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The Coconino sun [microform]. (Flagstaff, Ariz.) 1898-197?, October 06, 1922, Image 1

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AM
VOLUME XXXIX
MURDERED
HUNTER,
MRS. CARL HUNGERFORD
SHOT BY KINGMAN MAN
JEALOUS OF HUSBAND
Mrs. Carl Hungerford was shot and instantly killed
by Arthur 'Wilcox of Kingman at Winslow Wednesday.
Immediately after killing Mrs. Hungerford Wilcox turn
ed the automatic .32 to his left breast and fired three
shots into himself. He may recover.
Mrs. Hungerford, it is alleged, wasf
temporarily estranged from her hus
band, and had been living in Kingman
for a short time. She had returned
to Winslow a few days before the
tragedy and was living with her hus
band. Wednesday Wilcox came to
Winslow and met Mrs. Hungerford at
the winslow hotel where she was
stopping with her husband. It is said
Wilcox had a few words with hei1, and
was ejected from the hotel. He inv
mediately went down the street, pur
chased a .32 automatic revolver and
returned to the hotel. Approaching
Mrs. Hungerford with but a word or
two, he grabbed and held her with his
left arm and shot her through the
left breast as she struggled to es
cape. She died almost instantly. The
ball passed through her body, wound
ing Wilcox in the left arm.
Wilcox is about 32 years of age.
Airs, liungertord was about 30 years
old.
The reason for the shooting has not
yet been made clear, though Wilcox
advised the authorities they would
discover the reason for the murder
when they examined letters and pa
pers in the grip he had brought with
him.
Mrs. J. T. Huncerford, owner of the
former McCormick rooming house at
316 West Railroad avenue, Flagstaff,
but who lives in Winslow, is the mother-in-law
of the dead woman. Mrs.
Hungerford's daughter, Miss Elsie
Hungerford is resident manager of the
rooming house.
Wednesday morning Miss Hunger
ford received a telegram from Carl,
her brother, telling of his wife's death
and a short time later she talked with
him over the phone, then took a train
to Winslow to be with him. It is re
ported that Carl was estranged from
some of his family, because of their
objections to his marriage with the
woman killed Wednesday.
THIS COUNTY GETS
PART OF R. R. BOND
MONEY THIS MONTH
George Erhardt, deputy state treas
urer, was here on Monday checking
up with Airs. Ana rrohmiller, county
treasurer, the various interest pay
ments made on our share of the coun
ty railroad bonds. The supreme court
recently ruled that the state must re
fund both principal and interest to the
four counties involved, the refund to
this county being $44,000 we paid on
the principal and $175,000 we have
paid in interest.
There had been a discrepancy of
$60 in the county's and the state's ac
counting of the interest payments
made by this- county, a detail which
was soon straightened out. Mr. Er
hardt when he left here still had a
check to make with the Yavapai coun
ty treasurer. Then, all the details at
tended to, it was felt the first pay
ment by the state to, the four coun
ies would likely be made by the fif
teenth of this month. The first re
fund to this county will be about
$45,000.
C B. Wilson of Flagstaff was the
attorney representing the iour coun
ties in the bond suit, which was
brought because the state treasurer
aid state auditor two years ago stood
a'gainst the counties' just claims. Gov
ernor Campbell and the present audi
tor and treasurer, Fairfield and Ear
hart, are, however, anxious to get the
matter settled and in accordance with
the court's ruling nnd are doing all
they can to facilititate prompt pay
ment. HUNT AND HAYDEN WILL
SPEAK IN FLAGSTAFF AT
C0URTH0US5.T0NIGHT
Here, just as Governor Tom Camp
bell and our next U. S. senator, Col
onel J. H. McClintock, get every FJag
staff vote, including the democratic
quota, all sewed up during the repub
lican rally at the Orpheum last night,
Tom Pulliam, Pat Moran end a few
other renegade democratic mischief
makers requisition the court house
and are going to set up former and
dearly-want-to-be-again Gov. G. W. P.
Hunt and Congressman Carl Hayden
"and otheri democratic aspirants for
state' ofjecs there tonight and let
them try tounglue some of the votes.
All right'for youl
TV
TAKEN
J. P. WILSON AND E. A.
HAIGHT OF A. C. BANK
ARE BOTH PROMOTED
At the regular monthly meeting of
the board of directors of The Ari
zona Central bank, held on Tuesday
of this week, two changes were made
in the executive force of this well
known financial institution. J. P.
Wilson, who had been cashier of the
bank since 1912, was promoted to the
position of vice-president, and Edward
A. Haight was elected cashier to fill
the vacancy caused by advancement
of Mr. Wilson.
Joe Wilson has been connected with
the Arizona Central bank for over 15
years, having entered its employ in
March, 1907, in a minor capacity, and
being elected to the position of cash
ier in 1912, succeeding C. 0. Robin
son, who died in the spring of that
year. Previous to that time he had
lived in Flagstaff for about four
years, during that period being em
(Continued on Page'Seven)
PHOENIX JOBBERS MEET
MARKETING ASSOCIATION;
HANDLE OURSPUDS ONLY
The wholesale produce men of Phoe
nix, represented by Messrs. Barker,
Melczer and Duncan of Phoenix, met
the Coconino Farm Bureau Marketing
association in Flagstaff on Wednes
day, and agreed to handle Coconino
county potatoes exclusively till our
crop is exhausted.
The association was represented by
President Johnson and Vice-President
Etter of Flagstaff and Secretary
Cureton of Williams, and Babbitt
Brothers Trading Co. by Dave O'Brien
of Flagstaff.
At the request of Mr. Barker a
number of independent shippers were
invited to the conference. The pota
to marketing problem was discussed
from many0 angles and opinions freely
expressed. After these discussions it
was agreed among the jobbers, the
association and Babbitt Bros. Trading
Co. that the two former will work in
accord in Phoenix, while the two lat
ter will do the same in Coconino coun
ty. The independent shippers were
given a chance to express themselves
and discuss freely the many problems
before the farmer in getting the most
money for his potatoes. Upon being
assured that they were going to get a
square deal in Phoenix and the same
in Flagstaff, the independent shippers
agreed to market their potatoes either
through the association or Babbitt
Brothers Trading Co.
It was conceded by all parties con
cerned that the centralization of mar
keting would reduce the cost of mar
keting, thereby giving the grower
more for his potatoes and reducing
the price to the consumer. The job
bers, the railroad, and the retailers
will each take their commission re
gardless of the price the producers
receive. Among the items upon which
a saving will be made are duplication
of railroad fares, hotel bills, telegrams
and telephone. The elimination of
the independent shipper will tend to
stop market flooding with its conse
quent unfavorable results. Then with
the two sources of supply in Coconino
county working harmoniously, there
will be no chance for' price cutting.
o
JOHN ZALAIIA NOW MANAGER
OF THE APACHE LUMBER CO.
John Zalaha, the well-known Apache
lumber man, has assumed the duties
of general manager of the Apache
Lumber company at Cooley. Former
Manager Shoufe left for Los Angeles
Wednesday. Mr. Zalaha has been
connected with the company for sev
eral years, occupying positions with
the company as well as with the
Apache Railway company. His many
friends in Navajo county will be pleas
ed to hear of his promotion to the
management of the lumber company.
Holbrook Tribune.
Mrs. C. E. De Vaney, at the pub
lic library, reports that on account of
the library board meeting next Sat
urday afternoon, the children's hour,
which was recently inaugurated for
Saturday afternoons, will not be held
this week. On the following Satur
day, however, the regular meeting will
c held.
FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA,
Ji ,
m m V W aB mm A
W U1V1 AN
FOR TURKEY, KILLED BY
SENATOR ASHURST IS
AGAINST GOVERNMENT
DEVELOPING COLORADO
U. S. Senator Henry Ashurst told
John M Clark, Wm. C. Rittenhousc
and a representative of The Sun on
Tuesday that he is opposed to the
government building a dam in the
Colorado river for hydro-electric de
velopment and that of the two sites
in controversy Glen Canyon, near
Ferry and the Boulder Canyon he
favors the former.
Senator and Mrs. Ashurst spent
Monday in Flagstaff and then went
on to other points included in a gen
eral swing around the circuit of the
various communities of the state in
the interest of his candidacy for re
election this fall.
Ashurst says he's opposed to the
government developing the Colorado
river, because he wants to see the
work completed during his lifetime.
He said that the best engineers in the
world are making investigations and
preparing data on which the develop
ment will be based. He several times
repeated that he is against govern
ment building of the dam.
CAMPBELL SHOWED HUNT
UP LAST NIGHT-OTHERS
UP FOR OFFICE TALKED
Governor Thomas E. Campbell at the Orpheum last
night refuted the wild charges of extravagance being
made against his administration by his political oppon
ent, G. W. P. Hunt; repeated the challenge that Hunt
dare not accept that the two tour (he state together and
from the same platfonns, compare their respective rec
ords of expenditure and resujtsj and asked for two more
years as governor that he may get administrative meth
ods fixed along lines that cannot be disturbed by Huntfor
Hunt-istic disciples should he
ter campaign dupe the voters
It was a masterly address, punct-
uated with telling sarcasm, trenchant
tacts, keen humor and actual figures
unanswerable except by distorted gen
eralities, irrefutable with thinkable
people except by misrepresentation.
Campbell proved by official records
that administrative expenses in this
state are now less than 4 per cent of
the total expenditures; public im
provements getting 28 per cent; the
schools 52 per cent, charities and
penal institutions 7 per cent, agricul
ture 6 per cent These latter, he
said, were expenses demanded by the
people of the state, who, if they want
to reduce them need only to require
their state legislatures to do so.
There was a large and representa
tive crowd present, attentive and in
terested throughout Dr. M. G.
Fronske, chairman of' the republican
central committee of this county, pre
sided and briefly introduced each of
the speakers.'
Colonel James H. McClintock, state
historian and candidate for the U. S.
senate, in a. pleasing talk, mentioned
his earlier experiences as horse-
BONDS FOR FLAGSTAFF -PARK
VOTED MONDAY
In spite of bitter and organized opposition, Flagstaff
on Monday voted to issue bonds to the amount of $60,000
for the purchase of the John Clark 160-acre ranch for city
recreation park and high school site.
The opposition was hard at work and until the middle
of the afternoon polled the heavier vote. Apparently ev
eryone opposed to the bond issue went to the polls and
voted without delay. Scores of those who want the park
had apparently forgotten that it was election day. Then
some of those favoring the bonds, seeing how things were
going, quietly passed, the word around that if the election
was not to be lost more progressives would have to vote.
And during the last two hours of the day more than a
third of the entire vote was cast the count that night
showing; 326 votes polled, 173 for and 153 against the
bonds. The vote of 153 against covered practically all
those who were,, against the project, while the 173 was a
small portion of those who
Flagstaff will become a better
place to visit, a more attractive place
to live in. and more progressive in
spite of those who want to hold, it
back. The result of the bond election
Monday was significant of the new
spi-jt of progress that at last ani
mates us. We are waking up, throw
ing off our let-bad-enough-alone,
please, - let - us - sleep, to - hell -with
- our - future attitude. Flagstaff
has taken a step forward.
First the paving, then the new high
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1922.
THEN
IF YOU DIDN'T GET
A DEER YOU'RE IN
SAME FIX AS OTHERS
There was no attempt made by The
Sun to Rather a list of those who
wandered off, afoot, acar and ahorse,
bunuay morning to celebrate the op
ening of the deer and turkey season.
Just take your telephone directory
and you'll have a partial list. For
the number who went, multiply the
names in the directory by four or
five.
The season opened more auspic
iously this year than last. That is, if
the word leaves you gasping there
were more deer and turkey brought
in on Sunday than on the first day
last year.
Dannie Campbell at first thought
his 300-lb. buck, which he had several
hours before noon, was the first shot
that day. But others later claimed
that distinction and Dannie had to be
content with the knowledge that his
was the biggest of the lot
Walter Lindblom reports that the
buck fever ho and Harold Lindblom
got along with their buck was worse
(Continued on Pago Eleven)
or one of them in some la
into electing him.
wrangler, captain of the Arizona
Rough Riders and commander of the
state national guard. He pledged ar
dent support of a protective tariff
for our state industries and of devel
opment of the Colorado river. He is
opposed to government development
of the river; believing it can best be
.accomplished by private enterprise in
Wilton wtu onti o mivicsio imiuuiu u
carefully safeguarded.
The other speakers were: Emma
M. Guild, candidate for congress; Er
nest R. Hall, secretary of state and
candidate for re-election; James A.
Smith, candidate for state auditor;
Jane Gregg, candidate for state
treasurer; W. J. Galbraith, state at
torney general and candidate for re
election; Elsie Toles, state superin
tendent of schcolsand candidate for
re-election.
These, addresses were brief, to the
pointeffective. It is s. unfortunate
that they cannot at least besummar
ized here, but giving even this" incom
plete account of the meeting has"de
layed our going to press, which must
be clone in time to catch the mails.
approved of it,
school, now 'the city recreation park.
In a short time we shall have begun
to realize on these investments in a
way that will make the reactionaries
among us wonder why we didn't do it
all Iong; before we did. And they'll
be the very fellows who will be the
first to point with pride to our faster
growth and greater popularity and
strut .around in sublime forgetfulness
of the fact that what was done was
agaiftst their utmost efforts.
(Continued on Page Seven)
SHOOTS SELF
ERICK ERLAND INSTANTLY
KILLED WEDNESDAY NEAR
HERE BY ANDY ERICKSON
The first hunting fatality here in many years occur
red Wednesday afternoon when Erick Erland was acci
dentally shot by his friend and companion, Andy Edwin
Erickson, Wednesday evening while they were hunting
turkeys near Fulton Springs, 10 miles south of Flagstaff.
'" T?vlnMl nm TpMVcnn teretiin wlfll
JOE TISSAW, UNDER
KNIFE WEDNESDAY,
ISJHHNG NICELY
Joe D. Tissaw is the latest Flag
staff appendicitis patient He was op
erated on at Mercy hospital, this city,
Wednesday forenoon, by Dr. Palmer,
of Phoenix, and is now making a fine
recovery.
Joe had not been feeling well for
some time, but kept at his work for
the electric light company, feeling it
especially necessary to keep going in
the absence of George T. Herrington,
manager of the company, himself
sick in Phoenix. But Tuesday noon
Joe had to give up and go home. At
four o'clock a doctor was called and
the case was at once diagnosed as
appendicitis, the patient removed to
the hospital and Dr. Palmer called.
Joe's fine chance for complete and
early recovery, which is helped by his
general good health, will be welcome
news here, where everybody is his
good friend.
o
ROTARIANS HEAR OF
NORMAL'S GROWTH
AND FRONSKE'S FIDDLE
Dr. Mart Fronske, chairman for the
day, brought his fiddle to the Rotary
club luncheon Tuesday and played the
accompaniment while the crowd sang
a song he had especially composed.
Later President I. B. Koch produced
a letter written by George T. Herring
ton while the latter was ill in Phoe
nix, thanking the Rotarians for the
flowers and telegrams they had sent
him and expressing appreciation of
their helping him recover by keeping
Dr. Mart here. George didn't say
whether Mart's fiddle had anything
to do with his gratitude.
Dr. Tex Mackey, fresh-laid bride
groom, passed around some good ci
gars. President Koch reported the meet
ing of presidents and secretaries of
the thirteen 8th district clubs at Al
buquerque last week, and repeated
Herman E. Hendrix' philosophical
gem: "What we would put into the
heart of the nation we must first put
into the hearts of intelligent boys,
and girls."
Dr. Fronske called on President L.
B. McMullen of the Normal school
to tell how things look there now. Dr.
McMullen said it is too early in the
present term, which began Monday,
to say what the increase in enrollment
will be, but it is safe to say that the
school is still compounding percentage
increase, and it looks like 30 per cent
Last summer, through advising
high school students against coming
here to make up studies they should
have kept up with in their own schols,
there were 25 per cent less high school
students enrolled than the Mimmer be
fore. In spite of that, the increase
in attendance was 83 per cent! Most
of the students took teacher training
work. This wonderful increase al
though many teacher training schools
throughout the country barely held
their own in point of attendance.
By giving preference to the train
ing of teachers, the speaker said, the
school is best fulfilling its duty to
ward the state.
He said the 'new members of the
(Continued on Pago Eleven)
o
GIANTS WIN FIRST GAME
SECOND GAME A DRAW
The New York Giants won the first
game of the world's series Wednes
day over the Yankees by a score of
3 to 2. Bush was knocked out of the
box in the cigKth inning, when the
Giants retrieved what appeared to be
a lost game.
Yesterday's game stood 3-3 in the
tenth inning, when it was called be
cause of darkness.
JURY SAYS TANNER DEATH
ACCIDENTAL OR SUICIDE
Coroner's jury Tuesday night came
to their verdict on the death of Jesse
Tanner, the young Utah man whose
body was found two weeks ago on the
desert between here and Cameron,
two weeks after he had started, horse
back, to return to Utah. The verdict
was "death from loss of blood either
from an accidental wound, or suicide."
NUMBER 50
FRIEND
two other friends, Erick Smith and
Olie Smith, had cone down the old
Oak Creek road on Monday hunting.
They killed several turkeys on Wed
nesday morning. In the afternoon
they decided to separate, the Smith
brothers taking one hill while the oth
er two were to see what they could
find on a hill two miles farther south.
Erland went to the east of the hill
and Erickson to the west. Previous
to parting they had seen several tur
keys but they sefcmcd to go over the
top of the hill. They had gone near
ly around the hill and were within 75
yards of each other. Erickson scared
up two turkeys, but owing to the dis
tance and the coming darkness failed
to get a shot. He noticed a movement
in the bushes, thought it was the tur
keys he had just scared up, and took
a shot A loud scream followed.
Erickson ran forward and found
Erland, dead. This was about 5:30.
Erickson immediately fired three
shots, according to a pre-arranged
signal for help, and the two Smith
brothers, who were about two and a
half miles away, heard it
They immediately came to the sceno
and on learning the facts jumped into
their car and came into town, making
a record trip. They came to Dr. Fe
lix Manning, made known their com
panion's death, and asked what they
should do.
Dr. Manning notified Justice of the
Peace R. J. Kidd, who immediately
selected a coroner's jury Orinn
Compton, Eugene Phelan, John Metz,
Durward McKinney, Oscar Dietzman
and H. V. Schermann. They left
Flagstaff a little after eight that
night for the scene of the tragedy.
Their verdict was that the death was
accidental.
Erick Erland came direct to Ari
zona in 1915 from Sweden. During
(Continued on Page Six)
LYMAN S. DRUM, ONE .
OF ARIZONA'S PIONEERS
DIEDHEREWEDNESDAY
Lyman S. (Tom) Drum quietly
passed away at Mercy hospital, Flag
staff, late Wednesday afternoon. In
his death the community loses one of
its best citizens, the state one of the
rapidly-diminishing body of stalwart
men, those adventurous pioneers who
reclaimed her from the savages, and
laid the firm foundation for her pres
ent prosperity and fame.
Mr. Drum was born in Harrisburg,
Pa., on May 0, 1852. His parents re
moved to California in the early 'COs.
In 1875 Mr. Drum came to Arizona
and settled at the edge of Stoncman
lake, south of Flagstaff, where he had
lived ever since, developing His home
stead property into a fine ranch.
He had been afflicted with diabetes
for some time, though it did not inter
fere to any great extent with his act
ivities. Hardy, energetic, lie was far
more active than usual for a man of
his years. Then, last March, he
slightly cut one of his toes. He
thought nothing of it until it became
infected and, aggravated by his other
ailment, became worse. Even then,
he kept up and out of doors most of
the time until about two weeks ago,
by which time the infection had
grown so serious that he was taken
to St. Joseph's hospital, Prescott, to
have his foot amputated. It was de
cided after his arrival there that ho
was in too weakened a condition to
permit of an operation. At his re
quest he was brought back to Flag-
( Continued on Page Six)
TOURIST BURGLARIZED
W00LF0LK HOME IN
FAMILY'S ABSENCE
A lone auto tourist, whom, it is be
lieved, stole the Buick roadster he
drove, got off the road Sunday on his
way from Winslow to Flagstaff and
got as far as the Charlie Woolfolk
ranch home at Canyon Diablo, Sir.
and Mrs. Woolfolk being in Winslow
for the day.
Finding the coast clear, he went
through the house. Among his loot
was a new ,20-guage shotgun, shells,
water-bag. an Eastern Star pin made
from a gold nugget and belonging to
Mrs. Woolfolk, $7.50 from, that lady's
purse, and miscellaneous ' smaller
(Continued on Page Six)
4i.

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