OCR Interpretation


South-eastern Independent. (McConnelsville, Ohio) 1871-1871, June 09, 1871, Image 2

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87075000/1871-06-09/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE INDEPENDENT.
M'COXSELSVILLE :
FRIDAY June 9, ISTt.
Prohibition
STATE TICKET
FOB GOVRRSOR,
GIDEOX T. STEWART, of Huron.
FOR I.IECT. GOVERNOR,
P. IL WEDDELL, of Montgomery.
FOR BOARD OF PCBUC WORKS,
L. B. SILVER, of Columbiana.
FOR BCrRKMK JUDGE,
SAMUEL E. ADAMS, of Cuyahoga.
FOR TREASURER,
THOMAS EVANS, Jr., of Delaware.
FOR ATTORNEY GEVERAL,
J. W. STIXCHCOMB, of Hocking.
FOR STATE COMMISSIONER OF COM. SCFIOOI.S,
D3. SOLOMON HOWARD, of Athens.
FOB CI.KRK OF EFPRRME COURT,
ARZA ALDERMAN, of Morgan.
FOR AUDITOR OF STATE,
W. B.CHAD WICK, of Franklin.
Platform of the National Prohibition
Party.
Adopted at the Chicago Convention, Sept'r
2,1869.
Whereas, Protection and allegiance are
reciprocal duties, and every citizen
who yields obedience to the just com
mands of his government is entitled
to the full, complete and perfect pro
tection of that government in the en
joyment of personal security, person
al liberty, and private property, and
Wbkbeas, The traffic in intoxicating
drinks greatly impairs the personal
security and personal liberty of large
masses of citizens, and renders pri
vate property insecure, and
Whereas, The existing parties are
hopelessly unwilling to adopt an ad
equate policy on this question, there
fore we, in national convention as
sembled, as citizens of this free re
public, sharing in the duties and re
sponsibilities of its government, in
the discharge of a solemn di'ty we
owe to our country and our race,
unite in the following declaration of
rrinciples :
. That while we acknowledge the
pure patriotism and profound states
manship of those patriots who laid
broad and deep the foundations of this
government, securing at once the
rights of the States severally and their
inseparable union by the Federal Con
stitution, we would not merely garnish
the sepulchers of our republican fath
rs, but we do hereby renew our sol
emn pledge of fealty to the imperish
able principles of civil and religious
liberty embodied in the Declaration of
American independence ana our fed'
eral Constitution.
2. That the traffic in intoxicating
beverages is a dishonor to Christian
civilization, inimical to the bestinter
ets of society, a political wrong of un
equaled enormity, subversive of the
ordinary objects of government, not
capable of being regulated or restrain
ed by any system of license whatever,
Vut imperatively demanding for its
suppression effective legal prohibition
both by State and National Legisla
tion. 3. That in view of this, and inasmuch
as the existing political parties either
oppose or ignore this great and para
mount question, and absolutely refuse
to do anything toward the suppression
f the rum traffic, which is robbing the
nation of its brightest intellects, des
troying its material prosperity, and ra
pidly undermining its very founda
tions, we are driven by an imperative
sense of duty to sever our connection
with these political parties, and to or'
ganize ourselves into a National Prohi
bition Party, having for its primary
object the entire suppression of the
traffic in intoxicating drinks.
4. That while we adopt the name of
the National Prohibition Party, as ex
pressive of our primary object, and
while we denounce all repudiation of
the public dbt, and pledge fidelity to
the principles of the Declaration of In
dependence and the Federal Constitu
tion, we deem it inexpedient to give
prominence to other political issues.
5. That a Central Executive Commit
tee of one from each State and Terri
tory and the District of Columbia, be
appointed by the Chair, whose duty it
shall be to take uch action as in their
judgment will best promote the in
terests of the party.
Democratic State Convention.
lion.
The Democratic State Conven
tion7, held in Colnrabus on the 1st,
nominated the following ticket :
For Governor, Col. George W. Mc
Couk, of Sieubcnville ; For Lieut.
Governor, Samuel' F. Hunt, ol Cin
cinnati ; For Supreme Judge, G
XV. Goddis, of Kxhlar.d county ;
For Attorney General, E. S. Wall
ace, of Clarke connty: For State
Treasurer, Dr. GuHtav Broehl, of
Cincinnati ; For Stale Auditor.
Col. J. B. Coekerill, of Adams co ;
For Mecaber Board Pub. Works,
Aj-lhnr iingbes, ef Cuyahoga co.;
Fir School Commissioner, Prof. W.
W, Rosa, of Sandusky county : For
Clerk of Supreme Court, Charles
Patterson, of Franklin county.
The following is the Platform
they adopted :
The Democracy of Onio resolve :
first xnai denouncing wo
traorHftaary means by which limy
wore brought about, we recognize
as accomplished facts, ibe ihreo a-
rnendments in fact to the Constitu
tion, recently declared adopted,
and regard the same as no longer
political issues before the country.
Socond We demand that the
rule of Strict Construction, as pro
claimed by the Democratic fathers,
accepted by the statesmen of all
parties previous to He va and
embodied in tho Tenth Amendment
to the Constitution, bo rigorously
applied new to the Constitution ns
it is, lnclajing the three reent u
mendmeiits nlxjve referred '.o, ani
insist that these amen Jinoinu shall
ot be held to have in any respect
altered or modified tho original
theory and diameter of ibe Federal
Government ; but only to have en
larged the powers delegated to it ;
and to that extent, and no more, to
abridged the reserved rights of the
btates : at J that, as thus construed
the Democratic party pled-iCi itself
to the full, faithful and absolute
execution and enforcement of the
Constitution as it now is, so as to
scour equal rights to all persons
under, it, without disticcuon ol
race, color or distinction.
Third That the absolute equali
ng of each and euery Stale-wiibin
the Ijnion. is a fundamental princi
yia of the Federal Government.
lourlh lhat He will always
cherish and uphold the American
system of Stat o and local govern
ment, for Stale and local purposes
and a General Government for
poneral purposes only ; ard are un
vlterably opposed to all attempt t
..ou-Lniion ana consiiuon in
power in the hands of the General
Government ; and the more espici
ally when such attempts are in the
form of usurpation by any depart
ment of that Government. And,
further, that we adhere firmly to
tbo principle of maintaining a per
fect independence between the cos
ordinate departments of the Gov
ernment, the .Legislative, the Ex
ecutive and the Judicial, condemn
ing all encroachments by one upon
the functions of tho others.
Fifth While the fundamental
law aa expressed in the Constitu
tion, is necessarily permanent until
abrogated as prescribed by that in
strument, all legislation is, in its
nature and purpose, temporary, and
subject to change, modification, or
repeal, at tho will of a majority ol
the people, expressed through ihe
law-making power ; and thai the
pretence tbat any act of Congress
not executed or spent, or any leg
islative policy ot a party, is an ab
solute finality, is totally inconsiet
ent with the whole theory of re
publican government, and thatitis
Ihe unquestionable right of the peo
ple, of themselves, at each success'
ive Congress, to judge of what leg
islation is necessary and proper or
appropriate to carry into execution
or enforce the constitutional pow
ers, rights and duties of Ibe Feder
al Government.
Sixth That, as an instances of
eminently appropriate legislation
under the Fourteenth Amennment,
we demaad now of Congress univ
ersal amnesty.
Seventh That while we denounce
all riotous combinations and cons
piracies against law or to disturb
the peace, in the South, or else
where, and demand of all good cit
izens their utmost influence to put
all such down, we also denounce
the act commonly called the "Bay
onet Bill," recently passed by Con
gress ; and the more recent act
commonly called lb Ku-Klux Bill,'
extending by its terms, to ever'
State ; as enacted for no other pur
pose than to complete the centrali
zation of all power in the hands of
the General Government, establish
a militaiy despotism, and thus
perpetuate the present administra
tion without regard to the will of
the people, and as not only utterly
inconsistent with the whole iheory
and character of tbo Fuderal Gov
ernment, and revolutionary and
dangerous in their nature, but in
direct conflict with the spirit and
letter of the Coii6ti;ution, includ
ing the amendments which ibev
pretend to enforce.
Eighth That holding still to the
good old Democrotio doctrino of
annexation or acquisitions of terri
tory, we are yet totally opposed to
the scheme of President Grant, lo
acquire San Doimntro as a "job,"
and by the means and for the pur
pose, evidently intended.
If tntb That we are in favor of a
6triitly revenne tariff, cunfoi med
to the theory and principles of all
other just and wise tux laws, and
opposed to the protective" theory,
so called.
Tenth Thai the profligate cor
ruption and wanton extravagance
which pervade every department of
the Federal Government; the sac
nfiise of the interests of labor to ag
grandize a handful of aristocrats ;
the Wicked deprivation of the peo
ple of their rightful heritage in the
public lands, which have been made
a gift to railway and other monop
olists ; tho payment of more than
twenty-four millions premium, du
ring the administration ot t resi
dent Grant, on government bonds
payable at par ; the maintenance
at an annual cost to the poople of
nearly thirty millions, of an uncon
stitutional, oppressive and extor
tionate system of banking, where
by nionej' is made scarce and int
erest bigh, are abuses which call
for wise and thorough remedies.
Eleventh That we are in tavor
of strict economy ; of a large re
duction in the expenditures of the
rederal and Stale Governments ;ol
I service reform ; of Iho recol
lection of the internal revenue by
State authorities, and thereby re
turn lo honest labor, the myratds
of tax-gatherers who afilict our
land and eat up its substance.
Twelfth That while we reject
repudiation, wo equally reject the
proposition lo pay the bondholders
mors than the contract with them
demands; that if tbo bondholders
have rights, so have the tax-payers,
and we insist upon justice be
ing done to both. That the credit
or is entitled lo be pad in the
same currency he loaned lo tho
Government ; that when he loan
ed greenbacks, unless the contract
otherwise provides, and when he
loaned gold, he should bo paid in
gold. That to guard against too
great an expansion, greenbacks
should be made convertible into
three per cent, bonds, at tho op
tion ol the note holders, said bonds
to be redeemed in greenbacks on
demand. That the true method of
returning lo specie payments is to
make custom dues payable in Ieal
lender cuirjncy, whether paper
money or gold ; lhat such a policy
would Bocure a nniform currency,
slop gambling in gold, and thereby
elevute tho credit of the Govern
ment.
Th r.eenth That with the watch
word of 15 E FORM, we confidently
eo to the Country : tnat we be
lieve the interests of the great bodv
of the people are the same; that
without regard to past political as
sot ialions, they are the friends of
free govern mmu ; that they are e
qually honest, brave and patriotic,
and we appeal to them as to our
brothers and countrymen to-aid us
to cbtatn relief from the grevious
abuses which wrong and oppress
every one, except the wrong doers
and oppressors themselves.
Fourteenth Upon Slate issues
we resolve lhat we are in favor ol
calling a Convention, as providod
for by Article XVI., Section 3, of
the Slatd Constitution.
Violet Writing Fluid!
A full and fresh stock of this tmititi
ful, iice flowing, and eminently popu
lar CoxmiRciAL Vioi.Br Writikg Fluid
in quarts, pints, half pints, and two
smaller sizes just received this week
at ADAIR'h Book Store, in large lots.
G ROVER BAKER Scwins Marh-
; ; oil N,PIj:,s ,nd small materiiil.
;,t VINCENTS
i
Decoration Day in Stockport.
STOCKPORT, O. JUNE 5th, 1871.
Editor Independent : Dear Sib
As is the custom of the people of
Windsor township, tho 30th day of
May was very properly observed at
Windsor Baptist Church. As by
previous arrangement, on last Dec
oration Day, at the hour of one o
clock, and perhaps sooner, many
were seen calhoriiiEr at the Grave
Yard, where are deposited the re
mains of several of our fellow-sold
iers, each and every one bearing in
their hands neb flowers of tho May
Day season, laden with sweet frag
rance, to be by them strwn upon
the silent resting places ef those
who diod tbat their country might
I IV.
The meeting was called lo order
by P. J. Patterson, Esq., President
of the Association, and in a few
brief and pointed remarks stated
tho object or the meeting. Then
he announced that the meeting
would be. oponed with prayer by
tho Rev. Hastings, and very appro
priate prayer, abounding in elo
quenco, wae delivered ; after which
a patriotic song was discoursed by
the choir, entitled, "Wrap the Flag
Around Me, Boys." Tho President
then introduced tho Rev. Hastings,
who addressed the lurgo and atten
tive audience, choosing for Ins sub
ject, "Truth Must Prevail." The
Oration was biicf, but repleto with
the services and saarifices of the
fallen heroes of '61.
The choir then san the approp
riite ode, entitled, "The President's
Gravo." Next in order, the Presi
dent introduced Col. F. B. Pond,
our worthy Attorney General, who
proceeded to doliver himself of one
of his best efforts. The Colonel re
marked that it was embarrassing
to him to attempt an address on
such an occasion as this was like
unto talking at the funeral of rela
tives. No ono.who had not exper
ienced the life of a soldier could tell
anything about the heart throbb
ings of one comrade for another.
"Vou, my friends," said he, ' must
drink from the same canteen, cat
tho same food from God's own ta
b'o, on tho damp, dark, cold ground
of Ihe late battlefield, must wait in
listlcssness at tho bouviac of tho
Southern field ; then, and only then,
can you appreciate my feelings lo
day." Altera speech of half an
hour, the Association reorganized
by electing Stephen R. Hill, Presi
dent, Thomas D. Clancy, Secretary,
Joseph C. Koan and Asa McVeigh,
Commillce of Arrangements, lo
look aftor Iho interests of the Asso
ciation for the ensuing year. Great
credit is due J. C. Ivean and Joseph
McKibbcn for their efforts in pro
ducing for the occasion a bcauti.'ul
monument, an which was inscribed,
In Mcmmorinm, Peace, E Pluribus
Unum, May 30th, 1871. Tho mon
ument was decorated very tasteful
ly with flags, evergreens, and flow
ers, which was skillfully and beau
tifully arranged by the fair young
Ladies, who did their work with
great credit to themselves, by wrca
thing the evergreens and Cowers, a
fit monument lo Iho memory of
the dead. All honor to u irratcful
poople, who ineel on each 30ih day
of May lo pay homage - to the me
mory of those who died to keep our
Liberties unsullied. Too President
requested tho Committee, and all
interested in tho cause of Liberty,
to meet at the W i minor Baptist
Church, on the lt Saturday ot
May, 1872, to make tho preliminary
arrangements for May 30th. 1S72.
riy a unanimous voto of Associa
tion the Secretary of tho Society
was tcqucsted to furnish a report
of tho meeting to both of Ihe coun
ty papers for publication. After u
httmg benediction by JIcv. Hast
ings, the Association adjourned lo
meot 30th of May, 1872.
T. D. CLANCY, Sec'y.
T. D. CLANCY, Sec'y. For the Independent.
Westland Farmer's Club
WeoTXAnd. Morgan Co.. O., )
May 27tb, 1S71. j
Tho Farmer's Club,- of Weslanci,
met fit its rooms, May 27tb, 1871.
It being its first quarterly meeting,
organized at 10 o'clock, A.-M.
After the singing of a very appro
priate soni; and sortie miscellaneous
bosmeps, the fiubject brought op for
discussion was, Tho Best Time and
Mode of Propuring Ground for Corn
and Bost Modo of Working Corn.
Tho discussion was opened by Eli
Shields by an argument and tho
reading of an article from the Far
mer e Journal, and was followed by
Joseph Mendenhall, Joel King, L.
King, Joseph Jvennard, J. ising
man. V. C. Strode, M. Bingman,
J. Bingmau, B. V. Thompson. Ar
ticle read by the rrcsideut and
other speakers followed. Some ve
ry interesting suggestions on corn
culture w as made by a stranger,
tho Kev. ffm. Mock. The discuss
ion continued up to tho time of din
ner, which was prepared by the
mom bora and others. At just 12
o'clock tho FresiJent announced
lhat dinner was ready. The pro
cession was formed under tho care
of Marshals J. 1 King and Paschal
Strode: it was threo of fonr hund
red strong, and soon wended thoir
way to the barn of Mr. L. KinV,
about one fourth of a mile diutan.
There, under the management of
Mr. John Ilallowcll, T. J. Bingmar,
Kran Fonlke, and their many assis
tants, male and female, the vast
concourse of pcoplo found the ta
bles groaning under tho weight of
nice cake, pie and fowl, prepared
by the wive ami daughters of the
yoomanry of Wo6tland and sur
rounding
Mr. Editor, you lost n grand
treat by not being there. After the
bountiful repast, which occupied an
hour, they wended their way back
to the school house. After another
song and the reading ot an essay,
by J. F.King, on Agrieultuie, Past,
Present and Future, the question
taken for the afternoon discussion
was, The proper Time to cut Grass
fnr TlflTT find hftl MaHmIa trot, rrr.na
! into ' Barns. The discussion was
opeuod by W. C. Strode, in an arg
ument and the reading of an arti
clo from the Ohio Farmer, to show
! that clover cut early was best for
i hay, and was followed by Joseph
Mendenhall. James II. Kinsej-, T.
Strode, 11. Bingman, Joel Km;, E.
Shields, Jacob Bingman, A. Hotch
kiss. Paschal Strode, J. B. Thomp
son, R. W. Thompson. The discus
sion was very animated and was
kepi up until the hour ol adjourn
ment, many of the members mak
ing two or three speechos apiece.
Each member, from his experience
was convinced tbat at a certain
stage in the growth of grass was
the proper lime to harvest, and it
will have its influence among the
farmers, as grass harvest is Hearing
us, and the results of tho time of
cutting will be closely watched.
The Club adjourned to meet or. the
last Saturday of June, at 1 o'clock.
Mr. Editor, beforo closing withtbis
matter, let or.o say to our inaoy
readers, fcr a Rural gathering the
attendance was largu and of the
substantial and intelligent kind,
and one of tho most pleasing feat
ures was the presence of a great
number of Ladies, the wives and
daughters of tho members and
others, who took a lively interest
in the proceedings and contributed
greatly to the enjoyment of the oc
casion. It really did my soul good
to seo so many attend, and see such
interest as tiicro was manifested on
the occasion. For want of space in
a County paper, 1 was obliged to
defer giving the romarks of the
different members, although they
wore very instructive, not m your
:highfilutiu" but in plain farm lan
guage. When I look around tho
County and nee tho influence thaar
the Wcstland Club is exerting for
the improvement of Agriculture
generally, 1 do hopo and pray that
liko organizations may be started
in different parts of the County
that this Club may profit by their
experience.
J. H. KINSEY, Cor. Sec'y.
iMISCEEEAXEOlS.
TEACHERS' NORMAL INSTITUTEI
OP
FOUR WEEK'S DURATION !
Commencing
JiOJDAT, Jl EY SI, 1S71.
At
MeCONNELSVILLK. OHIO,
To bo Conducted By
Prof. X. 51. JlrMltiHMS,
AMI
ARTIiCK POD, Esq.
Hi Honor, W. D. II EN K LB.
State School Commissioner
will bo present and assist during theJ
first week.
Arrangement for boarding Will bemad
for all vrlio Mten.i. A thorough Iterlew of
the Lower Branch" will bo arrived at.
Clacaca will be formed and re-iltioD
heard, the object being rather th mode of
instruction ihau the niaiterr of the Bran
chrj. Tnachera, will, therefore, brinf
books, sluUs, eie,. as stmlenie.
HOOKS OY KKFKRK.VCE :
Reading McOnTy aud lvidd.
Spelling Si'li?rtions.
Arithmetic Uav and White.
Grammar Green and Ilarvor.
Geography Urocklry'a and Warren's
Tbya. Gcog.
Lecture and Xiaruuinn mi Theory and
Practice at Slated Period). TKKM5 fi.HO
payable in advauee. Uj Order of the Ex
ecutive Committee.
May 12, 1871!0r.
THli LAUGEST
QOKENSWAKE STORK
in
CL3 IS EI S3 ;
r. l. Jenkins,
I
IMPORTER AXD DEALER IX
QUEKN8WARE!
CHINA !
GLASS! AND
T 1 TITlT3r T- t Ul I t
North side of Center street, between
fast and Putin street.
McConnelsviUe, Ohio,
REASONS FOR PATRONIZING JEN
KIN'S ESTABLISHMENT I
1st. Jenkins imports his own goods
nnd is therebr able to undersell all
who purchase at second hand.
2nd. Tie has the largest establish
ment, and most complete variety of
goods in 6outh-nstern Ohio, and you
are enabled to get just what you want
do not have to take just what you
can get.
3rd. Living amongst us, Jenkins
helps to build up the business of the
community, and it is no more than
right that community should build
him up instead of going off to Zanes
villc, or some such point to buy your
coods.
-A.t Jenkins' in
April 21, 1872-tf.
NOTION
AND
MILLINERY
S T Oil E !
C. HALL,
Wholesale and Retail
SEALER I.T
MILLINERY GOODS,
UCLL, STUEET,
MALTA, OHIO.
K. HUSIXE3H DOXE 02s A
STKICTI.Y CASH SYSTEM !jb
Kov. H lS7V-tf.
MALTA B17SIXES9 CARDS.
J. M. .ROGERS. J. LUTTON. J. DAVIS.
J. M. P.OGERS & CO.,
Front St., near the Bridge, Malta, Ohio, keep constantly on hand
t&" All Orders rronjpllj Attended To ! -&a
April 21, 1871 Jy.
GEORGE JANEWAY,
Weit side of Eell Street, Malta, Ohio, keeps a well selected assortment of
1URDWJBE, TI5WIRE, STOTKS tud STOVE TRIOI.XGS. PAR.Hl.VG imSILS,
AND INVITES ALL TO CALL ON HIM.
I Special attention gien to the trade in Stoves and Stove Trimming.
Agent for the sale ot tho celebrated "Clipper Mower 4 Reaper." Everything
oldlow for caah. ! April II, 1871 -ly.
Dry Good Merchant. South-east corner of Front and Btll Sts., Malta, Ohio has
always on hand a complete stock of
DRY GOODS. NOTIONS. GROCERIES, QUEENS-
WAHE, BOOTS A.u SHOES, Ac.Ac.
Keir Goods reci4 wwulnrlr.
thing sold at th lowest cash figure.
foodi.
a flonrishiTi trnrW .....1. v.,..--
Country Produce taken in exchange for
April 21, 1S7I -ly.
II IS I CSS CAUDS.
W. R. KELLY, IYI. D.
May be fonnd at hi. office on
THE SOl'TII WEST COR.EIl
of taa
Public Square
M'CONNELSYILLE, OHIO
At all limes, when not absent ou Profess
ional business.
J- E. HAX9A.
Eo. M. KENNEPT
HANNA & KENNEDY.
ATTY'S:AND CQIMELLOHS
AT HiA.W.
On Center Street, near the I'ublie Square,
M CONNELSVILLE, OHIO.
f& Pseial attention giren to Collections.
TflK SPLENDID STEiJlER
CARRIE BROCKS,
FliKTET IHri.ixotos. Captain,
Will make regular weekly trips be.
tween rfViesrille and Pituburp, as
follow Leaves Znnesville at 8 o'clock.
on Tuesday morning; and, returning.
leare rilt-bure on aturdav eveniuct.
at 6 o'clock-
August I9th, 1870 3m
GIVEN UP!
Hint JOIIX RIt is the UK ST
pnitisi.rcii in iirrnvvi i .
vii.i-K.
me nt ofFiue and Slorie Fools, of hit own .
manufacture, which he i offering at the
lowe't OASU rates. Give him a call at his
establishment n Xorlh-west enruer of Pub
lic a-quare, Nr"iino!iUe, Ohio.
Sept. lo, ISTO-ljf.
ART CJT.LTKY.
C. TRKSIZK
ssks the iblic to call and examine hi
specimen 1'hotagrapha, FerretypeA, Am-
hrntype. (ini. Ac, ir., which ran not be ;
saipaSM1)! aujrvhrre. He has perforinl at- i
raiigeineuie hereby eiiy one can be ac '
coittoilairil with the 6nel ofOil rainttitsr.
ami picture of luUia Ink Work, ituotus
over Boone's Saddler Shop, in J. C. Simie'e i
Building, Center Street, 11 'Cunnciar ille, '
Ohiu. I
Airil 21-It.
II. Hi. TLtUli.
Physician & fcurgeon,
M'CONNELSYILLE, OHIO,
1 reals all loruis of acme and chronic
disea, mi new and improved principles. i
Callt promp 'y attmd'd to. end rliarges i
r-swtabh'. OFFICK : in Morris' New!
B'tild'tig. on .Center street, where lie
will la found wbeu not profession
!VaTR -
ed.
fFeh. 31
r4
a
t
a
a
s
C2
it
e
a
a -
is
S3
0
( I
5 c
M13A.T ! MEAT !
. GKOCERIES!
ASD--
PROVISIONS I !
E. S- WOODWA RD,
DRALKR IN
FRESH MEATS,
tven At
BEEF, YEAL, PORK AXD MUT
TON, W. A. MATTHEWS & CO..
DIILKRS l!(
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS ! !
In Buckeye Block,
(On Certer Street,)
M CONNELSVILLE, OHIO.
B. None but Ihe beat of Meats kpt ;
none bat the first class j'rocsnes and rre
viainns cflred lor sale 1
April 28th, 1871 2mo.
Attacbnient Kottce.
Villism B. Crawford, Tlfff.) Beforo Gro.
ts. Glenn, J.T.,
Atuoa Murphcr, defendant. J of Bristol tp.
Morgan county, Ohio. On the 73d day of
Mav. 1871. said Juttirs issued tn order of
attarhment in the above action for ths sum
' ofeisbt dollars snd 9 cents.
j WILUAM B.CRATTORI',
I Friatol, Jure i, IVl 3r.
:
'
;
'
I
(
!
.
J
I
31 ISCi:i.lVi COLS.
u. u. ioi'URKi.1. c. a. aozaax.
i. r. S05SAX6T1KS.
(tochran, .
yzmaii,
SOl'TII-fTEST SIDE OF THE
PUBLIC
SQUATIK,
M'CONNELSYILLE. ()..
Dealers in
HARDWARE, HOUSE-FURNISHING
GOODS,
'FARMING IMPLEMENTS, &C.&C.
SPECIAL ATTEiNTIOiN
Giren to the
Farming Implement
IVXaclrnery Trade.
II
OWEKS&KEAPEK
1!
SOLE Atin.MS
in thia lraliiy for lh sale of t lis
C'eleb rated
I T v 31 P I O
Mowers & Hcapers,
AV O KLD
Mower Heaper,
aud tba
Mower & Heaper,
C
ancianciiuor
it'ook & Healing Stoves,
aad odJ Diocea of all the mriettra of Cook
Bioves in the country ; all kinds of Threah-
in" Machine Castings ; alao Salt Kettles,
and Salt Flanges, Sugar Kettles. Pots, Grid
llea, SkilloU. alwut twenty Hf)Vrent pat
i eruaofriuw 1'oiun. Machine Castincslui
Steamboat. Saw Mills, S ilt Worka, Mo
I era aud Kcaper ; alao Ctai Iron t himney
Tops, Win, low taps. Cellar Window Grai
t ings, and alao Ciul Iron Lgs fur Schuol
houae ieaks and Seata.
Tin-ware.
!( consmntlr on hand, mtmfiilnred
thrir orIer. all maunr ofTinwre, 6tvi
Trimmings, Jcc.
Rlacksinitliins
Msuufactirers of Water Tweers, Mandrill
ijwedges, Ac, fur Blacksmiths.
Kemember the Place :
!?oth-west Side of. the Public Squaie
M COXXKLSV1LLE, ii.
tnar.l8.187U-tt.
BRISTOL. APRIL !, 1S7I,
HEARKEN UNTO GOOD ADYISE
Given Gratis.
Goods Sold Cheap For (ash !
The Ten Commandments fully Explained;
itrp Thrm tod Toon Shall Hake flun
h Commandments.
rir(. Thou shalt hare no other
place to buy your I'ry Goods, Groce
ries. Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps,
Yankee Notions, and Keady-made
Clothing, except the Cheap Store of
VM. II. COOL, Bristol, Ohio.
Sennd. Thou shalt not choose to
thyselfany other Merchant. Thou
shalt not bow to them, not listen to
their speeches, for COOL is a reliable
dealer, capable of drawing his custom
ers to the third and fourth generation.
Third. Thou shalt not seek in Tain
for cheop goods, for the can be found
for cash at COOL'S.
Fourth. Thou shalt bear in mind
that upon six days of the week thou
canst make thy purchases of COOL,
; but on the seventh day he must rest
from his weary labors.
Fifth. Thou shalt honor COOL, and
long may thy dnys be to enjoy the
fruits thereof.
Sixth. Thou shalt noi commit any
outrage on the proprietor by purcha
sing goods elsewhere, but go direct to
COOL S. Bristol, where you can get all
you want cheap for cash.
Seventh Thou shalt not adulterously
wed any strange goods into thy house,
but always buy ot COOL.
Fiahth' Thou shalt not steal from
COOLS Store, for his goods are so
cheap that it would be a sin.
Xtnth. Thott shalt not bear false
witness, but honestly acknowledge
that thou canst get better bargains at
COOLS Store than any other place.
Tenth. Thou shalt not covet thy
neighbor's goods nor thy neighbor's
bargains, but tak council of the wise
and r.roceed straicht to COOL'S Store.
; and lay in your supply-
M H. U. LUUlj.
April 21, 137l-:m-
JIEff ADVERTISEMENTS.
t. i. LLwia. c. r. Wilis.
Y.B. LEWIS & CO.,
DEALERS IX
Hardware,
FARM IMPLEMENTS, SEEDS,
And Sole Agents For The
BUCKEYE MOWER!
A5D
SMITH'S CAST CAST-STEEL
PLOWS,
No. 65 Main Street,
ZAXESV1LLE, OHIO.
T
B. Lewis
& CO.,
Are Genera! Agent in tie Maikingnm
Valley for lbs sals of the
t&- CELEBRATED -
CANTON
BUCKEYE,
8-Ths O dest V.hin on th Conti
nent ! !
113. Tha B Msehin on the Conti
nent t 1 1
tot. Ihe lightest Pratt Marhina en
the Continent I
It is unnrpspd aa a Slower rr
Reaper ! I I.'l
O-
CAN'T BE BEAT !
OVER
10 0, 000
Of thetp Machine in ne ti the U
ii i i ed State will make it in
teresting for a live, res
ponsible Agent, in ei
ther the town of
McCOXNF.LSVILLE or MALTA,
Fur the Sale of this
CELEBTIA TED MACIIIXE !
j2T Xone Other Xeed Apply. I
ADDRESS
V-B. LEWIS & CO.,
ZAXESTILLE, OHIO.
It addition lo the large lib of Ag
ricnltnral Implements, we wish
to call the attention of Buil
ders to our largj Itna
or
Building
Hardware,
FIRE FRONTS,
CARPENTER S TOOLS,
Oar Trices are aa LOW AS TI1E
LOWEST !
r. B.LEWIS & CO.,
65 Man Street, ZmesnUe, Ohio.
3Iy 26, It.
GROTER A, BAKER.
6 r. o 1 1 1
i
&
SEWING
MACHINES
Were awarded the htebest Premiums at
Ibe State Fairs of
New York,
Vetiuont,
Xtrr jerser,
Fennsjlpania,
Ohio,
Indiana,
Michigan,
Wisconsin,
and Iowa,
Kentucky,
Tennessee,
Miea-oorr,
Alabama,
Missioaippl,
Virginia,
or ih Caro'inia,
California,
and Oregon.
First Prizes
Uivealso been awarded these Uacbiucs
at the exbibitioos ef
LONDON,
TARIS,
DUBLIN,
LINZ,
EEiANCON,
BAYONNB,
ST. DIZIE1C,
k CHALONS.
MM? ? ? M
The very biul.sst prlne.TIIK CROSS
OK THE LKUION OF 110X03, waa
conferred on llie representative of tbe
Ntover & Baker Sawiug Machines, at tbe
El position L'uiveraalle, Faris, 1667, tbne
attesting; tbeir great soperiorilj over all
other Sewing Mtcbiocs,
H H k i k k
POINTS OF EXCELLENCE:
Btauty and Elasticity eStich.
Perfection, and Simplicity of Machinery.
y fastening of team by hand and n
watt of thread,
Wid rang of application, without eheng
f adjustment.
The seam retains its beauty and firmuu
after washing and ironing.
Besides doing all kinds of work done by
other Sewing machines the Elastic Stitch
macbiue txecutts tbe most beantiloland
permanent Embroidery and oroatcenl
el work.
ALEX. F1NLEY is the Genera!
Agent for the sale of tbo Grover &
Baker Shuttle or Lock Stitch Ma
chine and tho Elastic Stitch or
Two Spool Machine, in the coun
ties of Morgan, Athens, and Ilovk
ing, and has his traveling Agents
all through these counties. Any
persons wishing a first-class Sow-
inr f ar hino inst whut is npfr)rtl
for family use, should call on Mr.
Fioloy or one of his Agents.
May 12, 1871 If.

xml | txt