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Perrysburg journal. (Perrysburg, Wood Co., O. [Ohio]) 186?-1965, November 06, 1919, Image 3

Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87076843/1919-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

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'Fireside Talks
With Mpmttorc rtf ffio Nonronanor
f,. Bible Class
By REV. . B. ALLEN, D.D.
Pilgrim Congregational Church
Oak Park, 111.
A .
SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON FOR
NOVEMBER 9, 1919: "PETER'S
GREAT CONFESSION."
Golden Text: "Simon Peter an
swered and said, Thou arc the
Christ, the Son or the living God."
Matthew 16:16.
Lesson Matthew 16:13-24.
I. "Confessions of Great Men."
fleeter is remciribcred for his great
confession regarding Jesus in which
he said: "Thou are the Christ, the
Son of the living- God." It was a
new and sudden conviction in Pe
ter's experience. It was the product
of his long association .with Jesus,
his observation of His life and work
and his thought upon Christ's teach
ing. No man ever stays steadily
with Christ without being profound
ly, influenced by his life. The lon
ger he stays with him and examines
his career and teaching, the more he
is impressed with his divinity.
When General Lew Wallace had
reached mature life he was noted for
his indifference to religious matters.
Heihad' never even read the Bible,
and' he resolved to read it in earnest
that he might find out its truth or
falsity for himself. The result of
his reading was "Ben Hur." "I was
in quest of knowledge," he tells, us,
"but I had no faith to sustain, no
creed to bolster up. The result was
that the whole field of religious1 and
Biblical history opened up before
me; and my vision not being clouded
by perviously .formed opinions, I
was enabled to survey it without the
aid of lenses. I know I was thorough
and persistent. I know I was con
scientious in my search for the truth.
I weighed, I analyzed, I counted and
compared. The evolution from con
jecture into knowledge, through
opinion and belief, was gradual but
irresistible; and at length I stood
firmly and defiantly on the solid
rock. Whether Ben Hur' has ever
influenced the mind of a single read
er or, not, I am sure its conception
and preparation have convinced its
author of the divinity of the lowly
Nazarene who walked and talked
with God." 4fllEI
It is interesting to know that, Gen
eral Wallace was led to this investi
gation of Christ from every stand
point because of a confession which
he had from Robert -Ingersoll, the
great infidel who challenged the
right of Christ to receive the atten
tion and loyalty of men. -
The Westminster Bible Record
tells us that missionaries today are
rejoicing over the confessions of na
tive Christians, although they are
seldom as complete as that of Peter,
and often the words are few and
halting.
In the villages of India there are
many aged men and women who
gladly walk ten miles, through floods
and jdong unsafe roads, to the house
of God, and who, in their simple
way, by their zeal and devotion to
Christ, are proclaiming their faith in
him. One old man, quivering with
emotion . and incoherence made
many attempts to express his belief,
and'flnally stammered out: "We are
all sinners, and the Lord Christ un x
(iertook tor us all, and it we believe
in him we shall be saved. I know
that, and that is all I know."
Pastor Hsi, of China, first an
opium slave, but afterwards a man
of wonderful Christian character
and influence, recorded a moment
in his life when by faith he saw
Christ, not only as his Savior, but
his absolute Owner, his Master, his
Lord, and exclaimed: "He has en
thralled me; I am his for ever."
II. Convictions and Courage.
A man's courage is apt to show it
self in proportion to the truth, and
sincerity of his convictions. This, is
particularly true of any religious ex
perience which a man may have.
Whatever task we have to perform
will sooner or later demand courage
if it is accomplished. Ex-President
Roosevelt, when police commission
er in New York early in his career,
rigorously enforced the Sunday law
against saloons, and the Tammany
tiger, of course, growled and struck
out madly. Tammany called a great
meeting. Roosevelt was present and
made the first speech told them that
he intended to enforce the law, good
or bad, as long as it remained on
the statute book. If it was bad it
should be repealed, but as for him he
was in office to serve the cause of
righteousness. As usual, cuorage
and manhood conquered the beast.
Row It Affect 'Km.
"It Ib Boznewhat interesting,:', ob
served the Colonel, "to note the va
rious ways In which intoxicants af
fect the various natlonalltes. Hav
ing traveled to a considerable ex
tent, I have perceived that when a
Frenchman has had too much, he
wants to dance; a German to sing;
a Spaniard to Gamble; a Britisher
to cat; an Italian to brag; an Irish
man' to fight; and an American jto
deliver a speech." Llfe.i
.-1 Jl ji .
AGRICULTURAL REVIEW
t4titfl
FARMERS DOMINATE ONTARIO LEGISLATURE POLITICAL
UPHEAVEL IN CANADIAN PROVINCE HAS MORE THAN
LOCAL SIGNIFICANCE.
(Business Feature Service.)
A new political movement has de
veloped in the Canadian province of
Ontario. At a recent election the
United Farmers' organization return
ed 57 active farmers to the legisla
ture out of a total membership of 111,
against a former representation of 17.
A farmer's administration is not un
likely. Of the 57 only 18 were elect
ed on old party tickets, so strong
has been the feeling that agriculture
has not been receiving a fnlr share In
the government.
"It wus truly a people's move
ment," writes F. M. Chapman, editor
of the Farmers' Magazine to the Fi
nancial Post of Coronto. "The urban
centers swung off from their accus
tomed mooorlngs and labor is joining
hands with the farmer. The move
ment is one that will commend itself
to many lovers of sound government
and the stability of capital and prop
erty. The farmer is essentially a be
liever in property rights. His views
are capitalistic rather than socialistic.
The elected members are of the rug
ged honest type."
The U. F. O. of Ontario favors pub
lic ownership of certain public utili
ties under efficient and economic con
trol such as will stabilize investments
and encourage and protect legitimate
private- enterprise. The party con
demns granting class advantage. The
members-elect believe they have the
ability and broad-mindedness to form
a cabinet and to give all Interests of
the province due attention. No body
of electors could be more disinterest
ed, they maintain, in answer to the
criticism of class control; none could
be freer from unfair discrimination or
handle affairs with more intelligence.
The Canadan 'farmers' movement
gains added significance from the
overtures made by labor to the farm
ers in this country. Whether labor
ultimately seeks a dual political con
trol, or merely wishes to enlist sup
port for collective bargaining and the
"inalienable right" to strike, perhaps
eveu the labor leaders themselves
could not say. Certainly the farmer
and the laboring man have no real
nllhilty except as pursuing vocations
that require manual labor. Their
viewpoints arc essentially different.
Between the farm and fuctory hands
there is, of course, a direct communi
ty of interest.
The farmers' resentment townrd
speculation and price manipulation on
the grain exchanges has bamed high
during the recent sensational decline
In corn. But It should be remembered
there are bulls as veil as bears. Just
as the latter depress prices artificially
the former unduly elevate them. In
general the exchange performs a ser
vice by providing an open market for
grain, subject to world-wide influ
ences of production and consumption,
which Anally determine all prices,
and by protecting the farmer against
arbitrary price fixing by country ele
vators. Contrary to precedent and revers
ing conditions hitherto prevailing,
hog prices In Dominion yards have
quoted at a premium of as much, as
Cc a pound over American hogs,
which they usually follow. Receipts
have been unusually light and com
petitive buying held prices firm. The
Canadian farmer has not crowded the
market.
While painting woodwork near the
window pane place a, sheet of paper
or cardboard on the glass. This will
prevent the brush smearing the glass
with paint.
Add a few evergreens to the home
grounds each spring; There is really
nothing else like them for winter
cheer.
"It takes an artist to fry salt pork
and make ftillk gravy," and there are
plenty Buch artists mighty gooa
ones, toot
'COME TO THE STORE OF REAL VALUES."
COLDWATER'S
TOLEDO
207 SUMMIT ST.
OHIO.
This Coupon Is Worth ftft
ine making a purchase of $5.00 or more lnr I ""
Any one :
our millinery doDartmont within ono wank frnm
dato of thlB Issue,' will receive a discount of one
dollar on presentation of this coupon. Bring In
your coupon.
1
SPECIAL SALE OF NEW
MID-SEASON HATS
$4.95 $6.95 $7.95
ALD THE NEWEST CONCEITS OF THE MOMENT LARGE
DROOPING BRIMS, SMALL TURBAN EFFECTS AND CHIN-CHIN
STYLES IN BLACK, BROWN AND TAUPE. TRIMMED IN
OSTRICH, GLYCERINE AND FLORAL EFFECTS.
OLDWATER'
APPAREL SHOP
MILLINERY DEFT
207 Summit St, Toledo, Ohio
G
S
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BLACKWELL WELDING COMPANY
1013 Jefferson Arenas
WH WEIill AI.Ii METALS
If a machine part breaks while
harvesting;, don't stop work to
send for a new part.
OUR MOTTO IS
Service and guaranteed work.
Pioneer and Iianrest Weldlna;
Home Wione, Mala 1200
F. J. Fakle. Prrn. TOUBDO, OKI
ON HHOBT ITOTIGH
W will weld any part of brass,'
steel, aluminum, cast Iron, oop-'
per or bronie.
Company la State
DECARBONIZING
Auto Cylinders while yon' wait
Bell Phone. Kate 1801
WHERE
ARenv
Glasses
Vry
n .
Up To The Minute Busi
ness Requires Above All
Else Efficiency
You cannot be efficient if
your glasses are "forgotten
and left on the parlor' table at
home when you need 'them
that minute at the office.
Why not have TWO pair, one
on your desk, at your place of
business and one pair at
home?
Let us duplicate the pair
you are using. We can do so
from your 'present lenses.
THEBECKMANN
OPTICALCOMPANY
323 St , Clair Street
Established lfiV' Toledo, Ohio
Northof Keith'.
TOLEDO, OHIO
JS"
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A Mid-Season Sale With
End-of-the Season Prices
'
Thompson-Hudson
(TOLEDO, OHIO)
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Annual Buyers and Managers Sale
A ValueGiving Event That Has No Parallel
To have such a Sale as this come right in the heart of the season, at the very moment whefci the' things ;;7
it offers are most needed, is indeed, rare good fortune. !,.',.!.
Its benefits to you are Real not imaginary for it is a Sale of Standard Quality, New Merchandise that
.was bought expressly for this event. .-,
It is a sale that should and without doubt will win thousands of new friends for this store through the
excellence;of values the efficiency of servicer-and because
b .s.
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The Estimated Savings to Our
Will Total Close to Fifty Thousand
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' We believe that in planning this Sales offering we have covered every possible wearable need of women
and childrenand many for men. Every item Js of the Sterling Quality sold here the year 'round, and- . . ".' ..
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Every Item Advertised As A Sale Special
Is At Less Than The Usual Selling Price
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. Friday and Saturday Customers will find many new items ready for them and for the second' Week of '
the Sale (whic starts Monday) will be filled with new opportunities.
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