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South-eastern Independent. (McConnelsville, Ohio) 1871-1871, August 04, 1871, Image 2

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THE INDEPENDENT.
M'COXNELSVILLE :
FRIDAY AncnM 4,
IST1.
Prohibition
STATE TICKET.
FOB OOVKRKOR,
GIDEON T. STEWART, of Enron.
FOR l.tECT. GOVERNOR,
P. M. tVEDDELL, of Montgomery.
FOR BOARD OF PrBLlC WIKIS,
I B. SILVER, of Columbiana.
FOR ECPRKMB JIPOK,
SAMUEL E. ADAMS, of Cuyahoga.
FOR TREASURER,
THOMAS EVANS, Jr., of Delaware.
FOR ATTakXKY GENERAL,
J. W. STIXCilCOMB, of Mocking.
TOR8TATR COMMISSIONER OF COM. SCHOOLS,
D1C SOLOMON HOWARD, of Athens.
FOR CJ.tT.K OF srPRKDK rol'RT.
ARZA ALDERMAN, of Morgan.
FOR ACPITOR OF STATU,
tV. B.C11ADWICK, of Franklin.
FROIIII1ITIOX COl.T TIC
KET. For Representative,
DAVID MUMM K V.
For Auditor,
THOMAS HAMMOND.
For Clei k of the Court.
JAMES A. N E E L E Y .
For Sheriff, .
JAMES D. MARIS.
For Commissioner,
ROB ER T LU TTO X ,
For Infirmary Director,
n. P. DEARBORN.
For Coroner,
WILLIAM CUPPY.
Platform of the National Prohibition
Party.
Adopted at the Chicago Convention, Sepf'r.
2, 1869.
Whereas, Protection and allegiance are
reciprocal duties, and every citizen
who yields obedience to the just com
mands of his government is entitled
to the full, complete and perfect pro
tection of that government in the en
joyment of personal security, person
al liberty, and private property, and '
Wbkreas, The traffic in intoxicating
drinks greatly impairs the personal
security and personal liberty of large
masses of citizens, and renders pri
vate property insecure, and
Vhercas, The existing parties are
hopelessly unwilling to adopt an ad
equate policy on this question, there
fore we, in national convention as
sembled, as citizens of this free re
public, sharing in the duties and re
sponsibilities of its government, in
the discharge of a solemn di'ty we
owe to our country and our race,
unite in the following declaratioa of
principles :
1. That while we acknowledge the
pure patriotism aud profound states
manship of .those patriots who laid
broad and deep the foundat'ons of this
government, securing at once the
rights of the States severally and their
inseparable union by the Federal Con
stitution, we would not merely garnish
the sepulchers of our republican fath
ers, but we do hereby renew our sol
emn pledge of fealty to the imperish
able principles of civil and religious
liberty embodied in the Declaration of
American Independence and our Fed eral
Constitution.
2. 'Hint the traffic in intoxicating
beverages is a dishonor to "hristian
civilization, inimical to the best inter
ests of society, a political wrong of un
equaled normity. subversive of the
ordinary objects of government, not
capable of being regulated or restrain
ed by any system of license whatever,
but imperatively demanding for its
suppression effective legal prohibition
both by State and Rational Legisla
tion.
3. That in view of this, and inasmuch
as the existing political parties either
oppese or ignore this great and para
mount question, and absolutely refuse
to do anything toward the suppression
of the rum traffic, which is robbing the
ration of its brightest intellects, des
troying its material prosperity, rind ra
pidly undermining its very founda
tions, we are driven by an imperative
sense of duty to sever our connection
with these political parties, and to or
ganize ourselves into a National Prohi
bition Party, having for its primary
object the entire suppression of the
traffic in intoxicating drinks.
4. That while we adopt the name of
the Nation t Prohibition i'arty, as ex
pressive of our primary object, and
while we denounce all repudiation of
the public dbt, and pledge fidelity to
the principles of the Declaration of In
dependence and the Federal Constitu
tion, we deem it inexpedient to give
prominence to other political issues.
5. That a Central Executive Commit
tee of one from each State and Terri
tory and the District of Columbia, be
Appointed by the Chair, whose duty it
shall be to take such action as in their
judgment will best promote the in
terests of the party.
Who Will Be this Republican
Candidate fob State Senator ?
This question is the all-absorbing
topic amostr the Republican wire
pullers hereabout II is conceded
that Morgan Cujinly is entitled to
the nomination, and we see that
there are already two candidates
in the field from this County Dr.
Tbillip Kennedy, of Deavertown,
tind Eliaa Bundy, of Marion Town
ship.
It is a verv easy matter tc see
which of these two men will receive
the majority of tho Morgan County
vote in the Convention. Kennedy
is tbo Court House Ring candidate,
and the Ring is moviug evervthing
to secure his nomination. Bundy
is a good man, but he 6lands very
little chance of receiving more than
a complimentary vote from this
County. The Ring governs every
thing here, and Bandy will find he
will have to pay it tuoro attention
in order to succeed in getting
nomination in this District.
There is one thing, however, that
is operating against Kennedy. He
and Hon. W. P. Sprague were op
posing candidates from this County
before the last Republican Senato
rial Convention in this District;
and it as agreed, so. the story
goes, that the oae that 6howed the
most strength in the Morgan Coiin
ty caucus, should have the fu'l vote
ot the County in the Convention
The caucus vote was taken and
Sprague got fourteen votes to eleven
far Kennedy. Notwithstanding
this decision ef the caucus, and the
agreement made befbrehand", Ken
nedy would not allow Sprague to
bare the full vote of the County,
and consequently R. M. Suinson. of
Marietta, was nominated. This
sticks in the minds of many Repub
licans, and is operating against
Kennedy to a great extent; but still
as the Kmff has taken him up and
is exertinsr its full rower in his fa
vor, we predict that he will be the
sominee if Washington County
does not take the matter in her
own hands, as she baa the powsr to
a!0) bin! re-nominate Stimson.
A hit at Onf of OCR Cleegt -
mix. The Democrat, the first issue
of which appeared last week, con-
tained the following scurrilous par-1
.graph, striking at ftcv. C. Y.
CourtriTjht, of this place :
"Versatility of Pcrspits, The A-
mericans are an industrious peDijle,
and are disposed to turn their talents
in various directions. We know a
manwhoisan American all over. His
regular business is to keep a Chester
White for the pecuniary benefit of him
self and for the purpose of improving
the stock of hoes in the county; that
occasionally writes political editorials
tor a County Newspaper; makes po
litical Temperance stump speeches;
and, on Sabbath days, preaches the
Gospel; all this for the benefit of his
fellow-man.
He is a brick f-
Well, we doubt whether there is an
other nation of people in all Christen
dom that can boast of such a versatili
ty of pursuits as we Americans; if so,
we would like to know who they are."
The Democrat doesn't liko Rev.
C. W. Courtnsrht because ho is a
Prohibitionist, mid Iccauso- he
preaches in Deei field and Bristol
townships. Democratic Urcnjjhofds,
and it essays to destroy any influ
ence he mitrl't exert in cither of
those localities by scurrility nnd
falsehood. Jiiv. Courtrighs has
boon in this county a little over a
year row, nnd has been an earnest
and diligent laborer in tho cause oi
Christ ever nr.ee be tamo here, as
well as for j-cars before. Besides
doiiiff his duty in the pulpit, and
in his field of labor as a clergyman,
he hae interested Limsoli to a great
extent in live pursuits of farmers,
stock-raisers and gardeners, and
has spent considerable time and
means in trying to better the
worldly condition of those with
whom he has to do. When he first
came here, ho took a firm and un
compromising position. as a Prohi
bitionist, and, when called upon,
hae spoken out with emphasis on a
few occasions against the liquor traf
fic. He never wrote a political ed
itorial for any paper in bis lite:, al
though wo do not see why he could
not consistently do so if lie desired
to. (We might here n.ention that
the editor of the Independent docs
not have to depend on outsiders to
writo editorials.) For all this, Mr.
Courtnght is to bo falsely assailed
m a public print, owned and pub
lished, if not edited, by one who
but recently was making his living
by peddling whisky over the coun
try, telling hell' and damnation to
poor, frail humanity; doing all he
could to fill the country with wid
ows and orphans, all ho could to
rob men nnd their families on this
earth and damn them eternally.
We should think the Prosbyteriaits
of Bristol and Decrfield, and of the
count-, would feel like giving the
Democrat, and its owner, the cold
shoulder. If tho Democratic party
is to bo built up by assailing the
characters of clergymen, and by
suppoiting every vice and crime in
the land, wethiiik there are a uood
many men in Bristol and Duerfiield
thai will conclude that they had
better leave ;t and become Prohi
bi'.ionisiu. How do you like it,
Democrats of Bristol and Deerficid,
and of the whole county ? Hero is
your Democratic organ assailing
jour clergymen, endorsing' the
whisky sua beer traffic by rejoicing
over the repeal of the beer ordin
ance, excusing the iate New York
Hiot, and ridiculing all efforts to
better the condition of men. Are
you not distrusted with that kind of
Democracy ?
Restaurant.
Mr. "William Hibler is repairing
tbo Exchango building west ol
Mcrtley's grocery and 'is fitting it
up for a Confectionary Depot and
Restaurant. ' Mr. Hibler intends
keeping an establishment that, will
reflect credit on the town and sup
ply a tvnnt long foil, to wit: A
place where a meal or lunch can be
had at any hour of the day, served
up in the best style, and for a rea
sonable compensation. HcConnels
ville Herald of the 2SM ult.
The plac9 Hiblor has re fitted was
formerly the Stephen Miilcr beer-
ssloon, which has not been in oper
ation, until now, since tho shooting
of Wm. F. Tracy, leas than a year
ago. Millcr.it will be remember
ed, kept a "Restaurant, where a
meal or lunch could be bad at sny
hour of the day, served in the best
stvle aud for a reasonable compen
sation," and he also kept plenty of
beer to sell, and the public general
ly called it a beer saloon. Hibler
is doing the same thing, and the es
tablishment tho Herald thinks "re
flects credit on the town and enp
plys a want long felt," is nothing
more or less than a becr-suloon,
where in addition to all the beer
you may want, you can get a meal
or lunch served for you. We won
der if the wife whoso busbtnd comes
home to ber beastly drunk from
this beer saloon, will think it re
flects credit on the toicn ? We won
der if the cbildren that become
clothed in rags by moans of this
den, will think it" supply s a xcard
long felt? We wonder if tho fath
ers and mothers that may see their
eons started on the road to ruin,
degredation ard death by meai-s oi
ibis 6a!ooc, will consider it such an
auxiliary to the prosperity of the
town as the Herald would have its
readers believe it 13 be? In one
paragraph tho Herald makes great
pretentions to temperance, and in
another we find it reeomending
beer-saloon, under the name
"Confectionery Depot and. Restau
rant," to its patrons and their fam
ilies. This is fully r.s consistent as
its keeping its .temperance plat
form at the boad of its editorial col
umn, and continuing to support
Mueller, Williams and Hosmer for
State officers.
The Woodsfield Spirit claims to
have a circulation of thirty-five hun
dred, or at least of five times the
circulation of our paper. Drop
cat or two, 2fr. Spirit, and honestly
confess that you can hardly boasl
of a thousand subscribers. You
may bo able to deceive the people
the dark hills of Monroe, but people
outside of that County will not give
you so much credence.
A gentlemen calls the Democrat
the 2cer and Buttermilk Advocate.
1
I O.v last Sabbatb morning, Bev.
I Henry Cooper, of the Presbyterinn
Church of this place, preached
from the 24th verse of the 27lh
chapter of Matbew :
"'When Pilate saw that he could prevail
nothing, but that rather a tumult was made,
he took water, and washed bis hands be
fore the multitude, laying, 'I am innocent
or the bluod of this just person: see ve to
it.'" . '
The ppeaker painted in bis pecu
liarly vivid manner, the character
of Pilate, as sitting in Judgement
on Christ. As Coventor and J udjie,
it was the duty of Pilate to pass
judgment in nccoidance with tho
laws. If Cbritt vs a violator of
the laws, r.nd clearly proven so by
the tostimony, it was Pilate's duty
to render judgment accordingly;
but, if on the other hand, Christ
was innocent of all infractions of
iba laws, it was Pilate's duty, not
only lorecogn:ze and project the
rigbtsof innocence, but also to pre
serve the supremacy of law uud or
der, and to acquit hint. Tho trial
was bad, the evidence against Christ
had been duly exain-.nel
and Pi
.in him;
a.tiw .vsuu,. iiumi lip .. t i
found him in fact it '-just person.
He signified as much to the rabble
that was crj ing for Christ's blood
time and again, but finally gave
him up to be crucified, and then
attempted to wash his bands of the
responsibility of yieldiog up the
laws to be trampled under foot by
the rabble. The ppeaker thought
there bad been rccnt ovidcuces
in this country of a disposition on
tho pari of magistrates to yield
up the laws to be put under the
feet of mobs, and he rightly thought
that this fast-growing tendency was
threatening to our liberties as a
free people. Our magistrates should
be taught by thoso who place them
in power that they are not to be
influenced by aught else than the
laws and tho rights and duties of
cit:zcns under the laws. Ho evi
dently thought, too, that the politi
cal parties controlling localities
where the dispostion of magistrates
to yield to mob -influence? lias been
evident, should not bo allowed to
wash the.ir hands of the responsi
bility ot tho blood shed and the
peace and quiet disturbed.
While we agree with Mr. Coop
er in all thai he said, yet we cannot
help carrying tho application of the!
principle a little further than ho
did. Pilate, 1:1 listening to tho
rabble, and surrendering tho law
to the demands of the rabble, was
actuated by the same motives thai
actuated Mayor Hull and Superin
tendent of Police Kelso in issuing
their order lor the Orangemen not
to parade in New York City, and
also by the motives that actuated
the Republican State Convention
of Ohio in nominating Jacob Muel
ler, of Cleveland, for' Lieutenant
Governor of Ohio They all sur
rendered principle in tho Lope of
continuing in popularity and in
power. Pilate thought if bo did
not hearken unto tho priests and
the rabblo and give Christ up to be
crucified, bis power and influence
would be lost in tho land. Mayor
Hall and Kelso thought if tiny did
not trcckie to the mob spirits of
New York City that Ihcy would
lose their voles at the next election.
The Republicans of Ohio, in Con
veutiou assembled, thought if they
did not make concessions to tho
lnger beer and liberal German elov
mejit of Ohio by nominating a Ger
man liberal for an important office,
that they would lose the Lager beer
and free Sunday voles of Ohio.
For the Independent.
Temperance Meeting at
Lloydsville.
LYOYDSVILLE. Belmont Co.,
Ohio, July 29th, 1871.
a
a
of
Editor Independent: The usu
al sleepy-hollow aspect of this
place was broken in upon to-day,
at an early hour, by the assemb
ling of quite a crowd of "fair wo
men and brave men,-' who came in
obedience to a call of tho I. O. G.
T's for the purpose of consulting
together as to tho best means of ad
vancing tho canse of temperance.
On visiting the 6ciene, one was for
cibly reminded of the once familiar
operation ofgomv into camp,
"The banners floated in the breeze,
And bands braviuusic poured."
The weather wns such as we
might imagine was gotten up for
the occasion. Jjisrht. floating clouds
veiled Ihe dazzling brightness of
the sun without giving the scene a
sombre aspect.
It would bo difficult .to find a
more respoctable crowd than that
collected here. Aged men, Inj-ing
aside there cares were here smiliii?;
and happy; slout, ruged tillers.
wit h lheir careful spouses and beau
tiful daughters, and steady sons.
wei here; the merchant laying
aside his yard stick, nnd tie me
tallic, with his Sunday suit donn
el, were here; younj men and muv
dens, radiant with health and hap
piness, and decked with the regalia
of the 1. O. G. T., wore here. In
short it wns a scene,
Where wife and friends laugh merrily.
Without the aid of w:ne."
The obj-set of ihe meeting was
briefly 6tated by a member of the
Lodge, after which a most clcquenl
and appropriate address was deliv
ered by the Rev. Mr. Hidge of the
Christian Church. The echos of
that speech will thrill tho hearts of
the bearers
'While life, or thoncht. or being last.
Or immortality endure?."
Strongmen, men who with nn
faltermg steps, with unquailing eye,
with unlailmg purpose, and with
dauntless courage, bad faced the
battle's storm, 6tood and wept like
babies. If that was weak, God
helD the stroncr. Tbo vast crowd
listened with wrapt attention while
tho speaker hurled shot after shot
into the enemies ranks.
He was followed by Rev. I. TJ.
Feisterm one of his characteristic
lectures. The speachea occupied
nearly the entire day, and ycl there
was very little eviaence of fatigue
on the part of the bearers. Late
in the afternoon the crowd dispers
ed with renewed purpose to use
their strength for the cause.
WANDERER.
aup Meeting, at Summerfield,
Noble County, will commence
the 10th of this mouth.
McCook Departs.
Col. McCook, in continnation of
his missionary labors on the Wes
tern .Reserve, spoke yesterday at
Chardon, in Geauga County. His
speech related mainly to taxes and
the tariff those topics having bocn
particularly prescribed for that lo-
cality, as be informed his auditors,
by the committee under whose aus
pics he is traveling. Aside from
bis advocacy of free trado. the only
thing particularly notable in his
speech, was the reply lo a written
interrogator of a Republican edit
or, in regard to "new departure."
This rnodo of catechising, tho Dem
ocratic caudidate recognized as
"fair nnd polite," and wo must con
cede that, after a little preliminary
talk which might havo been con
strued as showing a desire lo got
avyay from the point black question,
ho finally met it squarely. Col.
McCook has made progress sinco
bis nom;nstior. In short, bo de
parts. Tho question addressed to him
wr.s so framed as to leave no loop
hole of retreat, or for paltering iu a
double sense. It was in these
words :
Do the Democracy of Ohio, by the
so-called New Departure plank in
their platform, desire it to be under
stood that they accept the last three
amendmennients to the Constitution
of the I'nited States in the same sense
and to the same extent that they do
all other provisions of that instru
ment, as portions of the supreme law
of the land, not now and never hete
after to be made political issues?
After objecting to the let of June
resolutions being called a "new tie,
parture," he said they "pledged the
party t the support of tho Consti
tution. The party hod always
been a constitution -loving pmty.
When ho received the nomination
he said that no black man who had
received the ritht to vote under the
Fifteenth Amendment ever crrild
have it taken away." Then, divid
ing the question propounded to him,
ho proceeded to say :
1. I am asked as t the 1 hirtecnth,
Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amend
ments: ''Do you regard them as in the
same sense ahd to the same extent
parts of the Constitution as olhcr port
tfbns?''
1 answer : Yes, certainly. Cannot
men sec tho difference between the
loyalty of opposing the adoption oTa
measure and yielding when it has
been adopted, aud oppositiou has be
come useless?
"2. I am asked : '-Are these amend
ments neveragaiu to become political
questions?
1 have no authority or power to an
swer such a question! How can I an
swer as to all the future? How can I
tell what the Democracy of New York,
or any other -'tate, may do? Put how
can they become political questions,
now that they are acquiesed in by al
most the en tire people ot the country?
The questiou of slavery is deepburied
out of 6ight forever. If he means to
ask whether they are more sacred
than other portions of the instrument,
I answer thai they are not.
Now let Butler County nnd Frank
IlurJ a. id all tho non-dcpariers
how-1. Howevor evasive or ambig
uous flie Vallandigham platform it
self, Col. McCook pronounces the
three latest Constitutional Amend
ments, known as tho Thirteenth,
Fourteenth and Fifteenth, to be
"in" the same sense aDd to the same
extent paits cf the Conslilution"
as tho earliest formation the solid
granite o tho original structure.
Cincinnati Times and Chronicle, July
2&th, 1871.
Obituary.
Died, at his residence, in Bloom
township, Morjran County, Ohio. Von-
oav July 10th. 1871. Deacon T. A: Kob-
mson. in the a'Jtli rear ot lr.s ace
Bro. Kobinaon was born in Beluiont
County, Ohio, Feb. 22nd, 1813, where
he lived Until about twelve yenrs of
age, when his parents moved to what
is now ouIe County, near the urooK
field Bantist Church, where he at
tended the preaching of Cod s word
by Elder W llliam hod a irk: and was
converted, and haptizod into the fel
lowshin of the Church, being then
about 20 rears of nee: about this time
he became acouain'-ed with Miss Ke-
becca Lehew.and they were mairied
January ord, 18.i3.
lie continued a member of the
Brookfield Church untfl 1S54 when he
withdrew by letter, rnd joined the
Kockville Baptist Church. His God
ly walk and conversation won for him
the esteem and confidence of the
Church, mid June 22nd, 1861, he was
elected Deacon, and in .Setpmber fol
lowinc, during the association at the
Church, he wns ordained, which rela
tion he sustained until his death, hav
ing been a member of church for 33
years. In the death of our dear broth
er we have lost a faithful, earnest and
devoted Christia'n; sound in doctiine,
wise in Counsel, and "always abound
ing in love."
His chief concern was the prosper
ity of the kingdom of his adorable Re
deemer. During his lat illness hia
mind dwelt principally upon the pros
perity of the Church to which he be1
longed. In him the Church has lost
one of its strongest pillars and advo
cates, and the family an irretrievable
loss. He has left a beloved wife, bun
and daughter to mourn his departure,
and a large circle of friencls. On We l
nesday, the 12th, his remains were ta
ken to Wesley Chapel where his fu
neral sermon was preached by hia for-
oner pastor, x.. . Dannels, lrom 2d
Sam., 3d Chapter, 38th verse, "Know
ye not that there is a Prince and great
man fallen this day in Israel''? after
which they were deposited in their
last resting place to await the resur
rection of the just.
May God bless and sanctify this loss
to t he good of the Church and family,
and may we all be admonished to pre
pare for the change that awaits us all,
"for we are but stranpers here," and
may the grace of God our Heavenly
Father comfort and sustain our dear
sister, nnd her family, in their sad be
reavement, remembering '"he doethall
things well," and may this dispensa
tion of his divine providence admonish
us who remain to be prepared like him,
who has cone "to be with Christ, which
is lar better.
T L ELWELL.
Rural Dale, Ohio, July 17, 1871.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
Road Notice.
There will be a petition presented
to the Commission ners of Morgan
County, Ohio, at their next session,
asking for a review and alteration in
the road leading from Barkhurst's
Mill to Chesterfield, commencing at
the center of the road, in front of
said mill, thence a South-westerly di
rection across Wolf Creek, thence on
lands belonging to E. R. Coalman to
the center of the present road in
front of said E. It. Coalman's house.
MANY PETITIONERS.
MANY PETITIONERS. Aug. 4, 1871-4w
MISCELLAXEOIS.
(ffochr
&o.9
SOCTII-WEST SIDE OF TUE
PUBLIC
SQUAEE,
M'CONNELSYILLE, O.,
Dealers in
HARDWARE, HOUSE-FURNISHING
GOODS,
FARMING IMPLEMENTS.
SPECIAL ATTENTION
Given to the
Farmiurr Implement
AND
Machinery Trade.
fOWEUS&HEAPEHi
j SOLE AGEXTS
in this locality for the sale of the
Celebrated
CHAM P ION
Mowers & licapers,
"W OELD
Mower & Reaper,
and the
RUSSELL
Mower & Reaper,
UASCFACrnititsor
Cook & Healing Stoves,
aud odd pieces of all the varieties of Cook
Stoves in the roll lit ; 11 kinds of Thrash
ing Machine Castings ; also Bait Kettles,
and Salt Klnnges, Sugar Kettles, l'ota. Grid
dles, Skilleti, aliont twenty different pat
ernsolTlow Points, Machine Castings for
Steamboats, Saw Wills, Sslt Works, Mow
ers and Reapers; also Oisl Iron t'himney
Tops, WiuduwCaps, Cellar Window Grat
ings, ami also Cast Iron legt ror school
house Desks aud Scats.
Tin-ware.
Have constantly on band, manufactured
their order, all nianuoroiTiu -ware, Store
Trimmings, 4c.
Blacksmitliing.
Manufacturers of Water Tweera, Mandrill
Swedges, ic, lor lUackauiiths.
Kemeinber tr.e I luce :
Soth-west Side of the Public Square
M COX NELS VILLE, 1 1.
uiar.l8,1870-'f.
THIS LARGEST
QUEENSWAKE STORE
in
a 0 u I s-iasmra
C3 HUE GLD I
E, L. JENKINS,
IMPORTER. AO -DEALER IS
QUEEN 8 W ARE 1
CHINA 1
GLASS 1 AND
EARTHEN WARE!
Xorth Mde of Center street, between
East and Penn streets,
EUcConnelsviUe, Ohio,
REASONS FOR PATRONIZING JEN
KIN'S ESTABLISHMENT !
1st. Jenkins imports his own goods
and is thereby able to undersell all
who purchase at second hand.
2nd. He has the largest establish
ment, and most complete variety of
goods in outh-Eastern Ohio, and you
are enabled to get just what you want
do not have to take just what you
can get."
3rd. Living amongst us, Jenkins
helps to build up the business of the
community, and it is no more than
right that community should build
him up instead of going otf to Zanes
ville, or some such point to buy your
goods.
FANCY
A.t Jenkins' in.
April 21, 1572-tf.
'an.
tXr)
?oziiian,
MALTA msIXCSS CARDS.
J. 2i. i:ogei:s.
R.
J. M. F.OGERS & CO.,
Front St. , near tli Bridge, Jfalta,
je All Orders Prompt! j Attended To ! -a
April 21, 1S71 ly.
JfjirSteqre ! Sfobes ! ifrhhs ! fqiq Uteris !
GEORGE
West side of Bell Street, Malta, Ohio,
filKDWlEE, TiMYIEK, STOVES sod STOVE TRIMIXCS. FAR.HISC UI.$!LS,
AND INVITES ALL TO CALL ON lllil. -
CS?" Sp?cial attention git'en to the trade in Stoves and Store Trimmings.
Agent for the sale ot the celebrated "Clipper Mower & Keaper." Evtrvthins
sold low for cash.
Dry Goods llorcliant. South-east corner
ulways on hand a
DllY GOODS, NOTIONS.
W.4RB, IJOOTS AXI SHOES, &.C., 1c.
S5 Xew Goods received regularly, as a flourishing trade demands. Every
thing sold at the lowest cash figure.
goods.
Z.i(:StILIX HI'S IX CSS CARDS.
W. 11. UUTLEDGE.
iifledgc
Altera' Block, So. 5S DXain
Have opnfd a complete Stock ef Velvets,
i.ers, .'rperntw, Meoinni Sinner?, Ingram,
and Kis Csrpet. ALSO Wall I'apers,
Agents lor Maruleizeu Man ilea. vt e invite tec 1 ub.io lo tall and rxani-ie cur
Block.
J. DAY1S.
Ohio, keep constantly on hand
JANEWAY,
keeps a well selected assortment of
! April 21. 1871 -ly.
of Front and BtllSts., Malta, Ohio- has
complete block of
GROCERIES, QUEENS-
Country Produce ta'en in exchange for
April 21, 1871 ly.
F. G.UAlLEl'.
& Bailey.
Street, Zaucirllle, Ohio, .
IWy pd Tapestry Brnsw!., Extra Su-
Venetians, Ud'ch Wool, Cottage. Hemp,
Window slmdec, Mutt Kuas. Oil Cl.iths. 4c.
(June 3, 1371.
LUTTOM.
msiLss CASUS.
W.R. HELIiT, 1,1. D.
Mav be found at his nitioe on
TllV SOITII-U 'EST COrtA'CR
or TBI
TPiafoiic Son n re
M'CONNELSYILLE, OHIO
At all times, when not absent on l'rofess-
i.mal Uusiuess.
J. T. C'KEW,
Attorney and Counsellor
AT iA-"W.
M COyX ELS VILLE, OHIO.
SSS-Oflice iu the southeast corner of Court
House
counti
. scceiid floor. Will rirartice in the
es ot Morgan, Athens, and Washing-
ton
I W. MOORE,
.1 TTOJiXE Y A XD CO VXSELL OR,
AT LAW.
3T Will practice in the counties of Slor-
gan and Noble.
OFFICE in tba southeast corner oT Court
Iiouse, MrCnnnelsvillo, Ohio.
July 7, 1871.
J E. HAXXA. En. M. KENNEDY
IIANNA & KENNEDY,
ATTY'S AND COUNSELLORS
AT L AAV,
On Center Street, near the Tublic Square,
M'CONNELSYILLE, OHIO.
jr Special attention piven to Collec
tion"; will practice in Morgan, Athens, No
ble, Wsihineton and Muskingum counties.
Jan. 1, 1871 tf.
TUB SrinDII) STE.OER
CARRIE BtlOOHS,
IfjtRVEr DARLrxcTox, Crptain,
Will make regular weekly trips be
tween Zanesville and Pittsburg, 3
follows: Leaves Zanesvilleat 8 o'clock,
on Tuesday mornings; and, returning,
leaves PittoLurg on Saturday evenings,
at 6 o'clock.
August 19th, 137) 3m.
That JOIIX RYA.V is the BEST
COIIIII.ER ever in MlCOAXEES-
ills:.
lie has constintly on hand a good assort
me lit ol Fine and Stoeie Toots, of his nnn
manufacture, which he i offering at the
lowest CASH rates. Give him a call at his
establishment on North-west corner of Pub
lic squHre, Mi-CouncUville, Ohio.
Sept. 16, 1870-17.
AKT OT.LYKliY.
TV. C. TISESIZE
asks the p iblie to call and examine his
specimen rhotiigraphs, Ferrelypes, Am
brotypes, (Jems, Jec, ic, which cannot bt
sin passed anywhere, lie has perfected ai
rangemenls whereby any on can be ac
comodated with the liues'l of Oil I'aiiitings
and pictures of India Ink Work. Kooms
over Boone's Saddler Shop, in J. C. Stone's
Building, Ceuter Street, il'Connelsville,
Uhio.
Ai ril 23ly.
XT. Xu TRUE.
Physician. & Surgeon,
M'CONNELSYILLE. OHIO,
Treats all lorin of acme and chronic
disease, on new and improved principles.
Calls promp !y altembd to. and cbarers
reasonable. OFFICE: in Morris' New
R.iildin?. on Center street, where be
will be found wlisnnot professionally encag.
ed. 1 Feb. 3d, 1871.
James Hiley,
JIANCFJU-rCRER OF
effl- BOOTS AXD SHOES. -&A
Opposite Blaniniey's Grocery
Store,
On Centre St.. McConnehriUe, O.
BPHU Snecial attention civen to Cobb
ling. Patronage solicited.
NOTION
AMD
MILL IN ER Y
STORE!
C. L. II ALL,
Wholesale and Retail
rEALEK IN
AXO
S-MILL1NEHY GOODS,
BELL STREET,
MALTA, OHIO.
n BUSINESS DONE ON A
STRICTLY CASII SYSTEM lJ3t
-0y. 11 1870-tf.
i
MISCEl,L.At:'i:S.
AMERICAN: HOTEL,
Corner .Mai Uet &. Streets),
WM. GETZ, ruomiEToa,
ZAKESVIM.E, OHIO.
S. Livery Stables attached to Holel.-tt
June9. 1871 v(.
o
a
t
o
c
F4
tad
u
1
o
0
I
0
H
5
a
3
SI
f, E
e
Fa
I i
THE GREAT C.41SE
or.
Huma n 1 iserv.
JeJWiJust published in sealed env
ii wselope. Price six ecu is. A Lec
ture on the Kature, Tieacuient
and Radical cure of seminal weakuesa. or
Spermatorrhea, induced by selfabuse, in
voluntary emissions, impotency, nervous
debility, and impediments to marriage
geueiaily ; consumption, epilepsy, and fits;
mental and physical incapacity, Ac. By
Iub J. Culverwell, M. i., author of the
"Green Book," Ac.
The world-renowned author, in this'ad
mirable Lecture, clessiy proves from bis
own experience that theawiul consequenc
es of sell-abuse may be effectually remov
ed without medicine, and without danger
ous surgical operat.ous, bougies, instrum
ents, rii.gs, or cordials, pointing out a mode
of 'lire al once certain and effectual, by
which every sufferer, so matter what his
condition luay be, may cure himseli chea
ply, privately ami radically. This lrrtu.-
will prove a boon to thousands and thous
ands. Sent nn.ier seal, in a plain envelope,
any address, postpaid, on receiptor 6 cents
or two postage stamps.
Also, Dr. Culvtrwell's Marriage Guide
price 25 cents.
Address the Publishers,
1 has. J. V. Kline & Co.,
127 Ltwery, Sew York, P. O. Box403tt.
'I HE CALABAK CHAINS
Area Decided Success I
TRULY Ihe old- mortar of "Bad Medi
cine" is teig hroken. Medicine must
iffectcal: but it is uo lonetr ucesaiilj
dangerous, p.iinful or disgusting. The re
markable Ntrve touic aperient assists the
tirnce of d:eestion. and is conducive
the iuit perfect physical and menial condi
tion?. They cure" dyppersia, headache,
allowncss bi.iousness and irregularities,
but their greatest success is in acting as
preventive of these disorders, ti not iouuu
at the nearest Drusgists, enclose fifty cts.
to Calabar Grain Co., M arietta, Ohio.
April 2?tb, 1871 2mo.
LEGAL NOTICES.
Xotice.
Benjamin V. Treaton, whose residence
nnknown, is hereby notiged that Snrah
Preston, on the 13th day of July, 1S71 . did
file her petition in the office of the Clerk
ol the Court of Common Pleas, within aud
for the County of Morgan, Ohio, charging
the said Benjamin with adultiry with one
Linda M. Tillman, and willful ad seiice for
four years, and asking that she be divorced
from the said Benjamin, have the custody
of the children and reasonable alimony.
Which petition will be for hearing at the
next term ef said Conrt.
SARAH E. PRESTOS.
By E. M. SmSBSsar, her attorney
Dated this 14th day of July, 1371 w.
Legal Xotice.
Harvey Parlinton vs. John C. Edwards.
John C. Edwards, of the State of Weal
Virginia, will take notice that at the June
Term, 1871, of the court of Common Pleas
of Morgan county, Ohio, the Plaintiff
the above action, obtained en order from
said i-onrt, requiring the said Joan Ed-
I wards, as administrator of John C. Ed
wards, deceased, to show canse wny me
above entitled action should cot be revi
ved against him as the administrator
JohnC. Edwards, deceased, as aforesa
The said John C.Edwards, aa administra
tor, will therefore take notice that, unless
he show cause by the 3rd Saturday after
the 25th day of Angnst why it should not,
said action will be revived against him
administrator aforesaid.
HARVEY DARLIXT0S.
Bv Hiss 4 Kismdt, his att'ya.
July 11, 1571 6w.
to
oi
a
5s
of
d.
IIOOFLAXD'S COLfJIS.
ONE MILLION OF LIVES
SAVED i It is one of the r.
markable (acts of Ibis remarkable age, not
merely that so many persons are the victims
of dyspepsia or indigestion, bat its willing
victims. Now, we wsald not be understood
to say tbat any one regards dyspepsia with
favor, or feels disposed to rank it among"
the Iu juries ol life. Far from it. Thowe
who have experienced its torrrnts woo'd
scoot sncb an idea. Mark Tapley, nhowai
jolly under all the tryiog circumstances in
which he was placed, never had an attack of
dyspepsia, or his j illity wonld have speedi
ly forsaken him. Met. and women some
times gaffer its tortures uncomplainingly,
but whoever heard o! a person who enj yed
them ? Of all the multifarious diseases to
which the human system is liable, there if,
perhaps, none so irenerally prevalent asdy.
pepois. If there is a wretched being in tbe
worlj it is
A Confirmed Dyspeptic !
Bat it is not oar intention tn decant on
'lie horrors of LVpeosia. y have said
that dj?pcpsia is pcrhnp the moet univer
sal ol human disease. This is emphatic
ally the case in tbe United States. Wheth
er this general prevalence is doe to the
character of the food, tbe melt..) of its
preparation, or the baMy manner in which
it is DMi-iIly swailowed, is not our province
to explain. The great fact with which we
are called to deil is this :
Dyspepsia Prevail!
almost universally. Nearly eveiy ot!i"r pert
son you meet is a victim, and npparently
a willing one ; for were not this the case,
why so mtny sufferers, when a certain spec
dy and safe remedy is within the easy
reach of all who desire to avail themselves
of it ? Bat the majority will not Blind.
t i hy prejudice, or deterred by some other
unexplained influencs, they refuse to ac
cept tbe reliel proBered them. They tarn
a deaf ear to the testimony of the thous
and whose stiGbriog3 have been alleviated,
and with strange iofatnitioo, appear to
cling with desperate determiaation to their
rn'.bless tormentor. Bat says a dyspeptic:
YVfcai is this remedy t to which we rep'y :
This great alleviator of human suffering is
almost a witely known as the English Ian-,
gsagc. It bas allayed tbe agonies of thou
sands, and is to-day carrying comfort onl
pnconragenierit to thousand ol olbers.
Tbia acknowledged panacea is none other
Than Dr. Ilttdund's German Bitters,
Would yon kvw moie of tbe merits ol
this wnnderlul medicine than can be learn
ed from the experience of others T Try it
yourself, and when it bas failed to la;6!t
tbe measure of its efficacy given by the
proprietor, tben abandon faith ia it 1
Let it Be Itememlered,
first of all, that IIOOFLAXD'S German
Bitters is not a tnm beverage. They are
not alcoholic in any sense of the. term.
Tbej are composed wholly ol the pare juice
or vital principle o! roots. This is not
mere assertion. I he exlrac's from wl'ieh
I 'ley are compounded are pn pared hy ore
ol ths ablest German cbeurste. Unlike a
ny other Bitters in tbe market, they sre
wholly free from spirituous ingredients.
The objections which hold with so much
force against preparations of this cits',
namely tbat a desiie for intoxicating
drinks is t imnlatcd hy their use. are not
vmIii) in the case of tbe German Bitters.
So fur from eneoarage or inculcating a
taste or di sire for inebriation beverasea,
it my be confidently asserted that their
tendency is in a diametrically opposite di
leclioc. Their effects can be
Beneficial Only
in a'l ce of the biliary system. Hnr-f -land's
German Bitters stand without so e.
qua I, acting promptly and vigorously upon
thrt Liver ; tliey rrm'ive its torpidity and
cam heal lb ful secrei ion of bile thereby
supplying the stomach with Ihe most indis
pensable elements of sound digestion in
proper proportions. They give too to the
stomach stimulating' its functions, and
eoahlir.gr it to per lor m its dutieaas nature
designed it sliou'd do.
They Purify the Blood,
cleansing the vital fluid of all hnrtfcl imp
arities and snpplaDling ihem with the ele
ments oi genuine bealthfulnes.. But in
th- most eener!y prevalent, distressing,
and dreaded di.-euse, Pyspepsia,
They Stand Unrivaled.
Now, there are certain classes cf pet eons
to whom extreme Bitters nte not only o.
paMahle, but who find it impossible to
take them without positive difcomfort
For sncb Dr. Ilooflandi German Tonic lias
been specially pn p ired. This preparation
ia not or.ly palatable, ' ut combines, in mo
dified form, all tbe virtues of tbe German
Bitters. In cases of languor or exce-wive
debility, wbeie the system appears to have
become exhausted of i'9 energies. IICO
flund'i Tonic acis witb almost marv
elous effect. It gives slrtnglb toweakneea
and throws despondeccy to the winds.
But Dr.'K'M'fliad's beneUctious to tL hu
man race are not cmfiueJ to his celtbra'ed
German Hitters, or his invaluable,
Tid:c. lie bas prepared anoitit r medicine,
which is rapidly winning way to popular
favor becanse of its intrinsic'merits. I bis
is bi, llooQaiid's Fodopbyllia
Pills, a perlect substitute for mercury,
wiihuut ssy of mercury's evil qualities.
These wouderfu! Tills, which are intended
lo act npon the Liver, are mainly compos
ed of Podophyllin, or the Vital Principle
of the JIuidrake Hoot. It is the medicic
al virtues of this health-giving plant.
Tie Phodophyllin acts directly on tbe Liv
er. 1 he extract ol Mandrake contained ia
them is ekillluliy combined with four other
extracts, thus producing a pill that influ
ences the rot iie d'geatire and alimentary
system, and in its act ion is entirely free from
nausea. Possessing these much desirable
qualities the Podophjliin becomes invalu
able as a Family I'ILL -fx No
Household should be without them. They
are perfectly sale, require bat two for an
ordinary dose, are prompt and efficient in
action, and when used in connection with
Dr. 11 Gotland's German Bitters, or Tonic,
may be regarded as certain specifics in all
cases of Liver Complaint Dyspepsia or any
of the disoiders to which thesystem ia o.d
inarily subject. The PODOPIIV
LL13T Pills act upon tbe stomach acd the
bowels, while the Bitters or Toriio purify
tbe blood.
DR. MOOFLAXD,
having provided internal remedies for dis
eases, bas given the world one maiily for
external application, in the wonderful pre
I aration known as
Dr. Hoofland's Greek Oil.
This Oil is a sovereign remedy tor pain k
aches of all kinds. Rheumatism, Neural
gia, Toothache, Chilblain's, Sprains and
Burns, Pain in the Back and Loins, Ring
worm, 4c, &e , 4c, all yield to its exter
nal application. The number of cares ef
fected by it is astonishing, and they are
increasing evsry day.
Taken internally, it is a care for Heart,
burns, Sidney Diseases, Sick Headaches,
Colic, Dysentery, Cholera Siorbu, and
Cramps, Pains in the stomach, Grid., As
thma. 4c
The Greek Oil is composed entirely of
heIing gums and essential oils. Tbe princ
ipal ingrediednt is an oily substance, pro
cured in the southern part of Greece. Its
i fleets as des'-rnyerof paio are truly magi
cal. Thousands have been benefitted by
its use. aud a trial hy those whoere skept
ical will thoroaehly convince them cl its
inestimable value.
These remedies will be sent by express to
any locality, upon application to the prin
cipal office, at the German ifedicine Store,
No 631 Arch street, Phil.
CHAS. M. EVANS, P.-op'r.
Formerly C. M. Jackson 4 Co.
These remedies are for sale by Druggists,.
Storekeepers, and medicine Dealers every-wbers.

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