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The Ohio Democrat. (Logan, O. [Ohio]) 1886-1906, September 25, 1886, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87075048/1886-09-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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Ohio
De
MOGRAT
A
v
I
X
VOIi. I. NO. 18.
LOGAN, O., SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1686.
TERMS, $1.50 PER YEAR.
THE PEOPLES' BANK
or LOOAN.
Cnsh Capital,
$SO,O0O.OU.
Doposlte scoured by Individual
Liability of over -
Four Hundred' Thousaifd Dollars.
DncB n Bcticrnl linnktiiR iniHlncw. "rorclini
nniru nml Htwuiiihln Tickets Tor sale tit low
tut rate.
OFFICE, Koom Ko. 5, Opera House.
IjAvriticNcn A. fiBt.vr.it, President.
UUOIIUKIW. rm.i.KN, Vlco J'rcht.
ItEtlUHN 1). Clll.VKH, CiiHlilcr.
THE FIRST BANK
OF LOGAN, OHIO.
Ofllco Hours from 9 n. in. to 3 p. m.
OUR EDUCATIONAL COLUMN,
AlliciiH County Test Ques
tions Used at the Last
Examination.
Paid in Cash Capital, $00,000,
John Waller, PrcHtdcnt.
Chan. E. Boiven, Cashier,
Down RCiicrnl banking IhikIiii-w, rer-elves
doposltR, dWcoiintu paper, niut buyH mid hcllH
KxohmiKO.
MT-IIANK In central room In tlm Jmncs
Til.K'lC.
ATTORNEYS.
G. AV. BREIIM.
in ...-tin... nml Ur.romr DnMlfl
AUOrUBj-al-ljaH ami uvuuj mvuv,
City Bnlldlug Logiin, O.
Collections ofC'lnlim:, Notes nml Aci-imiitK,
Mortenxra, 1,1'tiKM, CMiitnwtM, DenlM, A Ills,
Jlwliiiiili-'H I .If us Ac, drawn nml hrkiiowl
rdBwI. l'lirtltliiiuin.-.mlK. Honor, VoiwIik
uroof Mortitns-. nml l.'cin nttenilnl to. Ab
HtriiotHdrXltlo fmnMiol. Probate Ilili.i-s,
Hnle of I.auilK by Executors, Administrators
OnnrdliuiH, Auslunrwi or Trustees, mill tlielr
ncrount mnl Hettloinent iropaveii.
FMSIOKH AS1 INCIU'.AHB OF PENSION R
OBTAINltll I'OK KX-KOI.binllrt AM) 1,,,:"
WnioWRnn Mistim 1'iiii.iiiikx, N mji.kctkii
OB REJnCTED fil.AIMH LooKRII AVTl'.lt, AMI
ALI.I.AW MATTXIM CIKSKHAI.I.V.
JOHN F. WHITE,
attorney-a't-law
Nirfnrv Public mid Ju-Ule-f Pcno. nniw
p4eonil Htory or CollliiH Block, Rooms n. .1
nnd4.
JOHN HANSEN,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Collin Block, I.OKH11,
Offion wound Floor
O. Kooinii No- B A "I-
S. H. BRIGHT,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Offleo Second
No 1 t 2.
Floor Collins Block, Hooni"
C..II. BUKItH.U'S.
O.W. II.WlllHHT,
WRIGKT & BUERHAUS,
ATTORNEYB-AT-LAW.
OOm Reeond Floor MeCmthy r.loclc Fionl.
ELI M, WEST,
FIRE AND LIFE
INSURANCE AGENT,
' I.OQAN, OHIO.
. - t i D.ln. nml llnst CoilllialllCS,
Bwelnl AKont for The North WcHtem' Mu
tual i.irc, or MiiwiHiitpp.
Money to l.tmn on Kht Mortgages.
Oulco In Dolllson Block. .
PHYSICIANS.
Z. V. R ANEY,
Dental Surgeon,
Offlcv over Rochester Buns store.
Teeth Extracted Without Pain !
Tooth Inserted on rubber nml metnl platen,
and nil work warranted.
N. H. BLOSSER, M. D.
HOWKEOPATHIST,
Hpcclarntteulloii Klvon to discuses or vo
Bicimurt children, i -,,,,,,..
OVUtlU'c, ouu door west of Armstrong
Tim Store, Mulu Street, I.oKiin, O.
H. O. CAMPBELL,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON.
Onteo ono door West of Work
Tin Btore, Logan, O.
& Baker's
1.0. WEIGHT
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON.
Office Northwest cor. Ctty JIulldliiK, Iem,
O,
jlhii.'lm.
J. H. DYE,
rUYSlCTAX .0 SURGEON,
Ofllcoiiml ReMdencu with Ur. Jmncs Little,
Main Street, Logan, 0.
MAIN STREET HOUSE.
Loqajj, Ohio
Wm. WoBtlake; - Prop.
ARITMETIC.
' 1. "Write a negotiable note.
2. Write a thirty-day draft.
3. Define: compound number,
coifcrete number, proportion, cubo
root and cylinder.
1. How many yards of carpet 18J
y(lH wide mU8t b0 bought to ullrl)ct a
room 18 feet long and i:ty ft wide,
if tho strips run lengthwise?
5. A cistern bus two pipes; one
(Ills it 8 hours, and the other in -H
hrs; In how long a timo will both
fill it?
0. If 32 men dig a ditch 40 rods
long, G ft wide and 3 ft deep in 9
days, how many men can dig a
ditch 15 rods long, H ft wide and
2 ft deep in 12 days ? Solve by enuso
and effect.
7. A man bought a watch for
80 Icps than its value and sold it
for 40 moro than Its value. Ilow
many dollars would ho gain if lie
buys it for $12?
8. Give the reason for "pointing"
in multiplication of decimals.
THEORY A iTJ9 Pit A CTICE.
1. Where were you principally
educated ?
2. How arc County Institutes
supported ?
3. What powers of mind are most
active in childhood?
4. What should bo the tempera
ture of the school room ?
5. What is tho eirect upon the
pupils if the air in the school room
is impuro ?
0. Name some test showing
whether or not the air of the room
is pure.
7 Give specimen of your hand
writing on your paper.
GEOGRAPHY.
1. What arc tho principal islands
nCtlm Greater Antilles? Give tno
capitals.
2. What are the leading forms of
industry in the United Slates?
' 3. What principal chains form
the Ilocky mountain system?
1. What is tho metropolis of New
England? Ohio? Indiana? Illi
nois? Pennsylvania? New York?
5. Which onoof the United States
is about as largo as Cuba ?
(i. What divisions of South Amer
ica, are crossed by the equator?
7. What is the most important
commercial city on tho 1'aqillu
coast of South America.
8. Locate tho following moun
tains: Catubrian, Doveriicld, Bohe
mian, Cheviot Hills.
. Name the form of government
and tho title of tho chief rulers of
tho following States of Kurope:
France, Russia, Turkey, Germany,
Switzerland, Greece, Spain.
10. What are the mathematical
zones? Physical zones?
UNITED STATES HISTORY.
1. When were the Dutch Kast
India and Dutch West India Com
panies formed?
2. Who was Blennerliasset .'
What brought him to public no-
3. Name and define tbreo treaties
given in U. History.
4. What part of tho United States
has been disturbed by earthquakes
recently? What city suffered most
from it?
5. How and when did tho U. S.
acqulro the territory of Alaska?
(I. What was poor Richard's Al
manac? Give a briof account of
its author?
7. Give an account of Arnold's
treason.
8. Why did tho Pilgrims come to
America ?
GRAMMAR.
1. Define grammar and give its
divisions.
2. How do you determine what
kind of an element a word, a
phraso or a clause Is ?
3. Give a sentence having a com
plex ciauso as an adverbial ele
ment.
4. Form tho possessive singular
ami plural of man, her, it, lady,
chimney, ,
5. Give example, whore, which
and what are pronominal adjec
tives. 0. Write and diagram a sontonco
containing a compound participle,
7, AVrito nml diagram a sentence
containing two objects.
8. WrltonHontoMsuwlth a olaiiHO
in opposition with Its subject.
U, How nmy a compound Hon
tonco bo contracted? Give exam
ple, 10, Write throe sentences eon-
PENMANSHIP.
1. What letters would you first
teach to pupils learning to wrlto?
2. Give an example of your copy
to pupils beginning tojoln principles.'
3. Givo nn examplo of your copy
to pupils beginning to write capi
tals.. 4. Give an examplo of erieli olo1
ment.
C. Givo a spcclmon of $. C. D.
The Curse of Slang.
"Mamie," said a grammar-school
girl to a member of the graduating
class, "have you finished your essay?"
"Oil, yes," gushed Jrnmio, "and it
is too lovely for anything a prin
cess slip of white surah, the back
cut oir n little below the waist lino,
and full breadths of silk gathered
In so as to hang gracefully over the
tournure, and three bias rules on
tho"
"Why, what aro you talking
about?" interrupted her friend. "I
mean, have you finished writing
your essay, you know ?"
"Er no," said Mamie, her enthu
siasm rapidly diminishing, "but I
have begun it, and I wish the aw
ful thing was in Halifax!"
"What's the subject?"
"The curse of slang."
"Gracious! Isn't that a difficult
subject to write up?"
"Difficult! Well, I should giggle!
I'll have to hump myself to get it
finished in time for tho commence
ment, and I've a good notion to let
it slide. I might shut up the Pro
fessor's optics by pleading illness,
but I'm not that sort of n hairpin.
But come, waltz up into my room
and look at my stunning gradua
ting harness. It'll paralyze you."
Norrislown Herald.
Look Out.
Tho following are a few of tho
provisions of tho game law:
It is a violation of the fish law of
Ohio to catch in any Inland stream
or pond, at any time, any fish, ex
cept minnows, in any other way
than by hook and line.
It is a violation of tho game law
of Ohio to kill any game bird at any
time in any way excopt with a
shoulder gun.
It is a violation of tho law to
shoot Quail or Prairie chickens be
fore tho 11th day of November and
after the 81st day of December.
It is a violation of lite law to
shoot Unfiled Grouse or Pheasants,
and Bluo Winged Teal before tho
1st day of September and after the
31st day of December.
It is a violation of the law to
shoot Wood Duck, Mallard, or any
other duck before the 1st day
of September and after the 9th day
of April, and between these dates
It is unlawful to shoot ducks on
Sundays, Mondays and Tuesdays.
It is a violation of the law to
shoot Woodcock, before the 4th clay
of July and after the first day of
January.
It is a violation of the law to
shoot Turtle Doves 'before the 1st
day of August and after tho 31st
day of December.
Squirrels npy be shot from June
1st to January 1st and Rabbits irom
October 1st to Feb. 1st.
Each violation of tho law is pun
ishablo by a ilno of not less than
.f.2.r) nor more than $100, with im
prisonment till fine is paid.
All that is necessary is to report
each violation of tho law to tho
County Wardens, whoso duty it is
to prosecute all violations of tho
law.
'l'ormn One Dollar per Buy, Oood ltooinu,
VHVUM b.iiillo itooitl iiltuched,
talning temporal, local and "ciiBual
clauses respectively.
How Women Kill.
Woman aro unique in their con
struction and their constitution,
and, ns a consequence, it may bo
logically concluded that they will
bo equally unique in many of their
tendencies, thoughts motives and
actions. All tho training of the ages
has novor enabled tho average wo
man to roach n point where alio can
throw a stone tho same as a man ; in
this, as In thousands of other direc
tions, sho has her own methods of
bringing about certain results. It Is
safe to say that, given the manner In
which a man will do anything it is
the precise way in which it will
not bo done by n woman.
Tho originality of the sox Is scon
in tho duller killings, in which it
played a prominent part. Whon
Cain slow Abol ho wont at it in a
manly, brutal sort of way, ho took
a club or a stono ami beat out tno
brains of his brother. About tho
first murder on rocord In which a
woman was tho principal, was that
of Slsorn, a fugutlve, who fled dis
comfited boforo tho hosts of Israel,
Ho was tired and hungry, and asked
a woman whom ho mot for food
and shelter. Sho promised all ho
asked, and more; sho offered to
make an affidavit that ho should bo
safo from discovery In her tent,
and then, wJon ho selpt, she took a
hammer and a nail and drove the
latter into the temple of the sleep
er, "for ho was fast asleep and
weary," says tho account, "and so
ho died." Suohwus the method of
committing nitirdor resortetl to by
tho first woman who Introduced as
sassination on the part qf her own
sex.
Brinvilliers, tho alleged assas
sin; Lucretia Borgia; Toninn, tho
inventor of the poison to which she
gavo her name; Lnpara, and other
ladies, have illustrated in their
cases tho fact that women.as mur
derers aro always original and In
ventive, and utterly unlike brutal
mon. Tofuna alone, not very much
more than a century ago, managed
to send out of existence not less
than COO people, mid used, as did
the other ladles of the time, poison
as tho instrument of death. Since
that period poison lias remained the
favorite weapon of gentle woman.
It is but a few years sinco a lady
in Pittsburg was convicted of poi-
soninir to death a score or so of
people, for which she was not un
gallantly hanged without any re
gard for her sex. Tho latest intel
ligence from Boston furnishes an
account of a lady beautiful, cul
tured and accomplished, of course,
like all the Bostonesc who com
menced her efforts by poisoning
her husband, and then continued
assiduously on until she had dis
disposcd of her numerous children
in turn, and also of some near rela
tives immediately outside her do
mestic circle. She had no agla 'Jo-
ana, but she managed to get along
by using arsenic as a substitute,
which sho fed to her victims with
unsparing liberality.
Starting with an act of treachery
and a hammer and nail, woman
has finally settled down on poison
as the regular and accepted weapon
of death. This is a portion of the
evolution of her extremely sensi
tive nature; tho sight of blood and
gaping wounds distresses ner, ami
her natural delicacy of organiza
tion lends her to select less repel
hmt forms of killing. To "crtuiu
extent tho use of poison permits tho
operations of her affections, the free
piny of her nature. Brinvilliers
and other noted poisoners of their
day' usually practiced on their hus
bands, fathers, lovers and children,
whereby they were afforded oppor
tunity to watch the dying momonts
of their victims and soothe them
with such caresses and words of
comfort, love and the like as would
naturally occur to the sex on the
solemn occasion. It is there where
women show themselves not only
unlike men, but they are immeas
urably their superiors in sympathy
and feeling. What man, after hav
ing stabbed, shot or otherwise start
ed a person on the road to death,
would sit down by him and soothe
his last hours or momuifts with
words of consolation and sympa
thy? Particulars are not at hand,
but events will show that Mrs.
Robinson, tho Massachusetts poi
soner, was tender in the extreme
to every ono of her eleven victims;
that she hovered about their bed
side like a ministering angel us
she was. and that each of them
sailed ofrinto tho unknown firm in
the conviction that but for her ho
would have died much sooner and
a much moro unacceptable death.
When men drive home the fatal
knifo they fly in horror from tho
accursed spot. Tho woman remains
about, and tondorly assists tho fal
tering steps down to tho river.
Such is tho difference between the
two. Chicago Times.
wall, which Is still entire, Is Kil
feet, and the arena within Is 281 foot
In length, and 170 in breadth. Tho
exterior wall of the edifice consists
of four stories of three different
orders of architecture, the first
being Doric, tho second Ionic, and
tho third and fourth Corinthian.
The material of the principal walls
was travertine or white limestone.
The spaces between were filled with
brick. Tho arched spaces between
tho pillars were open throughout
tho first three stories, above this
there wore windows between each
alternate pillar of the outer wall.
Within there are still traces to bo
seen of three tiers of scats; it is
thought that above these a gallery
was oneo built. A covered space
surrounded the central arena, in
which tho Emperor, Senators, and
their families, had seats. The
building was covered by a tempo
rary awning or wooden roof, but
how this was put on or kept in place
is a never-ending puzzle to anti
quaries. Many of the early Chris
tians suffered martydom in the
arena, and a crosi now stands there
commemorate their death, and
curing by option, lands for mineral
purposes. Tho mineral would bo
of but little account without a rail
road to them. They tiro optioning
for coal, Iron and everything of the
kind, for rlirlit of way over said
lands, and If it were mine they
should have a deed, and then they
might pay the taxes; they are Just
like the speculators of the Hocking
Valley, who were In advance of
said road. MosH Back.
to
on Friday of every week devotional
services are still held there. The
Colosseum is supposed to have re
mained entire till it was partly de
molished in the sacking and burn
ing of Rome in 1082 by Robert Guis-
card, first King or Naples. Though
Injured, the building was used as a
fortress during tho middle nges for
many years by the powerful families
that contended for .supremacy in
Roman affairs. In 1312 tho munici
pality took possession of it, audit
was again used for public amuse
ments, especially bull lights. In
1387 it began to be used by the
church as a hospital. In the fol
lowing century tho groat Roman
families despoiled it greatly, tak
ing stone from its wall to build the
palaces. It was afterward proposed
to turn it into a center of trade or a
factory, but both plans were unpop
ular, and finally Pope Clement XI.
was persuaded by the church in the
early part of the eighteenth century
to consecrate It to the memory of the
martyrs, and thus throw over it a
protection from further wanton in-
jary. Inter Ocean.
Hnynts, Ohio.
Sep. 20, 18SU.
Tho Colosseum.
Tho Colosseum also written col
iseum was an amphitheater, loca
ted near tho center of the ancient
city or Rome, and the largest per
manent structure of tho kind ever
built. It was begun by Vespasian,
built by him as far us the top of tho
third row of arches, and finished
by his son Titus, in 80 A. D. It
was dedicated with games, gladia
torial shown, und scenic exhibitions
that lasted 100 days, in which fi.OOO
wild animals were killed, and a
nuinbor of gladiators. Tho struct
ure was intended solely for circus
performances. It covored nearly
five acres, and had accommoda
tions, for over 80,000 spectators. It
was for many years known as tho
Flavian amphitheater, butcamo to
bo called tho Colosseum bocauso of
tho great size, Tho building Is In
the form of an olllpso, its longer
diameter hieing (116 foot, Its shorter
510 feet. Tho height of its outer
En. Dr.MOCKAT: Sir, Our Fair
is over and the excitement of the
same. Tho excitement was of a
different kind this year, not favora
ble to the Association. It is assert
ed that the owners were awarded
the premiums and not articles.
Then tho racing was all poor, the
whole tiling was a gambling insti
tution, generally speaking, but the
managers promise to do better in
tho future. If they do so they may
save their organization, but if they
do not award the premiums
where they belong, their Associa
tion with go by 'the board.
But there is something else
(springing up in this part of our
county which will be of lasting
benefit to us. A railroad starting
from Hadiey Junction, Fairfield
county, thence to Laurelville, Hock
ing county, then down the valley
to the crossing of the Snltcrcek
bridge between the lands of H. W.
Smith and Esq. Joseph McBroom;
thence along Saltcreek opposite
a hollow, known as Big Hollow,
where it leaves Saltcreek, and runs
up said hollow to its head, then over
the dlvido botween tho waters or
Saltcreek and Pretty Run, then
down ono of the largest tributaries
of said run to its main branch at
Thomas Singers, then up Pretty
Run to the divide between said
waters and Middlo Fork of Salt
creek, then down said tributary to
Allensville, thenco to llanulen
Junction in Vinton county, thence
to Wellston, the supposed termin
us of tho road for the present.
This railroad will run through a
rough country for about twelve
miles, and through a ilno mineral
belt, of perhaps thirty-llvo miles, of
coal, Iron ore and fire clay, aW
through ono or tho finest timbered
nortions or soutliorn Ohio. Tho
resources along tho road will bo
almost equal to that or tho Hocking
Valley, except coal. Then there Is
an abundance of first-class stono
for building purposes. Tho Well
ston vein of coal is far superior to
any found in tho Hocking Valley
for bhtcksniltlilng, It Is pure, not
a particle of sulphur can bo found
In it; it is equal to Piedmont
Mountntn coal for working iron or
stool, and is said to bo a first class
gas coal. Thoro aro two men from
tho oast by tho names of Buol and
Norurnft, who seem to bo in tho In
terest of tho railroad, But I think
that their greatest interest is In su-
l'lckcrlng, Ohio.
Sep. 20, 1880.
Wo aro clad to note the Di:.mo
ckat still prospers.
Since the recent rains the farm
ers hopes for good late pasture.
The corn in this section is nearly
all cut, and seeding done.
John Tomlinson and B. G. Tro
bridge, attended Conference at
Athens, last Saturday and Sunday.
Miss Anna Gray or Buffalo lick
is sick of fever.
W. P. Miller and wife of Union
Furnace, aro visiting friends In
Muskingum county, this week.
Messrs. 'Stout, Darby & Ingmlre,
saw mill proprietors, made a busi
ness trip to W. Vti., this week look
ing up a suitable place to locate.
Jacob Backus of Union Furnace,
entertained quite a number of his
friends one night last week In the
way of an apple cutting.
The boys gave Mr. McArey, the
operator at Union Furnace, a grand
serenade last Saturday night.
Miss Lizzie Moore or Columbus,
is visiting friends near Starr.
Ja. Moore and family, of Starr,
spent Sunday with friends at Har
mony Grove.
II. M. Lewis, of Poplar Grove is
roofing Mr. Henry Carrick's Fur-nance.
One night last week while Jan.
Briinner. n restiected farmer, of
Honey Greek, was awakened from
his peaceful slumbers by a most
hideous squalling from his chick
ens, he immediately p.ioceeded to
investigate the cause of alarm. He
had gone but a little way from the
house' when ho chanced to pas- be
neath a large tree on which his
turkeys roost. Imagine bis sur
prise, when directly under the tree,
to see several of his turkeys come
tumbling down, and upon looking
up, he saw something ho took to be
a two legged creature come down
tho tree. He was still more sur
prised, when the creature instead
of taking to the woods, an he had
supposed it would on reaching the
ground, showed fight and came at
him backwards, kicking and strik
ing all tho time. Our hero was equal
to tho occasion, and before the two
legged monster was aware his
Impo.se not upon a babe a niinio
suggestive of flippancy or mean
ness. There Is no excuse for such
assult and battery on tho cradle
when our language Is opulent with
names musical In sound and sug
gestive In meaning, such as John,
meaning "tho gracious gift of God;"
or Henry, meaning "the chief or a
household;" or Alfred, meaning
"good counselor;" or Nicholas,
meaning "victory of tho people;" or
nibrose, meaning "immortal;" or
Andrew, meaning "manly;" or Es
ther, meaning "a star;" or Abigail,
meaning "my father's joy;" or Anna
meaning "grace;" or Victoria,
meaning victory:" or Rosalie,
throttle was being fondled in not a
very affectionate manner, this
brought the creature to time, and
he fell on his knees and begged our
friend Briinner not to expose him.
Mr. Briinner has a largo soul, so he
ifnally promised not to expose him.
Although ho does not tell any
names, he says the person he
caught after his turkeys is a man
with a farm and plenty or chickens
and turkeys of own.
Dr.
meaning "beautiful as a rose;" or
Margaret', meaning "a pearl ;" or
Ida, meaning "go'd-like;" or Clara,
meaning "Illustrious;" or Amelia,
meaning "busy;" or Bertha, mean
ing "beautiful," and hundreds of
oilier names Just as good, that are
a help rather than a hindrance.
A gentleman who sometimes
since was strolling along the streets
of one of our great cities, with no
object in view but to pass tho time,
says Ins intention was atirucieu uy
tho remark of a little girl to a com
panion In front or a fruit stand:
"I wish I had an orange for ma."
The gentleman saw that tho
children, though poorly dressed,
wore clean and neat, and calling
them into the store he loaded them
with fruit and candles.
"What's your name?" asked one
or the girls.
"Why do yoyou want to know?"
queried the gentleman.
"J want to pray for you," was tho
reply.
The gentleman turned to leave,
scarcely daring to speak, when tho
little one added:
"Well, it don't matter. God will
know you anyhow." And so Ho
will. He knows all our acts
whether good or bad. Only good
children are real happy.
11 Tays To Be A "Woman.
A correspondent, who evidently
wishes she was a big, bad man,
writes to the U'umaii's Journal to
ask if it pays to ho a woman. I
should like to know why not! If it
pays to be petted and shielilod if
you behave yourM'lf; if it pays to bo
worked for and treated and poor
pussy'd; il'ilpaystobo pretty and
graceful and charming; if it pays
lobe loved and honored and re
spected; if it pays to make some
body glad they were born anil happy
to live for your sake; if it pays to bo
the greatest power for good or evil
that this world knows; if it pays to
be the mother of that sweetest of
all God-giving things, a baby; if it
pays to bo a niotner wniweciiiitu-oii
grown to manhood rise up and call
her blessed; if it pays to bo a wire
dearer to a good man than his honor
or his lire; il" it pays to have the
blessings of the poor, tho sick, tho
friendless or the hopeless if any of
these things pay, then it pays to bo
a woman. New York Graphic.
Talmai?e
on Undesira
ble Names.
EXTRACT rilOM SKHMOX Or HKP. 10.
Many people are under the dis
advantage of an unfortunate name,
given them by parents who thought
they wero doing a good thing.
Sometimes at the baptism of chil
dren, while I have held up one
hand in prayer I have held up the
other hand in amazement that par
ents should have weighted tho
babe with such a dissonant and re
pulsive nomenclature. I huvo not
so much wondered that somo chil
dren should cry out at the christen
ing font as that others with such
smiling faces should tako a title
that will bo the burden or their lire
time. It is outrageous to nfilict
children with an undesirable name
because it happened to bo pos
sessed by a parent or a rich uncle
from whom favors aro expected, or
some prominent man of tho day
who may end his lilo in dHgrace.
It is no excue, because they are
Scripture names to call a child
Johoiaklm or Tiglath-l'ilesor. At
this very altar I baptized ono by
tho naino of Biitlisheba. Why, un
der all tho circumambient heaven,
any parent should want to give to
a child tho name of that loose and
Infamous creature of Scripture
times I cannot imagine I have
often felt at tho Impthmal altar,
whon names wero announced to
mo, like saying, as did Rev, Dr.
Richards, of Moristown, N, J., when
a child was handed him for sprink
ling and tho name glvon, "Hadn't
you bettor cull It something olso?"
The lover Could Not Stand
The Test.
"Do you see that row of poplars
on the Cannd'a i .-bore, standing ap
parently at equal distances apart V"
asked a grave-raced man or a group
of passengers on the Fort Erie ferry
boat.
The group nodded assent.
"Well, there's quite a story con
nected with those trees, hocontinu
cd. Some years ago there lived on
the bluff, in Buffalo, overlooking
the river a very wealthy banker,
whose only daughter was beloved
by a young surveyor. The old man
was inclined to question the pro
fessional skill of young rod and
level, and to put him to lest direct
ed him to set out, on the Dominion
shore, a row of trees no two of which
should bo any further apart than
any other two. Tho trial proved
the lovers inefficiency, and forth
with he was forbidden tho house
and In despair drowned himself In
the river. Perhaps some of you
gentlemen with keen eyes can tell
which two trees aro furthest
apart." The group took a critical
view of the situation and each
niomber selected a different pair of
trees. Finally after much discuss-'
Ion, an appeal was taken to tho
solom-faced stranger to solve tho
problem.
"The first and tho hut," said he,
ciiliiilv. resuming his cigar and
walking awa.v with the air of
sago.
tho
Rev. Robt. Wilson, of Charleston,
S. C., has published u card In which
ho says that tho man who culls thu
earthquake a visitation of Gotl's
wrath Tor sin Is a fanatic who ought
to bo slloncod,

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