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The Conservative. (M'connelsville, Ohio) 1866-1871, November 09, 1866, Image 2

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fBIDAT HORNING, - - - - NOV. 9.
HOOHE . KELLT, Publishers.
The Elections.
Several States held their elections on
Tuesday lost, but, owing to the failare
of tbe mail to arrive, we are unable to
irive the result of any of them. Wo
will gire a full report next woek.
The Cash System.
As we stated in our lant issue, we
intend to adopt tho cash system.
Several attempts, within the past few
years, Lave been made to carry on a
Democratic paper in this county on tho
credit system, and all have failed in a
very short time, and those who paid in
advance' failed to get their paper for
the full time for which they paid.
Now, we say to all our subscribers,
that we have contracted with Mr.
Glenn to furnish tho pnper to all those
who have paid him for it, and that wo
are bound to keep the paper going for
some nine months yet, and if, at tho
nd of that time, thero is no better
prospect of Us paying than at the
present, we intend to permanently sus
pend its publication. It is for the
Democrats to say whether they have a
paper or not. We will take no new
subscribers for a longer period than j
sino months. We would also stnto
that we intend sending one more copy
to all, and after that wo will send to
none who aro in arrears on subscrip
tion. We are compelled to adopt this
plan, for we cannot get a bundle of
paper, a load of coal, or a day's work
done unless wo pay cash in hand. All
those knowing thcmsolves indebted to
us on subscription, and who do not
wish the paper anyjonger,aro Tpect
fully solicited to como in and settlo for
the time they have had it. We hope
that all of our subscribers will recog
nize the necessity of this measure, and
cheerfully comply with it.
We request all those who desiro to
have tho paper continued for a longer
period than nine months to endeavor
to got us new subscribers, for a Demo
cratic paper in Morgan county has not
much else to depend on for support.
Pick the Flint and Try It Again.
our
pleasure to meet since the election,
says, with hope and confidence beam
ing in his faco, let us "pick the flint and
try it again, as tho old Domocratic gun
will not always miss tiro."
We heartily endorse such action, and
ay to all rally, and organize your
forces I Never despair of tho Repub
lic I Radicalism and all other isms
must havo their day, and we must
look for a bolter time in the future.
Thore are some bright political spots
in old Morgan, which serve as invig
orating cordials to all our party -workers.
Meigsville township, which has
beon, for some years past, polling a
Republican majority, gave at tho last
election a majority of three for Dem
ocracy and right making a gain over
Radicalism in one year of twenty-six.
Morgan township gave a large Demo
vratic gain. Manchester done nobly
ana so aia xoric. When it is remem
bered that the Radicals mndo such eu
per-human exertions to gain the day,
we may say that all the townships
done well. All that is requisite to our
eventual suocess is to bo earnest, vigi
Unt and active In our efforts to do our
portion towards reclaiming the coun
try.
"Artemus Ward was decidedly
harp when, in one of his letters to
London Punch, he said:
. "I look at your last Parliament, and
1 can t see tnat a aingio spoecn was
tncored during the entire session.
"Look at Congress but no, I'd rath
r not took ut Congress.
Jn fact, it is the fewest number
bar people who desire to look to our
Congress. Its assembling in Decern
ber is regarded as an approaching
. visitation of the small-pox or cholera,
Ohio Congressmen.
The Radicals in Ohio elect sixteen
Congressmen, on a total vote in th
State of 275,000. The opponents elect
but three members, with a total vote
235,000. 'It takes, therefore, under th
rascally district apportionment of th
Radicals in Ohio, 73,000 votes to elect
an anti-Radical member, whilo 17,000
votes are all that is required to choose
Jacobin. J his is their idea of equal
representation. With a fair appor
tionment we are entitled to at least
iarht of the nineteen members from
the fnt4wKxchange
The Complete Control of the
Presidential Election.
The New York Times', which is now
on the Radical side, commences a po
litical artical thus: , o '
"The South prefer8to trust td the
ascendency of the Democratio party,
and to await that event as the occasion
and condition of its readmission to po
litical power. Very well. It can do
so beyond all doubt., . Southern mem
bers are not likely, according to present
appearances,, to be forced into Congress
against their will, ana win prooabiy
be allowed to wait outside until the
Democratic party shall get control of
both Houses ol CongreBS, tr they eieci
to do so. But we trust they will not
tako it amiss if we suggest that they
may have to wait a long while. . That
event seems somewhat remote For
tho next three 3'cars it is cortain that
it can not take place Congress, for
that time at least, will bo in tbe hands
of tho Republicans, who will be only
too happy to wield its power, and to
govern the country in their own way
and for their own benefit, without in
terference from Southern members.
Tlioy have already secured, moreover,
tho complete control ot tho coining
Presidential election, and will undoubt
edly exercise tho power over that
event which the Southern States pro
pose io leavo in their hands."
We aro informed that the Republi
cans have "seen rod complete control
over the next Presidential election,"
and will exerciso their power over
that event. What meaning docs such
language convey ? Is one to infer that
tho Presidential election of 1863 is not
to bo in the hands of the people at
that time? The above extract says it
is already controlcd by tho Republicans!
Are wo to bo allowod, then, to have a
'residential election ; or is it to bo
hold if we have ono in such a man
ner as to be only a furco? Can any
one explain how this control has been
effected? Aro we to have a perpetual
dictatorship in tho person of Ben. Butler?
General William Schouler and
General B. F. Butler.
General William Schouler. formerly
editor of the Cincinnati Gazette, and
now Adjutant-general in Massachu
setts, is out in a Tetter against Goneral
B. F. Butlor. Ho says that he is a Re
publican, but ho cannot vote for But
ler, because ho does not live in tho dis
trict, and becauso he is pledgod to im
peach the President. General Schou
ler, in his letter, says:
"The President will decline to bo do-
posed, and ho will call upon tho army
und navy to support him. Congress
will call upon the sanio to support it.
Hero comes a clash. Tho President
will call upon tho militia to support
tho Executive. Congress will call up
on the militia to support Congress.
The issue is made partisan. The heat
becomes every moment more intense.
rvi i. J : .1 I : r 1 1 . 1. -i-
.lie peupie uiviud jjunucttiij'j imu iiuii
ia hesitates: the army hesitate which
authority to acknowledge. This
breeds dissension; fight takes placo;
blood is shed. Who can see the end of
t? Who can count tho cost? And
et it is to produce this condition of
affairs that we are to send General But
ler to Congress. 1 beg to be excused.
Should Andrew Johnson or any suc
cessor of his ever commit acts which
would make impeachment a necessity,
have taith thut Congress would meet
the exigency in proper form and right
pint: but tave mo lrom being a purty
to sending, a year in advance, a repre
sentative pledgod to impeachment, and
who labors under the delusion that he
s appointed of God to act the part. I
am ulso opposed to the election of Gen
eral JJutler because 1 have a most do
voted regard for General Grant. I be
lieve in him. I hope and behove that
ho will be the candidate of all truo pa
tnotio men for tho Presidency two
years hence, lie is our best and bra
vest, and should haveour highest placo
It is said and believed that he has no
more bitter enemy than Goneral But
ler, and it is also behoved that one of
the reasons noxt to the impeachment
Inch General iiutler has to cot into
Congress, is to head off General Grant
and uncork the bottle in which Gene
ral Grant's reports placod him for the
part he acted at Bermuda Hundred,
and his failure to act at Fort Fisher."
General Sherman on Political
Questions—His Prophesy.
of
of
There wero never more trutniul or
better words spoken than are' contain
ed in the following letter of General
Wm. T.Shermauto Chiof-justiceChaso.
We invite particular attention to tho
prophesy of tho distinguished General,
which we have placed in italics :
"Steamer Prussia, Bxai-fort )
Uakuob, May 6, 18G6. )
"I am not yet preparea to receive
the negro on terms of political equi.li
ty, for the reason that it will raise pan
eious and prejudices at toe jNorth, su
peradded to the causes yet dormant at
the &euin, inatiuigut reainuiei.no war
whose fares are now dying out, ana
which, by skillful management, might
be kept down. Ab you must observe
I propose to work with known facts
rather than to reuson ahoad to remoto
conclusions.
"T
"We can control the local State capi
tala, and, it may be, slowly shape )o
litical thoughts, but we can not combat
'existing ideas with force, i tety hon
estly lhat the assertion openly of your
Metis of Hnivirsol negro suffraos, at a
fixed iol!vy of our General Government,
to be backed by phmcal power, will to
duce a new war sooner or later, and. one
which, from its desultory chfcractor,
will be more bloody and destructive
than the last. I think tho changes
necessary in the future can, be foster
and more certainly made by meamv of
our Constitution than by any plan out
side of it.- If now we go outside of the
Constitution, for a n-.eans of change,, we
rather justify the rebels in their late
attempt, whereas now. as General
Schofiold tells us, the people of the
South aro ready and willing to make
the necessary changes without shock or
violence. I felt tho past war as bitterly
ana Keenly as any man could, auU 1
frankly confess myself 'afraid', of. a
new war; and a new war is bound to
result from the action you suggest of
giving to tho enfranchised negroes so
largo a share in tho delicate tusk of
putting tho Southern (States in practi
cal working relations with tho General
Government."
Chronic Anarchy.
It is proper to tako into considera
tion among tho natural consequences
of coercion, tho social and political an.
archy which exists in Eoveral of the
Border States. Loyal newspapers,
judt now, are dividing themselves be
tween tho nbuso ot the President, and
representations of the malignity of tho
Into secessionists in Missouri and Ma
ryland. Whatever tho etuto of mind
of the majority ol the peooplo of thoso
States may be, or the stato of society,
nothing can bo more certain than that
it is tho natural result of tho regimen
to which the people havo been subjec
ted. When the people of the North
determined to coerce, they resolved to
dare nil tho consequences of the coer
cive policy. This state of anarchy is
ono of the consequonccs. It could havo
been foreseen. It was foreseen anu
foreboded; and thero are none who
havo a right to bo surprised thut it
should exist, or to complain because of
its existence.
It is suid in a special dispatch from
St. Louis to a city cotcmporury that
"out of 2,200 votws in Mouroo County,
Missouri, only about four hundrod and
filly were able to show a loyal rocord,
such us would enable them to get on
the books as legal voters." Iu other
words, out of 2,200 who have been uc
customed to vote, 450 will be permitted
to vote, and 1,750, if possible, bo dis
franchised. It is inado the business of
450 to suppress and permanently keep
down 1,750; of one-fourth to reduce
three-fourths to political nonentity.
In order, in the Radical estimation,
that we, the people of the North, may
enjoy tho benefits resulting from tho
war, this practical subjugation of three
fourths to one-fourth, is essential.
This given up, nothing has been gained
and we aro worse off than wo was be
fore. If this istrno, the benefits of the
war havo yet to bo discovered. One
fourth can not long kocp under three-
fourths, l he disparity ot phisical force
and, After all, it comes to this is too
great. 1 ho three-fourths abido in tho
conviction that their rights aro equal
to thoso of tho one-fourth; and when
throat-cutting time comes as come it
will, it this preposterous claim is per
sistod in it in easy to see whose throats
aro in the greatest danger.
11 one thousand seven hundred and
fifty voters iu Monroo County permit
themselves to bo deprived ot their
rights by four hundred and fifty, they
aro a dill'erent stylo of people from uny
wo havo bocu or heard of this sido of
Africa. The state of society is pretty
much unsettled in Missouri. People
shoot each other on questions of party
differenco. It is rather a customary
mode of discussion. The disfranchise
ment of the majority is a very good
way to keep up thiB stylo of argumcu
tation, in which tho majority may, if it
choosos, rule, it is an interesting ex
periment in popular government to
thoso who are out of tho range of tho
arguments, and with some littlo curios
ity we shall await the result. Cincin
nun uuquirer.
Uneasy is the Head that Wears
a Crown.
Under this heading tho Now York
News well says:
"Like the shirt of Nessus, thepnrple
robe seems latal to the peace ot mind
and health of body of the wearer, and
consumes heart and brain with the
fires of ambition that too often leave
behind only the ashes of disappoint
ment. Napoleon, -weary withaccumu
lating cares and proBtruted by diseuso;
Francis Joseph, humiliated by defeat,
sullenly and hopelessly h looker-on iu
Vienna, while his empire is being dig
nieinueieu; the rope, impotent and
feebly protesting against the, destiny
flint utriria hitn nf liiu wnt'lHtfr Tmwr.M.
. ... . ., pnvi p
Victoria, a recluse in the midst of
worldly pomp, stirred from her leth.
argy ot soul Ly neither tne duties nor
the pleasures of her exalted position:
Maximilian, bearing the mockery of u
scepter, seeking to strut his hour upon
tho imperial stage, andCarlotto moro
to be pitied, less 10 be censured than
them all stricken with tho most ter
rible curse, or perhaps the best boon of
sutiering humanity, madness. What
an array of mournful attestations of the
truth ot the great barb s statement:
" 'uneasy lies the head that wears a
crown.' " .
JurNearly 2,000 Germans leavo Eu
rope every week for the United States,
in the Bromen and Hamburg mail
steamers. A company is established
at Copenhagen to encourage the emi
gration of Danes, Norwegians .. and
Swedps to the United States.
General James B. Steedman.
The Louisville Journal pays the fol
lowing compliment to this distinguished
officer :( ' ' , L
w;Bu General Sherman declines the
Secretaryship, and, as we are informed,
strongly indorses General Steedman as
Mr. Stanton's successor, We have
reason to know that Gen6ral S toed man's
name-', a considerable time ago, was in
tho minds of President .Johnson . and
the most judicious of his friends us tho
proper person, one of the very best in
all the country, to tako the portfolio of
Secretary Stanton whenever the later,
either voluntarily or by invitation,
should surrender it. Thero can be no
doubt of his high, if not Unoquuled, fit
ness for the duties of the office. 'Ihey
aro of a claps of military duties with
which he has been theoretically and
practically familiar for a long time.
Wo have heard some of tho most emi
nent Generals in the Federal service
cpeak with a degreo of admiration bor
dering on surpriso of his thorough,
minute and coinprehonsiveundcrBtand
ing of military principles and detail.
"General Steodman s lato awful exco
riation of General Butler in a public
speech, an excoriation which not many
a military man would accept at tho
hands of another military man, might
render his appointment distasteful to
tho Butler school of politicians, - but
anything not distasteful to them would
bo disgustiLg and revolting to all tho
true friends of tho country."
The Condemned Fenians.
gives ing
sketches of tho history of tho Fe
nian prisoners under scntcuco of death
in that city :
Robert B. Lynch wos born in Gal
way, wo understand, in 1818. IIo was
at one time chief clerk in tho Depart
ment of the Board of Charitable Dona
tions and Bequests, Dublin Castlo, and
retainod that post from 1837 to 1812,
when ho is said to havo emigrated to
the United States. llo then engaged
in business in St. Louis for a time, out
left thero in 184D, and traveled to many
of tho leading citiesin tho South Amer
ican Republic and West Indies. He
subsequently joined tho American
army, and was tiuartormaster, with
the rank of Major, in tho Twenty-
fourth Wisconsin Volnnteors. During
the latter part of tho wur he was chief
clerk, with the rank of Major, in tho
Dischurgo Department of Louisville.
(Subsequently, ho Hays, ho came to
Cunuda under the direction of Adjutant
General McDormot. of the leuian
Brotherhood of Louisville, Ky., to re
port the reman campaign in Canada.
This is tho prisoner's account of him
self; but wo have heard other ver
sions of his career, which assigned him
u rcsidoncc ot soiuo years in e stern
Canada.
Rev, John McMnhon was born in tho
couuty of Monaghan, Ireland, about
le-U, nnd is consequently lorty-six
years old. lie studied for tho ministry,
according to his statement, in tho Uni
versity of St. Mary's, Chicago, and
alter serving as n priest in various
parts, was lately appointed to Ander
sonvillo, Madison county, Indiana. Ho
was priest of a parish there until tho
time ot his arrest at r ort ji.no, on me
morning of tho 3d of Juno.
The Louisiana Plantations.
on
look, usuully, rather desolate. Instead
of tho waving fields of cane, and broad
fields-ot yellow corn, potatoes, peas,
pumpkins, &c, we now seo nn occasional
Latch of cuno, a few fields of worm-
oaten cotton, a lew potatoes, and broad
surfaces of yellow weods. It is thought
there will bo about 10,000 hogsheads
of sugar made on both sides of the La
fourcho its whole length this year.
They will generally make about one-
third ot a crop ot cotton. J hero
tho samo uncertainty about labor the
coming year thero as here and elso
where. x.very body seems struggling
faithfully to weather tho storm and
roach tho shore, but they havo many
dead weights to carry, and have wind
and tido against them. f Planters'
Xianncr. .
A Breastplate ok Cokk A Lyons
(i" ranee) journal states that a new
breastplate, made of cork, from an inch
an a-half to three inches thick, and
covered with metal on ono side and nnU
form cloth on tho other, has beon ex
hibited in that city. . It is very light,
and is said to be a good defense against
either saber, bayonet or bullet.
stiylb is said that tho expenditure
of two dollars and a hull would proba
blv havo saved tho JCvoninp; Wtar and
the lives of her passengers: the onset'
tion uoinir bused upon tho theory that
the sheave in which the rudder chain
worked was cheap one, not guardod
with iron, and that therelore the chain
sliuped out and the vessel bocamo un
mauugeublo. ,
A Radical editor fears that th 9 eleo
tion of one more blackguard to Con
irress, in tho person of Morrisey, tl
bruiser, may corrupt that body.
isn't ho equally afraid that the
consignment ot sinners wiU corrupt
hell 7
BttyThe spirit ofenterprise exhibited
in New Orleuns this yoar exceeds
thing betore unown. Ail sorts oi
are profitable employed.
Many stately buildings are going
and antiquated structures are either
torn away or improved.
.Gambling is the"heiehtof fash
ion" among the London Peeresses.'
lA.Prince Napoleon ia sorely
bled w.ith a carbuncl
trou-
is
next
any
me
chanics up,
A A. ADAIR.
ADAIR IIfcO'&
. i ',
I ; . ' t dsaLkrs in
BOOKS, STATIONERY, PERIODICALS,
Wall Taper, Cutlery, tc, ,
Adjoining the First National Bank,
. irco:v:vi:i.sriLi.E, oiiio,
Keep constanlly on had all cUmcs of School,
Ifllarellaiieous, lllank sad other
Hooks, which tl j tell at pahlielier'e
prices and cheap a can ba bought Kot.
Our flock of i , , j ,
ALBUMS,
POCK KT BOOKS,
HYMN BOOKS,
PORTFOLIOS,
SCHOOL CARDS,
CUTLERY,
BLANK BOOKS,
PAPER
EN ELOPES,
AM) MOTIONS
of nil kl Dili I fiomplott nn1 lh lt In tli mark! .
W r rrrr Win gimi)n from th Kit tiety two
rrkn, and tie alile lo anppljr onulioil noilr an;,
thing In our Hut that mty not hara on baml.
The HiIid.iy will be on band, and penon
linking nomethiox nire for prtaenU can beauilcd
hj railing at the bOOK SIOUK.
ISe iBicnd krplug up with the lltnf, and an
the Hunk M.te la an eMutillnhed Inil ilntion In
II I'ouimlnrlile, weaak the public te glre u a call
and ce what we lie, ami we led eaxnred thrt
will Incline lo part hniie ol u, and be mliifled with
what llirj fret, and tell their Bcighhora to "(to an
do likcwiae." io'J
id
Dn-J. ALEXANDER,
I'Oonnolsvillo, O.,
DIALER IX
DRUGS, MEDICINES, CHEMICALS,
PERFUMERY, BOATS. DItUSIIK.S,
TOILET AUTIt l.K.S, ALCOHOL,
Pure Wines and Lnknors
(For Medicinal Purposes Onl-,)
1UI I Y,
PAINTS.
OILS.
VAUXISIIKH.
DYB STUFFS.
Ao , Ac, Ac.
lie lias nlno constantly on hand n
largo stock of
AVall lapor,
"Window Sliadcjs,
CORV, TASSELS WTXVOW FISTVREH.
tiui
THE OLD FARMERS' EXCHANGE.
J. ft CI. Hall
DELL UTHEBT,
MALTA, OIIBO,
Have Juit opened a ceraplete atook of
NEW GOODS
CON3IST1MO II PART Of
DIUSSS GOODS,
CA31IMKKK3,
MEUIXOS,
MOHAIRS,
ALPAU0A3,
I'BINI'S.Yarlo.ieilylee,
BALMORAL SKltti'B,
HOOP SKIUTS,
DKLA1NK3,
' CLOAKINU3,
BI1AWIS,
JA8SIM EKKd,
BATINKTH,
.CLOTHS,
' ' ' JKANS
TWKHDjJ,
UKAVY A HLEACHKD MUSLINS.
SHIRTING FLANNELS,
NOTIONS, QUEENS WARE,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
HATS AND CAP3, Ao., Ac.
' ' ALSO
Ladies' Furs
AND
GROCER I KS
OF ALL KINP8.
Wa coidlally Invite our frienda to rail and
emliia our atnik lefora Durclitwlufl eltewhere,
we areaaUkllcd that we can aell aa cheap ai
cheapest. We take great pleaiure m abvwiog
Kooda.. v .. ....
(, - ... J, & 0. L.. IIA.LL.
JOHN t. ADAIR.
ex-
a
the
our
KHSINESS-.DIKKCTOay;--
KIRBY & RUTLEDGE,
Merchant Tailors,
Center St., nrt'onnrlsvlllr, O.,
one door west of J. B. Stones k Co'l.
The ire alwure rtedf t accommodate tkatr
easterner at the Invent ejuli rate.
e A KITalwaja warranted. nt
DKISTTISTHY.
Dr. VV. N, IIAMBLET0N
enntlniiea to niter hta profeiwlonal
'4 acrrlcea to the public In all the
nij varietioaand irtjlenof DKNTISTBlf
r Particular attention given In the cilutrue-
lion of teeth ou KLHBKIl l'LAl'KSV
o r r i c i! i
Crnler Street, M'Comielsi llle, O. .
JAMES L. BERRY,
gltatts at :f alu, '
OFFICE OVER EREWSTER 4 BODERTS' ITOlk,
M CONNKLSVILLB, OHIO.
auS-l
J. K WING, M. DM
X'hysician und Surgeon
M't OSXELSmi.E, OHIO.
OFFICE, in Bait Room of Hanna'i Law Bnlldiic
S-I'rofuMiooul Calli promptly atteuded lotiu
99 I'orliculiir attention siren
lu Diieeeee
of ilia Lung aud Chronic l'iavaiioe.
IlKHIltX(.'K, at
the raltnrenn Kouae,
A Kaliler'a Utore.
oer
Ada ma
nol
W. R. KELLY.
I'liywician and Burgoon,
M'lO..EIriLI.K, OHIO.
Hpeciet attention given In the Ireakuieat ef
11IUUMU llNEAtES.
rrofraaioual colli promptly renpondwl to.
OFFICE Soulhwcst Cornrr of UiePablle Sqoan.
I. M. ITAXUKBT.
W. w. r TLB
STAIN BEUY & PYLE,
bitumens at 3nfo
WcCOaNRLSTlLLB, OHIO.
OFFIt'B rion! Korr si Karris' Boildiif.
I.eiral bualuma Dromutlf attended to. aa
pecial attention aires to the col lee H of all dmihe-
fal claim. aut-lv
GALLKKY-UF ART.
THETINEBT 07
AMIIROTYPBS,
nlMIEREOTl I'UA,
I'HOTOGRAI'IIS,
AND ENI,
TAKF.X BY
J. v.
McOOMAfl,
, BOOMS IK
HALL'S BUILDING, MALTA, OHIO.
A Iko perfect AMHBOTVl'KS taken In I.oekeaa
and Ureaatpina. Uy price are cheaper than lit
cheapen!, and mjr work la warranted in ulve eatte-fai-tlon.
The pulilro will profit by calling un km-
before going eUewhcre.
nol W. M't.'UMAH.
a. aiu.
F. SILL & CO.,
DEALERS IX
Drj Goads, Brorrriei, Notions, TiHirarn, Triiki
AND
HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS.
OppoeUe t'owrt tloewe, M'CMHelevlIle,U.
jj JO tf
r. W. WOOD.
p. a. reel
WOOD & POND,
Attorneys and Counselors at Law,
U'CONNELoVILLK, OHIO.
F. B.PONI), Notary Public.
auJ-ly
WM. tllRKN.
i. A. I ILL I
GLENN 55 KELLY,
ATTOHNElfS AT LAW.
OFFICE South treat Corner of Pttblio Sa,aar,
' M CONNKLHV1LLK, OHIO.
, m. If
B. E. POWER,
ATTOUN'ilY AT LAW,
.... "
OFFICE with J. E. Ilanna, Center Street,
M'COKNEL8VILLE, OHIO

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