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The Conservative. (M'connelsville, Ohio) 1866-1871, November 30, 1866, Image 2

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FRIDAY MORHINU, - - - - NOV. 30.
MOORE A. IIEI.LT, rufcll.tien.
NEWS OF THE WEEK.
The Democrats of Idaho have
elected their Congressman by a baud
omo majority.
General Dix and suite left New
York on last Saturday for France.
A number of accused Fenians hare
een arrested in Limerick, and a quan
tity of pike and ether arms seized by
the Government.
It it announced that a popularout
Ireak is threatened 1n Spain, and that
the Queen will abdicate to avert the
term.
At the request of the Louisville
and Nashville Railroad Company,
General Thomas has furnished a guard
of soldiers for all night trains over the
road.
A New York dispatch soys James
Stephens has disappeared, and gone on
a secret mission. He left his office in
that city a few days ago in company
with four mon who had arrived from
Ireland, and were armed with a new
kind of revolvers, specially manufac
tured for them. Stephens took leave
of his friends, snying he should never
again step foot in his office.
Tho speech of the Earl of Derby
at the Lord Mayor's banquet in Lon
don, containod the following: '-Our
natural friend our relation, I may
call it that great Republic across the
Atlantic the storm of war has indeed
ceased there, but the- surface I may
say the interior of society is still ruf
fled and agitated; yet I cannot believe
that great and powerful Nation, which
has made such glorious efforts for the
purpose of keeping down the burden
of debt which that war has entailed on
its national finances, which is making
such superhuman efforts to recover jts
inancial position, I cannot but believe
that a country so deeply interested
in the science of self govern
ment will, and speedily know how to
compose! agitation which at present
prevails, and exhibit to the world, at
no distant period, the gratifying pros
pect of a great, a proud and a prosper
ous community. And I may be per
iaitted to say if, in the course of that
dreadful war which has so lg devas
tated that country, any questions may
have arisen between that and ourcoun
try which have produced the slightest
amount of unpleasant feeling, I have a
confident expectation that the two j
Governments, approaching those ques
tions in a spirittif mutual forbearance
and kind conciliation, will arrive at
such a solution of these questions as
not only to remove all remnants of bit
terness, but place on abetter founda
tion than ever our relations with that
groat country to which we are bound
by so many ties of interest to regard."
DEMOCRATIC STATE CONVENTION
TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1867.
To the Democbact o? Ohio :
A State Convention of the Democ
racy of Ohio will be held at Columbus,
on Tuesday, the 8th day of January
next, to. nominate candidates for the
following offices, and for the transac
tion of iu.cn other business as may come
before it:
Governor :
Lieutenant Governor ;
Auditor of State -r
Treasurer of State ;
Supreme Judge ;
Attorney General ;
Member Board of Public Works.
The ratio of representation will be
as follows : One delegate for each
county; an additional delegate -for
very five hundred votes cast for Thos.
II. Key for Supreme Judge at the last
lection ; and. an. additional delegate
for tvery fraction of two bundred and
fifty or more votee so cast.
This ratio given to Morgan county
five delegates.
It ia respectfully suggested that, as
far as it may be practical ana con-
enient, the delegatus be chosen on
Batordaj, tbe 29th day of Docember.
Ve avail ourselves oi turn occasion
to urge upoa tne jjen.ocracy an jinxne-
d'att orgamaraUcin.-midebpecially town-
blp tndward rgaeinit'qn,, , jNow, . w
J
the time to spread useful information
among the people ; but this cannot be
done without a thorough and efficient
organization. That our principles will
ultimately triumph we do not doubt
for to do that would be to doubt the
possibility of free government but vc
cannot achieve success, aud avert des
potism, without labor; and we cannot
begin our labors too soon, or prosecute
them too earnestly and steadfastly.
By order of the Democratic State
Central Committee.
JOHN G. THOMPSON,
Chairman.
B. J. Beam, Seo'y.
November 20, 1800.
The Meeting of Congress.
On Monday next, the third of De
cember, commences the last session of
the Thirty-ninth Congress, which
closes on the 4th of March,' 1867. We
use the word Congress, but tho body
to which we refer is very different from
that which is established by the Con
stitution. A Constitutional Congress
is made np of Senators and Rcprescn
tatives from every State, and it is ex
pressly provided that no State shall be
deprived of its equal representation in
tho Senate without its own consent.
Tho men who meet at Washington next
week represent only a portion of the
States, who, by a daring aud unscru
pulous usurpation, have seized tho
power that belongs to all, and by force
or fraud deprivod ten States of their
Constitutional representation. In every
sense of the word they are a body of
revolutionary usurpers, who are un
known to the Constitution and laws.
The country looks forward to their as
sembling with the greatest apprehen
sion. That they contemplate an im
mense amount of further mischief is
well known, and tho moderate and
peace-loving among us consider their
appearance at the Federal capital a
greater calamity thau the arrival of
tho worst pestilence upon our shores.
What little confidence may prevail in
political and financial circles is greatly
shaken by tho dangers which compass
their action. The people could well
afford to pay a most incalculable sura
of money to dispense for a year with
this terrible political affliction, wbich
threatens to plunge everything into
anarchy.
The patient, long-enduring and for
bearing might derive some consolation
in the fact.thht the session terminates
on tho 4th of- Marth. were it not well
understood that before it adjourns it
will take steps to convene its successor
immediately, ten months before its
regular convocatien, thus virtually es
tablishing a perpetual Congressional
session. Tbe most stout-hearted mav
0
well be appalled at such a prospect,
and cordially welcome Any remedy that
would save tho country from. it. Fer-
petnal sessions will enable them to sub
vert what there is left of tho balance
of power between the different depr.rt-
ments of the Government, and toxiom
pieto tho usurpation they have com
menced. We are to have, it seerns, a
reiteration of what was known in
England as the "Long Parliament,"
when that body deposod and executed
the executive, and established itself as
the ruling dynasty in the State, becom
ing at last so vile and tyrannical that
the people gladly welcomed their dis
porsion by the bayonets of a successful
soldier, and accepted a protectorate of
Cromwell in its stead. That parliament,
liko this Congress, was a mere frag
mentary rump, which, by its expi.lsion
of members and its frequent "purging"
of annoying minorities, had dwindled
down to a tithe uf its old Constitutional
proportions, ihe men who meet at
Washington onMonday cull themselves
the representatives of the people of the
United States. In truth aud in fact,
they represent but little more than half
of the peoplo in twenty -six States, and
are repudiated by a majority of 1,000,000
in ue wnoie Luion. juui, ignoring
this fact, they are fluehod with arro
gance and pride, and havo the audaci
ty to insist that their usurpations have
been approved and sustained, aud pro-
poso to le'riluto upon that basis.
Cincinnati Enquirer.
Bt The impression prevails that the
next sesHion oi Congress will be char
aeterizod by moderation, oud especial
ly bo, should the President's lnessggo
Throve to be conciliatory in tone. It is
trend-ally conceded that iimmrlial nut'
Irago will be the basis of a compromise
between the Executive aod Lugihlutive
branches of the Government, but tiev
ertuclcss the extreme ltuuicals are
fiiiiniHbd to 'ciitai-taiiiini' terms othur
i tU(lQ ti, adoption of the amendments
i to the Constitution proposuu by Con
' gross. .
T,)0 Uniou Ptt(.ifi(J Ruilroftd bag
been completed to Junction City, and
the Urst tram rau uto tuat pUce
tbe Lnst.
on
Financial Perplexities.
a
rency, an enormous public debt, ' and
an extravagant Government, eonstitute
a complication of financial evils, under
which, however skillful the fiscal agents
of the State, .he pooplo must suffer.
One of the moet valid reasons if those
who wore opposed Id the war, was the
belief that its prosecution would entail
ihia. very com plication of calamities.
Whether the Secretary of the Treasury
is pursuing the policy best adapted to
work justico to alltheparties concerned
under the circumstancos, is a quostion
upon which there are doubtless os ma
ny different opinions as there are dif
ferent forms of interests to bo affected
That he has an abundance of volunteer
udvisers, and a great variety .of counsol,
ai-.d that, under the conflicting pres
sures of class interests, porsonal in
fluence, and official obligation, his
measures are sometimes inconsistent
with each other, and with approved
maxims of public economy, is, to say
tho least, highly probable. Tho Secre
tary of the Treasury of tho United
States is exposed to the same species
of criticism to which all financial offi
cers have bn exposed, who havo had
the misfortune to be placed in equiva
lent situations; and who, unable, from
tho pressure of circunistunces over
which they have no ' control, to meet
tho expectations of any, havo fallen
under the censure of all, and been uni
versally pronounced inefficient and
incapablo.
From a soction of the organs of the
Radical party, there is a strong press
upon the Secretary for a speedy return
to specie payments. In our opinion,
just to tho extent to which he give
way to this pressure, and adopts the
policy which these organs prescribo,
he will fall into those errors of which
panics and fluctuations are the na'.urul
consoquonce. Relieving, as we do,
that the only true money is that having
an intrinsic Value, aud that all that ap
preciation of apparonyvaluos aud ac
tivity in tho channels of business which
an inflated currency produces, are de
ceptive and illusory, still we lire, con
vinced that all attempts to return sud
denly to a specie basis will not only
prove abortive, but will produce great
and sudden prostration and distress, in
all tho branches of productive and dis
tributive industry. The evil is, inhis
respect, like tho individual body: vio
lent changes are destructive.. There
must' be time for . preparation. Each
condition, however artificial it may be
in itself, bus its natural laws, and these
should bo obnerved. We aro unhappily
in a stute in which to et:mul&.t6 or to
deplete is equally hazardous. We can
not afford either to havo tho currency
considerably incrcss.-d. or considerably
diminished. No return to a specie ba
sis ie possible until tho currency has
been reduced to an equality in amount
with tho specie on hand, for its redemp
tion: until, in fact, paper has sponta
neously risen to the metalic standard,
and is exchangeable for metal in ordi-
ary business transactions. This state
of things is one which we are compelled
to contemplate as far in the future;
and whether it tan over bo reached
with the present debt hanging over uh
and Die present burdens upon trade
and industry in the form of taxation,
is a problem whososolution must bo left
to experience. Our manufacturers nre
all of them heavily taxed. The tax
gatherer is inexorable, and, when tho
month comes round, the manufacturer
must be ready with bis. hundreds or
his thousands to meet the demand..
No imaginable amount of capital is'
sufficient to enable hirn to do a credit
business. For his purpose the credit
must bo furnished in another quarter.
lie must do what, for the want of a
better torm. be calls "a cash business"
that is to say, he roust buy with aud
sell for thoe.o shadows of ensh which
banks and the Treasury supply; and
every curtailment of these is to thatex-
teut a depreciation in the value of bis
goods, a clog upon his operations, and
a warning of impending bankruptcy.
Cincinnati Enquirer.
spiritual x acts. mat, wnisity is
.mi 1 I 1
the key ny wnicn many gain an en
trance into our prisons and aim-houses
That brand v brands the nose of all
those who cannot govern their appe
titl'S.
That wine causes many to take I
winding way home.
That punch is the cause of many un
friendly punches. .
That al causes many ailings, while
beer brings many to the bier.
That champagueis the cause of many
a real pain.
That gin-Blings have "slewed" more
than the slings of old.
l.The population of Cincinnati is
estimated at 210,000. In 1826 that
(city contained but 16,000 inhabitants.
The Constitutional Amendment.
The Democratic organs contiuue sys
tematically to nisreprcse6t the Con
stitutional Amendment by declaring
that it providos for negro suffrage, nnd
even sound Republicans drift into the
way of associating it with "universal
sutii age. mere never was a grosser
mistake or a greater misrepresentation
conceraing mis imuprtani measure.
Philadelphia Bulletin.
Let us see if it is a misrepresentation.
It provides that if negroes are not al
lowed to vote they shall not be counted
in the basis ot representation iu the
Statcssodisfranchising thorn. Inothcr
words, tho South must either consent
to negro suffrago or suffer a loss of
twenty-fivo members of Congress and
as many rreaidential electors in the
choico of President. This may not bo
technically providing for negro suffrage,
but it is a reward to thoso States that
dopt it and a punishmentto tlioso who
do pot. by depriving them of their po
litical influence in tho Government.
Negroes are but one of several classes
of adult people who are now counted
in Congresnional representation, but
aro denied suffrage. These classes arc
women, aliens nnd negroeB.
The amendments do not decluro that
there shall bo representation in Con
gress based only upon the voting class
es, for if it did, States would loso mem
bers by denying suffrage to women
and aliens, as well as to negroes. The
latter are made an exception among tho
non-voting classes. Tho States are
still to have representation for women
and aliens who do not vote, but not for
negroes.
Here is the fnju6tico and rascality of
the scheme: Whj should a State havo
a representation iu Congress for 127,000
women or aliens who do not vote any
moro than for 127,000 negroes that are
denied that privilege! Will any frieud
of the amendmeut tell us? If the iro-
poscd chango in the Constitution put
all the non-voting classes upon an
equality, and confined representation
in Congress to the basis of suffrage, the
Northern States would lose thirty
members of Congress moro than the
South by the arrangoment,as it has by
far the largest non-voting class in its
midst. Tho Radicals, therefore, havo
dovised a scheme by which the North
loses no members of Congress by deny
ing suffrage to largo classes of people,
but the South does. It is, therefore,
simply a swindle, that has no other
uff.-ct than to punish the South for not
adopting negro suffrage. Cincinnati
Enquirer.
The Constitutional Amendment. The Water of Salt Lake.
All travelers.vrrites a correspondent,
Lave mentioned with astonishment the
tho peculiar buoyancy of the w itter of
Great Salt Lnke, and it ia truly surpri
sing. No dnnger of ehirwreck need
ever cross the inind cf thou who navi
gate the lake, for it would' Le simply
impossible for them to sink if thrown
overboard, With tny hands clasped
together under my head, aud my feet
crossed, I floated on the Tory surface of
the lake, with at leust one-third of my
body above the water. Upon a warm
summer's day there would not bo the
slightest difficulty in. going to sleep
upon the lako, and allowing youroelfto
be blown about as tho wind pormittod;
only one woald need an umbrella to
keep off tho rays of tho eun. It has
been BtateJ that three buckets of thi
water will yield one of Bolid salt, but
inasmuch as water will not hold above
twentyfive per cent, of saline mutter in
solution, and. if more be added if is in
stantly deposited upon the bottom,
this ettiinato is, of course, too. largo.
On inquiring of the mormons engaged
in procuring salt, they unanimously
stated that for every five buckets of
water they obt ained one bucket of salt
which gives the proportion at no Jess
than twenty per cent. No visitor to
the lako should omit the bath; the sen
sation in the water is most luxurious
and leads one to think himself floating
in the air. On tho way back to the
city, it will bo as well for thai bather to
stop at tbe superb sulphur baths just
outside tho town, and remove tho saline
incrustations which will havo formed
upon bim, by a plunge into tho fine
swimming bath, whose only objection
is its peculiar odor and its great beat,
which requires a. largo admixture
cold water.
tW Tho Prussian Wur Oifice pub
tishes statements to snow ttiat.it was
not the superiority of the needle gun
but of the men who carried it,jthat guve
the victory to-the Kingdom in the late
war. Tho total consumption of car
tridges during the campaign was only
aviii to eucn lmantrv soiuier. in inn
hottest engagement the highest figure
was twenty-three per man of those
present.. During the War oino hundred
cannon were brought' into play. Mid
I eaeli. gua fird forty rounds.
of
II. I.. JONtS.
EVANS & JONES,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
OFFICE, one door vest of Robertson's
Drug Store,
MCO..ELSTlM.E, OHIO.
B. E. POWER,
ATTOIIN jIY AT LAW,
OFFICE with J. E. Hnnnn, Center Street,
M ' O O N X R L S V 1 L I. R , OHIO
aol ly
POST 1IOUSK,
CENTER ST., Near Steamboat marf,
urt'oss KLsxiixc, oiiio.
31. METCALP, Troir M. II. METCALP, Cfk.
- The iIiom hnuae ll commodlaus.wlth Rood
blAUUMU connected. Special eflurte will U
made to eupply the wants uf gnenti.
Administrator's Sale of Rcul
i:Jute.
IN :utg!nnce of an order of tlie Prolmta Court
of l i.i kbii cnun y, Ohio, I will offi-r for xnle, at
pulilio ouclinn, on hutuulnv.tl.e twenl j iiinln (M)
ul Dri-rmlwr. A. I), lCCll, al'ten (10) o'clock A. At
upon tlie prettii-tM, Hie following de-t-rllied rcnl
eviatt. atiiuatuj tn tbe countj of Miuk-hi aud
Slate of Ohio, to wit: Hcing the eaal hull of the
bouthwcHt qiiaiter of acctinti lliirte-oiie (Jl), town
hi M-Tun (I), range ten (10), ev ept thirteen (I !)
arciei Hold oil the norlh ot miid lull nvctiou, now
owned hy Nathan Hauling, tho hulance contain
iiK aiity-aeveu (H7) acren mine or U-n; appraincd
at thirteeu huuUrcd and forty dullur (II, 340);
aid rule to ku aul.jrct to wUlow'a dower, nnd upon
the follow iug ti-iiim. to wit: One-third in Lund;
one. third iu one year; rrxldne in two ye.ua from
from the day cf nlc; dclened payiuvnu to hear
I mi rent lioin day of aule, and to be teemed by
mortgage ou aaid preiinnM.
JOHN c. Fonn,
Adniinhtiiitor of the estute of
no30-ff M ili.uk IIkt, deccaied.
Whiskeis and Mustaches
IOIiCKD to urow tipon tho niootheit fuce In
from three to five wr-cki hy niii(( )r. SK
VIONK S HKSTAUHATIJKIt CA HI.I. AlltK, tho
moat wouJorlol diacovery iu inoduin Hcieuce, act
In; upon tho Heard and lluir In an aluoiMt mil ucn
loua manner. It hua leen iikO'1 hy tlie elite of
I'urii and London willi the nioHt flattcrliifr Miccen.
Kutnea uf nil pnicliateia will he rcf:ialeied and If
entiro wit'mfai iion l not (riven in every lio-Unce.
the money will he cheerfully refunded. Price hv
mall, atinlt'daiud pontpuid, (I. lleauriplive ciiru
Lira aud n-i-tmiuniala uiuiled free. AUJu-. Wc.ll
OKU, HHUTTrt A Co.. Uieuil.U, No. 2S5 Itivcr
aneet, I'my, N. Y. tM agcuta for the Uuitea
bUitea. uo3Mw
Tllli OLD ESTABLISHED
Grocery- tore
At the eld aland, 4a the three atory briek,
Xturlj- Opposite the Post Hout-.
if
reapectfully luforroi the cltir.atf Ioraa soanir
that he kt-upa luiiBtanlly on hand a lull oilrant
of the Tarioua articlea nnually kept iu a firirt clan
Grocery bture, oo.unling iu part of
TIC A. C'OFFKIC. STJUAU, FlfiU. SODA,
Sl'H'KS, t.'ANNKI) FRUITS, COVK
UYKTKHS HYHUI'S. CllH-.-jiC.
CUA CK KUS, WOODWA Hit,
lOBAflJO. CKMUS,
1IAHKKIH. I'ACK
1NU YA UN,
rowinut,
FUSiC. .
3F.D COItr3. MANILLA nOPtf.
LAUD 01L,.UAItUON 01 L, 4c, ie.,
all of which will rold at the vary Inwent yrkat.
either at wuoietule or retail, tr eain or approved
country pn dure.
The lilKlu:st market price paid for all klalief
Country 1'ro.luce.
Kvy ai title aom ei lata eiiaunaemeiii ia tt am
ItAN'l KU aa reprenented.
- lie is aUo audit for the aale of TRACOCK'S
celebrated J'uilodelj) hit WUlKY.for medicinal
purpurea.
joun a ADiia.
A. A. AOAIT.
AUAIM BRO'8
DKALIRS IN
BOOKS, STATIONERY, PERIODICALS,
Wall Paper, Cutlcrj, &t,
Adjoining the First Kat'onal Bank,
MCOX.ELSVILLE, OHIO,
Kreo coimUntly on liaJ all clamna of School,
RllseellaneoitN, lllunk and oiher
ItooKs, which tlicy sell at putiliaher l
pi'icti. and aa cneup cau o uougui caii.
tliir aiook of
ALBUMS,
I'OCK KT BOOKS,
HYMN BOOKS,
PORTFOLIOS,
SCHOOL CARDS,
CUTLER V,
BLANK BOOKS,
PAl'KR,
ENVELOPES,
AND NOTIONS
of allktnda ia complete and the heat In the market.
We r receiving good from tlie Kuat every two
weeks, aud are aoie to auppiy on auon uuiice any
thinir in our line that we mav not have on hand.
'Ihe ilullduys will anon be on hund, and pereons
drill inK oiuo(liiUK nice for presents cuu he suited
i,v allUiir nt the HOOK HTOItK.
We intend keeping up with tlie times, and as
the Book fc-'vre-'is an ealituJUhed Inxtitution In
M'('ouulsvjlle,-we auk the puuliu to give ua a call
and aee wliut we have, and we leel us'Uird thes
ill mi lin iu nuitliHte ol ns, ami he atitied with
what llii-v net. aud tell their uviulihora to "ii aud,
du likewisa." ("o
A DM IN Id I1U TOla'S NO TICK
pi!E undersigned Las been appointed Adoiin
I stratorot the estate ol i.li u
stratorof the estate of Klica
avisdiM-euned
la La af Ueria eoKutr
Ohio
b1 OOFABP PAYII.
I. K. KY1SJ.
I
iLmuju jti..jes.! m.
BUSINESS D1KKCT0KY.
K.R8Y Sl RUTLEDGE,
Merchant Tailors,
Center St., srtooaelsTllle, O.,
one door west of J. B. Stones & Go's.
Thay ar alwaye ready to aooommodaU tfcar
antnii,ra at the tnweel cih rates. '
A li'lTalways warranted. not
DENTI TliY
Dr. W. N. I1AMBLET0N
ontlnuei to offer LI) profeieionaj
anrvk-ea to the pohllo In all tha
Tarietietaud atyleaof 1EN TIHTttT
t Partioilnr attention Riven to tbe oonaartt
tion of teeth on KU lilt Kit l'LATKB.
o v r i c k t
Center Street, BX'ConinelaTllle, O.
J AiUKS L.-13EUKY,
ttonutj at
Orl'lLI! 0T1! CREWSTBRi tODEETi' ITrftV,
U COKS'XLSriLLX, OHIO.
aut-ly
J. K W1NG) M. D.,
I?hy.sician nnd Surgooa
BI'CO..ELSTILLB, OUIO.
OFFICE, In Eait Coom of Uacaa'i Law Ealldlu.
9ri ofeiaional Calls promptly attended u"
rw rartieular attentien eiran ta
of the Lunge aod Clironio Liiteases.
HE9IDEKCR. at
the Patterson Ileua, eea
A Kablsr's Blow.
Adauii
not
AY. It. KELLY.
PLysiciaix and Surgeoia,
MCO.?rCL3TILLr, OCIIO.
Bpecial attention eiven to tbe treatment a
UllHU.'iit; D18EA9E8.
rrofesaioual palla jrorjplly reapoaded ta.
OFFICK SoutLntJt Corner ef ibePablli Itwu
a. m. iTiKunur.
v. w. rrua
STAM)EUY & PVLE,
W0CONNRL6TILLI. OHIO.
OFFICB IceonJ Ilorr tt Murri.' Ea.lx4.
aT I.sral bmlnsss Dromntlv attended aa. aal
apscialat;ealieu gives to Ibe cvlleeHuu ofaUdu4
fulolaimi. aaia-Lr
GALLKRY-0F ART,
T H B FIITBST or
AMUHOTTI'flg,
NPUEBeoTrrRa.
riioTCCRArns.
TAKES DT
J. W. MoOOMAB.
.1 soous u
HALL'S BUiLDING, MALTA, OKIL
AUopeifecl All BUOTVl'ES taken In I.na
and Uieastplna. My prices are cheaper than ttaa
cheapen!, and my w rk la wurraiiisj to give aaMa-'
faction, ihe puhlm will prout by oelliun ua bm
heloie guiug aUewhore.
uoi - j an3a. n, atl'UMAB.
Y. W. WOOD.
r. a. riap
AVU0D & POND.
lltornryi and Coansclori tX Lw,
U'COKKCLBTILLS. OBltK
F. B. POND, Notary Publlt.
uS-ly
F. SILL & CO.,
DICALURS IN
Dry Coodi, Groceries, Kotioni, Tinware, Tnatki
AMP
IIOUSS rURNISHINO OOODI,
OppastU Court Hssii, M'OoiineUTtlle.S.
Jyao tf
IXJlllSriTXJliiS .
H. DUNSMOOXl&EOIT
Keep constantly on band a large atoek ef
rm.NJIEl! AND QOlSC-FlR.ISni!,G GOUI
AT- LOW PUICBI,
at their new store-rooms, ia tue
I3anJlc JBuilding,
M'CO.ELSVILLE, O.
aeT-Snv
J, SKIVINGT0N, Mi D.,
Respectfully offers his professional aeryieae U.
the citiaeus af McCondclsTill and ricmity.
Ofl. at tko arqiMrt lIon

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