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M'arthur Democrat. (McArthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1853-1865, October 19, 1865, Image 1

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NO NOItTII. NO SOUTH. UNDEII TUB' CONSTITUTION. BUT A SACKED NAINYENAKCE OP THAT IH.TIHiMERT A IV IV MM.
M'ARTHUK, VINTON COUNTY, OHIO. OCTOBER 19, 1885.
N0.il
VOL. 14.
in n ;u
H 1 9
If
( . I i .:
. . . t
lit gltrlte J5cmoeat;
IU -,-lBi r.KKT THCRSuAV. BY
E.jrV.ft W.E. BR ATT ON.
() F F10E.
In Ur vlloii'- llJi:nniBi. taftof Court
tlmiff, Vti Staii.
Ti, Hkm. .at ' will l.e wuit one year for one
Dollar: ...Itiftynu: W V.VvO.nU
.nW-lUowiiu; -ur .lontfi., for Fifty Cent
-,ViViKfwillb aiacontinusd t the
expiration of tho lii.io paid fur-
TERMS t'0 11 AUVEPriSINO.
Duo Sii're ono Insertion, iOO
Kach additional insortion, .3
Carlsons year, . . 8
N..;coof iipltiti.en-.ot iniitt
-. C.uur.Uan an.) JCxnoiituis .W
A 1 niiminninoiii'oi hotore. . r . , w
Yo;.rlv advertinmcnta will ba charged W,
p,r o .l-'ir.n tur annum. , -1
i n l in i.rftimriliinawra e for less man a
V..-V.in and tr low time.
; ,r TonliuM minion cb irrfod M OM sqaare,
I ll ArtverU.DmeiiUai'i Legal Notioon must
?; mM I .Jva ice. ,
:v-riiQubovot'rm9mHt heo.0p
V
a Im (0 no moots.
TIs?. Detuocra J oh Office.
K,,a,, :, :u, U: ..rlca t' it .lafy compotltion,
I I,-; 1 1 j cf Jvo Worn, men a-
lUi'lKS,
l-AMPULKTS,
HAND BILLS;
iJJlOVV 13 ILLS,
-..ruSTEUS,
l'KOUKAMMES
FILL UliAlS.
.. BLANKS. .f ll KINIiS.
tfllll'l'INQ lilLLS;
LABELS, &C..&C.
.Hn ns atrial ant heconvmcoa mev win
n I
t''
..nil ,1 . .. inti l iieaparlorABH.vin n bi..
r...il,iili'n(iitintliisse.!tionotco.rnrj
SADDLE I'AKNESS
U.A-'.r.y.Ts All- WorK.
i -i-t? null y on hi"J ut:c wit
l .wen uriie."). Caudles
Bri
?:tni3 :f tvtM-y deccriition
. . . f,!i tix-ii vi'ura
; nj.i 1.10 "! j
i ( .1111110. 1st door woat o
f II nue.
.!, 1S04 Oran.
KlMl
rUlUr A: SHIVEL,
;:'rmv! at Law,
ltiiilEiUM Agont uiul Con-
Vinon Co0.
i: t ii i
U.ii;r . i. ,"ilnhi Slret t. two door eaM
r. K. 1 Dints' Store.
Will !i "J 1 1 I'riu it'y '.'i .ill liifinn eiitrr
t i Mii-.ir cjiu. in Uia. t'ouiiea of ii.u)., J
svii, l'i'e ami Scioto.
January l'Jthl8tj5-tr,
JONES HOUSE.
' PORTSMOUTH OHIO.
Mr. Jonm 1ms purclwecd ihe Old Ply
t:-. ii'lh llouto, ami chanyed its name ac
b!) ve. The Hoii-e Jis ben rpnr.o lele.l and
i-; noir open for t lie reception of the public.
Jt is on tire wharf.a healihy locmion. and
no pain- will be spared to nuke the stiy of
MsiiciB at ill's house, all thev can w'wh.
Clui gca low as the limes will uflbrd.
June 29ih 18C5 Omo. -
E. A. MUTTON,
At I or "lev r t Law and
McAr hin, Ohio.
IVin ' li, . n-;ol li ttlO U. S.. for tliO POTPOB
I will ntten'l io the prosecution and collection
nf v..ry iloiirtriloii of clnlms ugalna. th
Unite 1 Sttos.and Bute of Ohio, Inoluding th
Mor. in raid oluim. - -
'.ooiitic ami . rrenrnjea prPnr .
', Procured.' '' .
PKKSIONS for ivoiiiiJeil and distblod ol
Jicrs .m l to.11.1011, and for the hctra of ioldiers
vml idumcu who have diod and hean killed in
the f 'rvice. ' I would say to my friortds, that
ho wil t attend promptly to the.r business and
inol irate term. : : : ),'
Jane I6tb lSiil. . ... , ' - l
"jLONDKM.O. r A.ISAMIJiGKR M D
CONDSES:- .MiNGER.' '
PHYS3IAJ:"- AND SURGEONS
McArhiifvr ;QIiio, -
Will attend proiiipU a. d. carefully to
ihe practice of '(heW' proiessiori -in all its
branches, i. ; t r's-'. si"'lf! -'r- ' -1
uT SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TQ
BURGBRYl.ii-:.lA i iM.V!', a i O
tt. 6thj4rtr..":: ' -i -
E-.1.
UttAYO
A6.
: i . i :. i y '' ' i
I,..' i !..- i - a ri -
Me ATtTUUR, VINTON Co; O,
W I r.I, atun J to all legal b a si n en In trt itsd
to tholt ear in Viutoni Albena, Jackson, Boas,
llotjkio? and aitjoining: counties.
Partlcnlor attention given to tlie oolleotlon
nf soldiers olaims for Poimions. Bonntles, ar
rears (f pay bo..!against,tbe United States or
Ohio, including Morgan raid claims.
April 12th 1885, Ijt '
' JroncKa Blanks, Blahs Deeds,
etc. foall descriptiona for sale at this
I
SONG.
BY ALICE CAREY.
0 leavee.will you new be stayed,
Till til the garden U barel .
Fade, fade, fade!
They are falling tnd filling the air!
But what care I lor the naltitd valley.
So lung as my darlin; be clothed like a lily.
0 rain, are you never to stop?
0 sky, will you never be cleared?
Drop, drop, drip!
All over ntv 'minimi my bard!
Bui what lor the cuiJ and tlie wet cure I,
S long a my ditdinUd wurm and dry!
0 winds, ar you aWna to blow!
" J
0 clouds, we yo uovei to li t?
gllow lnow snowi
' .
m ? t0 my k,,e ,n the d(,fl
But wlwtcaie I ihongti ttcover my he.-!,
o "
O night, to "tinging and ttill,
Will you never and never depart?
tliill, tlilll, thill!
To the innermost blood of my heart!
But what care 1 though I Ireeie where 1
stand,
If my darling but throw me a kiss from her
hand!
Squire Pitman's Peaches;
or, a Story for Boys.
:
;
I
School wm over tor ' the ' day.
Artnud with eatclifla 'nd dinoer-r
iia UM acilOlHM fllea . OUl
ol the
, , , , . 1TPiiiii,
wended theif way
liotni'wurd. 1 he
iluOvH ol twtlve
Jket to iro 'ere two
who, had been ' kept , R'ter school
fur dtficiencit'9 in ecrapliy. Tiieir
Dames wre refipectively, Tom Grey
and Frank Grtetie.
'Tom,' said Frank, MiavG you had
any peachue th i year?
'Only one;. Uncle Ben brought 08
one apiece, when he came troin Boa
ton vt'StotJay. Wasn't it piiine,
tliouhr
Tlii.n
f lien you arc botttr i'ff than I
am, for have not had any. But 1
know where theie are some, and I
moan to have some more this very
night, too.'
' Yia do !' exclaimed Tom;
eagerly
1 Knt tuliprnnhniita art
they V
Ftank looked carefully about him
to make sure that no ouo was within
liuaii!K, and whispered, in "Squir
Bituiun'a gaideii'
'But,' etid Tom. a little dubious
ly, that would bo etuuling.'
Oh!' said Funk, 'he'll nevr
mi 88 'em, Tha trees are everea full.
It made tuy ruoath water when 1
passed there this morning. There
are more than he can eat, and we
miut as well have 'em s leave 'eui
o rot on the trees.'
'So we had,' saiii Tom, who was
easily persuaded. 'Are you going
to nMV
. 'Yes; there isn't any raoou, so that
will bo iu cur favor, , .Will you go?'
Yes. When wtil you bo rcaoyi'
'Cat! for me at half past eight, I'll
be at the corner of the oiel.aid.
iliud and bring r. big with . you
Wo shall watit w car.y a lew away
with us.
All rlht; I'll be on lia J.'
Sauire Fitmsn, the ovner of thi
garden refiirrwd to by tla boys, had
recently removed intoCedi-rvillc ilk-
bad spent must 01 me me ii im cy.
where lie baa accumulates ai-:rtui:o,
a part of which he invested in a tin.:
old place which happened to ho lor
sale. The loriner proj rivtor i:ad pid
particular tt'leution to tho gard;ii,
introducing clmice varieties ot rruii
trees of various kinds," wi.icli wrr-.-now
in exoelleor bearing condition
Squire Pitman (ho was called Squ'.re
putofi'eforence to his wwuth) Ii
moved into the villa.9 to. rocenti)
to hdViTu'iadfl any av.qii lintancus:
lie was a pleasiint lonKlDg old wu
tleman, rather old! .fashione'l iu hi
appearance, who geuerally walked
with the help of a gold headed
cane.
After supper, that evening, the
gardener came in and politdly re
quested to speak with him for a mo
taient
'Well, James.' said the old gentle
man, -'what is it?' -
1 suspect, sir,' ,'said James. 'th tt
an attempt will be made to rob youi
fruit trees to-night.'
Bless my soul! What makes yon
think sol'
'I happened to overhear two boys
I couldn't bear all
talking about it.
hey a'd. Iiut i In ;ird mouli to wbow
wliat they wt-ro after.'
Do you think tuey are coinmz to
nightt aaked the Squire after a
pause,
'Yes, Sir; shall I let out the
r . . .
Wo. lie might btta them.
And serve 'era rifht.'
'I would rather have them brought
in to trie. Yon may e:t Kenbeti to
Itand watch with you,
it
yon
catch them, you may bring them into
the houso.'
'Ys, sir,' said Jtrnvs.
Tom and Frank mot as agreed
Uon, and started iu com puny for the
garden.
'Did yon bring a bag!' asked
Frank,
No, but I hnvo got an extra
handkerchief that will hold a good
lot.'
'All ripht; wo can hide 'em in th
biir-l'ea, and ;'o to 'em whuc we want
Via.'
By hnlf past eight it was quite
dark. There was no moon, and
only horc and there a stitr was via
ble.
It's a j illy night,' said Frank.
'Jul tho tlnng."
At length the boys raclu:d the
picket fenco that surrounded the gar
den 'Get over first,' skid Tom.
With some difficulty, Frank
clamberud up. but got cautfut in
the picket 3nd tumbled t the ground.
'Are you hurt!' whispered Toui ,
'No, but I've torn my trowsers.
Look out for them plaguey pick
ets.' Now, where are tho trees' asked
Tom, when they got over.
Ttiere's one: you get op and
shake it, and I II pick em up.
No, Frank, you're the
best all
r
climbinc-'
'Ohl yes, no douut, you'u rainer
pick 'em up.'
Well, I'll climb the next tree.
I'll save vou the trouble,' said
a rough voice, which made boih tho
bovs 'urn uale. ihey stane.i to
run, but tlio pnrsuHrs were ti quick
inr tliem. lorn was soon struggling
iu the grasp of the gardener, and
Frank tried in vain togyt away Irom
Reuben, a boy of sixteen, who assist
ed on the farm.
You let me go!' said Tom, Btrug
ling energetically.
'i d a little rattier noti i ve oe?n
waiting for you some time, my liue
i'ellow.'
'If yon don't let me go I'll bite!'
laid Frauk, to his captor.
'If jou do, I'll have to pull your
teeth out,' said Reuben, laughing.
What are ypu going to do with
both of us, any wayl'
'Going to carry yon in to Squire
f tman. lie wants to see you.'
Terrified by this threat, the boys
begged piteonBly to be free, but their
captors were inexorable. Finding
struggles and entreaties alike useless,
they ri signed themselves passively to
their late, while visions of arrest aid
imprisonment fi.led thoir hearts with
dismay.
Squire Pitman was sitting in his
library, looking over the evening
Muoer. when a noise was heard at the
door, and Rouben and ' the gardener
iiparcd, each with a boy.
Her? they are, sir,' said Jamea.
We've caught 'emcaij Kisuben.
Bk'88 my sou!!' said the Squire,
Ami what are their namt&r
This ouii is Tom Grey, and
;?hcf one is Frank Grecno.'
tho
'V.n- null vnn m;v 'eava
the
vcnnir gentiemot: uore witu me.
Yea, sir.'
Rather relnctan'ly James
and
P.eubeti let go their hold of
our
the!
young auveuiurers, ana icit
roi'Ui-
Tom and Frank looked sideways;
at the 8qu're,exj.wotinK to bo seized
ud shaken, or at the Dost to receive
a severe scolding. What was their
sm prise, when
the
old gentleman
pleasantly, and
came torward
very
asid:. ., ,.. .. ,
'Rys, I am very
happy to see
yon. 1 iikb to receive visits iroui
V i I : ! V
voune people, t.iougn i luinit it ve
ter in eweb cases fov . them to oome
.1 1. il. .S,A ABM1 .. A... ft .(.MAS) tVllA'
MirOuUll UW gait's ttHU uui un mo
clotheB.'
Frank looked down at his torn
trowerse in a little bewilderment,.
'Pray sit down,' eaid the , Sqnire,'
uonieiy. , . .
Tom aod Fraak aat down on the
cornera of two chairs, evidently ill at
ease.
Pitman's trees wro as aaio as it
,biU dog iiad been chained at the
foot of every tree.
llowoid are you, l'liyiuasf 1
believe that is your natce.'
. 'Twelve, sir.'
4And y?u, Frank!'
'I am twelve, too.'
'And I am seventy. '' It was really
kind of yon to come and call upon an
id xe.mletiiau lie mo. JJut the
cve'iingrtHrti short; you ought to have
LouiH fiarlier.' '
Ti-m locked at Fran'i fn silent
V. n1er. II did not know what it
a I im-ant. If he had been shaken
up, that he wou'd have understood;
hnt tin- Squire's manner puzzled him
completely.
'A re you fond of fruit, Thomas!'
anked Ihe Squire, innocently.
'Yo es,' said Tom, a little uneasi
ly. 'Do rou like it too, Frank?'
Trotty well, said Frank, who
wag a little afraid of . committing
himself.
'S i I snppose. Most boys do.'
Sjuire Pitman row from hii a. at
and rang tho bull.
'You nitty bring ;n aome pianos an l
knivosi.' caid hi t the Birva'it, 'an f
lay thnm on tlie tublo.'
This wad d too. Noxt tho old
gentleman went to the closnt,
an i brought out a basket of cicu
peaches.. . i ; ' , ? .
-I generally ketp a little fruit.' ho
remarked, 'to treat the frieuds who
are kinoTenongh to call upn me.
Uelp yournelves.'
The wondering bovs did so. and
commencod 6atlng. Thoy wondered
whether the shaking wonld come a!-
ter the poaches were eaten.. Evert
il it did, they would hav the' satis
faction of eating them.'
'Do you like them?' asked Squire
Pitman, who seemed to enjoy seeing
the bovs eat.
'Yes, sir,' said Tom, 'they are tip-
'.. " -
'I am gad yon think so. I nave
several peach trees in ray garden.
James, the gardener, was telling me
that there was some danger of boys
lulling in and robhing the trees,
but I don't have any fears on that
score.' .
UeroTom and Frank exchanged
glances
'If any ot tho boys want fruit, I
know the" would prefer to come and
auk rae lor it, or drop in and make a
friendly call, as yon are doing. By-
. . . ... . .
the way, wouldn't yoo like to crry
liomo a IOW jjoiujuob wnu juui
Yes, sir,' said the boys, a little
hesitatingly.
'If you had eomething to put. them
in'- , , .
I've got a handkerchief,' said
Tom.
And I've got a bug.' said Frank.
Blasa tnv 9ul 1 how thoughtful
yoa wore to bring a bag. " It will be
lust tho thing. You're welcome to
the peaches in that basket, if you
can sto.v them away.'
We are uiecu obliged to you said
Tom, ureatlully.
'Ohl don't say a word. It's a
mere trifle, and I like to make some
acknowledgment for your kind call.
Will you call and see me again,
bovs?'.'
Yes, sir, if yon wou'd like it.'
'1 should bo most hap;iy to have
you come. I get Ion sly soiuetimos,
and young company euee.s m? op.-
Perhaps, though, you had better
coma to the door, as it is a little dan
;erons cliinbiu; over fences,' addod
the old gentleman, a little s'yly. "
Tho boys I tngnwi rathor concioua
ly, and were shown to tho' door.
Squiro Pitman shaking thorn both
by tho hand, and kindly repeating
the invitation. ' '.''
'Ain't lie a trump ?' ejaculated
Frank, "wheu tho door - bad closed
behind them.
Hint's so. I felt awful mean to
i i. irA.t m.i iii that miillilQl'.
, a. , i i,a i coma Htrr hi peaches ?
j jjj j ylu wor,'t crttch mo in
;Bl.h imAnf, aizain.'
Tin-, atorv of the boys' visit to
Squire. Pitman leaked out, and made
quite a sensation among the souool
buys. .1
It was onaniraoasly agreed that it
t I . I . I. ' .t.S.1. ,f mnnnnaaa tt
wouia oe me ihkuwi ui uicauim.
i aiaae any lunuer au?uip uym
property of ontt who had treated their
COUJLmu.UIH W9 unuD'uj.j,
- . h.lllHa.MllAlIU
: few nitfts but fro u ' Hihf time Squire
DCJThere.ia little use of the sonsa;
kv..;MM Xf n-r1l lir.cr B(.naw .
VIUDMIUgU no vaui vi w-- .
Influence of a Newspaper.
A school teacher, who has b'n "
lung time engaged in his profession.
and witnessed the influence t a
aewepuper upon' the ra'mdi of a fam
ily of children, writes as follow:
I hfcvo fonnd it "thii uni verul fact,
without exception', that those scholar.
of both sexes and of all ages, who
have ha 1 access to newspapers at
home, when compared with those
who hav not, an: A '"
1. Better readers, excellent In
pronunciation, and cocsoqueutly real
more undersfandin;ily.'
2. They are better spellers, arid
defnie words with easo and accura-
ey- m .
3 Tbuy obtain praotical kno.v!r
edge of geograpliy in almost half th
time it requires itlior. as tho news
paper has mad) thj;n familiar with
the location of the important planes,
nation), their nvernm -nts and do
iugs on the g o'je.
4 They batW gruwn irian.
fr having hQ'inn so familier wif'i
every i' myla in t;i.r nowi.H?)tr, from
fh.s i! i .- in n place alvirtiseinont t
Uiu- ti.iia'iei and clasiical oration o'
the sratesm'-n, they mor ra'ilv
comprehend the meaning of tex and
consequently analyze its construction
wite accuracy.
5.1 They write better ttoti isit'o i
using better language, oonta nin.
more thoughts, more clearly a-)
conmo edly expressed,
6. Those young men who have
f r years been readers nf the news
papers are al ways taking fie lead in
debating societies, exhibiting a more
extensive knowlodga npon a greater
variety ot subjects, and expressing
their views with greater fluency,
clearness and correctness in their use
of language.
Men and Women.
Women may talk o'" their inherent
richls us much as thoy pkase, but
they can't ovtrcme nanre they
rmy preach aliout the quality of the
sex, but they can t overcome tacts
and originations. Men and oaks
were made to he twiodd, aod women
aid ivy word made to twine about
them Though an equality were to
be established between calico and
cashmere to m rrow, ii would not be
a week before all the ofliccrs wonl I
be men, and all the soldiers women
Females are perfectly willing to g"
ahead, provided the men go fli'st.
Set die to a steam boa', an 1 not a
yard of dimity wll bulge till cussi
mere sets the example. So long us
the men cling to the vessel, the wo
men will clirg to the men But if
the men will plunge overboard,
chimiscttes plnuge to . As we said
before, reformers may prate us they
may about equal rights, but. can't
alter the regulation o Go I. It is as
impossible tor woru.'ii to cut them
selves loose rota men as it is foretce'
dust to free iOelt from its attachment
to a magnet.
The Blackamoor.
"
uEiop, who has a fable illustrative
of every phase of life, has left us one
appropriate to the ell rt uow on loo
to erect dverv negro hit a vo e 'in I to
make him tlu wiiite inn's eqial.
iEsop says;
"A. cert Yin nun having bonght a
blachamoor, was so simple as to
think that the col ir ol his skin was
only dark and tilth, which he had
c infracted for want of due care under
is former m:ifi!nr. This fault he
imag'ned might oasity ba removed.
So he order .-it tho poor black to bo
put into a tub, and was at connidera
bl" charge in providing ashes, soap,
and scrubbing brushes for the opor
htion. To work they went, rubbing
and conring his skin all over, but to
no manner of purpose, for when they
had reperted their washings several
times, and wore grown quite wearv
in all they got by it was that the
wretchi d Blackamoor caught cold
and died." ,
a
1
0There is nthirg pnrer than
honesty; nothing warmer than love;
nothing more bright than- vir'ne: and
nothing more steadfast than faith.
Those united in one mind f rm . the
purest, the sweetest, tho richest, tho
holiest, and the most stead last hap
piness.
CQfPoor mon plant an-' gather the
corn, and rich one3 driuk the whis-
rn
a;
Strange Developments
Somebody Has Pocketed
Somebody Has Pocketed $300, 000 to $350, 000.
The summary suppression of v. t
investigation by the dominant pa-t-'
in the Ust Legislature, we have tir-.f
ban n w aisund our realers, c m .'
nave u other signilioanco tban t! ;i
there was so nothing io"ten in t t
maniigeitient of tatrtirs. which is wit
ncceflsary to cover up in order no' ; '
end mger party BU'rcoBS. '
Now, liowvver, wi aro in pe- -son
of the huts, a i J wj hist n
submit them to t'ie pto,;lo ot M m .
The caio is sibsUutially at follow :
Some seven hii'idred man, ciii !l'
negroes, were enlisted in tho n' -lious
States, tip in tlu q i ta of .Ua n .
These men so enlisted should h
been CJUiited up in thj q nta of t! '
Stae, reducing it by so mtny, and
should hivubv'on creditjl t tlu 6JV
eial districts.
This wui not do'io O i t in cm
trary, teesj very men w-tn Hid bv
somebody to ditTTont to vns in th
State, at s)m i two f.iin lr:d d illar
a,jieje,a id ;ln in mey poiitttj I by the
pors in or poison porputrating the
fraud, ami the aiders ani abetters
thereof.
Thus some three hundred to three
hundred an I til' y thousand dollars
were takon out ot tlu pockets ol the
p 'opto by tlu grtce'.os.s scoundrel
kviif Irivi Hiinsn ipcm rinting in tho'r
Portland Argus,
Oct. 2.
Reasons Why Boilers Explode.
pt idc.
Tliis momentous qucsoo wasn' '
discmsed belore tho Society lor r m
Advancement of Art sod Science,' ' i
New York, on Friday ' night. ic
Norman Wianl tho itivontor of i
Wiard gun, proposal as a theory i
u icqtal expansion of tlie tntal of' 1 1
boiler, c.iujod by super heated -.
acting on a portion o-' tlie snriaje -The
boiler above thy waler-lino n
thus greatly heated, and thus nvn-"
expanded than tho m tal in cont.i"
with the water. Too boiler is thus
8'rained aud weakened, s thtV il
may yield to tho ordinary presure o:'
the etoain. The explosion ran lv r
oevec Likes place svnilo the en m m' s
workiug, but when it is star el u.r r
a short rest. Too s'o'ipvgi n,' in
O igine often causes tin un q i 1
heating an 1 expansion o "i lnuei',
Which it is unable to b .-.'. i I s n I
that the explosive toicu oi t in steam
wascaii83dby the inutnjntnm co:n
muuicated to aid it when the rupture
takes place. Mr Wiard illustrated
the theory by several diagrams, an l
concluded with citing a few exam
pies in support ol his theory.
IjrTho South Carolina corrcs
pondent of the Bjstou .ddvortiser, i
Uipnblican piper, writes to it us
follows, respecting the temper ot tho
Southern people:
It is idle and foolishmore, it ia
false and cu ;!, to urge or argue that
there is danger of further arrae I ro
distance to the authority of the G 'V
ernmont in South Carolina. Tlie
argument Against tho resturat. iii ot
the btate to political tellowship :iiu-t
rest on other gr muds. It can re -l on
bases without losing any o its
strength, tio I know there- we i a
score of ex Confederate officers h tho
convention. D ieso'1 that indica o a
rpirit? inay be q ierid For my p u ',
I wish every ofhij in the State co i!d
be tilled with late robel offivrs. It
is the universal testimony of ev t.-y
jfficer of our own troops with w'n c
I havo conversed, from the comm.. i
din General down, as well a9 of etr-
ery Northern man two months re
dout in the btate, that the late M :l
ofEaers are of better disposition t -
ward the Government, toward N ir h-
enters, toward progression, thau any
other class of citizens.
rTPA new married conplu went to .
Niagara on a visit, and the g '.Me- . .
man, In order to convince his .-,c... t
that he was a brave as he was t:'1' . i
lanf, resolvi-d tOigo down into -tu-i v
!'oavo of the winds. '' , She, ol couif', ',
objeoei; but .finding , tnat, Jie ; 'is .
deteimmad, aUoctionateiy rcqu aie , ,
hiixs to 'Wava bis pocket, book and ( '
Watoh behind. . i;i;..d t.J :::!..;
:.: . . . ... i , i ' .yHiiuo;.'-."!
X7"Jnlg RicharddOn' onee-sali'. ,
that ''everything was fifkon by;;;
the Almighty,- excv .w.hft't'vviuUl co-'
the verdict of apotit jury." - ;

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