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The Conservative. (M'connelsville, Ohio) 1866-1871, November 16, 1866, Image 2

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FRIDAY LORNING,
NOV. 16.
KEU,V, Publisher.
MOORE K
NEWS OF THE WEEK.
General W. T. Sherman and L
1). Campboll, Minister to Mexico, ftr
rived in New Nork on the 8th inst.
The New York Herald's Havana
correspondent says that Monsieur Res
iignicr, Maximilian's Chamberlin, ar
rivod recently in Havana, on the Man
hattan, from Mexico. His attention
seems to be doroted to an inspection of
ntitennnted houses in that city.
Gen. Muccno, the newly appointed
Captain General of Cuba, arrived at
Huvnna on the I Oth Inst, to relievo
Gen. Lcrsundi.
There heiinntobouo longer danger
that the Fenian prisoners will be exo
cutcd. Toronto papers, probably speak
ing by authority, say death sentences
will be remitted, but that the punish
ment will be score.
Typhus fever Las broken out ma
lignantly in several public institutions
in New York. A number of enscshavo
recently been removed to the fevor hos
pital. Considerable alarm is felt, and
means have been taken to prevent the
spread of the disease.
The Herald's Paris correspondent
says Gen. Castelucau will arrango for
the retirement of the French troops
from Mexico en masse, as Napoleon
thinks that a march by detachments
would be inconvenient. It was con
sidered that France would be relieved
of two huge incubi, Rome and Mexico,
ubout the samo time.
The Empress of Mexico.now called
the Princess Charlotte, is said to be af
flicted with a religious monomania, always
bewailing the injuries dono to the
Church in Mexico, and that her case is
hopeless of cure. It is said that the
unfortunato lady had just attempted
suicide by jumping from a window
The ships which have been ordered
fur the servico of removing the Fronch
troops from Mexico were ready to sail
on the 7th. '
The Monitcur of the 7th instant
says that Maximilian will remain
Mexico.
A Washington dispatch says
From the 1st of July last there have
been over 2,200 changes of postmasters
in Northern and Western States alone
In Pennsylvania almost every officer
of the Internal Revenue service was
changed previous to the election.
The official majority for Governor
Saulsbury, of Delaware, is 1,510 ; that
for Nicholson (Dem.) for Congress
1,498. The Legislature is more than
two-thirds Democratic. This Stato,
with Maryland and Kentucky .prevents
the adoption of the Constitutional
amendment.
The official report of the Govern
ment agents upon the Evening Star
disaster is published. As already pub
lished, they found nothing to condemn
the vossel, but condemn in strong terms
the lack of hands aboard the ship,
the fact that there was no carpenter
board. They recommend changes
the laws to provide further protection
in these cases.
It is understood in the diplomatic
circles that our relations with England
are improving ; the British Govern
ment has unofficially shown such
friendly spirit that it is believed
indemnity claims will be sullied with
out an ultimatum from this sido.
The Elections.
Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Michigan,
New York, Missouri, Illinois and
Jersey have all gone Republican.
New York city and Brooklyn an
voto was polled by tho Demo
cratshaving a majoity of over
thousand in tho two cities, and had
not been for the-extreme Domocrats
tho interior of the State, and the
of certain promises made
prominent Fenian leaders, thero is
doubt but the Stato of New York
have been Democratic. Tho
York Express says:
"The nniversul impression was
with a maionty of 45.00U lor JLloliinan
in this city and 7,00Utr 8,0i0in Brook
lyn, the rcault would, be certain for
Democratic candidates. But while
voters hore, representing Hie Conser
vatism, the commerce, tho trade
labor of the city, with a fair
thecapitul, iiave done -.veil far
indeed, than was expected some
lign infliiMK'H has worked adversely in
the inter ior of the Stain.
'This la charged in part to the fiilse
promises lielU out '.o certain rcniun
leaders, who could not bo deceive I
here, but who were deceived in the in
terior of the Stato. 'lhero was, also,
class of Democrats who punished them
selves by relusing to vote for Hoffman
or even to register their names, bo-
cause tho President was not quite up
to their standard of Democracy. They
wanted Stanton reraovea and bewaru
displaced, and, because they were not,
they thought it dignified and becoming
not to register, and not to vote for
Hoffman." We have no pationco with
such logic, or such nonsense, but thero
arc ninny wno oeneve in n, nn
were some who punishod Hoffman by
staying at home, and becntwo they did
not like one of the Democratic nomi
nees for Congress. These, however,
were among the minor causes, but tho
two together, small as they are in the
estimation of some, fully account for
the small majority given to Fenton."
In Maryland, notwithstanding the
fraudulent manner in which tho elec
tion was carried on by tho Radical
Police Commissioners, tho Democrats
have succeeded beyond tho expectat
ions of the most sanguine. There is a
Democratic majority in both branches
of tho Legislature, thereby securing
tho election of ft Democrat to tho
United States Senate. All tho Con
gressmen, with the exception of one,
are Democrats.
Dclawnre gives a Democratic major
ity of about two thousand.
In Missouri tho most glaring out
rages wero committed, ino registry
law was the means by which many,
whose qualiBeations were unquestion
able were deprived of the right to voto.
In wards and districts whero tho Rad
icals were in the ascendency the voting
was carried on without deley or hin
dcranco. But where the Democrats
were in tho majority, so much time
was consumed in cxaminingtherecords
that hundreds and thousands, tireing
of waiting went to their homes, dis
gnstcd, without voting. In some places
the r olls were kept open until after
night.
The East and the West—the way
Taxation Works.
is
and
on
in
a
tho
New
In
im
mense fifty
it
in
in
fluence to
no
would
New
that,
tho
the
and
better,
ina-
v o have heard it said by persons
intimately acquainted with tlio work
lngsot our system ot excise taxation,
that such are its cllccts that practically
no honest man can expect to carry on,
profitably, any of the heavily taxed
branches ot jnanutneture. i ho tempt
atiou to fraud is so great that there will
nlwavs bo enough ot those who have
Iittlo to lose, cither in money or cnar
actcr, to evade tho law, and thereby
keen tho prices of tho manufactured
article below tho rates that are rcquir
cd in order to afford a legitimate re
turn.
Wo will give an example of thefacts
of which we have been inado acquaint
ed by parties concerned. I here is in
this city a lirro is a particular ana very
common branch ol manutacturo : a
branch in which thero are several mil
lions of dollars of the capital of our fellow-citizens
invested. The operations
of the firm are managed bv men of ex
perience aud integrity. Thero is capi
tal enough in it to enable the managers
to tako the utmost advantage ofall the
processes for manufacturing cheaply,
and ot all tho lavorabie phasos in ine
market. I hey havo neither been com
pelled to borrow money, nor to make
sacrifices to meet liabilities. The prof
its of the concern exclusive of taxes
during tho laBt year, havo been about
twenty-hve thousand dollars. J he pro
tits, inclusive of taxes, nothing, in short
the proprietors have paid the net pro
coeds of their year's Dusiness in taxes
to the uovernmcnt. In their opinion
every man, in the same branch of bu
siness in the city and there is a mul
titudo of them who has conducted his
affairs honestly, is in the samo prcdic
anient. Mho year s trade, tho years
labor, the year s use ot many thous
ands of actual capital, every dollar
it has been swept in by the tax-gath
erer.
Tho manufacture to which we havo
alluded above is neither tlint of whisky
nor tobacco. It is not exclusively
Western mauulacturc, though some
what peculiarly so : the cities of tho
H cat, aim vm;iiiiiuw m inu wiv: uiai
having gone into it to enjoy the profits
of working up a raw material which
more abundant here than elsewhere
In respect to whisky and tobacco man
ufacture which is also the working
up of natural products somewhat pocu
liaiiy ot our own section the nam
rule will apply: no man can expect
carry them on at once honestly
profitably. We may allude here lothe
beurings ot these taxes upon agricul
ture. Corn is the great staplo of
West particularly of Ohio, Indiana
and Illinois. Corn is bulky, and,
proportion to its price, costly of trans
portation. It was once a prime source
ofnrotitto the farmer that ho could
sell his corn to a neighboring distiller.
Reduced to a moderate compass by
nrocess of distillation, tho cost
freightage was comparatively small
tho benefit of which inured to tho
Under tho present laws,
bushel of corn distilled into whisky
alcohol pays six dollars in taxes to
Government six dollarsl The
of this im that men of integrity
euniLul hiiVi K-Lormod onerations in
' distilleries and the farmer hat closed
against him his surest and most con
venient market, x ne corn goes iouio
East, to bo eaten up in transportation
nnd commissions ; and tho Jvist hns
tho advantage, nearly all tho time, of
an over supply and corresponding pri
ces. In the meantime, the country in
scandalir.od and demoralised by con
tinual frauds practiced upon the rcvo
nue, which hordes of officers oro cm
i.loved to detect and expose.
While this is going un, wiu uuiiko vi
tho country, which add nothing to its
wealth, and whose accommodations nro
mostly devoted not to the facilitation
of regular trndo but of speculation, are
declaring dividends of twenty, thirty
and forty per cent, intact, tue econ
omical condition of tl o country seems
profitable in proportion to its useless
nss for any purpose but to enrich its
proprietors.
Hero is anv thinir but protection, ei
ther to tho Western agricultural or the
Western mechanical producer. Tuxes
which close his best market to theono,
and eat up the profits of tho woll-con-ductcd
establishments of the other, do
not nrotect. It is thought in some
quarters to bo very wrong to alludo to
.. .. . '.I . I 11 ' . A -
tholMistin connection wun mo esi;
and the suggestion that the country is
governed for the benefit of New Eng.
.. . I f
and has been accounted savoring ii
treasonable disunion. But wo have
the authority of that unimpeachably
loyal journal for the remark that the
present tnriff "is evidently not for rev
enue but protection." Who does it pro
tect? It protects, by a tax often cents
a yard on tho foreign article, every
yard of calico manufactured in Lowell
and Providence The manufacturers
of Massachusetts, Rhode Island and
Connecticut nro dividing ton per cent,
semi-annually among their stockhold
ers. 'J he profits ot eastern manuiac-
tories may bo judged from the increase
in quantity and valuo of their produc
tions. Says the Secretary of State of
Massachusetts, in his abstract of the
Industrial Statistics of that State:
"The last decade exhibits an increase
of seventy-tiro per cent., while the pop
ulation during the same period oiuy
increased three percent. A compari
son, in a few articles, of the capital in
vested and the annual valuo of the nrti
cles produced during tho ten years
which preceded 1850, with thotcnyre
which succeeded that date, will give
an idea of tho encouragement which
our wise and boneficient Government
has afforded to the industry of New
hnglaud :
Valuo. (.'niitnl.
150,140,538 ?31,Vil,0u0
6.213,001) 1,1180,000
13,M)j,&74 7,305. 500
9,mA,Mli 2,270,6110
18I1S
Cotton,
Calico 1 Delaine
Woolftl
Clothing
Value. Capitul.
Otluii $.VI.4rt,h81 fj33,2ti.1,SU
. Calico 4 Pelelue 25,25S,703 4,2'-'2,oo
Woolen ' 4S,43U,S71 14,77i,Klfl
Clc.tliin 17,743,84 4,034,440
These are facts which it bec'oiuesour
fellow-citizens to ponder upon. It is
richt thev should understand whoso
industry is encouraged and whoso dis
couraged. o nave not yet given u
the idea that a Government whit-
does not press equally upon nil sections
of tho country, and all kinds ot indus
try, is unjust, and ought cither to be
abolished or reformed. Every voto
which our fellow-citizens havo given
to keep the present party in power, hns
been given also to perpetuate the pres
ent inequality. Are they content with
what they have done. Cincinnati
Enquirer.
Good Coming out of Evil.
says:
'Next to the popularity of our can
didate and tho righteousness of our
cause, we have to thank the Registry
Law for tho immoiise Democratic gains
in this city and Brooklyn. Passed by
tho Radicals to cut down the Demo
cratic vote unfairly, it has awakened
so much indignation and opposition
that our citizens went out of their way
to cast their ballots. Jf the Registry
Law was applied to the urhole State Jlotf-
man's majorities would have been counted
by tens of thousands.
Letter from Col. Lynch the Condemned
Fenian Prisoner.
of
a
,
is
to
nd
tho
in
the
of
Tho iollowing letter, written by the
condemned Fenian prisoner Lynch, is
published in the Toronto Leader:
Al 1LITARY I H1SON, X OKONTO, JNOV. O.
To tho Editor of the Leader:
You would much oblige the under
signed by correcting a false statement
made in the issue ol the vthinst., in an
article headed "remans, with refer
ence to myself and family. The un
dersigned is tho son of the late Thomas
Lynch, of Jleadford, County ualway.
My father was nover in the British
army, but a private country gentle
man, and a younger branch ot tho
Lynchos of Ballymen Castle, County
Mayo, my uncle, the late dipt. Peter
Lyncy, ot Ballymen, being the first
High bhcriR ot County Mayo by the
Emancipation Act. My mothor was
neither English nor Protectant, but,
thank God I Catholic and Irish. 1 havo
uo brother in the British service, aud
but one now living, who lias resided
for the last twenty years in Milwaukee,
Wis., United States, so that, instead
of my father and mother being ad
herents of tho Church of England,
which I have no doubt would have
been of much service to me at the late
trial, I have the honor to belong
ono of the oldest Catholic families
the West of Ireland, and one of the
twelve tribes of tho ancient city of Gal
way.. Respectfully,
ROBERT B. LYNCH.
or
tho
effect
and
their
Attf'Countcrfoit two dollar green
bucks are said to have mado their ap
pearance. They are pretty well exo
cutod on tho face; buttUo buck is rough
and too light colored, and they
easily detected.
[From the Nashville Dispatch.]
Daring Outrage—Another Train
Robbed on the Nasnville Railroad
—Three Cars Thrown
from the Track and Burned—
Passengers Pillaged and Express
Treasures Burned.
We are again called upon to chroni
cle the daring and reckless exploits of
a band of thieves and outlaws, whoso
operations on the Louisvilloand Nash-
V1110 Iianronu ourmg m ihkv icn
months have been the sourco of griev
ous annoyance nnd heavy losses, not
nly to the Company, but to privato
ndividuals. In the midst of peace, we
are experiencing again the attrocious
excesses of the guerilla days of the
war. Trains nro thrown Irom the
track, the lives of unoffending, men
and helpless women and children arc
perilled with the same atrocious anan-
don. and tho property of the victims
illaged with equal banditti cruelty as
during tho last year of the war. x nat
some extraordinary efforts should be
made to apprehend these villains and
bring them to justice must be manifest
to every one. We give below tho par
ticularsof tho daring outrage of Thurs
day morning :
It was a little nfler two o clock yes
erday morning that tho tram from
Louisvillo to Nashvillo, duo hero at
3150 A. M., was speeding at a rapid
ruto through tho wild, lonely country,
about five miles from the little town of
Franklin, aud a trifle over filly miles
from this cily. Suddenly the watch
ful eve of the' engineer, Jim Stewart,
discovered an obstruction ahead on the
track. To whistle down brakes and
reverbe the engino was but tho work
of an instant. Un sped tho train, how
ever, and ere its momentum was half
reducod, the cngii.o plunged inloa pile
of cross-ties and rails which had been
placed upon the track by tho band of
demons in human shape, who waited
coolly by to commence tho work of
pillugo and plunder. Thercas a wild
crash of breaking iron, and the loco
motive leaping Irom the track and
followed by tho express car, shot down
the forty foot embankment, making
two complete turns, and finally stop
ping with its head pointing directly
back to Louisville, mo baggage car
followed tho express car pnrtly down
tho embankment nnd butting back in
to the smoking car, which likewise
plunged to ono side from tho rail, left
tho ladies' cur and sleeping car on tho
track. Thero was about one hundred
passengers-on board the train, among
them six ladies and a number Of chil
dren, nil asleep or dozing in tho weari
ness ot night travel, but the nrst shock
aroused them in an instant todisagiec
ablo consciousness. Tho firing of
volley from the party of banditti out
side intimated to every ono the causo
of their sudden stoppage and tho prob
ablo fate before them.
Tho robbers had selected a point
whero tho road runs through a dreary
and almost uninhabited country, with
thick woods on each side, and piling
upon the truck, a mass of rails nnd
crossties, they sent three or four men
a short distance back with other ob
structions on hand to throw across
in case the engineer should bo ablo
bring his tram to a halt before colli
ding with the mass nhead, and by put
ting thetrainbaek escape their clutches.
These having performed their work,
rendered unnecessary, however, by
train running from the track, joined
their companions nt tho wreck, and
work of pillage commenced. The par-
ty consisted of ten or twelve men,
roughly dressed, armed with navy
revolvers, aud with their faces black
ened after tho most approved stylo
the burnt-cork artists. Sentinels wero
placed at the ends of the cars, and
remainder went through the coaches,
demanding tho money and watches
tho passengers. The modus operandi
was as follows ; The passengers in
sleeping car were aroused and marched
into tho next car, being soarched
tho entrance. After the car had
vacatod, tho villains commenced asys
tematic search for secreted money
to
in
the
ap
pearance. are
valuables, but were stopped by
burning oftho express car, which,
the nieuntime, had caught fire, and
this time was sending up lurid flames,
lighting tip the surrounding prospect
with a ruddy glare. Fearfull of losing
the chief booty, for " which they
dared to jeopardize scores of
alter a hurried search of the passengers,
tho robbers sprang to tho express
to secure the money safe, but it
too late. Tho fire had already 'trap
ped the treasure box in its embrace,
and tho contents were speedily burned
to ci'iup with the entire lading of
car, which consisted in part of through
packages Irom JNew xork, Cincinnati
and other points.
From the express car the firo
communicated to the baggage
from which meanwhile the baggago
master und mail agent had thrown
bagirago and mail-Gags, and it, together
with the smoking car, wore reducod
ashes. The robbers tearing, doubtless,
to remain longer at the train, collocted
such light baggage as they could
and, about a hull' an hourafterthetrain
was thrown from the track, disappear
ed in tho woods, lcavingtho discomfited
travelers to enjoy the spectacle
burning train and talk over
themselves thr incidents of the
ing.
Immediately after tho dcDarture
tho banditti, Charles Ilice, the
set out for Franklin t secure
About four o'clock tho conductor
returned to the wreck, having found
locomotive and several curs at
belonging to the special truin of
Lipman's Circus, on its way to
The engine hitched to the two cars
left standing On the track, and, taking
on board the . passengers, bnggago,
mail, &c, cnnie on to this city, arriving
here at twelvo, M.
The Louisville and Nashvfllo Rail
road Company lose by this affuir as
follows: Damage to new locomotive,
110,000; three cars burned, $5,000.
Tho loss to tho Adams' Express Com
pany can not yet bo ascertained, but
it will not probably bo more than
$1
Thanksgiving--Proclamation by
Governor Cox.
Columbus, Nov. 5. Gov. Cox has
issued the following thanksgiving proc
lamation :
Tho year which is ncaring its tloso
has been filled with blessings from the
hand of God. Freedom, pence, pros
perity nnd health havo been given us,
and threatened ills have been turned
awny, or havo only been suffered to
touch ns so lightly us to quicken ottr
sense of the happiness of our lot as a
people. Therefore, in accordance with
tho good custom of our fathers, 1 do
appoint Thursday, the twenty-ninth
day of November, inst , as tho annual
day of thanksgiving and praiso to God
tr I I.V. . I 1 1 1. ...nt.!.
our Jieaveiiiy i nuitii iui mi mu inum
fold mercies and abundant goodness
with which He has crowned the year,
and recommend tlint usual business be
laid aside upon that day, and that ltbe
kept throughout tho Stato with grate
ful worship, as a holy feast.
In testimony whereof I havo here
unto set my hand and fixed tho great
seal of the State of Ohio, this fifth day
of November, in tho year of our Lord
ono thousand eight hundred and sixty
six, and of tho Independence of tho
United Stutes of America tho ninety-first.
Signed J. D. COX,
Governor of Ohio.
By the Governor:
Wm. Henry Smitii,
Secretary of Stato.
Gloomy Picture.
a
to
the
the
The cotton mills of Lancaster, Eng
land, having adopted "short time," Mr.
J. Fox Turner issued a circular on the
cotton prospect, in which he says:
If tho American supply bo only 2,
000.000 events will force short time
upon tho manufucturcrwithout waiting
tor Its prescription, lor il is cieur irom
the above figures that wo are working
up our cotton supply on far too liberal
a scalo, instead of nursing it carefully
until we see clearly before us the cer
tainty of an adequato supply. If, per
ndventure. a killing frost should como
early, or tho labor question provoke
new difficulties, or the President's atti
tude toward Congress indnco yoliticnl
complications adverse to a regular cot
ton trade ns it would be, of courso, to
all other trades and the vield- of tho
season 1806-7 from the United States
should full below 2.000,000 bales, can
it bo doubted that , wo should ngain
have inflated cotton prices? Yet. will
any ono pretend to say that such con
tingencies nre beyond the rango of
probability, or that with such contin
gencies on theenrds tho future supply
of cotton cnnbo'called unusually prom
ising. If this bo so, what will bo tho "situa
tion" whenitshull turn out that the
American supply will not be more than
half a million ?
of
the
of
the
at
been
and
the
in
by
Ladiks Should IIkad Newspapers.
It is a great mistako in female edu
cation to keep a young lady's timo and
attention devoted to tho fashionable
literature of the day. If you would
qualify her for conversation, you must
trive her something to talk nbout give
her education Willi una actual worm
and its transpiring events. Urge her
to read tho nowspapors, and becomo
familiar with the present character and
improvements of our raco. History
of somo imnortancc: bntthe past world
is dead, and wo have nothing to
with it. Our thoughts aud our con
cerns should bo for the present world,
to know what it is, and improve
condition of it. Let her havo an in
telligent opinion and bo ablo to sustain
a conversation concerning the mental,
moral, political and roligious improve
ments of our times.
had
lives,
car
was
the
was
car,
the
to
carry
of a
among
morn
of
conduc
tor, as
sistance. a
Frunklin
Mike
(nig
JOHN I. ADAIR.
A. A. ADAIR.
ADAIU BUG'S
DZALEU8 IX
BOOKS, STATIONERY, PERIODICALS,
Mall Paper, Cutlery, &e,
Adjoining tho First National Bunk,
M'C'ONNELSVILLi:, OHIO,
Keep ennstautly on had all claaaea of Mrliool,
Miscellaneous, lllank. and
Hooks, which they ell at publialier'a
pricei. and at cheap can be bought Kuit.
Our atock of
ALBUMS,
lOCKKT IJOOKH,
HYMN BOOKS,
rOJtTFOLlOS,
SCHOOL CARDS, -CUTLERY,
BLANK BOOKS,
PA PUB,
! ENVELOPES,
AND NOTIONS
nt all klndi li complete ami the beat in the
Wa are reoelvinK good irom ine uaai every
wetka, and are aMo to anppiy ouauon nunc a
In our line that we mar not buve on band.
Tim ilulului, will aoon lie on hand, aud
desiring eoiuuthlnK nice lor presents can be
liv calliuu at tho HOOK HTOUIO.
We intend keeping ip with the tlinca, and
the licuU Mre i n cv:.l.!Uhd luktltutiun
U CounnlavllU. we uk tne uuoli.' We u a
and we Uut wa uv, i.nJ w uiil
will Incline to purchase ul ua, and he utii,litid
what they set, aud tell their neighbor to "go
do llkewi.."
BUSINESS DIKKCTOIIL
K!R3Y & RUTLEDGE,
Merchant Tailors,
Center St., M'Connelsvlllc, O.,
one door west of J. B. Stones fc Co'i.
Ther are alwiri renir to accommodate their
camoiiierii (U the lowest cnnn riitei.
tCT A KIT lwaj warranted. no
DIjNTTI THY.
Dr. w. n.ILImbleton
fw-r- continue to nlTbr lili profelonrd
nnrlcee to the public In alf tft
U-Lff rtfT varlotieaandntyleiof BPNTISTRV
r Particular attention given to the Contru
tlon uf teeth on ItUUIlKR PLATES.
O F F I K I
Center Street, Al'Connelsvllle, O
JAMES L. BERRY,
Unxq nt'!$ato,
OFriCE OVER BnEWSitRl ROBEBTS' STOIh,
M'CONNELSVILLE, OHIO.
uS-ly
J. EWJNG) M. Dm
I3liysician nnd Surgeon.
MXOXJVCI.St ILLC, OHIO.
OFFICE, in East Room of Iluuna'i taw Rnlldiof .
3BProf.'Mloual Calls promptly ettemU.l to
rnrticuliir attention given to Piieata
of the Lunga and Chrome Liieaic.
RE3IDEXCK, at the ratlerton lluuae, ofec
AitHint & Kalilcr'a Btore.
no
V. R. KELLY.
l?liyioian nnd Surgeon,
m toxxtLsriM.i;, omo.
Special attention Riven to Uie treatiuaat f
CHRONIC DISKASF.8.
Frofrnsional call promptly ruxpomUJ to.
OFFICE Southwest Corner of thePubllt Squnre.
U. U. eTANUIIY.
STAIN BERY &
w. w. rrts
McCONNELSVlLl.E. OHIO.
01FICE gftond Story of Jlorrin' Buildlnj.
WW Leirnl bunlneKt promptly attended to. Bad
pecia I attention given to the vollcrllon of all ilnubl
rnlclutma. auJ-ly
GALLERY OF ART.
is
do
T II K FINEST OF
AH UKOTYI'ES,
hlMll'Itr.OTYI'F.fi.
IIGTOGKAI'II.
AND ui:mi,
TAKEX 11Y
J. W. McCOISEjVS,
ROOMS II
HALL'S BUILDING, MALTA, GHIO,
Alxo perfect AMBROTVPKS taken la I.oeke4
ill proUt by calllii
JKSBB W. U'C'OMAS
and Breaatpina. My prices are cheaper than tlie
cheapen!, and my work la
ruction, lue pi
before going eUi where
noi
warranted to giro aatl-
calling ou mt
r. SILL.
w. a. sat.
CO.,
F. SILL &
DEALERS IN
Dry Good., Groceriei, Kotioii, Tinwari, Trnnki
AND
HOUSE FURNISHING GOOD!,
Opiioaltc Comrt Homer, H'PoimcUvllU.U.
Jyaotf
r. W. WOOD.
WOOD & POND,
"'""I
s and Counselors tt Law,
oiber
market.
two
any
tliinir Demon
auited
all
til
call
tlifv
with
aud
iuo
M'CON N ELS V I LLB, OUIO.
F. 13, POIND, Notary Public.
auS-ly
WM. OLSNN.
J. A. KSIXT
GLENN & KELLY, .
ATT0HNEVS AT LAW.
0FF1CIC 8omb treat Corker of Public Sqare,
, M'CONNKLBVILLB, OHIO. ...
B. F. row Ell,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
OFFICE v illi J, E, Uanna, Center St. ct. ''
M ' U 6 N N K L y V I L I K , OHIO
u ly i . . ..

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