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The McArthur enquirer. (M'arthur, Vinton County, Ohio) 1873-1884, January 22, 1873, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87075167/1873-01-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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M'ARTHUR, VINTON COUNTY, OHIO, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1873.
NUMB).
Enquirer
The Mc Arthur Enquirer.
J. XV. HOWKN, Editor and Proprietor.
Term of Subscription. .
One copy, ouo vcur.$l 50 1 Ono copy,8moB.$l 00
One cop v, IHnoa .... 15 1 Ono copy, 4 inon . 60
If not piiUl within tlio year 00
Clulm of Twenty I'-'0,!'
Tho McArthur Knquirkk circulates 1KM,
OF POSTAGE within tho limits of Vinton
'rVieMcArthur EnquIbbu nnd Tht Clirtt
thin Wli mi will bu sent to ono person ouc
yeur for 3 00.
A iiiiluro to notify a iliHcontinniince lit tho
end of the time mihacrihed for, will ho taken
n a now oiiKiiKoinent for Biilweriptiou.
Advertising Ratal.
Tho apiico occupied by 10 lines of this (Non
pareil) tvie ahull conntititte a squaro.
ltulo nnd Figure Work 50 cents additional.
3 ninfl. 0 mos. 12 mofl.
Ono square, 4 00 H 00 Hl
Two miunrcs, 5 IK) 1 00 10 00
Throe siinnruH, 7 00 10 00 15 00
.r'ourntiuiirca. . 00 19 M 18 00
Hixs.UnreH, 10 00 15 00 !0 00
column, 0 00 12 00 SO 00
ii column, 15 00 36 00 40 00
One column, 25 00 40 00 BO 00
Legal Advortinomcnta ?1 00 per square for
fli'Ht Inxertlon; nml 60 cents per squaro for
each additional iiiKOition. , ,
UubIucdk CuriU, not exceeding 8 lines, f5
per year.
All bills due on first insertion of advertise
ments.
llilU with regular advortlsors to lio paid
ciunrterlv.
llusines.H Notice 10 cents n tine. Marriniro
Notices according to tlio liberality of the
parties.
Vearly ndvcillscrg entitled to quarterly
I'lllUlL'OS.
Advertisements uot othcrwiso ordorcd, will
be continued until ordered discontinued, and
charged Hceoriiinixiy.
Marietta & Cincinnati Railroad.
TIME TABLE.
On nnd after November 9, 1ST2. Trains will
run as loitows:
m
Sin
.2 & a
, -2 3S X 'JJ I- t-
.Ja; , ; ; ; ;
8":
(Ji Oi OS 3J
a ; ; ; ; ; ;
j i : : : : : '
'a'i'i-ai'fM
::::::::: :S
! : : : :H
CC 91 -
Miles
'A
C
' !8 :.3 : :
,. . u . : bt
Nd a a i.
E : , -s
A" a ii -4
a : :
'" u : S :
;&2
9'Z 3 5
T. a 1.
id
i ?. 4. 7. i ?. r. ? ?. t ? ?! r. ?. 5 8
S a : : S . ::::::::::::
O S i O flt m C C 5 CC SO tO US
:::::!::
': : I i : : :
::::!
i3d :::::
3?
CI N( INN ATI KXI'ltKs.S will run daily
All
otner iiams uuiiv, except nuiiiiav.
CINCINNATI" KXI'KKSH, KAST, makes no
stop between Ilnmdcn and Athens.
artuiouth Branch.
Mall
4:00 p. in.
4:S!I "
7:00 "
8:45 a. m.
11:05
11:45 p. ni.
Accniiimodat'n
8:15 a. in.
7r21
11:10
12:20 p.m.
4:00
5:20
Dep. Haniden
" Jackson
Arr. Portsmouth
Dep. l'ortsuiontli
Air. .Inckson
" Hitiiiden
Tlt.UNSCONNF.CT AT LOVKLAND
For all points on the Little Miami l(alroiid,
and at tlx Indlnpapnls A Cincinnati ltHil
road Juiiftlnir lor "II Pnnts West,
"' " W. V. I'KAIIODY,
Master ol Transportation,
LINE.
CLEVELAND COLUMBUS, CINCINNATI
& INDIANAPOLIS RAILWAY.
On and after Monday, May 28th, 1871, Kx-
lnvss Trains will leave loiiuiiiiiis nnii liwi
lino and arrive at points named below as fol
lows:
Siatlou8. No.li", No".4. . N'oTOT"
Columbus..
n:inn.iii.
4:0 p.m.
i 2:;:.;a.nr
Jii
. 2:00 p.m.
4:40
5:05
l::W)a.in,
11:00
0:40
f live tinil..
llutWo 10:30
4:10
(1:45 a.m.
7:05
2:00 p.m.
11:20
0:80
HUB
. in.
Unchester
Albany....
IlllNtoll. ...
N. Y.City.
. 1:80
0:15
fi-M p. 111.
8:30
Cii'stllno . . ..12:45 p. 111.
Pittsburgh., :35
llarrisburg . 7:15 a. in.
8:115 p.m.
1:6 a.m.
11:25
2:40 p.m.
113
8:85a.m
8:45 I). in
9:40 a.m.
I!itltimore...iu:io
Viiiliinninn.
iltt
p. up
a. in.
lilluleipiiirti
t:00
Crestline ....11:30 p. ni.
Fort Wayne,. 6:30a. ni.
Chicago ... .12:10 p. in.
7:45 p.m.
1:15 a.m.
7:20
6:55 a.m.
11:25
8:00 p.m
RhiyN'o. 4, leaving Columbus nt 4:10 p. in
lniM'iiTlii'onuh Car via Delaware for Spring.
Held, reaching Springlleld without change at
1-'M ii. m.
Train No. 2, on tno commons a j
Valiey Kaiuonil connect vlth No. d
tlll-oiigll'iMa'yiJ f.jf atto at'Xl uiuV
' fi,siFiNtiK' Tit lIH returning ri
Train No. x, on tno loiumoiia a, jiucunig
.i .tnjiu
t arrive lit
Culumbiu at 12:38 a. in.. 11:15 a. m., and 0:50
a. in.
ftarPalaca Day and Sleeping Cars
Uii All Trains.
No. 0 leaving Columbus nt 2:83 a. m., on
Butidav, runs tlirough without detontlon, by
both Kilo and ?iow lora iCiitrai nniiwaya.
arriving at Now Vork on Monday morning al
n.o tt. in.
For nartlcular Information In regard to
n,,..,.,,rl, Hi.ki.ts. limn, connection, etc.. In all
iuinl:,rtas, nt,-.fc(irttt lll ii!H','i Ol'llly'r"
I AS. I'ATTKUSON,
General Agent, Columbus, Ohio.
KlUliNlii FORD,
Passenger Agent, Columbus, Ohio.
Columbus & Valley R.
nnnnd (iftnr DowinlierOth.lWitroMiowm
icns
(1:80 a. m.
'Arrive'
ICoOti.'hi.
12:10
1:05
... . 8:2
:10
.,.,12:15 a. 111.
p. ni.
Arrive:"
Mi
7::to
7:50
0:15
11:17
9:20 a. III.
8:80
I plnibtn
" WWnirgli...
Cluvolitnd ...
Xenla
Dayton
Richmond...,
Indianapolis.
Cliicngo
Closo cnnncetlnn inutlo nt Lnne.nstor for Clr
"levlllo, Zancsvlllo and all points on tn) Cln
i i l. ......n, v H.1..V. LLllnud.
Hjkdl), H.Hnllo!(, WaiH4iMnrt'MleW
anil all points W.est, Also, for Cleveland,
lliitralo, Pittsburgh, and nil points Kast
i..i, Hi ii,.t,f;, i Vnll.w and Pan llnndlO
mute to Clilcago and tlio Northwest; ItUth
slKirtcs byslxiy-six mllns, fivlnn panoti-r
.the limient of lulckcr tlmo ami lower
' tlmn liu anv llilit .
: 1',. A- BWtl,I, (it'll ! TICKUC A(UU
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad.
Great National Short Lino Rout
East and West.
Only Direct Route to the Natlonnl Capl-
ioi anu .a.aiwaru,
On and after Monday. November 10. Trains
will run as follows:
EASTWARD.
CMnati Fatt Mail
Esepreti Lint Kxprtu
6 55 Am 040Fm .........
2 35 I'm 2 8.1 Am 8 44 Am
6 03 " E 61 " 1 12 I'm
8 80 " 8 20 4 45 "
8B5 " 8 45 " 5 05 "
10 00 " 10 00 " (J 25 "
235 Am 1 20 I'm 12 4 I'm
U15 " 410
12 30 I'm 8 30 Am 9 20Pm
12 54 Am 11 45 I'm 4 00 Am
0 45 I'm 8 00 " 8 00 I'm
800 " 4 OS Am 850Am
8 20 " 4 25 1 9 20 "
18 08 I'm 8 59 " 1204 "
5 00 " 1032 " 845Am
0 25 1100
Depart
l'arkorsburir
Cumberland. ..
Harpers Ferry
Washington Juno.
Arrive
lialtiniiire
Wnxhiniiton
Philadelphia
New York
WESTWARD,
Depart.......
Now York
Philadelphia
Washington
Haiti more
Arrive.. ..
Washington June
llurpor's Ferry..,
(,'iimbcrlnnd
I'arkersburg
Pullman Pslaot Drawing Boom Sleeping Can
Which nro as comfortable, elegantly furnished
and almost equal to a flre-eide, are on all
trains from Cinclniinll to Mttltlnioro and
WaHhinglon. Kee Schedule of Cincinnati nnd
Marietta Itailroad for timoof arriving and de
parting from McArthur.
Tlio advantages of this routo over all others
is, that it gives all travelers holding through
tickets tho privilege uf visiting Baltimore,
1'hiladclphia, and the National Capitol free.
Time quicker nud ratesof fare lower than
by another route.
Tlio scenery along this Railway is not
equalled for granileuron this Continent.
TO SHIPPERS OF FREIGHT.
This lino oilers superior Inducements the
rates being one-third lower to anil from Ilos
ton, New York, or any other eastern point
In ordering goods of any description from the
Kast give directions to ship tin Unltinioro &
Ohio It. It., and in shipping Kast give same di
rections. Freights shipped by this route will
have despatch, and be handled with care and
save shippers much money.
.1. L. WILSON,
Master Transportation, Ilaltiinore.
O. II. HLANCHAttl),
lieu. Freight Ag't. Baltimore.
L. M. COLE,
(Jen. Ticket Ag't. Ilaltiinore.
S.1J. JONES,
(ion. Pass. Ag't., Cincinnati.
Ind., Cin. & Lafayette Railroad.
Great Through Panenger Railway
to all Points West, Northwest and
Southwest.
This ia the Short Line via Indianapolis.
Tho Ureal Through Mnit nnd Express Pas.
senger Line to 8t. Louis, Kansas City, St. Jo
seph, Denver, Han Francisco, and all points in
Missouri, Kansas and Colorado.
The shortest anil only direct route to In
dianapolis, Liifnvctto. Terre 11 ante. Cam
bridge City, Springlleld, Peoriu, llurlington,
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul, and all points
in the Northwest.
Tho Indianapolis, Cincinnati A Lafayette
Railroad, with its connections, now oilers
passengers more lacuities in Tlirougn coach
iiid nit'cpiug inr service tnan any otner line
rom Cincinnati, hnvlnir the uilvantniro of
Through Daily Cars from Cincinnati to St.
jouis, Kansas Citv. St. Jnseuh. Peoria, llur
lington, Chicago, Omaha, and all Intermediate
points, presenting to C'ulouis(s and Families
such cumiuris ami accommodations as i
(ilnrded hv no otlior route.
Through Tickets and linggago Chocks to all
pniiHH.
i rains leave Cincinnati nt T:so a. m., a:uu p.
m., nml 9:00 p. in.
Tickets can ho obtained at No. 1 Burnet
House, corner Third and Vino. Public Land
nig, corner main ana itiver; also, at nepot,
corner l'luni ami real! streets, Cincinnati.
lie sure to purchase tickets via ludiannp
olis, Cincinnati & Lnl'nvette Railroad.
u. i.. ii.i(iu.ur,it,
Master Transportation, Cincinnati.
C.K. LORD,
Chief Ticket Clerk, Cincinnati.
Great Through Passenger Route,
TO KAX8A8. X ERR A SKA. COLORADO.
XX W MEXICO, VTA II tt PA CIFIC COAST,
IS VIA THE OI.D KKl.I AIII.K
Ilftiinilwl 4 St, Joseph
HIIOIIT I.ISB, VIA QflNCV.
THREE FAST EXPRESS TRAIXS
,'iosh the Mississippi at Qiilncv. and Missouri
at KniisitH City, on Iron Ilridges, with Pull
man sleeping palaces and palace dav roaches
f .i,t t I., I a.,... In U .Tnu....!, U .U.ii. I1!! .. ll.in.
ver.Nelirnska City anilOiiia'lin, withoutciiangc
of cars.
All the great throuirli I'assenicr Lines from
the Kast connect with tlio Hannibal nnd St.
Joseph, hv wnv of Ouincv. securing nasseugers
me loiiciwingaiivantnges:
LOOK HF.iiK ItlS.U) THIS
Tio ii(SfrlfiBit' 'lihiV Jihliphirths'tluwigh
Drawing iinom bieentna l'ttlnoos and Day
Couches run in ilia World.
The Inmost and most convenient depots and
Tit rou gli llaggage Arrangements in the C ut
ted (stales.
The great rivers all bridged, avoiding all
transfers and ferriages; ami all who are posted
will consult t'omlort and oconoinv, ity taking
tnis routo to Kansas, Kenraxna, coiorano am
the far West to tho Paclllc, Coast.
fWT"0 sure vonr t!r::-i.ivf t.rt Iiv this oh
eliablelino. rorsaldhtalVTIe.ket Offices.
For Denver. Cheyenne. Salt Lake. Sacra
mento antl Kan Francisco, nassengon have
choice of route, either Mil Kansas City and
Denver, or St. Josoph and Omaha.
All connections via Ouliicy are direct and
perfect. L. O. LY FO It D. Gen'l Sup't.
r. if. HRpraj WW 4 JWVi
Ohio and Mississippi Railway.
It is tlio shortest, quickest and only Road
running its entire trains through to
ST. LOUIS AND LOUISVILLE
Without Chunge.
Our arrangements and connoctloni with all
lines from St Louis nd LnujRyillff are per
feet, reliable and uoinplutc ftrr nil points
WEST AND SOUTH.
Tills U the Shortest and Host Route to Kan
las City, Leavenworth, Atchison, St.Josoph
aid to all points in Missouri, Kansas and No
hraska.
Through Tickets and hill information as to
time and fare, can be obtained kt any It. R.
olllcc or our olllce Ir Cincinnati
E, (i ALLVl', (iHl naai'PHssenger Agent
CINCINNATI.
IV. II. HALE, Gen. Pans, and Ticket A gt,
HT. LOCI.3.
Cin'ti Muskingum Val'y R. R.
On mid after Monday. November 13, 1872.
trains will leave and arrlvo at Laucastor,
(Siiiiilnysece;to(,) j, pjloyij
Ewnaml if nil, Aeoommotluiion
Arr, 10i45 a.m. Arr. 7:50p.m.
O01N0 KABT,
Arr. 4:10 p.m. Arr. 8:30a.m.
Direct connections made at LANCASTKll
with trains on tho Coluinhus ana iiockini
VhIIov llnllroftd for Athens. McArthur. Cbll
llcotlie, Portsmouth, Marietta, audforColum
una.
. Direct coniior.tions made at ZANESV1LLE
with trains on the U'll'liroie ft ()..m. I(. h., loi
iMiUir. tililila bWUWVWhnl ,1)mK9EN
,H)Nt 'ilONi'wItli truiUu nn t he' liltUbtiruh,
Clno nhati A St. Louis Railroad, Kast ami
West. U. 11. HAILKY, Oon'l Ticket Ag't.
C. (J. WAtTH, Suporlntendent.
M
AMI00D i
now lost, now kkstored.
.Tost, nuhllshnd. a new edition oe li Cul
vorwull's. ,Celiibrai'd,:h)HBHl"OU tiro : radical
oni'e(wrthoutpupdlclne) of itpormntorrhuia or
Seminal Weakness, Involuntary Seminal
losses, Impotency, Mental autl Physical In
capacity, InipeilliiieiiUitoinnrrlagN etc.! also,
C6inliihpt nm Kid t;Piy .(1IH nilurJuflW
sell ill
lidillliuliOilui'suiiiliil exti'ttvngamio.
ri'luu, 111 sealed envelope, umy o coma.
ossay, olearly tlomonstrates rroin a thirty
years' successful prnctles, that tlio alarming
coneiuencea of self-abuse may be radically
cured wltluiut the dangtirous use of liitornal
medlctiio or tlio appUeatlon of the knife;
IHilntlngout a mode of cure at once simple, bv
,11 wnioiirvmy iiinniii, iiijiuH.r' T .
NtsVtin m.y hot nmyimte'lrliYfiitilf lfepJ.
(JlThi'iVwituKUWil Inthohnmlt of
ovory youth ami evory man in tno lami.
Sent, under seal, In a plain envelope, lo any
address, postpaid, on receipt of six conta.or
two postage Ht snips.
-Also, Dr. CulrwU'l Mrrtegtlviaol
price tm cenU.
A.i-.wst)iel'"idl-
i, . . t;ltiM,J . ' I IM'.AIU..
,'P, 0lo4,lk)'J. .. I .i 'Jrteryow Xorlt.
JQ B. SHIVEL,
ATTOENEY -A.T LAW
McAKTHUK, OHIO.
Will attend iironwtlv to all losrnl business
entrusted to his care in Vinton and ndjniniug
counties. uvriOK in me Recorders omce.
J."
McQILLIVEAY
ATTOENBY .A.T LAW
MuAUTIIUK, OHIO.
Will attend promptly to any business given
to his care and nianageiiieut in any Courts of
Vinton and adjoining cnuuties. Officii in
the Court House, up stairs.
u.
S. CIAYP0OLE.
ATTOBKEYAT XjA.'W
McAUTHUn, OHIO.
Proskcutino Attohnkyoi' Vinton County
Will practice in Ross, Vinton and adjoining
counties. All legal business entrusted to lift
care promptly attended to.
JJ0MER C. JONES,
MoAUTIIUR, OHIO.
Office First door West of Dan. Will &
Ilros. Espeeiid attention given to the collet:
tionof claims.
"jyERCHANTS1 HOTEL.
PORTSMOUTH, OHIO?
W. VARNKIt
Troprletor,
This Hotel is in the most convenient nart of
tno citv on rrout bt.. between Market and
.jenerson.
MERICAN HOTEL.
Corner High and State Sts., nearly opposite
mate nouse,
CaiiTXaEBTJS, OHIO
E. .7. KLOL'NT -
rroirletor.
This Hotel is furnished throuirliout with all
tlio modem iniiirovemeiits. Guests can relv
on the best treatment and very low bills.
.-treet ( ars pass tins iiotel to and Iroin all
Itailroad Depots.
D
EP0T HOTEL.
CHILLICOTHE, OHIO.
M. MEKKLE
Proprietor.
This Hotel, a few lect from tlio Itnllrond De-
iiot. anil where all travele . on all trnius can
take meals, has just been greatly enlarged nnd
thoroughly repaired, painted, Sec, and is now
in complete order lor tne reception oi guests.
Trains stop ten minutes for mculs. Terms
niodorate.
JSHAM HOUSE,
JACKS.OIT,
OHIO.
DR. I. T. MON AH AN -
Proprietor.
Tills house, formerly tho Ishnin House, bus
oeen inorougiiiy renovated nntl ueautiiuiiy
furnished. Hnvlnir sunerinr facilities, everv-
thing will be done to make guests comfortable,
Table always supplied with the best the mar-
m:i uiiui.is. .Mi-eiy iiiriusneii rooiiui nun
cleanest beds, Good Stables. Every effort
made for tlio comfort of patrons. All charges
aiuuerniu. , ,
gOWEN HOUSE,
(formerly Sands House,)
ZALESKI, OHIO.
EGREJW RQWKN, I'maudEioii,
This House, which is convenient to the 11.
depot, since changing proprietors, has been
thoroughly renovated and refurnished, anil
the present proprietor offers to traveler! and
uoarucrs mo nest accommodations.
Ootid Slableon Hie premises.
flr-jy TIIIM.S UOKT HEASUNAULK ,gSfl
QRAWF0RD H0TISE,
i .timer " ami vt ainut nireets,
CIlTCI2SrisrA.TI, OHIO.
F.J. OAKE3 A .1. T. FISHEH, Proprietors,
Jno. JIcIntyhk & J. ii. CONMtLLY, Clerks.
This house has been entirely Relit ted. Un
furnished and ltcuiodclcd, and i i in uii ru
spects a '
- f lllT-CCASiS HOTKLi
Al.I.TIIKl.t'XI'ltlKH OKTUKSKASON. Table
surpassed by none in the West. Ample and
pleasant accommodations for travelers. Give
us a cull. OAKKS A CO., Proprietors.
J.
QREElfLJA? & O0
W110I.F.SALI DEiLtna IM
Dry G' ods, Notions, Hosiery. &c.
anil nouiii uigu treet,
COLUMBUS, OHIO
C. II. Saok, of McArthur, Is the traveling
agent nir tne nuove nouse, ami an orders en
trusted to hlni will receive prompt aUciuUiii.
January 5, ' 1
jgSTABLISHED 18 YEARS.
J. ."F1 . TO"WBLL,
W1IOLKBALE DKALKH IN
DRY GOODS, AND NOTIONS!
front St., Poiitsuoutii, Onio.
J. V . Towell Is agent for several Mills, and
his house is lieaihpiarters fxr ijpttty-ituKirriblo
niuk: ftt Krtdlc.rn '(loqlU, 'All guods will
soul in mo lowest posninio price.
Closo csili buyers, llrst-class tlmo. trailc.
Wholesale peddlers anil furnsccmeu are par
tieulnrly Invited to au examination of
stock.
Jg R. HIG0INS & BRO.,
Marblo Manumonts, Tomb Stones,
MANTLKS, FVKNITVHK, o.,
IiOaAN, ... OHIO
Good Assortment of Marble constantly
hand. All kinds of CliMKTIiliy WOUKdono
to order in the llnest style.
WOK, THBYIDAll 1873.
TUG GUIDE Is now published Quarterly.
So cents pays for the year, four uumhors,
whic h is not half tlio oust. Those who after
wards send money to the amount of One Dol
lar or moro for seeds, imiy also orders III! cents
worth extra the price paid for the ('uii',;.,
Tho ilnnuiirv f U..U)' ncnutlfdl,lndi
Liiiuu lor junking Ililrnl ilouinsi Designs
lu,tun iiaijH ieoorauiHis, winnow uanieus,
Ac, and containing a mass of Information
to tho lover of flowers. One hundred
and fifty pages, on fine tinted papor; some
hundred engravings, and n superb Colored
r.i :it iii nwui cnvov. ','nid nM edition
1'lV Hrtiltiild TIiuushiuI Just priiitml l.iKn-
gusli ami uormaii, ami ready to send out.
J AM liS VICK, Itocheater, N. Y.
Nov.W-8m.
DIVORCE NOTICE!
1
Nlace iV. lidrtiftKl. Vrfymflll'tl'l'
"S.B!
ll 1'CHI-
tliat .luiii;
m.I.. liUnlil-.irtJk ...V ol U .V.... a ti,;...:.K.;l.
jn,,Hlc hlli pel jtlun in Die oilleo of the Clerk
tlio Court of Coinnioii 1'lvas, In and for Vinton
county, Ohio, charging tlio said Nancy
l'eltlt Willi having been willfully absent
mini iimii lor nioru (linn iiniia yrnrn mm
and asking tlmlhs mav bodivomud from
N nt 1. I"frlt ; iHtth ieIH(m will atnnd
li ,! liig at Die ne term of alil court.
, "N ATI! AN I'l'.rl'lT,
' " ity 1.'U. ;ii'.'Ult.MvAr, li.a n.-y.
- uiiiuM'j,j,-fiy,. , , ,, t -,
It.
rpHE ALDINE!
Prospectus for 1873-Sixth Year,
Au Illmtrated Monthly JourDal,iniTor8lIy admit
ted to be the Handiomeet Periodical in
the World A Bupreientativf
and Champion of Ameri
can Taste-
Not for Sale in Book or News Stores
THE ALDINE. while issued with all the
regularity, has none of the temporary or
Uiiuly interest characteristic of ordinary per
iodicals. It is an elegant miscellany of puro,
light, and graceful literature: and a collec
tion oi pictures, tuo rarest specimens oi artis
tic skill, in black and white. Although each
succeeding number nu'ords a fresh ulensuro
to its friends, tho real value and beauty of
TiiKALUiiMswiu no most appreciated aner
It has been bound up at the closo of the year.
While other uubllcations mav claim suncrior
cheapness, as compared with rivals of a simi
lar nass, j tift ALUi.vt, is a uuliiuo nnd orig
inal conception nlono and unapprouched
absolutely without competition in price or
cnaracier. i no possessor or a complete vol
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41
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designs lor emnroliiered slippers anil luxuri
ous dressing-gowns. Hut tho reading-mutter
oi me iia.ak is unuorniy pi grejtr (licoiiei
The paper lias Required i wide liilliularlty
tli0ruUi o euJpylHent It ftlfoids. X. Y, Ert
mug Punt,
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(S)8 llmndwny, New York.
Ing
fur
in
valuable five
of
J
ol
1.
inm.
sahl
for
mericau Submerged Pump.
"The Best Pump in im Wpxaw
Oti H AOKNTS report over :)00,000 worth of
pitipeiay suvoil Ironi iro mis year uy muse
pumps, being tlio most ltoworful forco-punips
in tne worm, as wen as nos-r iikhzi.-cj.
See Octolier number, page 8'Jtl, nlso tho Pre
in I urn List, pago U03 of the Amercuti A.grcul
turlst, TiUua
1st, - iS pa,p,PV uUV1 ft.eiyes in ittr
nuilimVn Vubruurv numliur. linue 45,
HO fanners,
neu
Tlv
one. If It don't do tho work claimed, snnu
it
inck and lot vour inoner. as WK W A Kit ANT
our pumps to do all wo claim for them on our
circulars.
Send for circulars or orders to tlio Tlrldgo,
Dort M'f'irCo.. No. oft Chambers St.. New York,
An order for nine No. 1 l'linips secures an
exclusive town agency. i i-u.
A WSTW FRAHEE'8 HEIR
State oj Ohio, Vinton Co.
Notice is hornbv ulven that W. K. Hasting
administrator of the estate of Isaac M.Long,
deceased, late nuardlnn of llolvotta Fraute,
minor, has Iliad herein for llnal lettlemnnt tho
aitfmmtof thesiiH Issso Vf. Totiff wllMtlilu
iur.i: sin! (..in' too aanic in i''i
ibn '.'mil day t.f January. A
i'c l.vt; n, t;
" H,. i-
VoirQIUOl
;ulk',
THE COAL FIELDS.
[From the Cornhill Magazine.
a
of
A mistaken impression is
somewhat widely prevalent that,
in the coal-fields, we have the
remains of ancient forests in
other words, it is sunnosed tli.nt,
' - ir
wherever there was a forest in
primeval times there now exists
a coal-field of greater or less
extent. In connection with
this view, also, the opinion is
entertained that the forests
now in existence will, in the
process of time, and after, due
geological changes, become the
coal-beds of future ages. But,
although, as we shall presently
see, the coal-fields are undoubt
edly due to the vegetation of
fc'TTier eras, it is far from being
the case that the primeval for
ests became converted in a
general way into coal. Condi
lions of a peculiar, and to some
extent exceptional character
were requisite for the forma-
tJon of COtll fields.
If we con
sider the evidence given by the
coal-fields themselves, we shall
see what these conditions were
he beds or seams of coal form
but a small portion of the thicl
ness oi tne great geological
n ii -a
group of strata to which they
or the most part appertain
his group is called the car-
i n i i
bonuerous, ana not uncom
monly "the coal," but even
where coal is the most abund
ant it forms only a minute part
of the whole mass. Thus it
ias been estimated, Sir Charles
yell tells us, that in South
Wales the thickness of the
carboniferous strata amounts in
all to between 11,000 and 12,-
000 feet (or more than two
miles), "but the various coal
seams do not," according to
rofessor Phillips, "exceed in
he aggregate 120 feet," or less
than one-hundreth part of the
whole. In North Lancashire
he carboniferous strata occupy
i depth of more than three
miles. Hero, no fewer than
eighty seam of coal have been
counted (seventy-one having
been exposed by the action
he sea); but these seams are
nowhere more than five feet in
thickness, and many arc but
ew inches thick. Thus, it is
evident that the formation
coal can have been in progress
but a short portion of the time
during which the carboniferous
series of strata was in process
of deposition. Throughout by
far the greater portion of that
time other minerals were being
deposited. It is next to be no
ticed that under each coal soam
a stratum of ancient soil exists,
in which there are commonly
found the roots of ancient trees,
while above the coal there
commonly a layer of shale
sandstone, in which not unfre
quently the trunks of those
trees are iounu eituer laiien
still in their original position,
and only partially converted
into coal. The bark remains
but it is transmitted into coal
the hollow of the trunk, decay-
caying long oeiore tne truiiK
gave way, is represented by
cast m sandstone. Ihus, it we
try to -picture to ourselves the
state of things which existed
when such a seam of coal first
began to be covered up by the
next higher deposit, we soe
that there must have been trees
standing erect above a layer
vegetable matter, the roots
the trees being nnbQdded m the
sou Y,'hioh forms tho denosi
next below the coal, ine veg
etable layers may probably have
been two or three times
thick as the resulting coal seam
and were reduced by pressure
to their pjcaont thickness, bu
such layers cannot at any time
have reached to the branches
of the forest trees. Then
process of deposition began
This can only have happened
wLeu some subsidence of
soil has caused it to be sub
merged to a greater or leas
depth. We can infer from
depth of strata overlying
coal seams that this state
submergence took place.
soon as submergence was com
plete, the tall trees perished
and began to decay. Tho stou
trunks above the vegetable
layer were broken oil
swept away- by. tha-eea. The
forest itself, properly so-called
was for the most part destroyed
Ij; was thej nywwfiiMr-'--
tV forest, v' ''7.h T'H'j
t ..... M . it: ! M' J I 1T
i'nt, ' ! M ''V- 'vi''
.brmedU-.ually,
the coal seam as it how exists.
nong these were tho lower
parts of the trunks of the an
cient forest trees. These be
came converted, like the rest of
the vegetable matter, into coal.
How Good Farmer's Save their
Money.
They take good papers and
read them.
They keen an account of
farming operations.
They do not leave their farm'
nig implements scattered over
the field, exposed to the rain,
heat and snow.
They repair their tools and
buildings at the proper time,
and do not suffer subsequently
three-fold expenditure of time
and money.
They use their money judi
ciously, and do not attend auc
tion sales to purchase all kinds
of trumpery because it is cheap.
They always see that their
fences are well repaired, and
that their cattle are not grazing
in the meadows, or grain fields,
or orchards.
They do not refuse to make
correct experiments, in a small
way, of many new things.
They plant their fruit trees
well, and care well for them,
and, of course, get good crops.
They practice good economy
by giving their stock sufficient
shelter during the winter ; also
good food, taking all that is un
sound, half rotten or mouldy,
oft.
Successful farming is made
attending to little things
he farmer who does his best
earns his money with the best
ppreciation, and uses it with
the best results. Such men are
the salt of tho earth.
They do not keep a tribe of
cats, or snarling dogs around
the premises, which eat more
in a month than they are worth
in their life.
Lastly they read the adver
isements, and know what is
coins: on, and irequently save
money by it.
a
is
or
or
;
a
o
as
The remains of antiquity are
found in America from Mexico
o the Lakes. Who those rude
and curious people, the mound
builders ot the valley of the
Mississippi and Ohio were,
an unsolved problem. Accord
ing to the Maine Historical So
ciety, traces of the Northmen
whether ol Leit, son of Eric
the Red, or of Biorn, the son
Heriolf, or of later settlers
undetermined have boon found
in that State. AVhence came
the city building Indians
New Mexico, and the older Az
tec civilization ? Here are se
crets of old days for the anti
quarian to puzzle his brains
over. And every day is adding
lething new. The latest has
reference to a number of anj
cient copper mines that have
been discovered on Isle Royal,
in Lake Superior. On authority
of the Duluth Herald, shafts
considerable depth, filled
by the accumulated debris
ages, are being opened, and
penetratinc: to a distance
sixty feet, tools of wondrous
workmanship have been found,
together with charcoal remains
which mark this as the point
where skilled artisans formed
copper tools whose temper and
durability would astonish ingen
ious makers of such things
the present age. Hammers and
chisels seem to have been
principal implements for work-
; this mine, and they,
gether with fire, were used
reduce the ore to a condition
which rendered its removal
detail easy. Finely tempered
knife blades have been picked
out of the pit, and granite hammers.
How the Word Boston was Made.
the
tho
the
ol
So
and
A writer in Good News thus
accidentally mentions the cu
rious derivation of the name
Boston :
Lincolnshire, or Lindissey,
as tho land south of the Hum
ber was formerly called, re
ceived the gospel from the good
Bishop. Paulluus, in the
seventh century. In the same
century, a pious monk, known
as St. Botolp, or Bot-holp ;
that is, Boat-help founded a
church at a place called Y:
cean-ho. Tho town which grew
up around it was called "Bot
olphV-TowrV "contracted into
j.n:
r-t.0V,
1.'
An Inland Sea that Never Gives Up
its Dead.
[From the San Francisco Bulletin.]
of
is
of
Some twelve or fourteen per
sons have been drowned in
Lake Tahoe within the past ten
years ; none of the bodies have
ever been recovered. Supersti
tion, ever ready to weave a
sentiment from Nature's laws,
assertod that there was a doubt
ful mystery in the non-recovery
of the drowned ; that, in fact, a
monster had its abode in this
fresh-water sea, and that the
bodies all passed into its capa
cious maw. The true explana
tion of this mystery never has
been given, llie non-appear
a
ancc of the bodies is due to
three causes. The first is, the
great purity of the water, and
its consequent lack ot buoyan
cy. Drowning is very easy in
it for this reason, though I have
not, while swimming in it, found
any moro than ordinary dim
culty in sustaining myself. The
second and main cause is due
o the great coldness of the wa
ter. liven at this, the warmest
season, the surface water is as
cold as the drinker desires
to be, but it is warm there com
pared with its temperature a
tho depth of one hundred
two hundred feet. It is as cold
there as the arctic heat of an
iceberg. When a body sinks
in the lake to the depth re
quired, it is frozen stiff. The
process, of course, preserves it.
so that the gas which originates
from decay in other water
prevented, and distension
checked. Tho body is thus
kept in a state of greater spe
cific gravity than the water
which it is suspended, and
thereby prevented lrom rising
to the surface. The third cause
lies in the great pressure of the
pure water on anything whic
is sunk to a great depth in
Corks placed in deep sea-nets
are pressed down in a week
half their size ; and one of the
oldest residents of the lake ex
presses the belief that, by
time a man's body has been
suspended for a week at a dept
of about two hundred feet (it
not likely that it ever reaches
the cavernous and almost fath
omless bottom of the great lake)
the compression of the water
has reduced its size to that of
child's. Doubtless the idea
uncotlined suspension in such
"world of water" is not a pleas
ant ono to contemplate; but
be pressed into a solid mass,
and suspended in a liquid coffin
of ice temperature, is quite
pleasant as interment and mol
dering in the ground.
Food and Health.
of
up
of
in
of
of
the
to
in
Bulk, as well as elements
nourishment, is essential
food. Neither cattle nor horses
could be kept alive long on
flour, meal, or grains of
kind. Mixed, however,
grass, dry hay, or straw,
thrive. The walls of the
mach and bowels must be
apart in order to have perfect
digestion, A dog lived twenty'
one days, the only survivor of
wrecked vessel at sea, closely
shut up in the cabin, by eating
the tick, strong wood
leather binding of a Bible.
he had hard bread, he would
probably have died in about
fifteen days, as the mucus
faco of the digestive apparatus,
by
coming
in contact, would
have inflamed fearfully.
Those persons whose diet
rather course, as bread of
bolted flour, large fruit eaters,
bread and milk people in
country, etc., are exempt
pains ol dyspepsia. Those
tained mainly on very line
centrated, delicate lood, washed
down with tea, are gaunt
form, weak in muscle and
ways taking medicine.
food should have moro bulk.
a poor mans lamiiy
lack for an appetite with a
of brown bread. His neighbor's
darlings, sufeited on rich
t 1 ' 11
highly seasoned dishes
nutured in luxury, are tho
of doctors and druggists.
says science.
K Resist tho temptation of
ill reports ; spread
not at all. If you cannot
Wllof
uV ill
Of I
Animals Showing a Preference
Particular Colors.
[From the Popular Science [...]]
it
in
it,
to
the
is
Bert lately took ujj
ery curious experimei
ho prelerence oi anuc
different colored rays. . V
some of these almost mio
Crustacea, common
in our fresh waters, the d
eas. remarkable for theii
way of hurrying tow:arct
number ot these insect
put into a glass vessel.
darkened, and a specfc
the ray then thrown L
The daphnes were dls ' :
about tho dark vessel ,
soon as tho spectrum cof
peared they began toV"
and gathered in the co.
the luminous track, but )M
screen was interposed they .
tered again. At first all '
ors of tho spectrum ati '
them, but it was soon i -
that they hurried much i ; .
toward the yellow and p n,
and even moved away b i I '. M
if these rays were quicld;
placed by the violet. J-
yellow, green and orange v ;
of the spectrum there
thronging and remarkali-: ,
traction. A pretty large nr. ::-
berof these little things wvp
remarked in the red, too'u
tain number in the blue, , . '.
some, fewer in proportion i t
the distance, in the mo;,i. in frangible
portions of tluv :
and ultra-violet. For these in
sects, as for ourselves, the jiiost
tuminous part of the spflctrjun
was also tho most agree a Ik,
They behaved in it asti. ; i
would do who, if he wished to
read in a spectrum thro v.V
about him, would approacji t!:e
yellow and avoid the ii "t
This proves, in the first jducc,
that these insects see all t'f?
luminous rays that we se cir
s'elves. Do they percei.i t
chlorific and chemic rayf, ;'..,.(
is to say, the ultra-red .a u l
ultra-violet ones, which (lo not
affect our retina? Bert's ex-'
periments enable us to answor'
that they do not. That jpliy .sin
ologist is even led to Jusscil
that, with regard to light and
rne umerenr rays, an animals
experience the same impres
sions that man does. t
a
of
a
to
as
of
in
fine
any
they
sto
kept
a
and
Had
sur-
is
un
the
from
sus'
con
in
al
Their
never
ems'
cake
and
life
So
cir
culating them
speak
The English railway-? ,
certainly managed with r u
regard to the safety ofn!
passengers. There are fiffoeti
ad miles of rail in tho
United Kingdom, and on the
entire length during tin) pa;;t
year the number of fatal ! no in
dents, including those to
employees of the road, wa t
one in every three hundred , I
seventy-three thousand pas, :.-
gers carried. Ihree-fourtLs ;t
east of these were caused 1
careless attempts to enter
eave the trains while in i
tion. lor damages lor person u
injuries the companies il.avo
paid in all one million ono hun
dred and twenty-five thou- :
dollars. The exhibit of nine
of the great railroads mule : a
recent Parliamentary conin.n
exceed even some of tlio,
American scandals. Of llie
capital of the London, ClnUV "'
and Dover railroad recent !v
bankrupt, fifty millions of dol
lars were paid for rolling stock,
right ol way,' machine eIiot-si
and
general equipment,'., aiid
in
"finn
rigging the
ItUU UV1V llUwl
market, and
making things
generally pleasant."
I;- '
There are few collection
statistics which are readw iih
more interest or with great
advantage than the Wrcrjc J,:,y.
isier, annually published by the
Doard ot Trade. Tho vear ,1 1
was not remarkable for seven)
storms, but tho previous V'
was in this respect still 'morn
fortunate. The wrecks recorded
in 1870. wero 1,502, ' thoso
last year wero 1,575. Mir.!:
both wero considerably be J o
the average for tho fiveycuis
ending with 1871, as well
for tho similar period en.u'
with 18GG. So we may t
gratulate ourselves upon a '.
inconsiderablo gain. But;
must recollect that the an!
tale of wrecks, which amours
in 1804, to no more than V
rose m 1000 10 i,buu in i v
to 2,090, and in 1B09 tff 2,1
Since tho last mentioned y
there, hod been, as wo IViivo
v.'-r.
,1 U, 1K.C'

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