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M'arthur Democrat. (McArthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1853-1865, March 31, 1864, Image 1

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MO NOKTII. NO SOI Til. IXDEU THE CO.HSTlTt'TION. BIT 1 BACHED fVAINTEJVAM'K OF THAT iftSTK fill Eft T AM THE INION.
VOL. 12.
M'ARTIIUR, VINTON COUNTY, OHIO, MARCH, 31. 1864.
NO. 3
in . .
f"t!l.l!Si r..KY THLB9t..;T fU
E. A. & W. K . B R ATT O N.
O V V 1 0 K :
In UrHtton'a BiiMuhib". Tnt T fouri
llnti, tin Stitira.
TirirYv"i ViH "
Tbe Jim. cT will he wnt im year fur
Dollar; Hn Month, fur r.fty Ounla: Thrco
Month-, fir Twentr-fite IVnti.
HTA!! paper will ha .H,,utinne.l at tha
VAllllil III bUV UMIQ 1lkaU .
TfcRMH I'OU Ai)Vi:itnsix;.
Pni 8'iiirc onuinnertion, I'1,"')
Kaeii H liln.nul iiieiiii.n, ,'.'.5
l'.-r.l o reur. K.'H)
Niiii.-t of app.jintn.rn : ot ..linMra
or, (ianriliiiii aii'l Kmmturs. 1.30
AU:tclineiilnit:'" helor.J. P. ,M
h li'-'rial nutiofc. r liiie, 0.1
l-f Ti'li line nui-ioa eharfrvil lie in aquar,
nd all Ailvertin'innula mid l.'i.l N.liooii must
o. pato- in hiIvrik.
UT VllnilJcam-.ionwini.emct.yr-
l-tT I'll ahoveterinamual hecomplieil w:.h
t'tT" All iico(a mint main to I bo l'rn
fri iWr w liuvo hu mrcul.
.The Denioerai J oh Ufliec.
W r pro'r). lu i-xttnie v (.h timt.rii:M.
Jiiit-li aM'l nt .riou tlmt !)' couimli tiun,
til kUI ol Job Worlc.Kiich
i'A.M I'ULKTS,
JIANI MU.S,
silOU7 IJILI.S.
l ObEUS,
rUOUKAMM ES
BII.I. MliM S
BLANKS of all KINDS,
SllIlTIXCJ HILLS.
LAI5EUS, Ac, Ac.
' .- r s trial an. te eon vi noorl llict weenn
li I r i : I In riutinK-liuicr fur Cahii.iIiu
II T KTaT
"-CLINTON II 0 U SE
SCOTT & POLLARD,
PROPrtlTORS,
rr.KVJKI. or y'l t UK IIIIIUK. WII1.M.IMI, V4
Jn. lyr :liilliiolhr, Ohio
ri 1.11 01 Tli Hi) SE
TOUTS MOUTH, OHIO
-1IY-
CHARLES IIIGGINS.
Uiu Hiiukc lrmi! mi i he Sicmn Jin:it
l.xnitm, and imar ih- KHilrmiil Dt'ioi. No
luiiu will Ivsp.irH tor the aiToiiiiitlation
01 (llrlF.
Nop'. , 1 803,- lir.
CHANGE OF TIME.
SIOTO AND OCKING VALLEY
RAILROAD.
ai.'MMKIl ARRANGKMKNT.
OtiiU'lai'tor MomUy , April liiili, ISiil .trinna
will um oh fullowH :
4oim 5ohth- Mail I'rniii lav I'ortxnicn'b
nt '.!) a. n.; arrivu- m ll.ini.li'ii nt 10:1 ,i r. u
n ikiniiol 'u .'oiiim lii.n il I. Uirfiiigl, truljn.to
M ir.i!t a i. (.'inuhiiiHii Uiiilrnn.t d.r dill point
K!. f I Vnt. .(.iviiMimoltttif n Tnin li-ave
P'.MVijii:liiii l:LUV NjurriVesut llaimien at.'.
J t -i.
iio Sdctm- A o. iiinii.il;ilii.n Tr.in Ihhv 1
ft- -. I jn t .'. n:nrriv.: t I'oriMiinnt). ,
V ' A. M. Mh:I Ii on Iflnvoo fin in.lcn nt 2:
r m; i.'ri vn ut I'urlHi.ibiit Ii nt '1 00'. m.
Thronirh TiikisU liir Mnrlcll. ('Iiillliolli
"ciinii'i mnl C 1 milium. nun he priciuvd tb
'-.Oi"et'eili!.i,(l rate..
.. W. wppp,.
j
I. 1. E N 8 V J I. LR
STIUM .Mil LS.
rpilK Allemvilla Rtenm fl. n rinp milt!'. In. v nn
J iler.iim h tlmrniyh r.-p:iir. nrnl lh propria
er wilie In iiifrni il.a pntttlo that they arr
propare.l nulu all i"itoin wurkto lh( entire
tJ l"f't.n .it vh.ir i iii.ininr.
mNKW VI t'!l INKS hitv'n hucn .M? la lhi
niilla til l our frii'i. i-will liii.l )ro". work and
got I 1 ii r ii nut it :it n'4 iither lui! , givo U9 a
au'lnii.l tft the truth !" v lirit ro aiy.
if. Ut.h -13 - tf,i. llt'SToN 4 RICE.
EVEIll llOliy 'fOlIl THIS
bi uiu iiimm lunri llllo iUI
-AND SEE
HFLTEBRAN & BEYER'S
JTI i i: tl 1 A L
MARBLE WORKS
wchlch we a' jimt peninir and you will
Sul it th .hiniH;.t plu.-a tn buy
GKVE STONES
TIT Cri nly. Wahoiieh our Mnrhlo at the ve
r lowMtcaeli pnoan. H'n thick we ait rnifo when
wt aay thoao linn never been any peraon iu Mc
Arthur, tlial ran tune timloan in tioint of
WORKMANSHIP. DESIGN OR
FINISH.
Onr Marhle of the haat quality, tnlh Rut
land ami Halimi. Yon will i nH n. nri.no.ul in
furnish you with (?rn. a Stuiiena moat any prico
N. B.-We have l,o nn hand the celebratwl
flcraa (tnnd Stone, wlii, b we will nell low for
Mb.
Do Out forget 'lis place whi n in Town.
ukltkbuan noy
lorner of Main Logan teet
mi A.im.r, u.
Ju!-6J.-if
NOTICE.
Andrew Jarvia Guardian of the person
end estate of William D. Swaim. haunted
his teeounts as such Guardian for inspect
ion ind final Fettlrment, and will b for
hearinf on the 26th day of Manh A. D.
1854
JflCHAKDCRUG,
March 3, 1864, 3w Probate Judre
Heuric Holier,
ri ri ,. ' D"rJ:a"-. CiBOinnali, Ohio
im
S
THE AUTHOR OF THE CELEBRATED
CIRCULAR EXPLAINS
IT.
From a Debate in the United States
on the 11th.
MR. POMEROY ON THE POMEROY
CIRCULAR.
'. 1 CHtlel"V, ot lvin.tnii, addressed
, the Senafu. lie fuid tln it; lotd bo t-n
considerable curiosity inani tested, litre
and el so who re, as to the hiii Itoril v Bii'l
'genuineness of n circular tanned by
Mm tie cliaiman .l the National Ex
t tu live Committee. Such curiosity
was very laudable, and !.o took nc
(anion to say tmt ho did issue the
aid circular, and it embodied the
i ii! n T . I . .. ' -. .1
v. " V. i:u""1 ' upon
inu miij-ci presenteti. lho eoinnht
too was ii.Ptituted in this usual mar.
at a imhlic mectiri; convened in
this eity in J unitary last, c'Miipofed t'
imihlicM ot (oiiM-(i ni;d citizen
tV-.m neariv'eviry lnyal Statj in the
Union, all ot' !l lu v the immt mi.
(iieitliiinable loyalty, and devuied to
i the Union and freeiluni as ;he bigt
menus of restoring and ureservin the
i Union Tht! olj' ct ol the c iuiiiltruu
is to unite tliu Beiitiineiit ot ihe conn
1'iy npi.n nun and niiaanii b suitable
to ,lie tlH- w notliiuj! Be-
crt-t about tho ciicuhtr issued, uulesij
80IDO poison marked the word secret
on it to attract attention ami ivo it a
wider circ n'ation.
In Older to notify lite country ol tin.,
existence oI'mhIi a committee and llm
purpoM'8 of its orjruniiutioii, copies
wi re Fcnt tiy mail to tlu I'tenident,
Judges of the Courts, (JoVeniori of
iStatos, and other diHtini;irsliud per
sons in the loyal portions of tho emu
try. lie did nt know tlmt thp bo
eietnry ol tho Troaaury wax consulted
in retert tico to the organization of the
committee. So fat ns ho knew, he
wn8 ignoi ant of the persons couip' sinj
the c.'inmittco, ns also of its action.
This was, howt vtr, the era of drafting
men into the sorvico ol their country
without iifilicc, and in thnUpiril tho
Secretary was drawn, and he (Mr
lYmcio) Ulieved him to be the
pio.cr ieismi whom t lie people would
dv.!igh: to honor. He was yit to find
he man Iriondly to freedom, wliodid
ii"t coiiei'do that tho choice ot the
ei inmilteo would depopit tho rcspon
sibilitioBof the Executive Ciovernment
in ab'o nml stife handa. I
Ihe iSrttn iii.1 Lxecutivu Cominilt -e
elill lived, and through it wo hop.nl
to btimulate, enconrago and combine
ihe loyal men ol the country to a more
vigorcn8 and pucccBsful proht c.ition
,01 me war, l.elu-ving that a tweedy
ibsue lo a thiee veaiH' doubt ful con-
net win mve lli u erotlit o l ie lull on
Ihe lives of the ai:ny, Mnl thv loud
hopes of a free govti iiiik lit among
nun. Iu tho absence ot any political
organization fully representing our
views, Ibis was thought tho opportune
period lo initiate an organization ol
tlmroi.li sml earnest men. who
a
id'
of
gatheiing inspiration and p'tn-i tli I
irom I He leasoiis o tho past, shall bo 1"
oi
come the Mile, 6iic-esul, ai;d con
trolling party ol tho Im tiro.
Mr. i'oineroy proceeded to give a
h'sloiy of the rise and downfall oi the
old political parties and they had now
to lj Biiporseded. The mission of thu
lViIlT1u,,Ii(:a" waa ended when iu
wt(lk wa8 Hccomplirthwl. and that
work was to stay the progress of slav
ery; and it never pretended to aim at
more. It made two splendid cam
paigns, and died in ita last triumph.
SeceFsion, tho foieruuner of war. com
inenced at the opening of the last
Congress of Mr. liuchanan's adnn'nis
trution, iud et by etop, in juick
succession, slavery committed its ov
ert acta of rebellion and treason. How
slow was Ihe Administration to com
prehend the cause of the rebollhn, and
the moans to be HBed for its over
throw. So Ik'htly wtia the crisis com
prehended, that the war was pro
nounced a ninety days affair alter
which all the States were to coniu in
to a restored Union, and the inptitu
tion of slavery left unimpaired.
Jiecounti'ug tho acts for the restor
ation of the Union, Mr. Pomeroy saiJ
was no wonder we had 6ufil-rcd the
teachings of adversity, and that our
course tay over so many fields of
Uoubllul tr.iumpli. With such declar
ed impolicies we had been called to
weep over the slaughter ol" thousands,
and find the pathway of national suc
cess to bo by way of thb Wildernnaa
and the Ked Sea. For a vear and
halt, in tho Unndeet fanaticism, the
naf
. i
the
and
fitlo
est
to
to
age
am
k.
and
and
and
ho
nl
Admin'itrution fnll, tn .k ...u.
ofslav,ry,bo.hin tbeconcl and iiip
the lie:' Now, by the dioir
sorrow and ad vere.it v. i ho nut;..'J
j, r......
heBrt Iihs boon retched,
ule Rre tiroi'Hi inu lor
ii)Rnci.auon ny an nicin1ment to lie
I ru-
and tho po-
tho ed'etjof.
i ii8titut',nii, hp pnivMed tor an
ncipaled by the Adunni-trat'oii
lf.
i
hntcitainin-Buch views u these, j
ml in order m pruiuve thuGovt a
lunt to Iro.dnm. we are fr ori. U
iina party in. a wel!U lined pjkt-
oim and policy. ior in ijrriodd ol'tik-
oi.hI convnl,,,,,, it Uco.nes i.ecey
'lltll 111.. .iiiIi.iT.i til.. ml. I ii....... . fct J'. I
...... ... .vv..., cii'miiii iiiciuiii-e inuir
viilancf, and acquire new etrenut li'iti
-uppoi t o! their clierished Institutions
He held that, after throe venrs nt
1 I . . . - .
leiirful and exhaueting conflicts, tiic
country is still ruonacod by danKT
wind, can only be arrested by instaiiiV
.... u.uiium me pan oi
and victory n the part .of the army
v . i j. ii. i-
lo tare the tniliun I mm demora i:i
;, on. I ,t;..,..i-..i i i ... n
nUirm,
Sai:r,27iSl.,Tr?"lt-MJ 't
' , ; ""V ., T'"'"4. ,
m; nt ol men. I o tins end tho aid of
all c.t.zens elionhl be invoked who
a spco.ly restoration of the jof
Union, uiion tire priueioles ol univur
. . i
hI Ineilom, Becured by an amended j
Oonst.fut.of, inviting all to join iu ,
advocating and maiutaimne a politi-1
...1 . i i i. .
ca o.gan ziti,.. embracing the living !
w us ol t ie present .lay : j in
1. lhe .m.nediato H.pp.eas.on ol i
Mill fn kit lltll li I.Jinn it..,1 4.. I
. .. . .. ' r-.
m I ami itiil.tary j.ower ol tho nation,
Vl'llllllllf' I IPfcllllll I II I'll Jifl .H .4k.J - I . . 1
ii r.ui. in viiip ui imu'Mi oy j
proelamau n of a.nuoHty to traitors,
jut reserving to a fnumphunt people
ibo right to detormine to wliau-x'enl
mercy shall be tempered with malice
i. Buc.li amendments to the l'eder
al Constitution us shall prohibit slav
ery wherever tho llMg ot tho Union
tloats, with sintublo tmouragemeiit to
general system of education, in or
der ttiat euHruge shall bo intelligent
as well as free, thus furnishing addi
tional guarantees for the perpetuity of
our libei ties.
3 Tho maintenance of the Monroe
doctrine, by which Ihe deepotism that
amicis mo uiu world shall bo denied
any additional foot hold iu tli9 New,
thus guarding our country against the
encroachment ol tyrar.ny, and dedi
cating this AmoiicHii continent to the
development ol popular institutions.
i. ihe orgmrzatioii of a signal
eomoiiiy in tlie administration of pub
lie all'iirs. in order both to relieve, the
burdens of the people and to insure
the tiiiancial credit of the nation.
5. Tlte cotiilouatiou of the property
leading rebels, and tho inaugura
tion of republican govern inunts in all
the districts iu robollion, whenever
tho loyal inhabitants shall voluntarily
acquiesce in and adopt the eamo.
1 no piojoctioii ol a sound svstom
national currency, made stable and !
sure by a l'lodL'e of tho" wealth and
l'u3,,',!-s the whole country, thus '
111
an issue oi uneuaroea uauer cur-
:ting the people from the evii,!
in.i ul iih.....r.luH ...iw . !
rency, and supplying them with a'
t and convenient medium of com-'
merciai exchaiuM in a national cur-
reticy of uiiilonu value iu all parts
. . i . . . . .. I
country, and convertible into gold
without lobs.
7. such subordination of tho sev
eral States to the General Govern
ment as shall secure a homogeneous
undisputed nationality while not
destroying the rights reserved to the
States, so that allegiance to the N i
tional Government fihail always ba
regarded as the highest fealty, and the
ot uu American citizen tho proud
t'liit can be borne, believing him
be an American who has an Amer
ican heui t in his bosom, no matt;r
where has been thu accident of his
birth or education, for he is as likely
bo us truly an American who be
comes one by thofco as ho who
compelled to be one ot necessity.
8. A general adherence to the ti3
oi tno (iovernmcnt for thirty
vcarsrast. in rh na 1:. A
lied ta the nffi,., ni'iu .. Z'" i
... ... r- -rror
I
i
belicvincr tlmt tU r
third term is fruitful of teanta- i
tionP. and tends to impair the purity
patriotUm of his kminirtrB
to surround him with influences!
to the use of a free and uubiaeed : 81
executive patronage, and hijrhlvi
dangerous to iwpu.ar liberty which :
has chosen to protect ;
o Ti.r,i. ... . .
i. lliorough protection to individ.i
;l.ia f.. .- .
'. ",u w"1 IU
K sut!
j ?! . .. 18 . I0.
cuaros asamst a treasonah a. ku haul.
. . - " iiu-
guards against o treasonable, subsid-
protection nvHtein ol foreign immiur...
jtion, which sluill attest cm rKympnl hies
llzed, and cornipted prens.
Jo. Tho support of a liln-
liberal and
with the Btrnlinj; people of Kurnp.
in ji h h rt'h iin b iiia i t.i..ft.i. ..r. .
present destructive war, ntimiTateu
our injured commcfo. Hii.plica the
!demHiiJ for lal,r, and develops thr,90
iminenRu rosourcn of our oont.try on
which r mtmr n imi,fi. ...u i... .i.
(sjK'edy exringuishnient uftliu national
1I& . .
jOeDi
11. The f!Xtenoion of euitaolo aid
for the construction of a railroad
across tho continent, for tho better
union of the Atlantic and Tacitfc
jStutea .and tlmir easier defenso a jalnst
possible foreign eiiein'oa, as wolU to
hasten the development of tht. rich
mining region of thtj (iontirent. whieh
we liuvo reason to believe destined
1 u iB uvsiiinut
t.i nnitr.il !.. :..i .. .i -r.i ...L:
T rniuesoitno
'"'tHnd:i,yalmen of tho
Wvro 0,'kin? "uiling
"icbo 18110?, uuil that wo had
;cll(J.,gh ol hesitancy an I uncertainty
-of indecision and wrong decision
deP.re Coh1nes and neglect to tho frhmds
.if tin. ...i :i . e .
. 11v, w . n iiuiuiii, wimu i ivor linn
kindness are meted out to its enemies
This appeal ,0 said was urged by tho
mi.mn. i.m ,,f n, .,oo( .,a ..r.. ......r..i
font uuu iii ubi .uiu ill i
apprehensions of tho future, l'aith
)0,,re89 HriJ ,,; ,, of tliJ ,(t
,mi8t not bo left to humnish withont I
It.-- '
.uu.tj tiuu union Biiail 00 IOUI1U 0110
and lorcver insepttrablc. This is a
e
war lor mankind. It has thu old
laugijish withont i
baitlc cry or Liberty. It establtsh
freedom in a free Government, as t!
hpU of tho world.
ies
tho
New Facts as to the Strength and
Position of the Rebel Armies.
From the Philadelphia Inquirer, (Republican.)
NAbHvn.t.B, Tk.nn., 31 arch 12.
Tho interest taken in the Kobe! situ
ation increases. The dirty crowd
which whs to havo been annihilated
before the 4th of July, IS62, exists as
a veteran nrmv in action, 'which, in
magnitude, is only second to our own
in number and disciplino, in tho
world's present history. Tho conutry
which was to have boon starved out
before tho first of Jannarr. ltfrU still
feeds its own army and a portion of
out.
Since General Sherman has pene
tra'ed the heart of the Confoueiate
States, his scout havo reported to
these headquarters that the country
thrtT which he Iihb marched nbounds
in life's necessaries for man and boast.
The people who had heretofore depen-
1
.leu upon thu manufactures and mo ,'
chanibni of the North for the simplest
commodities of .inivMl ,. nr.iol
.v -i
commodities of univeisal use,
loom up m a fraternity conversant
wiih all the ails and sciences in vogue
l l .1 . I ... . i V
iiuoiiiioui. toe nemiepneres. oucli a
people, who have crown from a hill
,,c't 10 a mountain in mechanical im
mensity, must bo attentively watched
"v'in" oueeebses wnicu muse post
dring tho next four months, lest they
achieve fluecessP whipli .....ar . ..t
poe the Urmination of hostilities for!
Ion time.
the past month 1 have been
......
:
ol'PruIm"RR l'lu following, which, with
l. ..... .v i i .
the facilities afforded me here; in con
nection with those which I obtained
in my last trip to Chattanooga and
Knoxvjlle, placed mein the position
to give you' a pretty complete and
reliablo Daguerreotype of tho robol
situatiJij,
First, let mo make a remark which
will olten bo contradicted, viz : That
T a . ?
8trect,nnd Johnston there
"venty thousand men. This
a .Aost f.,.o ri,lu.l,,a
.i:
the rebels have as lanre a forcu in tfo!a,PP'-
. i
i i j.j
ueiu, armeu anu equipped, as our
selves, not counting in tho colored
troop6.
The above parigraph U an abao-lute-
fact. It is really laughable to
read the correspondence of somo gen
tlemen connected with the army.
For Instance, a telegram from ' the
Army of the Potomac to somo Nor-
them journal a fow days ago, stating
that iu the three ariLiea of Lee, Lon"
r
wcro but
18 an
M&ost too ridiculous to aain
,,8 ,nt0 "0tic?- Tbat lhe80 Goner
8 IC 1 f JlVnber may be
,
... 18 , "? "amber and dl9P
fatal 100 of tho rcbe trooI)fl Jm
y T" ?8 "carly corroc1, lhcro
a,a.,mv0 ?cen 80me changes since
portions of ray notes were obtained,
!wl,lc" ,n? Pubhc mast overtook.
r .un Ii i.
T".n" VU,J B"aK veteran troops;
giving the number of soldier n!
t'otifod-
"f, "
numoer ot coneenpts which have been i
numoer otconc
added to each.
lhat ;iorti'n of tho Southern Hrruy,1
which cciid'ituto thu forces under
Gen. Ii'jo (oonnting ir. L winstrect,
who coiii'iiiiiii!. a. nrr'.'mn cf liii?irinr
number ninety thousand tromn.
I his id also coiin'iii in too trooD
which aiu in tho vicinitv of Abinp
don, Lynchburg nd other portions ol
South Wcntern Virginia, and Eat
Teiinesseo, formerly under General
Sam Jones, w!io was detached trotn
Leu's army late in September to op
erato against Uetieral Uurnsidc, and
which are now under the command ol
John C: Breckinridge. At Ilich
mond mid retorsburg there are,' not
untween I'etersburif and V!dan
there are ' ono thonsntid men. AH
along tho railroad, between Velden
n.A WW .... .1. . ...
inu it ii iu i ii jf iuii, mure nre i least
. ... T , .
Hi uuii!uM men. ine torcm under
-he aru.v'in lvtteru V i t gi tda and
N'or.h Carolina to seventy ?wo thons-
(.1111 hit J a .n) II....... ll.Ln. ..4 . I
..-., .w,i uuw wiunomm uiun. .
.11..
t laiuns ui iiimui
'six thousand m.
(8everrt divi .
inir eiehtaoi. tl.
r-i O
and etroiitf.
Thu recond great army in tho Con
federacy is that under General Joe
Johnston, a large portion of which is
cava'ry. Tho army known as the
Army 01 Tennessee is composed of
two corps, each of which has six di
visions ol intautry; numbering tlrrty
men. iiicre are also
sofcavalrr. numlwr.
ing eighteon thousand men, makine
-ri . i i .i . ....
iiiis lnciuoes tne louroivisions sent
to roenfrce llisliop I'ulk, and the
two divisions sent to Mobile, and also
the entire cavalry under Wheeler,
Wharton and John Morgan. Joe
Johnston also has command ot all the
Confederate forces iu Georgia, Ala
bama and Mississippi exoept those at
Savanna, Mobile and under Forrest,
(who has an independent (rovingi
commission. Deforo the arrival ol
Sherman at .Meridan, Polk bad eigh
teen thousand troops, only two thou
sand of which were veterans, however.
Eight thousand is a strong , nnmber
ior doe uoritiston, ol voteraus, outside
of the Army of tho Tenuesboo, in theso
inreo oiaies.
The forces in Sontli Carolina and
at&avaniuu, under General IWnrn
gard, and in Florida, under Uoueial
Mct'owu, will number tou thousand.
Hi i
1 lie reauer wi.i recollect that this
only includes the veterans, or old
soldier, as tho armies in these three
localities above mentioned at presout
niimucr iweniy nvo tnounanu tunn )
l tie next regular armies of the
Lotiiederiicy are thu Texas-Missis
siimi Inrc. B aiarr..ru.t :.. .4:i.'
,,: ' 7 l V n u,u"cu'
!ff " v Arkansas and roxas, and
'.J.1'0 ct,UJU,"uJ ot Liuu'euaut
U . 1. .. W . 1. .1
vjvutmi rvn uy oomii, mo army in
Arkansas under iiolmes. and tho
army in Texas under Magruder, the
old Boldier ol which uumbor twelve
thousand men.
The forces at Mobile under Gens.
rj, K"J, 4ai0O1D0 IJ0t
UBVur,,J nniuber about eight tlion-
to
i
on
a
J?"?; f "ca under Oenoral
;or ?oi Chalmers, Lee and
""-"""i w.' " w 'x u.ou
can. I innmn .mil i... 1.1 . ..' .1.
nuivu li ill ILIlllua Mil II1Q VOl-
crans in tho rebul service.
To these may be added, however, in
tho eama lino, twelve thousand sol
i : .. ..... .
more, eugujeu in nuportam prison
guard, and in the hospitals aod Quar- i
teruiaster's and Comtniasary depart
incuts, mere are also about two
thousand men engaged in guerrilla
watiare on me oauks of the Missis-
tki
otl!ur giiomlla bands of
iimiiiifd tita nviot in I . I t .
1 here are still eevoral
dooartineut
guerrilla organ izuLns in West Ten
uessee and iNorthern
RECAPITULATION.
Number of troops iu General Lee'a
army, including Loiujstreet'e and
all otiW forces' in Kaat Tcnoea
ee, end Breckinridge' and all
forces in Souih-wenotn Virginia 00,000
Number of troop in Nonh Carolina
amlKastern Virginia; under Gen.
Pickett and Barclay, i.iluiling
those at Richmond an I Teteriburg
and along the line of the Virginia
ami Nonh Cdroliua Railroad . . 22 000
iiiiiiuci ui irunpe in joe Johnston
f Mob,!- nde,
fh.i.n..r. r,..4 b.-.l.A.. f'l
"""""""fl
umber eftrorps detailed as Fpfcial
command, im luding the ermy of
iriiii.-i-o ana oilier portions of liia
command distributed in portions
ol Georgia, Alabama and Miwia
sippi Number of troops in South Gsrolina
Savannah and Florida, under Gjii.
erala Ueauregard and McCoivn
Number of troops u nn n,u Tra.is
Mississippi Army, under Generala
Kirbjr fcmiih, Holmes and Mjg.u.
der .
63.000 i
I
!
lo.npo!
is,u';ij
,000
6.000
iuwJi, Quirtermwrrfi'' e'.rVi
334,000
iao.000
llOlmtal aikaiaiania A...
Numiifr of tronnt ,iffii nn
hsiika of the )1nt
Mli uniform
the
3 003
Total v?tf ran troops in the tebt) ser
vice . .
Number of conscriuu lately 'adJed
.v. me icuii irmifa . .
Total number of troop in the rebel"
. i . . . . 341.000
, 1 ortions nftheso fignrca may seem
hnga to some, but you will yet find,
in a eho. t time, that they are not out
ji the way. , t
It . . -.., .u
vCllotll iMrf atlOllt th inU , I.
Iir - . j
vnxse. llw aava that am nn .,t t,
rwieni co:a mornings his c iV'l worth
$95 in a good season for' cats)' froze
mo up eiiu oi ner tan to a . red hot
stove. Seeing a f'rozju mouse at tha
other side of the room she sprang Tor
it, and jumped clour out of her skin
leaving the skin standing by tha
stovo Irozjn. Feeling cold she went
back an I crawled intu tho skin the
wrong way. and now a tail is growing
oj the end of the cat that naed to bo
the Iron'. We have the utmost con
fidencuin "Hrick's veracitv, ordina
nly, but are inclided to believe bis
story is a Uult exaggerated.
This story reminds ns of ono which
w heard on a young cmple who wars
having a 'chat' all to thomselyes da
ring one of tho coldest nights of thv
last winter. The stove was kept ted
hot to prevent the 'breathiugs of lovo,
from freezing before theyreachod the
ears for which they wore destined.
When the clock stnek four, 'the hour
for retiring,' 4IW resolved to have a
last kiss of his lovely Uir one; and
upon applying hie lips to hers t'uev
stuck as tight as -'wax.' Aftsr a
considerable time spout in applying
hot shovel and poker, and no little
pulling they succeeded in getting apart
without sorious injurv to either It
is said that 'Bob' lo'st his mnstacb,
and that it was found frozon to the
lady's 'upper .!iiV next mm-nii, .
COMP. DEM.
Repartee.
8omo yoars since, Elder John O'
kane, of Indiana, was holding a pub
lie discussiou with the Rev. W M
Daily, D. D.p LL. D., a Methodist
preacher, and at that timo President
of the State university at Blooming,
ton. At ono period of the dobato
(we mean tit one period particularly'
tor there were many such,) Daily was
logically cornered and complete! v
tied up. Becoming highly excited
and very mad as the manner of
Methodist preachen h and
overwhulm his opponent with an
lea of the prevalence and universal
ity of Methodism, ho tornnd lnrir.i,.i
Brother O'Kane, and, glaring like
tiger, exclaimed : ''Sir. .Villi ar-lll
flud Methodist preachors all the wsv
from here to hell" "res." said 3ro-
thcr O'KllQC, "AND THE KEABKRnBIX
Western Christian
Advocate.
Ladies vs. GExrtEMicy. Three
things that a lady cancot do
1st. Sho cannot pass a mil.'insri'
shop without stopping.
a. Mie cannot see a ninrn nf u,.a
" - - " V I IA4 V
without sking (he price
3d. She cannot see a babv withont
kisning :t.
A la.Ij of our acquaintance tarns
the tables or. the gentlemen as fol lows
;
Three things a gontleman cannot
do
1st. Ue caunot go through tha
house and 6hat the door after him.
2. Be cantiot have a shirt made
to suit bim.
3d. He can never be satisfied with
the ladies' fashions.
Thk Legislature of Missouri which
lias just adjourned was in .;,-. n i tj
days, at a coat, to that impoverished
ciaie, oi nearly mo hnndred and fifty
thousand dollars. Most of the time
was consumed by members in defin -ing
their position on the Emaucipa
tion question.
DCT3'"! wish vou had bnAn Pc. "
said an urchin to an old maid 'who
was proverbial for hor moauness.
"Why so?"
Because yon would hare eaten all
the apples withojt Jividing with Ad-
ftin ' v ,
GCr MaIio is an I ud inn name sig
nifying the Gem of the Monntains.
XT' This filis cot the Column

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