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Springfield globe-republic. (Springfield, Ohio) 1884-1887, January 09, 1885, Image 1

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Springfield Globe -Republic
TI1K H'MVUVttlTIEIO GJ-OIIJ3, I
Vol j mo IV- Nximbor llt. I
SPRMGFIEIZ), OHIO, FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 9, 1885
JTHE 8PIHNOPIEL1D BErCBLIC
I Volume ZZX. Number 3UU.
OWEN, PIXLEY & CO.
Ohio Valley and Tennessee: Clearing
weather; slightly colder in west portion;
slight rise followed by falling temperature in
east portion.
THINK OF THE
All Wool Snlts gfllnp Tor the liair-$!,
the Uirc-qnartera $12, the Mripcd
I'autaat $1 the Agcnoria Jean Pants
at 50c, and so on.
THINK OF THE
Melton Otcrcoats, our make, makes $(,
the line All Wool Mack Heavers $10,
the Youths' Storm King $5, the hand
some new brown Meltons $11, another
grade $14, the Diagonal Worsteds $10,
the Matronal Cotton Worsteds $S, and
so on.
THINK OF THE
Fine Press Suits to he found here $12,
$15, $1$, $20. The Double Breasted
Hliie Diagonal Cassimere Suits $15.
The .Wat Mack and White Small Check
Cassimere Suits $14. The Millers gray
extra line $15, and so on.
THINK OF THE
Children's Fine Otcrcoats now sightly
arranged in our window, down from
$13 to $5. Then those on tallies behind
u dollar till Saturday night. The one
remaining 3$ Surtout Oiercoat $12
and so on.
THINK OF THE
Children's All Cotton, some Wool and
All Wool Suits, to be Tound In that $2
pile, and the beauties jou may select
from the next pile at $3, or the gray or
lirown mixed oa the shell above at $4,
or the flue mixtures at $5, and so on.
THINK OF THE
Scotch Caps at 50c; other Winter Caps
more Flush, Bearer, Ac Still Brim
Hats $2, nad seme better. Soft Hats
75c, $1, $1.50, $2, $2.50, Ac, and the
Patent Ear Frotector the Hats lit over,
and so on.
THINK OF THE
Seamless Half Hose 10c, the advance 2
for a inarter,tbeadtance 20c per pain
then the All Wool Shakers now going
at 20e, the Camel's Hair Extra Heavy,
onr way makes, 30c; titc Imported
British, our own importation, selling
at a quarter, and so on.
THINK OF THE
Guaranteed Cotton Handkerchiefs going
for a nickle; a dime buys a belter;
then the Monstrous Big Turkey Reds
at 10c, or as for the other way 2 for 5c,
or between at 5c; then the old-fashioned
White Linen, Corded Edges, 25c and
20c The Fine Hemstitched Colored
Borders 25c, 30c, 35c, 40c, 50c The
belter ainong the Silks, and so on.
THINK ON THE
Whole of the enormous stock we carr
for yon to look at and think OTer, of our
adrantages OTer ordinary dealers, man
ufacturing our own Clothing Stocks,
our way of Retailing at Wholesale
Prices, onr Strictly One-Price System,
and so on.
OWEN, PIXLEY & CO.,
SPRINGFIELD'S
ONLY ONE-PRICE CLOTHIERS,
25 A- 27 WEST MAIX STREET.
X. B. Lookout for the Sharks selling
our 50c Jean Pants at $1.00 per pair.
BOSTON STORE LOCALS.
Clonkst Cloaks! Clonks!
Be sure to attend the grand clout display
at the Itoston Store, 34 South Limestone
street, Saturday, January- 10th.
300 Sample Garment! at lesr than half
their value will be be shown at the Boston
Store Saturday, January 10th.
The Boston Store is going out of Business
and advertise their entire stock for sal at
what it will bring.
Fine Seal Plush Newmarkets worth $90
w ill be sold at $50, at the great Boston Store
Sale January 10th.
Splendid Brocade Newmarket, astracan
trimmed, worth $20 for $10, at the Itoston
Store Sample Cloak Sale.
A $12 Garment for $5 at the Boston Store.
The slaughter begins Saturday, January 1 Oth.
You can buy dry goods at your own prices
at the Boston Store during their great clos
ing out tale.
Silk ilattasse fur lined circulars for $12,
cost to make $25, at Boston Store Closing
Out Sale.
51b. all wool Blankets for $3.50, wortli $G,
at the Boston Store Great Sale.
Newmarkets and Russian Circulars costing
$12 and $15 to make: our prices for same are
$' to $7 each.
Remember all our cloaks are new and
fresh from manufacturers, and must be sold
ht some price. Sale begins Saturday, Jan
nary 10th, Boston Store.
WANTED.
llTANTED-BOAKD AND LODGING OU
l three gentlemen in a prirate fauily c!oc to
j.t office. Call on W. K. 11 bite, 71 West Main at.
ALEoMAN WANTED TOCANVAS SPUING
O &eM for a rapidly wllin
or other mechanic nnferrr
r filing article, a can
article. A carpenter
re lerml ill pay salary or
ir salai
eoiumwlon. Call to-diT.
James Hotel, Springfield, O.
E. J. Johnson, fat.
sir ANTED A
KELIAI1I.K BUSINESS MAN
IT with a few hundred dollars, to engage in a
itrofitable business in spnof-ucia. run parucu
ars made known lj calling at the St. Jatnrs Ho
tel. bpriogfielJ. )., E. J- Johnson, Manager of
Jol nwn'i Business Exchange, of Cincinnati, O.
UTAH?
rKD LADIE3 AND MISSES TO
crochet and make fins laces at home; pleas
ant and profitable; work sent out of city. West
ern Manufacturing Company, IIS Stats St,, Chi
cago, III.
T ANTED-rUTII.S IS bHOKTIIAND. EVEN
II iugcliss- first class instruction. Address or
call on W. II (iIrsox, Gtomt-UtPUBLic office.
WANIED-LADIEI AND GENTLEMEN IN
city or country to take light work at their
own homes; 13 to ti eaily made; work sent by
mail; no canTauing. We hare a good demand
for our work and lurnish steady employment.
Address, with stamp. Crown MTg Csmpany,
234 Vine St., Cincinnati, )hi.
GOOD 1AY FOIt AOHNTti. IIWTU t200 I'EB
nioDth made selling our (Irand New History,
lauoui and Incisive Matties ot tb World.
Write to J. U Mct'urdy A Co., l'hlla.lf l.bU, l'a.
WHEAT.
Wheat and Flour Lively and
Stronger in New York and
Cincinnati.
Bismarck, Gladstone and Salis
bury. Congress.
AVashivbtov, January 8. Senate. Rill
introduced: Relating to the fees of pension
claim agent' and attorneys.
A long discussion ensued as to the practi
cability of putting general legislation ou ap
propriation.bills. Resolution offered: Asking the President
to transmit to the S'nate a historical state
ment concerning the public policy of the Ex
ecutive department ot the Confederate States
during the late war, reported to hare been
filed in the War department by Uene-al
Sherman.
Adjourned.
Hocsi. Bills pvsed: Granting the right
of way to the Fremont, Elkhornand Missouri
Valley railroad across the Fort Itobinon
military reservation; the inter-state com
merce bill.
The Alabama contested election case was
decided by seatinj- Craig, Republican.
Adjourned.
Washington-, January 9. Sknatk Bill
passed, directing tLe transfer ol one of the
vessels of the Grcely Relief Expedition to
the Treasury department, tor a revenue cut
ter, for use in the waters of Alaskv In sub
mitting his report Cameron said that the
revenue cutter now at Alaska was insufficient
for the purposes of the government.
McPherson inquired whether there was
any intention on the part of the Government
to return to the English Government the ship
presented to the United Slates for the pur
poses of the Greely Relief Expedition.
Cameron said Under the law as it would
stand, without the passage of this bill the
Secretary of the Xavy would be required to
sell all ships forming a part of the expedi
tion. Jackson, from Committee on Pensions, re
ported favorably, without amendment, the
bill yesterday introduced by Allison, compris
ing the legislative provision of the pension
appropriation bill recently passed by the
house. Jackson said that he would call
the bill up tc-mcrrow. Resolution ofered
by Wilson was agreed to, calling on the Sec
retary of the Interior for a copy of the report
of the Government Directors of the Union
Pacific Railroad for 1884. irlater called up
the Oregon central land forfeiture which had
been in abeyance, subject to mortgage,
covered by the amendment, but because they
did not think the amendment necessary under
the special circumstances of the Origon Cen
tral c-u, be then withdrew his motion to
reconsider. The bill, therefore, standi passed,
as amended by the Senate. It now goe to
the House.
Senator Sherman to-day reported favorably
from the Library Committee amendments in
tended to be proposed to sundry civil ap
propriation bills, appropriating $10,000
for a portrait of Gen. Thomas,
by Miss Ransom, and $15,000
for painting the Electoral Commission, by
Mis3 Fassett.
By a vote of C7 to 80 the House refused to
postpone private business in order to take up
the bill. A large number of private bills
were reported and placed o j the caleudar.
Curtin, from the Committee on Foreign
Affairs, reported a resolution calling for in
formation. O'Neill (Pennsylvania) presented a resolu
tion from the board of trade, Philadelphia,
asking the tjassage of the Lowell bankruptcy
bill. Referred.
The House then went into Committee ot
the Whole, Cox (New York) in the chair, on
the private calendar.
Ohio Legislature.
Ja.vcart 8. Senate Rills introduced:
Establishing jurisdiction of circuit courts; re
quiring foreign insurance companies to de
posit state securities ; for incorporating col
lateral companies; authorizing the Wilming
ton school board to borrow $4,000; regulat
ing testimony in civil cases; giving the
Probate court of Morrow county concurrent
jurisdiction.
House Bills passed: Senate bill authoriz
ing cemetery associations to sell land; House
bill antborizing transfers to the Reform farm
without commitment to the penitentiary,
making 2,788 cubic inches for bushel of char
coal. Lands LeartCft from Cherokee.
Washington, January 9. Capt. Solomon
Tuttle and J. W. Hamilton, of Kansas, mem
bersjot the Cherokee Live Stock Association,
and sub-lessees of the lands held by that Asso
ciation, were examined by the Senate Commit
tee on Indicn affairs, to-day. It was tound
that the Association held about 0,000,000
acres rented from the Cherokces at 2 cents
an acre, ftnd the lessee- paid 21 cents
per acres.
Senator Harrison asked what use was
made of the surplus.
Senator Ingalls objected, on the ground
that this was inquiring into private busi
ness of the witnesses. He would not ob
ject, he said, to an inquiry as
to whether any portion of the surplus was
paid in securing the lease.
Senator Harrison maintained that his in
quiry wa3 necessary to develop the facts in
the case. The committee went into secret
session, su'pending further investigation.
Fntnt Itntlwity Accident.
Fabjiinoiiale, h. I., January 9. The Deer
Park accommodation train which left Hun
ter's Point, last night, was derailed at Beth
page Junction, a mile west of here, at 0:50.
The locomotive was upset, the engineer,
Henry Burtsell, and fireman, Joseph DotztH,
fallijg under, were crushed and scalded. Hurt-
sell was dead when takea out.
The body was terribly mangled. Dotzell
was alive, but his injuries will prove fatal.
The train consisted of a locomotive, one comT
bination baggage nnd smoking, and one pas
senger car. Both cars left the track. The
wheel truck of the combination car, next the
engine, was torn from under, but did not up
set. Fortunately but few passengers were
aboard. All in the rear car were badly sha
ken, but none injured.
Financial Trouble In South America.
Bdexu3 A vats, via Galvesttn, January 9.
The financial situation has become greatly
complicated. The demand lor drafts to Eu
rope and general want of confidence of com
mercial houses have produced grave conflicts
in the banks. National and provincial drafts
for 1,500,000 pounds for mail to-day were
wanted, and only one hundred thousand
pounds obtained. This caused a run on the
banks and created a demand for gold. Busi
ness is at a stand still; people are waiting to
see what measures are to be taken. The
Minister of the Treasury and president of
banks are in favor of "Curezo Forzoo." The
President of the Republic prefers to adopt
other measures. There is great anxiety in
he market to know the resnlt.
Salisbury Has Something to Say.
LoMiox, January 9. The Marquis of
Salisbury, conservative leader of the lords,
has written a letter to the conservatives in
which he condems the government for
vacillating in its foreign and collonial policy.
The Nation, he says, find3 itself opposed by
European collusion and the colonies are
justly dissatisfied at the government's failure
to prevent Germany from annexing con
tiguous territory.
Suicide.
Cincinnati, January 9. Heary M. Guild,
late teller of the First National Bank, com
mitted suicide last night at the residence of
O. II. Tudor, his brother-in-law, cashier of
the Union National Bank, East Walnut Hills.
Ha resigned his position at the bank last
May and had not since found any employ
ment. This is said to have depressed his
spirits and led to his death. K was unmar
ried and forty-two years old. .
New Style of Hat In Pern.
Lima, Peru (via Galvestox), January 9.
The National newspaper says: Dealers have
caused an agreeable surprise by the importa
tion of the English cream-colored helmets or
hats, which have commenced to be worn here.
They are very pretty and are as suitable to
some gentlemen as a carbine. The desire to
become Eutopeanized is making us lose even
our politeness.
Failures of the Week.
New York, January 9. The failures ot
the last seven days, as reported to R. G. Dun
& Co , numbers from the "West, 429, Canada,
28. Tatal 457, which is far in excess of av
previous chronicled for the sama period. The
increase is largely in the South and West
where the failures are probably twice as
numerous as during the ordinary weeks in
1884.
A fraud.
Toronto, January 9. Mr. Longman, with
a gla?a eye, came here some months ago and
started an ngeocyfor the collection ot accounts
He soon ingratiated himself into the good
graces of tradesmen and others, and has de
parted to the States, leaving creditors to the
amount of $10,000. He is well known in
Pittsbmg and the West.
Chill at the Coming Paris Exposition.
Santigo, Chili, January 9. The' Minister
of Foreign Affairs has spoken to the directors
t the National Exposition with a view ot
sending to Paris articles of exhibition in
Santigo. The directors coincide and hare
comffinced-oHe collection of the "national
product! of Chili far the exhibition in Paris.
The Pullman Company and the Pennsyl
vania. PuiLADELruiA, January 9. The terma of
the new contract of the Pullman Company
with the Pennsylvania railroad have been
agreed npen, but not made public. It is said
it will be more favorable to the railroad than
the previous one.
Fire on Broadway.
New York, January 9. A fire early this
morning in the establishment of Henry
Rogers, wholesale fancy goods, Broadway,
damaged his stock $75,000; fully insured,
Mills & Wallace, clothiers, occupied the top
Stories; damage $50,000.
The Beta Fsls.
Philadelphia, January 9. The thirty
eighth convention of the Beta Psi fraternity
met to-day. A hundred deUgates and mem
bers were present from all parts of the coun
try, from Maine to California, and even
Canada.
Bismarck and Gladstone.
Berlin, January 9. The North German
Gazette denies that Germany's Egyptian and
Colonial policy is due to Bismarck's hatred
of Gladstone. The motives of Germany are
according to a more dignified policy.
Depositor to be Paid in Full.
Augusta, Ga, January 9. The Bank of
Augusta, chartered by the State many years
before the war, has made an assignment to
Harper Bros. Capital stock, $150,000. The
depositors will be paid in full.
Important.
Little Rock, Ark., January 9. State
Executive Committee to-day nnanimously
selected S. H. Fortcie, for Arkansas member
of the Democratic National Committee, vice
Judge Cottrell, resigned.
What are They up To?
Philadelphia, January 9. The Reading
Railroad General Committee has been in ses
sion at company's office since eleven, and are
still sitting with closed doors.
Flour and Uratn.
New York, January 9. Flour is stronger
and wheat is higher, and the market in an
excited condition. No. 2 red, February,
93i(,94l; May, 9899j.
Chilian Politeness.
Valparaiso, January 9. The Chilian man-of-war
Esmeralda arrived from Quinteros and
saluted the French and United States men-of-war
in the bay.
St 1 1 stuck.
New York, January 9. Stix Bros., Ilernai
t Co., manufacturers of cieaks, filed an as
signment to-day to Henry Rice; preference,
$50,000.
A Senator Benumlnated.
Carson, Nevada, January 9. John P.
Jones has been nominated by the Republican
caucus as United States Senator to succeed
himself.
Indications.
Washington, January 9. For Ohio Val
ley and Tennessee, fair, colder weather,
winds shifting to westerly, rising barometer.
McCuIlough, tho Tragedian.
St. Louis, January 0. John McCuIlough
left this morning for Chicago, where he says
he has important business to attend to.
Flour.
Cincinnati, January 9. Flour is active,
with active tendency, and wheat is stronger.
Madame Clovis-Uugnas.
Paris, January 8. In the trial of Madame
CIovis-Hugucs for shooting her traducer, pri
vate detective Morin, she declared that she
offered Morin to apply for a remission of his
sentence it he would retract the calumnies he
circulated about ber. To this offer Morin
only returned an insulting reply. In con
cluding her statement she said: "If you be
lieve me guilty, condemn me. If you can
understand the moral tortures I have en
dured, acquit me." With these words, ut
tered in a firm, energstic tone, she appeared
to make a favorable impression on the jury.
In reply to a remark by the judges that th
murder was unjustifiable, especially after fif
teen months premeditation, she said: "You
would not reason so coolly .If you suffered as
I have," and the prisoner proceeded to unfold
the unremitting and atrocious character of
the persecution to which she had been sub
jected. During the narrative she became
very excited.
Set en Men Frosen to Death.
Siocx City, Io., January 8. A man who
arrived here to-day from Running Water
brines news confirming the report of tht
freezing to death of seven men on the Ni
obrara river road in Nebraska. Two of the
men were fonnd sitting in. a buggy frozen
stiff, the horse having reached a statin
with bis silent drivers. No names have
yet been heard of the victims. This Nio
brara case ol freezing should not be con
founded with that previously reported, where
it was stated fourteen men had perished along
the new Sioux City and Pacific grade. Noth
ing further has been learned regarding the
latter. People here bad friends who started
to locate land along the new road and great
anxiety is felt, as they hare, had ample time
to get communication and not a word has
been received. The scenes of the two trage
dies are about 100 miles apart, th railroad
grade being almost due westot Niobrara river
Mr. Oglevee Talks.
Washington, January 8. Chairman Ogle
vee, who is here, says his party in Ohio is io
good shape aadonfident of success at the
next gubernatdfal election. Judge Foraker,
he thinks, mry bt the candidate. The liquor
question, which was the cause ot all their
difficulties, he says, will be let entirely alone
this year, and the Democratic Legislature
allowed to make itself responsible for any
changes in the laws on the subject. If possi
ble, the next campaign will be fought with
out reference to it, and the full party strength
brought out by advocating the princip et on
which the presidential campaign was fought.
Mrs. Hopkins' Big Houso.
Pittsfield, Mass., January 8. The widow
of Mark Hopkins intends to build in Great
Barnigton th most expensive residence in
the United States. The cost of the house and
grounds will be $5,000,000. Th house will
be built of blue stone from a quarry she
owns, and the work will begin as soon as
spring opens. The work at the ejuarry will
be carried on day aid night. An electric
light will be used lor night operations. A
thousand men will be employed three years.
xm wa XOTXS.
The Democrats of Missouri in caucas nom
inated Senator Vest for reelection.
Chief Justice Waite's condition Is improv
ing.
The pool of the Lake Superior mining com
panies has been broken by the Quincy Com
pany. 4
W. P. Heston k Co., tecNealers. Toledo.
O., failed. Liabilities (83,000. Nominal
assets 80,000.
The Union League Clnb, ot New York,
adapted a resolution favoring W. M. Erarts
for U. S. Senator.
A horse and buggy reached Sioux City,
la., and the occupants, two men, were found
frozen to death.
A man at Wilkesbarre was relieved of
twenty-nine water crabs and a milk snake
that had been inhabiting his stomach for
about two years.
The British bark Isabel experienced a
severe earthquake shock while at sea. The
ship was shaken in every fiber, and a thund
erous submarine roaring was heard. Two
days later she passed the wreck of a Nor
wegian bark, the Alhama.
The postoffice receipts for the last quarter
show that the reduction of letter postage
from three to two cents has materially de
creased the use of postal cards, and that the
receipts have not been materially aflected by
the cheap postal rates.
At Paris Mme. Ungues was acquitted of
the murder of Morin, but fined $400 and costs
of trial.
General Santo Domingo Tilla is the new
President of Panama.
The form of government of the Congo
Free State will be based on English Colonial
administration. Brussels will be the seat
The Powers decline England's Egyptian
proposals.
Bismarck thinks Germany requires an im
port duty on corn.
Disturbances of the earth continue in
Spain. The inhabitants think the end of the
world is at hand, and are confessing their
sins in preparation.
Two Paris policemen attacked a newspaper
office with swords and pistols. They were
finally overpowered by the efforts of the ei
tire establishment. On was badly wounded.
An Ohio Democratic Club has been orga
nized with Durbin Ward as president, and
W. A. Taylor, of Columbus, is secretary.
John Stapleton, sr., was taken from jail at
Mt. Sterling, Ky., and hanged by a mob, be
cause his son had shot a man named Culli
ban. Several persons are reported killed and
wounded in a whisky fight at Mt. Vernon,
Kentucky.
At the Lot Wright examination at Cincin
nati, Thursday, M. L. Hawkins, who was
sheriff at the time of the election, testified
that he appointed 1,000 deputy sheriffs to
serve at the polls. Most of them were ap
pointed the Sunday and Monday before the
election, and were paid by the Democratic
committee. He had made the selections from
the lists furnished by reliable men in the dif
ferent wards. He was moved to 'appoint
these deputies because be was informed that
Marshal Wright was appointing a large num
ber of deputy marshals.
A Dayton boy named William Clark
jumped upon a passing freight train at the
Arcade depot about 2:30 this afternoon to
ride to Dayton, but was struck by the water-
pipe, lor supplying engines, ana Knocked
from the car, breaking his left arm near the
wrist. He was taken to Dr. McLaughlin's
office where the arm was set.
Hon. Jesse L. Moss, an enterprising cotton
manufacturer and an inventor, at Westerly,
R. I, who has number of warm friends
here, is now a member of the Rhode Island
Legislature, and we are sure an able and
fiithlul one.
The Skating Rink.
The father of a family remarked yes
terday in some heat: "Last night I
went to tho skating rink on upper
Broadway, for the purposo of taking
my daughter home. I had left them
there at 7 o'clock, and had then gono
down to tho Hodman house to elect
somebody. When I got back I walked
in without their seeing me, aid leaned
over the railing gazing at tho skaters.
I was disgusted by tho sight that met
my eye. I am a liberal man, and
don't belicvo in cooping a girl up m
you would a raro exotic, or watching
her as you would a criminal. But I
made up my mind before I got home
that night that it would bo just as well
to keep an oye on tho girls as not.
The sight that met my eye was not
an agreeable one. Both of tho girls
are young, you know, 17 and 18, and I
supposo you have observed that they
are pretty. At any rate, they are
bright and fresh young creatures, full
of life and fun. I send them to the
park every morningbefore breakfast on
ponies, they spend six months of every
year in tne country playing tennis and
dipping into the ocean, and 1 had flat
tered myself that no nonsense concern
ing young men had entered their heads.
I believe the skating rink has undone
in an hour what it has taken me yoars
to accomplish. You know they employ
as assistants at the rink half a dozen
spruce young fellows, whom I am told
are hired solely on account of their
good looks. They are, in fact, a re
markably pretty lot of little men.
Their ages are from 23 to 25 or 28, and
eacfctot them has a nice curled mus
tache, carefully-banged hair, and gush
ing manner. They are dressed in uni
forms, and they are the most conspicu
ous little crowd of mashers that I have
ever seen. They are actually sickening-
As I stood there gazing at three or
four of these young whipper-snappors
sailing along, clasping ttio girls nanus
in their own and whispering in their
cars, I was astounded by seeing my
youngest daughter sail by in the clutch
es, of tho mashie.st masher of them all.
He had hold of both of her hands, and
was leaning against her, whispering in
her ear. His mustache rubbed against
her check, his eyes were half closed,
and she was as red as a beet and star
ing straight at the floor. I gulped. Be
fore I caught my breath I descried sail
ing down the middle of the room an
other masher with my other daughter.
They were even more familiar and af
fectionate than tho lirst two. "What
did you do?" I asked, as he stopped to
thump his leg with his open palm.
"Do!" ho roared. "I walked out on
the floor and yanked those girls to the
benches in such short order that I pride
myself that I was the center of attrac
tion for a short time anyway. I ex
pressed a few sentiments to tbe assem
bled mashers and took the girls homo.
I am given to understand now by the
entire family, except my son, that I
made a confounded ass of mysolf, but I
don't believe it. No more skating
rinks for roe. '1 hey are too risky."
Brooklyn Eagle.
s e
A True Story.
"Yes," said old man Sapphira, drag
ging a box up to the stove in the coun
try store, and loading in a fresh chew
of tobacco, "yes, Jeemes Darby wuz a
powerful Injin fighter. You know. In
them days it wuz fashionable among
the redskins to roast a feller at the
stake, an' they hod it in fur Jeemes cl
they ever kotch him. He lit aroun'
fur nigh onto five years, an' killed
about two dozen uv'cm, an'uv course,
thet didn't make 'em love Jeemes any
better. Finally, one day, they slipped
up on him, and, after a lively scrim
mage, they took him in. They whz
the gladdest set tiv redskins you ever
see, an' they made a bigger hullabuloo
over Darby than folks does now over a
Presidential candidate. Jeemes wasn't
no coward, an' he tuck his misfortin'
az cool az he could under the circum
stances, an' watched 'cm gittin' ready.
He knowed it wuz goin' to be a picnic
an' barbecue an' he wu. goin' to be
called on to furnish the meat, but it
didn't skecr him much. When they wuz
ready they yanked Jeemes up to the post
an' hitched him to it tight an' fetched
on their kinalin' wood. Then they lit
it with some leaves an' powder Hashed
on to 'em an' tho blaze began to shoot
tip pnrty lively. Jeemes scrunched,
an' struggled, 'caue tire is hot even on
a brave man's legs, but he never holler
ed. In a few minutes the blaze MTti7
crecpin' up one side uv him an the
oth(7 wuz not much hurt. Jeemes no
ticed it, an' jist ez cool cz if he wuz at
a Dclmonico dinner, he sung out:
" 'Look h'ar, yer skulkin' heathen;
stir up the tire on 'tother side. Jeemes
Darby nover did like rare meat, an' he
don't want it half done now.'
"That wuz what I call hecroismboys,
an' Jeemes orter had better luck than
to be cooked for a redskin picnic"
"You don't believe that story, do
you?" asked one of the listeners.
"In course I do. Jeemes told it to
me hisself. an' Jeemes wouldn't lie."
Merchant Traveler.
A New Gain'c For Children.
Tho little ones will thank us for re
printing a description ot the following
new game for children, as is described
in the Little Folks' Magazine. It is
called the game of "Names."
Each player is presented with a long
slip of paper and a pencil, and it one
of the players has a watch so much tho
better; if "not, a clock must be used.
One commences by calling out: Gills'
names commencing with A two min
utes allowed." Each player thon
writes down all the girls' names that
he (or she) can recollect, and at the ex
piration of the two minutes "time" is
called. Then tho oldest player reads
from his (or her) slip all tho names he
or she has written down say Amy,
Amabel, Alice, Ann, Annie, Armanda,
Allcen, etc. All the other players, as
the names are read out, cancel any
name read out- If, for instance, all
have written Amy, all cancel Amy and
count ono mark. " Say six players have
Amabel and four have not. each of the
six counts one luark, those who have
not thought and written down Amabel
get nothing for Amabel, and so on
through the list '1 he object of the
game is to teach the children all boys'
and girls' names. When tho marks
have been allotted for all the names,
the total of the marks are read out and
noted on each slip. The players then
Erocecd in a similar manner for all
oys'names commencing with A, such
as Alfred, Abel, Adam, Andrew, Ar
thur, etc The game can be continued
until all the letters of the alphabet are
exhausted. But practically, young
players rarely care to "do" more than
thirty sets, or fifteen letters consecu
tively. Various ifames crop up, and
the memory is well exercised, and the
children generally voto it great fun.
Any one introducing pet or fancy
names, such as Fussy, Kit, Teddy, etc,
forfeits two marks, unless it be ar
ranged that they be allowed.
GLEANINGS.
The number of Protestants in Franco
is now 580,000, or about 1 to every 61
Catholics.
Ono county in Australia has this year
paid tho bounty on 25,8-10 dozen of cap
tured sparrows' eggs.
Shakspeare's daughter could not write
her own name. Her father could write
it, but nearly always spelled it wrong.
At tho recent Cat Show in London
one fclino valued at $500,000 was ex
hibited, and $5,000 cats were plentiful.
Of the 4.000 Chinamen in New York
and Brooklyn over three thousand fivo
hundred are engaged in the laundry
business.
"Irenus," of the New York Observer,
says in a recent postscript to one of his
letters to that paper: "1'ho grandchil
dren of those who read tho lir3t of
these letters are now reading tho last
of them."
A Chinese play at a San Francisco
theatre has run forty-two nights and
only reached the third act. There are
twclvo more acts to come, and it will
bo a year or more before the critics can
begin their abuse.
Virginia has a larger state debt than
auy other stato in the Union, Tennessee
being second, and Louisiana third. The
total debt, state, county and city, is
larger per capita in Massachusetts than
in any other state.
A good authority calculates that tho
six leading nations of Europe have
standing armies of about 2,700,000
men, with reserves which could be
brought into the field within three
months of about 4,000.000.
The London Olobe, in an article on
"Nationality in Voice," declares that
America for the next century will pro
duce the finest singers in the world,
owing to "tho semi-barbarous condi
tions essential to such productions."
A man who lives near Pittsburg has
six pieces of silver, each weighing a
little moro than the standard silverdol
lar, all perfect, and dates as plain as
when new. The dates run from 1736
to 1754. On one side tho figure resem
bles General Washington's head, the
other side being hieroglyphics. These
pieces were plowed up in a field, and
their owner wants somebody to tell him
what they arc.
There have been fifty Speakers of tho
National House. Henry Clay served
longer than any other, holding the po
sition during six Congresses. Jona
than Dayton served two terms, Nathan
iel Macon three, F. A. Muhlenburg (tho
first Speaker) two, Joseph B. Varnum
two, Andrew Stevenson four, James
K. Polk two, Linn Boyd two, Schuyler
Colfax three, James G. Blaine three,
and Samuel J. Randall three.
An expert in pianos remarks: "Peo
ple will not learn that a cover on a
piano, no matter how much high-art
needlework they are may be on it, is
almost useless unless it is waterproof.
Have as fancy a piano scarf as you like,
but keep one of the plain and "homely
drab rubber covers under it or you
won't keep your piano. The better
your instrument is the more suscepti
blo is it to the effects of moisture."
The Athens Banner tells how a man's
wife made a trade with him and thus
gave that section a good preacher. It
says he "went to preaching just to
keep out of the War, and after the War
was over he had got to be such a good
one ho kept on. His wife was a Bap
tist and bo was a Methodist, and she
told him if he would go to preaching
and keep ont of the War that she
would join the Methodist Church. The
trade was made, and since that time
he has been a big Methodist preacher.
toiunwus (ua.) inquirer.
Lately the distance between London
and Edinburgh was covered in three
days by a tricycle. This feat was sur
passed a week later by another traveler,
who accomplished the 400 miles in two
days and nine hours, considerably more
than half the distance being traveled
in the first twenty-four hours. A med
ical writer in the Lancet warns all "cy
cle" riders to beware of large wheels
which are accompanied by small sad
dles. He says that unless' a good-sized
scat is provided, serious evils may re
sult. The torritory of Russian Siberia, one
and a half times as large as the United
States, has belonged to Russia three
centuries, yet of the 4,000,000 inhabi
tants nearly one-half are still pagans.
Paganism is fostered by the home gov
ernment. The pagan priests are al
lowed to collect and burn the copies of
the Bible with which the missionaries
supply the converts, and no missionary
may baptize without the authority of
the pagan civil authorities, who are al
lowed to do almost anything to drive
Christianity from the country.
A committee has been formed at Lu
cerne with a view of erecting what is
called a "universal column." It is to
measure 300 feet in height, and it is to
contain in its interior relief portraits of
all the celebrated men and women of
the present era on bronze tablets. An
other project of the committco is the
building of a "museum of the nine
teenth century," to be dedicated to art,
science, inventions, commerce and in
dustryt and to contain tho busts and
statues of all distinguished persons of
these domains. The cost is estimated
at 7,000,000 to 8.000,000 francs, and is
to be met by subscription, lotteries, etc.
The New York Sun gives the follow
ing interesting figures: A Parisian jour
nal has been making some inquiries re
garding the number of gaming houses
and gambling clubs in the capital of
civilization, and the amount of money
which changes hands in them! If tho
information be trustworthy, it is indeed
startling. There are twenty-four of
these trtpols in Taris, and between $30,
000,000 and .;,000,000 are computed
to have been lost there during the last
five years. The minimum profits f the
banks in tho clubs are put down at
81.200 daily, and in tho less select gam
bling houses at 200. Taking the aver
age at $400 pur day, tho total for the
lite vcars conies out at tho respectable
figure of $17,500,000. Nearly 12,500,
000 are set down as the live years'
"pickings" of the croupiers and prc
leurs. Some of tliee men nrike enor
mous iucoiucs, and it is certainly well
within tho mark to put down their re
ceipts at an average of $20,000 per an
num. Then there is another $500,000
for the administrators and their staffs.
A physician of long practico was re
minded that we can judge of a horse's
years by its mouth, and asked why
some rules could not be laid down, in a
general way, for estimating the ago of
a woman. The uncertainty is not al
together due to deceptive practices, ac
cording to his reply, but to tho widely
varying effect of time in individuals.
As a rule brunettes look older than
blondes of a corresponding age. As to
plumpness and the lack of it, fat may
be said to increase the apparent ago of
a girl under 25, and to lessen it in a
woman over that; anil the reason is
that slenderness is girlish as long as it
does not produce wrinkles, while ro
tundity keeps the skin taut and smooth.
"In no gathering of women strangers
to you could you guess the ages within
fivo years on the average," ne added,
"and in half the instances you would
bo ten years out of the way. I know
a woman of 35 with a son of 18, and
when seen together they are commonly
mistaken for brother and sister. Pop
ular ideas as to the ages of actresses
are extravagantly erroneous. I could
name several whom I know to be tre
mendously outraged by overestimates."
i
TOYS FOR THE LITTLE ONES.
Some of the Novelties Displayed for
Christmas in the Stores
Christmas toys and novelties for the
littlo. ones are displayed conspicuously
in all the shops. The improvements
since last year have been many, but lit
eral new novelties invented have
been very few. Mechanical toys seem
to lead, anil every child that can speak
wants a toy of some kind that either
moes or squeaks.
A large firm on Broadway, who have
an immense toy factory at Bridgeport.
Ct-, and who b'uy up all the patents of
new-fangled mechanical toys, have a
few ingenious novelties invented this
season.
"How are toys selling this season?"
asked a reporter of the head of the
firm.
"Oh, much better than I expected.
Tho run on mechanical toys is some
thing wonderful. Tho baby doll that
walks and speaks, says mamma and pa
pa at each mechanical theatrical stride,
eo like hot cakes. They have simply
een improved upon very mnch, but
not recently invented.
"The mechanical smoking man is a
late patent. It is a comical figure of a
man eleven inches high, seated on a
black walnut box and a small keg at
his elbow, with tho historical long pipe)
and mug of beer in his hand. Place a
cigarette in his pipe, and, when wound
up and the cigarette lighted, the figure
will draw andpuff the smoke in a per
fectly, natural manner. The motions
of the head and arm, and the action
while smokiug, are perfect These sell
rapidly to the small boys, ambitious to
learn now to smoke and use tobacco.
"Then there is the walk around.'
two figures that go cavorting around
something on the style of a go-as-you-plcaso
walking-match. This is new
and saleable
"But ono of onr latest hits is the
stump orator. It is a negro with a car
pet bag in one hand and an umbrella in
the other. Ho makes motions, pounds
the desk in front of him with the um
brella, and assumes positions of appeal,
entreaty, fierceness and humor such as
tho orators of the day do when speak
ing. We paid a good deal to tho in
ventor and do not regret it The dog
cart with the dude in ltdrivinga pranc
ing horse will be put in the show-window
for the first time this season. By
winding it up, away it goes until it runs
down. The bear that walks about snap
ping his jaws cost a lot of time and
money to perfect.
"Ah! here is something," continued,
the toy man, "wL'ich fires the young
American heart and sells splendidly.
The idea is not new but the modus op
erandi is the work of a genius. It is
our Home Guards. You see here are
thirty-eight wood soldiers, lithograph
ed in bright colors. A platform ot
which they are is supplied with woo
pins, and aa the eoldiors and pirn ar
immoveable the soldiers can be formcu
into an endless variety of positions
and when so formed can be made to
march and counter-march with the ut
most precision, in single or double file,
by companies, columns, battalions or
hollow squares.
"The Donnybrobk Fair toy is a re
cent invention. It is called 'Shoot the
hat.' A native of the Emerald Isle sits
under a ball suspended by an elastic
cord. You take the ball and try to
knock his hat off without knocking
over the figure. It is as difficult to do
as winning hats on election bets, and 1
ought to know, for I lost only seven."
N. Y. Mail and Express.
And She Rose Up.
It was coolly planned and deliberate
ly executed in cold blood. They gat by
the fire, and as he perused his paper
she was busy with thoughts of Christ
inas. By and by he waked up anr,
asked:
"Did any parcels for me come up to
day?' "No, dear," she replied, as her face
grew white as snow. "Have you been
buying anything?"
"No, nothing much. I happened in
at Blank's this afternoon, and, as he
was selling out his slippers at cost, I
bought me three pairs. Guess I'll be
fixed for the next ten years to come."
"You bought slippers?" she gasp
ed, as she pressed her hand upon her
heart.
"Yes, and Dash came to the door as
I was going past, and asked me in to
tako a look at his stock of dressing
gowns."
"And and "
"And I bought me a couple. Rather
handy garments, you know, and these
are something extra nice."
"Do mean to tell me that vou went
and"
"Why, dear, how you tremble," he
interrupted. "Yes, I bought two of
them, and when Dash happened to
mentiou that I ought to have a smok
ing cap, twelve new shirts, and a
smoking set and cane, I told him to go
ahead and send them up." I'll order a
new silk hat, wristlets, gloves, sleeve
buttons, and six neckties to-morrow,
and then I guess I'll be provided for.
Come and kiss your old hubby."
But she didn t. She rose up and
gasped and rushed out of the room
with tearful eyes and clenched teeth.
m i m
Rules for Every Day Use.
Never dispute with a tax-collector,
unless yon have a receipt.
Never light with a bigger man than
you, unless he has his hands tied.
Remember how often you forget the
poor; forget how often you remember
them.
Brighten your friend's face with some
act of kindness. To a man who hasn't
had his supper, a new dollar is about
the brightest thing, if you have one
handy.
Don't steal monex from the widow to
give to the church.
Don't show your i .ristmas presents
to a fellow that ha-.i t ;ot anv.
During the 300 years between A. D.
14 and 313 the Roman Empire had fifty
seven rulers. Of these twenty-three
were assassinated, one was poisoned by
his wife, three were killed by their own
roldicrs, live killed themselves, one was
strangled by his mistress, one was cap
tured by the enemy and flayed alive,
several were killed in battle," ono was
drowned, ono died of plague, and two
or three were formally executed. Al
together the rulers of the empire would
not have made a promising field for
the operations of a life insurance com

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