukee,
the son of J. J. Hagerman, vho
was president of the Milwaukee
Iron company. He went to
Europe when ten years of age,
and there the foundation for his
education was laid. He graduated
from Cornell in 1894, subsequently
taking a law course at the same
university. He practiced law in
Colorado from 1896 to 1898, when
he was appointed by President
McKinley second secretar' of the
United States embassy at St.
Petersburg, under Ethan Allen
Hitchcock. Before leaving Russia,
Hagermafliwas. decoratedHiy the
czsuywith theFder'bflSttA"nne.
HetcamettoNeW'Mexicowinwtoory1
and ha'- rsuisted his father in the
management of the South Spring
Ranch and Cattle company and
the Felix Irrigation company and
numerous other immense interests.
He was a member of the board of
managers of the St. Louis exposi
tion for the New Mexico exhibit.
He was alternate from New Mex
ico to tne last republican national
convention. He is a student,
writer, deep thinker and convinc
ing public speaker. He is a man
of high ideals and of clean moral
character and a gentleman. He
takes a strong stand for civic
righteousness and the upbuilding
of public morals. It is claimed
that he will be the Folk of New
Mexico and that he will clean out
the "old factional gangs at Santa
Fe.
Skaggs Acquitted.
The trial of the case of the Ter
ritory vs. John Skaggs, charged
with the murder of William Clark,
on Beaver creek, occupied the
time of the district court Wednes
day. The case was given to the
jury a few minutes before 6 p. m.
After beinc out two and one-half
hours, the jury came into court
with a verdict ol not guilty. The
prisoner seemed to irrow about ten
years"ypunger in a few seconds, as
the verdict was announced, and,
as he walked out a free man, sev
eral of HlS friends stennerl nn.
shook his hand and congratulated
mm. He was defended by foe
Morrison and-R. M. Limr. Tho
defense was that Skaggs fired the
tatal shot to save his own life.
Courier. - '
CRAZING FEE NOT FIXED
The Question to be Acted en Next
Week. Leasing Pasture Land.
320 Acres If Needed.
Forest Supervisor Breen has
been recently advised that the ar
ticle on grazing, first published in
Colorado and reprinted in the local
papers, to the effect that the price
for grazing cattle and horses on
forest reserves had been reduced
to 10 cents per head, and that all
settlers would be allowed to graze
one hundred head of cattle and
horses free, was unauthorized, and
no such ruling has been made.
The question of price and other
matter pertaining to it, is now un
der consideration, and no definite
action will be taken until Decem
ber 10. The price eventually set
tled upon will be a reasonable one,
and the stockmen will have little
reason for complaint.
In the matter of leasing pasture
lands a more liberal policy will be
pursued than was at first contem
plated. While the limit of 320
acres still stands, lands will be
leased to settlers living within or
on,ihe,J?Qrderf.atreserye,Jo,i?iveJ
mem exclusive use ox adjoining
pasture, during a portion of the
year, when needed for protection
against outside stock grazed on
the reserve.
While the area is limited to 320
acres, it is not intended that the
full acreage will be allowed unless
really needed. This ruling is made
for the benefit of settlers, who need
some means of saving a portion of
the range adjacent to their homes,
for fall or winter pasture.
FAIR POSTPONED
Rain
and Snow Cause the Territorial
Fair to be Put Off UirtH
December 25-30.
The management have an
nounced the postponement of the
First Annual Territorial fair to the
week of December 25-30, inclusive,
This has become necessary on
account of the heavy rains that
have delayed the work of final ar
rangements and have caused floods
in the Salt and Gila rivers.
The Santa Fe bridge at Tempe
has been carried out and the prob'
abilities are that the other lines ol
railroad wiil be very seriously af
fected by the flood waters and tc
such an extent as to make it ques
tionable about the attendance. In
view of such uncertainty it has
been thought best to make this
postponement.
Santa Fe Wreck.
A wreck occurred in the east
end of the Santa Fe railroad yards,
here, about 5:30 o'clock Wednes
day morning. An east bound
freight train was on the south sid
ing and one of the engines was
doing switching and had left the
east switch open. The west bound
limited, which was over eight
hours late, and not yet expected,
came in and ran into the" opea
switch of the siding and collided j
with the freight engine. The lim
ited engine, No. 125, was thrown
from the track down a twenty-foot
embankment, and rested on her
side. The freight engine, aside
from losing her headlight and
pilot, was but little damaged. The
limited had a number of cars dam
aged. Engineer Clark, of the
limited, had his leg broken, being
the only one on the train severely
injured.
r
Passenger trains have, on ac
count of the storm, been late this
week.
December Weather In Flagstaff
The following data for the month
of December have, been compiled
from the weather bureau records at
Flagstaff, Ariz., and cover the
period from 1898, to 1904, conclu- e
siye. They are, issued to show the .
conditions "that have prevailed,
during the month in question, for
the above period of years, but
must not be construed as a fore
cast of the weather conditions for
the coming month.
The mean or normal tempera
ture of December is 3: degrees.
The warmest December was that
of 1902, with an average of 48 de
grees, and the coldest, that of
1898, with an average of 24 de
grees. The highest temperature
was 65 degrees, on the 18th, 1901,
and the lowest, 12 degrees below
zero, on the 15th, 1502. The
average number of days with mini
mum temperature below 32 degrees
is 31, and the average number
with maximum temperature below
32 degrees is 4.
The average precipitation for '
December, rain and melted snow,
is 1.95 inches, and the average
number ofdays with .02 of an
inch or more, 4. The greatest De
cember precipitation was 1.74
inches, in 1902, and the least, .oi
inch, in 1000. The greatest
amount of precipitation recorded
in. any 24 'consecutive hours was
.90 inch, on the I2-I3th, 1902.
The average snowfall is 5.6
inches. The greatest amount of
snowfall recorded in an 24 con
secutive hours was io.4 inches, on
the i7-i8th, 1899.
The average number of clear
days, is 18; partly cloudy days, 7;
and cloudy days, 6. The prevail
ing winds have been from the east.
A. E. Hackett,
Officlan in Charge Local Office.
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