OCR Interpretation


Perrysburg journal. (Perrysburg, Wood Co., O. [Ohio]) 186?-1965, October 09, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076843/1919-10-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

V
PERRYSBURG JOURNAL
A
K
ik
VOL. LXVII -LOUIS 0. MAETI, Pubhshw.
PEBETSBUBO, WOOD 00., 0., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 0, 1919.
$1.60 IN ADVAH0E-IO.34
i?t
'4
r
'f
fc
h
L-
AGRICULTURAL NOTES
What 100 Ohio Farmers Know
About Beans
Upward" of 100 Highland coun
ty fanners raised soybeans this
year in their corn for silage. A
summary oF their experiences as
collected by the county farm
bureau indicates the following
jiGnts regarding the culture of
soybeans :
Soybeans can" be satisfactorily
raised without inoculating the
seed, but no nitrogen-fixing
nodules are "produced on the roots
unless (1) the seed is inoculated,
(2) beans have been previously
grown on the land, or (3) soil on"
which soybeans have been grown
is applied to the new field.
If fertilizer is drilled in with the
seed, there is ' danger- that the
germination as well as the inocula
tion of the seed may be affected,
particularly if the fertilizer is not
well cured.
The corn planter with a solid
tire may form a crust which will
reduce or prevent the growth of a
stand. The open tire wheel re
duces the packing effect.
Even though the weather has
been dry this season in Highland
county, observation does not indi
cate that the beans injured the
corn by robbing it of moisture.
The varieties that have proved
popular this year are Medium
Green, Wilson, and Ohio 9,035.
Yellow Mammoth was disappoint
ing. Waste Lands Grow Walnut
Profitably
Tljiat walnut, a high-priced and
fast' disappearing timber in Ohio,
may be grown profitably on waste
land is pointed out by the depart
ment of forestry at the Ohio Ex
periment Station. "While1 walnut
does not grow, in pure stands like
oak and muple, groves may be set
out in unused agricultural lands
by getting a start from seedlings.
The seedlings may be secured by
planting the nuts in gardens this
fall.
Because the black walnut is an
extremely intolerant species, it
will not thrive directly in the
shade of other trees. To create
good forest conditions in the wal
nut groves then foresters state
that it is necessary to mix the
seedlings with the maple species.
Pure plantings of the walnut
species thrive well until they reacli
an age of about 30 years when un
like many forest trees, the growth
is checked and some of- the trees
die.
A bulletin on growing black
walnut is mailed free to residents
of Ohio from the Experiment Sta
tion at Wooster.
Concrete Floors Save Fertility For
Farmers
By increasing the value of
manure produced, concrete floors
for feeding stables will return
their cst in about one year, as
shown by tests at the Ohio Experi
ment Station. The extra crop re
.(Continuad on Eighth Pas.)
DR. B. KINSLEY
DENTIST
Office Hours 8 to 11 a, m.; 1 to B
p. m. Office upstairs corner
Second and'Main Streets.
PERRYSBURG, O.
Phono Main 14.
FREDERICK C. AVER1LL
ATTORNEY,
AND COUNSELOiUAT-LAW
h. 818 Spitxer Balldtat,
(
,"
TOLEDO, OHIO.
Ham Phi
1428.
JOHN ZURFLUH
PRACTICAL
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER
. . Dealer in
Watches Clocks, Jewelry, Spectacle!.
906' Monroe St. Toledo, O.
Near Michigan Street
Special care will be taken with the
repair of all kind of Watchee;
Clock and Jewebry.
ALFRED P. HAYWOOD
Doctor of Ofciropraotio
4th Street, Perrysburg, O.
Hours:
6;00 to 9;00 Tuesday. Thursday and
BRYAN TO SPEAK AT PERRYS-
" BURG
America's silver-tongued orator
and people's statesman, Wiliam
Jennings Bryan,'will speak in Per-
rysburg bunday evening, October
26. It will be an out-door meeting,
weather pprmitting. He c'omes in
the interest of every man, woman
and child. All who cherish the
home, the church and the state,
who stand for law and order, lib
erty and honor, will rally to hear
this great champion of truth, right
and justice. It will be a wonderful
opportunity to hear this most dis
tinguished orator on a subject of
pre-eminent concern and interest,
not only to the people of Perrys
burg and Ohio, but to the whole
nati'on.
"Hear ye, him."
AT THE CHURCHES
-
Evangelical Church
Orin Daniol Swank, Pastor.
Sunday School, 9:30 a. m. Mr.
Albert Fahrer, Supt.
Morning worship, 10:45 a. m.
Sermon by the pastor. Theme,
"The Constraining Love of
Christ."
Young People's Alliance, 7 :00 pJ
m. Topic, ' "framing m Citizen
ship." Harry Spreng, leader.
Evening service, 7 :30 p. m. Ser
mon subject, "Love's Trinity of
Virtue."
The monthly business meeting
of the Young People's Alliance
will be held at the home of Miss
Charles "Wednesday evening, Oc
tober 15, at 8 o'clock.
Bally Day will be observed Oc
tober 19. A special number on the
program will be a reading by
Edith Sherman Guastason, head of
the dramatic department of the
Toledo Conservatory of Music.
First Presbyterian Church
Rev. W. H. Pheley, Minister.
Services for Sunday, October 11.
We enjoyed a real rally day last
Sunday. Young and old responded
loyally and with a spirit that sure
ly means a year of happy, fruitful
service in all departments-of the
church for the golry of the Mas
ter. Let next Sunday be marked
by the same loyalty, with such ad
vance as may be possible.
Begin with the Sunday School
at 9:30. "We have a fine lesson,
' ' Fishers of Men ' 'Mark 1 :14-20 :
3 :13-18. Mrs. Roose had a class of
twelve graduate from the primary
department. Each received a beau.
titully engraved certificate of pro
motion. Morning Worship and sermon at
10:30. Dr. Pheley will preach.
H61y communion will be observed
at this service. New members will
be received. There will be no
evening service.
Christian Endeavor meeting at
6:30.. Topic, "Training in Citi
zenship," I Peter 2 .-11-20. Charles
Braun, leader.
Prayer and praise service Thurs
day evening at 7 :30. Subject for
consideration, What s in a
Name," Matt. 16:13-20. You will
find this a good hour and we invite
ytou to share it w.ith us.
The social rooms will be open
Friday evening ior all who care to
come and play. There are games
for all to enjoy.
Choral Union will meet for prac
tice Saturday evening at 7 o 'clock.
Mrs. Maud Lackens, leader.
Methodist Episcopal Church
W. H. Spybey, Pastor.
The worship hours of the Sab
bath day have inspiration as well'
as rest and pleasant association for
those who usg them. You are wel
comed to our services in the belief
that they,willr do you good and
offer you an acceptable opportun
ity of expressing your devotion to
God.
The m'ornin'g pennon next Sun
day -will haye for its subject, "Re
ligion Modernly Expressed." At
night, "At the Beautiful Gate."
Epworth Leigue at 6:30 p. m.,
led by Lindsay Johnson. Subject,
"Christianity and the Health of
America."
Bible School at 9 :00 a. m. Classes
for all grades andeacher's train
ing class. Strangers welcome.
Prayer meeting Thursday night.
Choir practice on Saturday
night.
i
-SATURDAY SPECIAL The
Journal for 3 months to new lub-
lfgrlbm MtytfOV aOfMh
SCHOOLS CO-OPERATE
Students Given Opportunity of Ed
ucational Sociology by B. G.
Normal College.
The teachers in the Perrysburg
public schools have made arrange
ments with the Bowling Grceii
Normal College to offer an ex
tension course in educational sociol
ogy to be taught each Tuesday
afternoon from 3:30 to 5:30 at the
school building in Perrysburg.
This makes it possible to (receive
more normal training without go
ing to college for it.
Dr. Pheley will deliver Hie next
address to the high school Friday
at 1 o'clock. We are profiting
much by these talks.
P. II. S. defeated Genoa in a
hard-fought game on Friday last.
The opponents outweighed our
team but the speed "of-the backfield
and the spectacular defensive work
of the line overbalanced their ad
vantage. The first quarter was scoreless
with the ball in Genoa's territory
most of the time. In the later
part of the second period Thornton
managed to carry the pigskin over
for our first touch down. The goal
was not kicked, making the score
G to 0.
Tn the third quarter Dibling
drop kicked a goal, which finished
the scoring. It remained 9 to 0 till
the end of the game.
Friday, October 10, Prairie Do
pot will come to Perrysburg looking
for scalps. East year Prairie won
here so P. II. S. is out for revenge.
Come out and see a good game of
football and help the team by
rooting.
(Continued on Eighth Page.)
SWEET CLOVER TOUR
Sweet clover has proven its
worth on many farms in Wood
county. It huS "been used primar
ily as a soil builder though its use
is becoming more general as a jas-t
ture, hay and seed crop.
To visit fields use'd for the above
purposes and to talk to farmers
who are enthusiastic about sweet
clover a tour has been arranged for ,lots left iu the cemetery'and the
Tuesday, October 14 The tour I tion of 1W lo1s is oue that
will start from V F. Mann's farm 'needs prompt attention and monev
one mile north of Lemoyne at 9:30 hns to be raiscd jmmediately for
and will proceed south through this purpose flic above bond is
Bowlmg Green at noon and close ' n. aiso be voted upon on
near Jerry City about 3:30. November 4, so let every voter
We have arranged for men who 'onnsirtm- von- nnrnfnllv wlmrn lm
have grown soy beans in corn for!wjU ue "placed at rest" if the
silage and for hogs this past year
to relate their experiences.
If interested in two new and
very valuable legumes come.
PAUL GERLAUGH,
County Agent.
A STEP IN THE RIGHT DIREC
TION In order to convince tho people
in rerrysburg and the territory
surrounding it for miles that they
can do better by trading in this
town a number of our -progressive
merchants have inaugurated a sys
tem of special prices on articles for
Saturday only. On every one of
the articles advertised there is a
genuine saving and they will go a
long way towards helping to solve
thc"-problem of the high cost'of liv
ing. These specials will bo in the
regular advertisements of the mer
chants and it will pay every woman
(and man to watch for them each
week and read them carefullyv Tho
progressive spirn. snown oy our
merchants in the endeavor to ex
tend the trade territory of Perrys
burg is certainly to be commended,
and there can be no doubt but that
tho new move will be profitable to
the advertisers and a lasting bene
fit to tho town.
Visit Factory Prospect in
Easi Toledo Wednesday
Messrs. George Munger, Dr. M.
H. Bowers, C. J, Schneider and
Fred W. Leu, members of the Civic
Association, spent a' few hours in'
East Toledo, on Wednesday after
noon, in an effort to induce the U.
S. Mop Company to move its plant
to FerryBburg.w Robert U. Uorne
lius, head of the enterprise is a hus
tler' and after taking the company
over as a practically defunct affair,
has increased the capitalization the
second time to $50,000. Chic
ago man order houses have con
traoted for the present output
m Plftty
NEW CITY BUILDING
An Absolute Necessity and Its Ex
istence to Bo Determined at
Election
The voters will decide at the
polls cfn Tuesday, November 4,
whether Perrysburg shall have a
new, city building or nothing at all.
The present building occupied
by the fire department and council
chamber has been condemned and
ordered closed by the State Indus
trial uomnu&sion, witli the per
mission to be used only until elec
tion. The tower is dangerously
unsafe and the front wall of the
entire building is about to cave in.
It was erected forty-seven yenrs
ago and has served its purpose,
now it lias become dangerous and
unfit for use and must, be torn
down.
On the same location, if the peo
ple of our town are in favor, can
be built a fine city building, for
which bonds must be issued to the
amount of $7,000. Are the major
ity in favor of voting this bond
issue? Consider the matter, look
at the "fine new buildings being
erected by some of our progressive
business men, the large extensions
added to their present buildings
by Mr. Geo. W. Moser and "Win.
Schlect & Son ; the new tailor shop
Milton Meadcnus has erected and
the new Masonic Temple now un
der construction; all these im
provements, and the town not own-
jing an up-to-date city building
If the council and fire depart
ment are compelled to rent quar
ters the cost of same will, in a
short time, pay for a new build
ing, besides the many modern
conveniences wall be lacking. A
town as progressive as Perrysburg
bj- all means should have an up-to-date
administration building, and
the question rests with the voters
to be settled.
CEMETERY WANTS MONEY
The -cemeterv trustees are ask
ing for aVonclissue of $3,000' lo
prepare the eleven acres recently
purchased, for burying purposes.
.H'linvn nvn lin. tnn m fiftnnn vnftnnf
bond issued don't carry.
COURT. NEWS
Callahan's Hearing
The hearing of Charles It. Calla
han of Prairie Depot on an insan
ity charge sworn out by John J.
Patterson, a barber with whom
the shoemaker had had trouble,
will be held in probate court Mon
day atternoon at 1 o clock. Calla
nan has been released
1
Marriage License
Herbert C. Schutzberg, 29, farm
er, Haskins, and Mary M. Enright,
25, postmistress, Haskins. Rev.
George McKay.
Lloyd Dishong, 29, tarmer,lloyt-
ville, and Mae A. Ilincsman, 28,
Hoytville. Rev. Van Gundy.
Martin W,. Sanders, 24, carpen
ter, Toledo, and Marie L. Kohring,
25, Pemberville. Rev. E. II. D.
Winterhoff.
New Cases
Suit for divorce on the ground ofi
wilful absence has been brought By'
John J. Donaldson against Esther)
Donaldson. They were married in
Bowling Green in 1906.
Josephine Yotheimer in a suit for
divorce against Richard E. Yoth
eimer, to whom she was married in
1010; says he choked and slapped
her because she would not take his
mother into her house and keep her'
although at the time, the plaintiff
was working to support herself, as,
she charges, deiendant tailed to sup
port her.
Probate Court
Petition to sell real estate haB
been-filled by Amos L. Conn, ad
ministrator of the estate of John
Mazur, deceased.
Final aocount of N. R, Harring
of I ton, trustee, of Riginald C. Abel, et
! (Contiiuwd on page ,)
ONE KILLED IN AUTO
ACCIDENT
Harry Dalo Brand, 17, of Ilas
kins, was killed and three other
occupants were injured when their
machine turned turtle on the Bowl
ing Grcen-IIaskins road, Monday
evening.
The quartet, consisting of young
Biantl and another young boy with
their girl friends, were joy riding
when Ft rand's hat blew off. In en
deavoring to recover his hat he lost
contiol of the machine.
Young Brand was a son of Mr.
and Mrs. Albert fyaud of Haskins.
COUNTY SCHOOLS
Consolidation of the One-Room
Rural Schools
The increasing of teacher's
arics the decrease in niral school.
population the disinclination of
rural people to house and board
he teacher, the reluctance of well-
trained teachers to work in the
one-room schools, and many other
factors are closing more and more
W. Uli VIIVIWWIU .JUJIWUl HU JV.UII
Within the past year one of the'
Perrysburg township schools was
closed and is now transported to
Perrysburg. Freedom township
closed two schools and is trans-
porting them to Pemberville. Only
two one-room schools are now miancial loss, Perrysburg must
maintained in Freedom township.1 also lose the advertising she
Perry township has organized a1 gained when the highway was laid
consolidated school, and has but out through the town and thou
two one-room schools in the town- sands of people came through and
ship. One of the Bloom township saw what an upto-date and beauti
schools is now transported to Cyg- ful town it was. They will now
net. Webster township has closed pass around the town unaware of
all the one-room schools except our wide and beautifully shaded
three. Lake township has closed streets, our rapidly improving bus- '
two of her rural schools and now
maintains but three one-room
schools.
The teacher employed for the
Silverwood school in Center town
ship did not appear to oper her
school September. 15. J3hc had
been employed to teach the school
at $90 per month, but accepted a
position in another county with
out notifying the Center township
board of her change of plans. The
board of education is now trans
porting that school to the Center
school at a cost of $30 per month.
DEATHS
Mrs. Anna Smith, 75, "died at
her home near Lime City, Friday,
Oct 3rd. She was the mother of
Mrs. Fred Mahler, of Perrysburg,
who with three sisters and three
brothers and a number of grand
children survive.
Funeral services were held at
St. Rose church Monday morning.
Burial at St. Rose cemetery.
Chas. Bason, 67, died at his home
in Maumee Saturday evening. He
is survived by a wife and two
daughters.
Funeral services were held at St.
Joseph's church Wednesday.
will not assure
and dear.
I Fine Words 1
A savings account in this bank may. It
will tide over an emergency and give the feeling
of security that makes for happiness.
Material things are necessary for life and
happiness. Fine words will not provide them.
Let the young lady beware of the man who
has nothing but fine words to offer. Let her
demand some proof of his character, ability and
habits in the shape of a savings account that is
not in its infancy.
Four per cent, interest .'paid on
savings.
PERRYSBURG,OHIO.
AN
CAPITAL STOCK f 30,000.00
simm. a f3o.ooa.oo
1 ' ,r . - k
THINK IT OVER ONCE
Front Street Shell Holes Cause
Big Loss to Town
The shell holes in the Front
street paving will cause thousands
of dollars loss to the business
interests of Perrysburg during the
coining year. This became ap
parent during the past week when
the Toledo Automobile club
caused signs to be placed east and
west of the town, asking all tour
ists oil the Dixie Highway to de
tour around the town, on account
of the condition of Front street.
What this means to the financial
interests of Perrysburg can easily
lwx. tiiini.it.nfl M'nniotn sittilllf
sal-li,1.ft11i, nn im. M tw ;,. fnr
ai some stop for iunches
S0JUC for kc crcam aud cand and
h.utH some stop at the groceries
and meat llinrkots for articles to
e hinehcH wUh ln fact 50
cent Ht fop Bomothing and
iSomc moUey iu the town.
ill lit.. . , i -rs
. A" ms ,s ow ax an CUu ven
lf work ?tarted nY woud
mca,u Pably a year before the,
rK C0.1UQ "e compicicu ana we
S1S takeu dowu-
In the meantime, along with the
incss district, our modern boule
vard, lighting system on Louisiana'
avenue, our finely paved streets
(except Front), our pretty resi
dences, our stately church and
beautiful school building. All
this is lost and more too.
Mayor Canfield's article in last
week's Journal deals with tho
financial aspedt of the case and
shows that the city officials are
anxious to do their utmost in sur
mounting the obstacles in the path
of the improvement.
There must be some method by
which this improvement can be
made and the columns of the
Journal are open for a free discus
sion of the matter.
Clocks to be Turned
Back on October 26
General uncertainty as to when
the clocks of the nation may be
be turned back and daylight sav
ings be abolished seems to have re
sulted from the action of Congress
in repealing the daylight saving
saving act. In answer to numer
ous inquiries officials have pointed
out that clocks may not be turned
back until the last Sunday of Octo
ber, or October 26, at 1 a. m.
the happiness of those near
WfTlRll CSTABUSHCDiNm mill
r &W I
'J l
J
11
WFHFZWrZs iJ."i i i iCtS
i - ' ?? w
i 't! .
pi-i
J;lSZ!K''T
M
!m
i
r r- s 7-. p r
TH.
Ji
I 'A !
I (
' T?" if
l - ""JS
' 4" i
i ; vf ,f,s$

xml | txt