OCR Interpretation


The Coconino sun [microform]. (Flagstaff, Ariz.) 1898-197?, September 29, 1922, Image 9

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062055/1922-09-29/ed-1/seq-9/

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1922.
illtMlMIIMIIIItlllllllMlllllllltllMIMIIIIIIIMIinillMIIMIIilH
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jQlj3 I
X
WHY?
I Why let inexperienced men f
fool with your generator.
Economy and satisfactory I
motor action both demand high- f
i est skill. Bring in your genera- I
I tor troubles and they'll be I
I promptly solved.
I SamSweitzer
Phono 262 !
I 113 East Aspen Avenue,
Rear of Power Hat Shop j
I Flagstaff - - Arizona
H"" ' "".MM..,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
MRS. SPENCER DENIED
RIGHT TO SUE FORMER
HUSBANDFOR MILLION
Judge- Richard M. Lamson presided
in superior court here for three days
last week in a continuance of the
property-settlpment suit following the
divorce of Mr. and Mrs. Charles H.
Spencer.
Mrs. Spencer, who wanted to sue for
a million dollars, and who had been
awarded 20,000 when it should be
realized from the sale of certain prop
erty, appeared with her attomeys be
fore the judge to get the $20,000,
claiming that the recent transfer of
Mr. Spencer's interest in the Coconino
Water Development and Stock Co., to
the Arizona Cattle & Sheep Co., con
stituted a sale.
Mr. Spencer is represented by
Judge George H. Crosby of Flagstaff,
who with Colonel George D. Christy
of Phoenix, represents the last-named
corporation, George R. Darnell being
attorney for Mrs. Spencer. Both the
latter attorneys were in court
Judge Lamson ruled that Mrs.
Spencer could not sue for a million
dollars, because her judgment for
$20,000 was final; that she was not
entitled to attorney's fees, as she is
no longer Mr. Spencer's wife; but that
she is entitled to a hearing to deter
mine whether the transfer above al
luded to constitutes a sale and makes
it possible to at once collect the
$20,000 judgment.
WORK ON NEW HIGH
SCHOOL BEING RUSHED
THE COCONINO SUN
FREEMAN A RECENT
GUEST HERE, TO WRITE
OF COLORADO RIVER
Lewis R. Freeman, who accompan
ied the Colorado river party who were
guests here last week, was probably
the only one in the group who is not
an engineer, he being an author and
traveler of note. Some years ago he
took a 14,000 mile yachting cruise to
the Hawaiian Islands, the Marquesas,
Samoa, and other groups. This trip,
which was taken in the Lurline, is
generally conceded to have been the
most successful, from a yachtman'a
standpoint, of any of the South Sea
pleasure voyages. Among some of
the books written by Fieeman are "In
the Tracks of the Trades," "Down the
Columbia," and "Sea Hounds."
Although the traveler's home is in
Pasadena, he is seldom there. He has
ranged from Alaska to the Southern
Pacific, and from Argentine to Tibet
He has had exciting times in India
and Africa, and in almost every other
country of the world.
(Freeman accompanied the engineer
ing party to the Diamond Cieek proj
est, Boulder Canyon and Black Can
yon dam sites, and then will proceed
by boat to Needles, Visit Yuma and
the gulf, studying irrigation proj
ects and collecting material for sev
eral magazine articles on the recla
mation situation, and for a book on
the Colorado river, which will be pub
lished early next year.
Freeman says Carl Mayhew of
l' lagstr.fr is one of the cleverest pho
tographers ho ever knew and while
here made arrangements for Mayhew
to do a lot of magazine illustrative
work.
Page Nine
Good progress has been made on
the 'basement wall of the new high
school, and it will probably be com
pleted in three weeks. V. O. Walling
ford, the architect, of the firm of
Marsh & Wallingford, is overseeing
the work, and will be in Flagstaff un
til October 1, when he will go to Phoe
nix, where he is supervising the build
ing of the Arizona Deaconess hospi
tal. In a few weeks he expects to re
turn to Flagstaff. Ben Haddix is in
charge of the construction of the base
ment wall, which is Doing maue oi
gray laa rock.
MRS. WARNOCK, ACCOMPLISHED
MUSICIAN, WILL TEACH HERE
Mrs. Helen Schwarz Warnock, who
has been in Flagstaff since June, is
planning to give private lessons on
piano theory and music and wind in
struments. Mrs. Warnock is a grad
uate of the Combs Conservatory of
Music of Philadelphia, and was award
ed a teacher's and a supervisor's cer
tificate by that institution in 1919.
The Philadelphia conservatory is af
filiated with the University of Penn
sylvania. Mrs. Warnock taught for three
years in the New Mexico State School
for the Blind at Alamorgordo, where
she instructed Miss Marguerite Bran
en, the talented child, who is at the
present time giving saxophone solos
at Grauman's million dollar theatre
in Los Angeles. Mrs. WarnocK is a
June bride, the wife of Henderson
Warnock, of Babbitt's,
o
NEARBY TOWNS DOING
FINE BOY SCOUT WORK
Percy E. Warner, local scout execu
tive, recently returned from a trip to
Navajo and Apache counties, and
found the people there enthusiastic
for scouting. Williams organized a
troop on Thursday, with 24 members.
Holbrook organized two troops today,
with 25 members. One of these troops
will be made up of Mormon boys. To
morrow Snowflake will organize a
troop with 16 members. On October
6 Winslow will organize three troops,
with about 50 members. Warner will
start tomorrow for Winslow, where
he will put on a campaign for $1,000,
which he says will be raised easily.
St. Johns will start a campaign next
week for $300. Flagstaff took the
lead in raising the money subscribed
here, but is behind in furnishing lead
ers. A scout program can not be
successful without scout masters, and
the young men in Flagstaff, who are
21 years of age or older, nhould get
into the game and serve the commun
ity. o
' Give The Sun your Job Printing.
.7
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MnjB. TT,HEflavotofFolger'skAfca ""
H3BPB ) Gate Coffee is well worth
(KhH keepbg. That's why it is packed
ftoHfHHi for you in a vacuum tin.
B 'j0fr T? What's more, it is a flavor you
7H& F) will like "dififcrentinttsterrom
f Sw) other cofiee and better." The ex-
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MASONIC BUILDING
(Incorporated
371 DEPARTMENT STORES
FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA
f 4H AAA JgvWo.
Stylish Suits and Overcoats
Remarkable Values for Men and Young Men
ALL men and young men who are contemplating the
purchase of a new suit or overcoat will be keenly
interested in the remarkable values we are showing
at prices that assure such substantial savings.
J. C. Penney Co. Suits and. Overcoats
are made exclusively for us and sold only
in our 312 stores. They are carefully (tail
ored from selected woolens and modeled on
the best fitting, up-to-minute lines for
men and young men.
The styles we are showing are new and correct the
same as sold by us all this season styles that are worn
by well dressed men everywhere.
The opportunity is presented for you to come to
this store and effect substantial savings on the purchase
of one or more of these handsome new suits or overcoats.
We stand squarely behind our claim that there is the utmost for the dollar in our clothing, and an
nvesfcigation of the styles we present at the following popular prices will, we are sure, substantiate our claim.
IwH i, I
$19
.90
$24
.75
$27
.50
$34
.75
THE LARGEST CHAIN DEPARTMENT
STORE ORGANIZATION IN THE WORLD:
FIND BIG SETTLEMENT
IN THIS COUNTY THEY
DIDN'T KNOW EXISTED
A citizen of Massachusetts, who
thinks of his state as "big," if ho
lived out here for a while, would won
der how he ever got that way. When
it got fixed in his head that Coconino
county would comfortably hold his
state with a couple of other New
England states thrown in, and Rhode
Island, besides, to chink up a spare
corner, he'd beirin to realize Massa
chusetts is a mighty small part of the
universe.
The immensity of Coconino county
hit Undersheriff S. O. Thompson and
Ueputy Sheriff JJHly Kudd in the im
pression center behind their eyes the
other day when they were down south
east of Flagstaff, trailing A. L. Par
ker, the horse-thief. They were.forty
miles south and slightly east of Wins-
low, and supposed they were in Nava
jo county. They were breaking camp
in the morning and wondered how
they were going to get something to
eat. Then they saw a ranch house
and a lot of horses in a pasture. Driv
ing up, they asked the woman of the
house what county she was in. At
first they thought she was mistaken
when she said Coconino county. They
got breakfast and on looking and
inquiring around found a prosperous
settlement that neither knew existed.
More than thirty adults and about
fifteen children of school age. Splen
did growth of sugar cane, beans, corn
and other crops. No school-house or
store. Not even a voting place. The
only way they could vote would be to
come through Winslow to Bly Rang
er station or Canyon Diablo, at least
70 miles each way. Naturally, they
had no idga of voting.
T. L. Haught, relative of Dad
Haught of Payson, is one of the
ranchers there. He is coming in here
next week to meet and form one of
the party with Zane Frey, the famous
novelist, who will arrive here on the
28th to outfit for another bear-hunting,
trip in the Tonto Basin. Another
of the ranchers was an old school
mate of Rudd's.
The settlement is in the north edge
of the Sitgreavcs forest, southeast of
Chavez Pass, near Chevelon Butte, in
the southeastern part of. this county
and between Chevelon and Clear
Creek Canyons. It's the situation be
tween these canyons that makes the
trip to Bly ranger station, the nearest
polling place in this county, so long.
They have to go around the canyon
to get there, and so must go north to
Winslow and then south again to Bly.
0
HOW COME, JUDGE?..
GAME SHORTAGE IN
LONG VALLEY REGION
E. G. Miller of the forest service,
was at Barney Pasture last week on
a regular inspection trip. That lo
cality was formerly one of the best
hunting regions in the country, but
game is scarce there now. Forest
service men have been impressed
more this year than ever concerning
the growing scarcity of deer in the
Long Valley country. Only a couple
of years ago a man taking the same
trip would probably see from 10 to 15
deer or more. This shows that the
slaughtering of does and fauns is
leading toward the extermination of
deer in this part of Arizona. Mr.
Miller says a sentiment must be cre
ated against shooting out of season.
EPIDEMIC AT PENNEY'S
DEMOCRATS FILL
COUNTT BALLOT
Ray Simpson, manager of the J. C.
Penney store, says he'll have to nut
in a jewelry department First, Hor
ace Nay. of the staff, went and
bought a big diamond for a fortunate
young Wisconsin girl who was here
visiting and after whom Horace is
gointr before long. Then last week,
up bobs Miss Laura Paris, the cash
ier, wearing a gorgeous diamond on
the correct finger, and Miss Helen
Branch, with a million dollar blinder
on her spoken-for digit Our society
editor will please take notice.
The democratic county central com
mittee met in one of the Babbitt of
fices Saturday night and organized,
electing P. J. Moran chairman and T.
E. Pulliam secretary-treasurer and
the following members of the state
central committee: P. J. Moran, ex
officio; T. E. Pulliam, John Hennessy,
Ed McGonigle, Ben Sweetwood, W. P.
Phifer, James Lane. Mr. Pulliam at
tended the state meeting in Phoenix
Monday.
To fill vacancies on the democratic
ticket for county offices, Mrs. S. S.
Acker was nominated for school su
perintendent, George W. Copeland of
Doney Park for member of the state
assembly and J. D. Dunn for assessor.
COMING SOON
Dr. Schell, the well-known opto
metrist and optician of Tucson, will
be at the Commercial Hotel on his
regular visit on Tuesday and Wednes
day, October 10 and 11, and will re
main for two days only. If your eyes
need attention, call on him for expert
service. Weak eyes, headaches, ner
vousness, etc, positively relieved by
glasses. Money back if not satisfied
in 30 days' trial. Special attention
to children's eyes. Numerous local
references. 9-29-2t
RtHmMMHMIIttMMIHIHMIMMIMMIMtMIMMtMltlMlllH1
For Sale, Ranch
Near Gsants, New Mexico, on
Santa Fe Ry., right along south
side of track, about 90 miles
from Albuquerque, consisting of
160 acres of deeded land and one
I section leased from the state, I
l and 390 acres leased lumber
I company land.
Deeded land is half in natural
hay meadow, other half excel
lent grazing with independent
water. State lease is at edge of
town and has irood natural hay
meadow with spring. Lumber :
Co. lease hps water with best
of grazing. Leases am assign
able. Forest reserve a few miles
from ranch. $3500 takes the
outfit Will consider part cash,
part time.
Write
J. W. Bush
tf
Dilkon, Arizona
PTwiHIIHHIimil.IHimmMIIHIMMIMIIIIIHHIIIIHMIMM..rH
Try Sul Want Ads.
Judge J. E. Jones is particular
about the company he keeps. That's
why he can't explain how it is that
the sheriff at San Bernardino, Calif.,
in reporting the recovery of a car
that had been stolen from that, place
and recovered at San Luis Obispo said
nothing had been found in it of a
personal nature except some 0$ the
judge's cards announcing his candi
dacy for renomination in the primar
ies. The Sun had this story last week
but didn't let it out then for fear the
judge would think it was adverse
campaign propaganda.
0
Give The Sun your Job Printing.
FOR ECONOMICAL TRANSPORTATION
.!
Pfirf&Sv ?
The Aivakening
ljij & l. trf AiK V, O.
Important changes in public sentiment are usually-slow in,
growth, but sudden in expression.
Success in any business depends on ability, to sense a change,
and adapt one's action to meet it.
For several -years the sentiment of automobile buyers has,
been shifting towards economical transportation.
The Chevrolet Motor Company has been fortunate in cor
rectly interpreting this sentiment and in supplying a line of' cars
in harmony with it.
Witness then, the sudden rise of Chevrolet from seventhxto,.
second place in sales.
How does this change affect you? ;
Are you with the tide of trade or against it? '
CARR0N MOTOR & IMPLEMENT CO:
FLAGSTAFF, ARIZ.

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