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Perrysburg journal. (Perrysburg, Wood Co., O. [Ohio]) 186?-1965, October 16, 1919, Image 9

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076843/1919-10-16/ed-1/seq-9/

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i Dry Cleaning 'J
at Home
lltlitlttlHHI HI t MMIII
On every homo there are many dain
ty articles that cannot be washed in
water. Unless the housewife is well
supplied with pin-money she cannot
send these articles to a dry cleaner.
Dry cleaning can be done at home as
well as other laundry work when you
know how. Dry cleaning is not dry
cleaning at all, although it is not as
some people suppose simply dipping
in gasoline. Washing in gasoline ia
like washing In wator to which no
eoap is added.
To dry clean bay a reliable dry
cleaner at the drug store and use it in
the gasoline like soap. Place tho
amount of gasoline in a tub with as
much dry cleaner as directed. The
most delicate fabrics that would be
mU,ed if washed with soap and water
can be beautifully cleaned without
danger of having color changed, finish
injured or harmed by shrinking. The
only real harm done in dry cleaning
is too vigorous rubbing. If the article
is old or Very delicate or frail .Im
merse in the gasoline and cleaner and
let Boak for some "time, then press
gently with the hands and the dirt
will be quickly removed. Rinse in
clean gasoline. This part of the work
must be done thoroughly if you are
Buccessful. Hang in open air to dry
but never in the sunshine.
If clothes arc carefully hung, skirts
andl wastes put on hangers and care
fully stretched there need be no press
ing after dry cleaning. This Is one of
the conveniences of dry cleaning, no
pressing unless heavy cloth belts or
hemB. Another thing, no ripping be
fore washing, , as the dry cleaner will
not Injure any trimming, even bits of
chiffon or lace.
Often a garment is soiled In only a
few spots and these can be removed
with the cleaner without leaving a
ring by brushing around the spot and
gradually toward the center. Placing
a blotter beneath the spot will avoid
leaving a ring. Use a white blotter
on delicate fabrics'.
Lace curtains can have their lives
prolonged by washing in dry cleaner
as they require no Ironing or stretch
ing! Woolen clothes and furs can be
safelv put away after dry cleaning
without fear of moths.
Sometimes stains. remain after dry
cleaning. These are some substancs
not soluble in gasoline and can usual
ly be removed with a cloth rung out
of warm water and a little white soap.
Warm gasoline Is more effective
than cold. To warm gasoline place
the gasoline vessel in another contain
ing hot water. Always remember that
the vapor from gasoline is very In
flammable and that it can never be
used in a room with a fire or a light.
Always work with gasoline in open air
if at all possible as t'-,i removes dan
ger and the fumes are not so offen
sive. When cleaning men's clothes
search for matches before beginning.
When dry cleaning a number of ar
ticles the lightest colored and those
lcr.tft soiled should be cleaned first. In
this manner the samo solution will
wash tho entire lot. After cleaning
'let the gasoline settle and then pour
Into another vessel that will exclude
air to it cannot evaporate. Bo care
ful that no drers are poured In and
tho mixture will he perfectly clean
and can be ued again and again. In
this way many dollars worth of li
cleaning can be done at home for a
trifle. One can afford to wear dainty
garments that would not lie po-s.ille
If they had to be sent to a profession
al dry cleaner.
Fireside Talks
With Members of the Newspaper
Bible Class
By REV. E.B. ALLEN, D.D.
Pilgrim Congregational Church
Oak Park, III.
SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FOR
OCTOBER 19, 1919: "JESUS IN
PETER'S HOME."
Golden Text: "Jesus said unto him,
Today is salvution come to this
house." Luke 19:9.
Lesson Murk 1 :28-39.
I. Kindness.
A famous writer who went down
with the Lusitnnin used to sny some
what oracularly that he believed in a
religion of kindness. He was the
same man who divorced the faithful
wife of his youth in order that he
might marry a new and younger "af
finity 1" Jesus Christ went about do
ing good and showing kindness to
men. It is said that men wondered
at the graciousness of His life. God's
grace as it is manifested in Christ
nns been described as "undeserved
kindness or mercy." It was a beau
tiful kindness which Jesus showed
to Simon's mother-in-law when he
healed her of her fever. Jesus never
went into a home but he brought
blessing wan mm. tic is a great and
goou guesi lo nave in trie nome cir
cle. Holman Hunt's beautiful painting,
"The Light of the World," gives us a
picture of Christ standing at the
door knocking and asking for admis
sion. Dr. Alncrtson tells of a little
girl looking for a long time at the
picture very intently and asking,
"Why don't they let him in?"
"Oh!" said she, "the door sticks;
the weeds have grown up about it."
Wailing a minute she added, "Per
haps they are living in the back of
the house and they don't hear him."
There arc a great many people
who do not give attention to the
Master when he seeks to make his
home in their hearts. It was a great
day for Peter when Jesus became a
guest in his home. The Christian
ought to make his visits as helpful as
possible everywhere. Are you a
good visitor?
II. Spending Sunday.
Some people spend Sunday as care
lessly as tliey spend their money.
!ftGC!&02K&Ki&&H!
Special Showing of Suits
PWiiirac Mwfalc of tAQ Rftl (tmz A 4QC
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The day is given to them for the
highest use. Wc oiifiht to keen Sun
days for the highest things of the
soul. Jesus made it clear that men
could do good on the Sabbath Day.
A distinguished preacher has said:
"Wc keep the Saubath by what we
do rather than by what wc avoid."
It is u day for service and not for
lazy self-indulgence. I know a man
who devoted his Sunday afternoons
to calling upon those who were sick.
He was an ordinary mechanic and
not an outstanding member in his
church but he was loved and re
spected everywhere for his min
istries. III. Medical Missions.
Jesus was the first medical mis
sionary. No service being rendered
in foreign innus today is more great
I ly needed or meets with a readier re
. sponsc than the ministry of our phy
1 slcians and nurses' to the bodies of
mankind. Our Missionary Boards
are always looking for those who
, are willing to go out to serve as doc-
tors or nurses.
It is interesting to know how
Christ's life has influenced such a
great medical man as Dr. Grenfell
who is well known for his service in
Labrador. He says: "I always keep
posted up in my surgery, where
sometimes the continuous stream of
patients coming to see 'the doctor'
calls for more sympathy than I have
to give, and is apt to make one ir
ritable and useless because unsym
pathetic, these old words:
f
He did kind things so kindly
It seemed his heart's delight
To make poor people happy
From morning until night.
Any time when I happen to look
up, is is a clarion call to me that, if
I would iind joy, tbe real way is his
way."
irntvn.
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"That was an awful mistake the
Burgeon made. The man he operated
on didn't have what he thought he
did."
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An extensive collection which includes numerous models at all these popular
prices.
The new fabrics, styles and colors are much in evidence.
Three models described from these exclusive groups:
According to a Norwegian scicuti'
Saturn's rings are electrical pheno
menu, produced by the radiation o'
luminous particles from the plain''
'liirli riMirws ilicm constant!
1. Button trimmed model
developed in silvcrtone, con
vertible collar, narrow belt,
fancy stitched pocket, fancy
pussy willo wlined warmly
inter-lined. Colors, navy, ox
ford, green and brown .$40.50
2. A model of plum suede
velour with collar and pockets
of Hudson seal irregular cut
coat, fancy pussv willow lined,
$75.00.
3. Blouse model of navy
duvet de laine, with longer
coul. Handsomely embroid
ered, ringtail collar n n d
duvetyn vest, $95.00.
Other suits ranging in price,
$45.00 to $395.00.
Third Floor.
ffelMIe&lloth
00
Adams at Huron Street, Toledo, Ohio
Toledo,
Ohio
Toledo,
Ohio
"Didn't have appendicitis at all,
eh?"
"Oh, he had appendicitis all right,
but he didn't have any .ney."
An old Scotch worthy was in the
habit of calling each evening at the
villagb inn for a "drop o' the best''
When he had gone one night the
landlord discovered, to his horror,
that he had supplied Donald out of
the bottle of sulphuric acid which he
had been using for cleaning the taps.
Every moment he expected to hear
of Donald's death, and his relief was
great when the old worthy arrived
next evening. '
'JDonald, what did you think o' the
whisky ye got last night?"
"It wis a fine dram, a guid warm
in' dram, but it had aye f au't every
time I coughed it set fire to ma
whuskers."
An Impressive and Convincing Demonstration of Values in
Coats, Suits, Dresses at Thirty-five Dollars
The splendid garments featured in this store at thirty-five dollars emphasize this store's leadership in both values
styles. They are garments carefully selected by us especially suited to the needs of the majority of women,1
They are marked at a price well within the scope of the average purse although in order to mark
them so moderately required the sacrifice of a goodly portion of the customary profit.
and
t .r.t
A man went into a southern
restaurant not long ago and asked
for a piece of old-fashioned Wash
ington pic, The waiter, not under
standing and yet unwilling to con
cede his lack of knowledge, brought
the customer a piece of chocolate
cake.
"No, no, my friepd,'' said the man.
'"I meant George Washington, not
Booker Wadiinetfln."
Suits
Coats
Dresses
Clever new models, belted or plain tailored, in the
favored new coat lengths. Made of extra good Silvcrtone,
Broadcloth and Serge in all the new fall shades. Among
these are plain styles for the street and fancy ones for dressy
wear. The values are unusual.
llie models are as full cut as you will find in many at
much higher prices some' full lined, others half lined.
Large convertible collars of self material or fur. Made of
Polo Cloth, Silvcrtone, Kersey and Velour in qualities sel
dom seen in coats at $35.00. Also, 48-inch, full belled Plush
coats some with fur collars.
Silk and Satin in straight line, tunic, ruffled and plait
ed models. Also plain tailored styles. Embroidered or
braid trimmed.
Tricotine and Serge in the new coat and Russian blouse
effects; as well as smart straight line models. Embroidered
and beaded.
Many of these are the inimiiuble "Betty Wales" dresses.
$35
$35
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