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The Coconino sun [microform]. (Flagstaff, Ariz.) 1898-197?, September 22, 1922, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062055/1922-09-22/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE COCONINO SUN
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1922
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Dress Better Get a Clothcraf t
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Suit for Fall
$23.00 to $30.00
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Style Departures Win Your Approval
Our fall stocks of smart Frocks, Coats and Suits have just ar
rived and are ready for your review.
The vogues of the season are unusually charming and chic and
these interpretations are decidedly fascinating.
There are numerous style departures in cut, drape, fabric and
trimming that we are certain will win your approval !
Silk Frocks, $13.85 to $29.50
Wool Frocks, $6.75 to $30.00
See display windows Nos. 5, 6 and 7.
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Individual Interpretations Mark Fall Millinery!
They are smart and modish to be sure, but they
have that individuality that the fastidious woman
appreciates and demands.
The new fall models are ready for your inspection
$4.50 to $15.00
Good Clothes like
these are inexpensive
because they wear long
make you look bet- iff
J ty
ter, feel better and
save you money.
Come in and let us show
you the new fall styles.
Tou'll like 'em.
$272
will buy a new fall
v.
Clothcraft
Overcoat
We have just received
our new lall stock and call
your, attention to our dis
play in windows 3 and 4.
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BABBITT BROS. TRADING CO. i B
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DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT
Phone 172.
NO TRACE YET OF UTAH
MAN LOST ON WAY HOME;
SHERIFF THINKS HIM DEAD
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Sheriff Billy Campbell believes that
'fanner, the thirty-year-old former
soldier who disappeared in the unset
tled country northeast of Dead Man's
Hat, two weeks ago, is dead.
Campbell, Deputy Sheriff Billy
Itudd, Walter J. Stevenson and an In
dian trailer from Cameron, hunted
-out in that country nearly all of last
week until Saturday night, but could
-get no clew to the whereabouts of the
man. Campbell is still hunting.
Tanner came on his horse from Es
calante, Utah, where his home is,
about three weeks ago, crossing the
Colorado river at Lees Ferry. He
worked for Young at Cameron for a
couple of days. He said he had been
in two of the biggest battles of the
lost war, but could not tell what regi
ment he was with nor names of the
ships he went over and back on. Then
he came on to Doney Park and work
ed for a short time for F. W. McClure,
then for Claude Knight. The man's
carelessness around the barn with cig
aiettes scared Knight, who decided
he'd better be examined to see wheth
er he was insane. But Tanner refus
ed to see a doctor and left the Knight
ranch to ride back to Utah.
Deputy Itudd met Tanner a few
minutes afterward. He talked sanely
and said he would have no trouble
getting back home. Then, about four
days later, his horse showed up at
the Simpson ranch, Dead Man's Flat,
without a rider. There was blood on
the saddle horn, which Dr. Felix Man
ning says is human blood.
The officers found a tree near Az
tec Tank, on the old Tuba City road,
where the horse had been tied with
the reins for some time, then had bro
ken loose and gone back to Dead
Man's Flat. But they could find no
trace of the rider. There had been a
storm during the time the horse was
tied to the tree, which washed away
the man's tracks.
Tanner was a large, full-blooded,
smooth-fneed man, sandy complexion
ed, and wore blue bib overalls, blue
chambray shirt, big white hat, and
canvas rubber-soled shoes, He said
he was a nephew of Joe Tanner, for
merly pf Tuba City, now of Farming
ton, f. M., and that he himself was
winw. Tiawnr
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from less TEA
because its now
vacuum packed
JlsKyowr grocer
rOLGERS
Golden Gate
TEA.
born at Tuba City and lived there un
til he was five years old. He has
mony other relatives in this state.
Campbell believes the man must be
dead. He doubts there having been
any foul play. It may be that the
man, demented, tied the horse and
then wandered away and got lost, but
the more reasonable theory is that the
horse broke away from the tree where
he had tied it and left him afoot The
tremendous distances out there be
tween places where either water or
food can be obtained, makes it almast
certain that Tanner has been dead for
several days. In that case it may be
months or even years before his re
mains are found.
COLONEL LAMSON BELIEVES
SILENCE IS GOLDEN
Col. E. M. Lamson, president of the
Lamson Business College of Phoenix,
which has a renutation for thorough
ness second to no other institution of
the kind in the country, writes ine
Sun that he is glad to report "that
we have more inquiries about our
school from northern Arizona than
ever before." Then he hands us a
facetious compliment, as per:
"We do not suppose that running
an advertisement in The Coconino Sun
has anything to do with it, as people
simply advertise to support the pa
per; however, we think when our
present course runs out, we will im
mediately begin advertising with you
for the winter term which will open,
Monday, November Cth. We can then
say something in our advertisements
about the wonderful climate of the
Salt River Valley, a subject upon
which we are absolutely silent at the
present time."
ENTERTAINS AT JAIL
Miss Cloto Fauble of Phoenix, said
to be an authoress, accompanied by
her brother, on Monday visited Fred
Jamison, who holds his soirees at his
county jail salon, where he is still
waiting action of the supreme court
in the attempt of his attorney to save
him from serving the term at the
state penitentiary to which Judge
Jones sentenced him for fraud in con
nection with the sale of stock for the
Jate Pacific Co-operative- Lea'pie
stores. '
NEW FORDS AT BABBITT'S
ARE OF THE NEW TYPE
Many added conveniences and re
finements are to be seen in the Ford
enclosed cars now being displayed at
Babbitt Bros. Garage, Flagstaff.
The interior of both the coupe and
the sedan is finished in walnut brown
broadcloth, and the seats are uphol
stered with a similar material thread
ed with chalked ebony-stripe. Heavy
floor rugs give an added touch of
comfort. Lifts, of a special design,
minimize the effort of raising or low
ering the windows Door bumpers in
sure tighter fitting, and new door
grips, both inside and out, add con
venience. The demand for-Ford enclosed cars
has been unusually high during the
past two months. Although production
has been speeded up in the factory,
sales continue to exceed the output,
making it necessary for purchasers in
many parts of the country to wait for
their cars. Local dealers say this is
why they have been urging customer
to place their orders as early as possible.
Bluff travels only to the end of the
road.
LUC!
STRIKE
:iQAPETTI
it's toasted!
It's toasted. This
one extra process
gives a delightful
quality that can
not be duplicated
IF WE HAD THE ROCKS
WE HAVE THE ASPHALT
TO PAVE OUR STREETS
Charlie Thomas of The Sun staff
discovers a mine every few days. He
recently sold the one he had down
near Prescott and since then has been
putting In his bundays annexing a
few new ones.
A few weeks ago he staked claims
on a manganese, gold and silver mine
not far from Flagstaff. He claims it
contains all three of those things.
But a few days ago he found an
other mine not far from Dead Man's
Flat, on which he has filed location
and this time even the uninitiated can
see he's got something. It contains
potassium nitrate and asphalt At
least Charlie says it contains the first
named animal, and he proved it con
tained asphalt, for it looked like it,
smelled like it, and when heat was
applied, liquefied and proved to be
asphalt He says there's any quan
tity of it there and the next thing is
to break up the asphalt trust
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4.
'
Kendrick Park Doings
HARRY GRAY NOT RUNNING
Harry Grey of Bellemont came to
town Monday and handed. in his res
ignation to the county board of su
pervisors as candidate for county
clerk of court on the republican tic
ket Someone wrote Harry's name in,
which constituted nomination, and he
bowed up. Some of the others whose
names were handed in, if they do not
do likewise, will find themselves out
(in we current, without oars and
bound for the election breakers be
lyond all hope of rescue. The person
wnose name is written in the most
number of timAa fnr an nffiVn fnr
which the party has no name printed
ior nomination is nimseif nominated.
bo watch out.
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hastings and
children, Miss Clara Jungkind, Harry
Clayton and Albert Dillman returned
Saturday night from a camping trip
on the Indian reservation.
Mrs. Crist Hulls and son arrived
this week from Cooley, on a visit to
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. iFish,
at Kendrick Park.
An enjoyable dance was held at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Mc
Mahan. Dainty refreshments were
served at midnight
Jack Frost "was a visitor in Ken
drick Park last week.
o
Happiness is something that re
quires practice.
Try Sun Want Ads.
Frank Bennett
Coal and Wood
MILL BLOCKS AND SLABS
IDEAL CEMENT
Phone 3
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Pickens j
! will be in town a short time yet
! so get your mattresses fixed, s
First class work guaranteed. I
I Call at his workship back of I
Flagstaff garage. I
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