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The citizen. (Honesdale, Pa.) 1908-1914, December 23, 1908, Image 3

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Names Noted In the News
6-
Tlie New Comman
dant at West Point.
The Special Chinese
Commissioner, Tnntf
Shao Yi. and Prince
Tsal Fn.
Two Eminent Divines
Who Figured Con
spicuously In the
Council of the
Churched of Christ
In America.
I
WASHINGTON LETTER i
Special Correspondence. !
Washington has nn innovation in the
weather service line.
redestrians along Pennsylvania ave
nue have noticed a boothllkc structure
nt the intersection of Pennsylvania
avenue arid E street, almost opposite
the new District building. They have
wondered what manner of building It
is and for what purpose It was placed
there.
Officially the little cast iron building
Farm and
II. C. HAND, President.
W. 11. HOLMES, Vice Pres.
II. S. SALMON, Cashier.
,V. .1. WAKD, Ass't Cashier
We want you to understand the reasons for the ABSOLUTE SECUIIIT
of this Hank. J
STONE HITCHING POST.
ft
has
AJOK FItED-
12 KICK W.i
SIBLEY, -who
just been ap
pointed comman
dant of the United
States Military acad
emy at West Point,
relieves Colonel Hob
ert I. Ilowze, who'
is detailed as lieu
tenant colonel of the
Porto Itlco regiment
of infantry. . lie Is
one of the best dis
ciplinarians in the
regular army and is considered nn au-
thdrlty in matters respecting military
tralttlng generally. The bead of the
apadeuiy is the superintendent, but the
i Js known as a "meteorological kiosk,"
I but in plainer English It Is a down
town automatic weather station. The
station was erected by Professor
The observance of a recent Sunday I Charles F. Marvin under the direction
as a day In the interest of Christian of Professor Willis L. Moore, chief of
unity by the Federal Council of the . ihe United States weather bureau, and
Churches cf Christ liy America, in scs-1 is outfitted with meteorological Instrn
slon in Philadelphia, directs attention mcnts of up to date pattern and ready
to the progress made toward unity, orjto convey weather Information to the
at least friendly co-operation, between 1 general public.
MAJOB SIBIXT.
the churches. Co-operation and com
bination and substantial unity In the
work of uplifting humanity arc grad
ually taking the place of the old time
rivalry between the denominations.
The executive committee of the Fed
eral council Issued a call to the sev
eral Christian bodies affiliated in the i
movement In behalf of the observance
A Meteorological Kiosk.
The Instruments In the shelter com-1
prise a thermograph to automatically i
record the street temperature, ther
mometers to give the maximum nnd
minimum temperatures lu a given pe
riod of time, a hygrometer, which
shows the amount of humidity In the
air: n standard thermometer and an
of the day In the interest of unity , automatic rain gauge, which registers
among Christians, and the appeal was
widely heeded. One of the features
of the observance of the day In Phila
delphia was an Interdenominational
. . . . . , nuifinf in titn intAFMr nr iniwii nnn
nnnsini ill- nnn 1 r i a mno amn i iv iiiik ... ..... . . , - .
Asrwwlnltr Itntwirtanl nt nn tnaflhiHnn tDO onurcll, WHICH IWllCaiea a marKCU
of this kind that it be held by an officer increase in me syrapainy ikiwciu mc , out may turougii me lour windows
of discretion. 1 church and the worklngman. i read the Instruments, the weather map
There are thirty-two religious bodies . and the forecast cards.
In affiliation with the Federal Council
on a dial the amount of rain that has
fallen in a certain period.
By means, of the outdoor weather
station every man who wishes may be
his own weather observer. The public
Is not permitted to enter the kiosk.
A Device Which Will Last a Century
If Well Made.
A country place muse have a hitch
ing post at the side or In front of the '
house, else thoughtless callers will
hitch their horses to the shade trees or
to the fence. From Us very nature It
Is difficult to make a hitching post
look attractive on a lawn, but some
thing will bo
gained if it can
be kept from look
in decidedly unattractive.
A wooden post
Is an Invitation to
a horse's teeth.
Iron posts can be
used, but "these
arc more or less
expensive and are
not readily secur
ed except In the
large cities. A
stone 'post is at
tractive, but ex
pensive. A "made"
stone post, how
ever, is both lnex-
WAYNE COUNTY SAVINGS BANK
HONBSDALB, PA.,
HAS A CAPITAL OF
AND SURPLUS AND PROFITS OF
MAKING ALTOGETHER
8100.(100.0(1
355,000. 0(?
455,000.00
KVEKY HOLLA II of which must be lost before any depositor can lose a PENNY
It lias conducted a growing and successful business for over Ji5 years, serving
an increasing number of customers with lidelitv and satisfaction.
Its cash funds arc protected by MOHEKN 'STEEL VAULTS.
All of these things, coupled with conservative management. Insured
!y the ("AltKKUL PKKSOXAI, ATTENTION constantly elven the
Hank's affairs by n notahly able Hoard of Directors assures the patrons
of that fUl'ISKMK SAKKTY which Is the prime essential of a eood
Hank.
Total Assets, - - - $2,733,000.00
ear deposits may he made by mail, -a
. " DIRECTORS
11. :. HANI),
A. T. SKA Itl, K.
T. 11. C'l.AHK.
CHAS. .T.SMITH,
II.J.COMiKK.
V. K. SUYDAM,
V. B. HOLMES
K. P. KIMBLE
H. S. SALMON
FIG. 1 SECTIONAL
VIEW OP POST.
Tang Shao YL high commissioner of
the Chinese empire to the United
States, who was recently received by
President UooscvclL is a Chinaman
who Is pretty well Americanized. It
was because of his familiarity with
American Institutions that he was
chon-ed hv the Phlnpsj enrprnmont
wiiu oeanuK 10 lue ueuu 01 me unit
ed States government the message of
gratitude from China at the remission
of the sum which the oriental power
had expected to pay by way of indem
nity for Injuries to American interests
In the course of the Boxer insurrection
of 1000. In the suit of the high com
missioner are several Interesting per
Bonages, among them Prince Tsal Fu
and Chung Mun Yew. Commissioner
Tang Shao Yi Is nt present director
genera! of railways of the Chinese em
pire, high commissioner of customs and
a member of the grand council, the
body which really governs the great
nation known as the Chinese people.
He was educated chiefly In the United
States, having been sent to this coun
try by his government in 1874 as a
boy of twelve. He attended school In
Hartford. Conn., nnd later studied at
Columbia university, where he was in
attendance when recalled by his gov
ernment, no has served as nmbassa
dortp Tibet, minister to England and
mandarin of a Manchurian province.
Cjhung Mun Yew was once a member
of She Yale class of '83 and coxswain
of fits crew. The Yale Alumni Weekly
says he was a very competent cox
swain, juu grauuaiu cuucu 01 ine
crew. It seems, had a theory that for
oarsmen, as for mules, forcible exhor
tation was Indispensable. "Jimmy,"
he said, "you'll have to swear at those
men." The Alumni "Weekly tells the
rest:
Now, Chung Mun Yew abjured pro
fanity. After further commands from
the coach, however, he did get out a
formula like this: "One, give way
tarn! Two, head up, pull tarn!" Xo
t-,i wind uuu luai turn uui wo
of the Churches of Christ In America, ! kiosks will be established In other clt
nll of national extent. Together they i ies should the one here prove to be
represent nearly 18,000,000 adherents. successful, as It is believed It will.
pensive, and easy to construct.
Dig a sauarc hole in the irround at 1
It Is wild similar automatic weather tne desired point for locating the hitch-
The council results from the Inter-
51
photos. copvniGMTrn
ritlNOi: TSAI FU AND TANG SHAO TO.
board with laughter, so "Munny" was
left to his own wav. because ho was
otherwise the most promising cox
uwaln that ever had held the ropes for
Tale, And his own way was a 'revela
tion, lie made a scientific study of
steering a shell, and It was said that
he could demonstrate mathematically
the effect of every extra pound pull on
either larboard or starboard side of the
boat
nnv. "on. william n. noBr.r.TS atto jiir.nr
ItKV. 1)11. O. W. WHITAKEU.
church conference held in New York
in 1003. In the three years which
have elapsed since then thirty-two re
ligious bodies have formally ratitle.l
and adopted the plan of federation de
vised by the conference and appointed
delegates to the council. The presi
dent of the council during these im
portant years at the beginning of the
movement has been the Uev. William
II. Hoberts, 1). I)., LL. D., of the
Presbyterian church. He presided at
the opening sessions of the council.
Dr. Huberts was formerly moderator
of the general assembly of the Pres
byterian church. Prominent in the
proceedings at Philadelphia was the
venerable bishop of the Episcopal dio
cese of Pennsylvania, the Right Itev. O.
W. Whitaker, D. D LL. D.
I'nlon betwocn Christian denomina
tions has not usually been attended
with a great deal of success except In
the foreign mission fields. There un
ion is more easily accomplished be
cause denominational differences, so
far as the native churches are con
cerned, are neither old nor deep. In
China, Japan, India and Korea prac
tical unions have been accomplished
between churches of similar funda
mental faiths. In the establishment of
educational nnd other Institutions on
the foreign fields many denominations
have jolued, ono university in China,
for example, being supported by Ilap
tlst, Methodist, Congregational, Quak
er and Anglican missions.
Most of the movements which begin
with organic union of denominations
as their object end lu the establish
ment of federations, of which the Fed
eral council is the largest In tho
world. Federation organizations are
advisory only, whereas n lody result
ing from organic union would have
legislative functions.
In Canada n union between Presby
terians, Methodists and Congregation-,
ullsts seemed likely for a time to bo,
effected, but leaders now believe that
federation alone can be accomplished.
In this Canadian Baptists and Episco
palians will probably join. A similar
movement In Australia promises a sim
ilar result. The proposed union in this ,
country between Congregatlonallsta, 1
United Brethren nnd Methodist Prot
estants hnn heon fnnnd to he imnnssl- I
ble of accomplishment, and a new
movement whereby Methodists, Meth
odist Protestants and United Breth
ren seek union Is under consideration.
National Art Federation.
Tentative plans are being made to
form in this city a national art fed
eration to Include within its fold about
300 societies composed of painters,
sculptors, architects, artisans and oth
ers having artistic alms who have
been invited to send delegates to the
proposed convention. The exact date i coating of cement
has not yet been fixed, but it Is be
lieved the convention will be called
sonic time in January.
During the convention there will be
on exhibition in the Corcoran Gallery
of Art a very complete collection of
the works of Augustus St. Gandens
and a national exhibition of American
paintings.
For a National University.
That Washington, as the seat of the
federal government, also should be
the seat of a great national university,
at which all the states should be rep
resented on an advisory council, was
advocated here at the closing session
of the thirteenth annual meeting of
the National Association of State Uni
versities. President Edward J. James of the
University df Illinois, as spokesman
for a bill now pending in congress to
provide for such a university, won
over many of his fellow college presi
dents In support of the movement.
The purpose of the proposed university
is to provide for the higher instruction
aud training of men and women for
posts of Importance and responsibility
In the public service of the federal
government or of states and for such
professions as may require a higher
training. The bill provides for the ap
propriation of $500,000 with which to
establish the initial equl;"ne!it of the
university.
Boxed With the President.
J. J. Parker, an amateur athlete of
St. Paul, who boxed with itoosevelt
on a ranch twenty-seven years ago,
called on the president a few days ago.
Mr. Parker brought a letter from
Frank U. Kellogg, the antitrust law
yer, but It was unnecessary, for the
president recognized his caller as soon
as he espied him "as the man with
whom he boxed several times on a
western ranch.
"I called merely to pay respects and
was cordially received," said Mr. Par
ker. "I don't want a thing in the
world In politics, but the president
gave me a picture of each of the three
younger children, and I prize thorn
more than any otlice."
Dcgs Go Unmuzzled.
On Dec. 1(1 next the dog muzzling
order of the commissioners will ex
pire, and then the several thousand
canine pets In this city will have an
opportunity to run at largo without
any strapping or wiring about their
Ing post about one and a half feet I
square and deep enough to reach the j
"frost line." Fill the bottom with .
small stones and cement. On this set
a stout cedar post with a strong iron
ring In the top. Fill in about the poet
with tho small stones and cement to
the surface of the
ONLY$2.oo
FOR ALL !
ground. Thencov
, cr the post to the
top with a thick
not less than
two and a half
1 n c h c 8 at any
point building it
up In -the square
shape shown In
Fig. 2.
To give the ce
ment a stronger,
uoki upon uie v
wooden post drive
largo nails Into rics. n Tim rosT
the wood aud tixished.
leave the heads projecting an inch or
more, as is suggested In Fig. 1. The
cement may bo mixed one part Port
land cement to two parts sharp sand.
Do not use the post until it has had
time to dry and harden thoroughly.
The cement and small stones about the
base should form a solid body that wa
ter cannot enter. The stones are used
to save cement. The outside surface
of the finished part should be smooth,
with corner edges a little rounded to
prevent chipping.
By a recent arrangement with the
able to offer
publishers we are
The New York Tribune Farmer
The "Human Life"
and THE CITIZEN
FOR ONE YEAR FOR $2.00
THE TIMBUNK I'AliMKIS isa thoroughly practical, helpful. m-to-clate
Illustrated national weekly. Special pases for Horses, Cattle, Sheep, etc..
and most clahsrate and reliable market reports.
Ilr. C. 1). Snind. tluhi't known veterinary surgeon In America, writes
regularly for THK TltlBUNK FA KM KB. thoroughly covering the breeding,
cure and leedlng nt ll domestic uniimtls, and his artic les meet the needs of
every practical working farmer, nnd Interest every man 'or woman in the
city or town who owns n horse or cow.
The "Human Life" isa monthly magazine with the world's hest contributors.
Sample copies of the three pubalictions
sent on application to
THE CITIZEN,
Honesdale, Pa.
Briefs For the Farm Home.
Tho second national corn exposition
will be held at Omaha In December.
As a special feature extensive educa
tional exhibits by a number of agri
cultural colleges and experiment sta
tions are contemplated, these to be of
such a character as to give visitors an
idea of the work carried on by these
institutions.
A disease, seemingly a bacterial
giowtii, has been noticed on chic-kens
which produces lumps on the comb
and nt the base of the bill. Washing
the heads of the fowls with a sat
urated solution of boric acid gave re
lief. Ucsults of experiments in making
butter from sweet cream is an Idea
In a report to the Dairymen's associa
tion of Quebec. It is claimed that the
process is just as advantageous as
that with ripened cream aud that the
butter made from sweet cream is
equally good when fresh and keeps
good longer than butter from cream
spontaneously fermented.
Corn to make a pound of pork is dis
cussed by a writer In the Ilreedor's
Gazette. A pen of eleven Duroc-Jcr-seys
fed sixty-two days galued SOU
pounds and required C.71 pounds corn
nor pound of gain. A lot of fifteen Po-
MEANS
MiUCH
i
I
f
l.iiid.riiiii:is fid tliirtv.flvf" diivs train-
jaws and without fear of molestation,. 5S5 pounds and required -l.tMi pounds
on the part of the dog catchers
This will not only be a welcome day
to tho many owners of dogs, but to
the dog catchers as well. During the
term of the official edict the latter
have spent busy days and nights cor
ralling clogs without muzzles. Since
the order went Into effect more than
fiOO dogs were Impounded for not hav
ing muzzles. Many of thePse were li
censed dogs and wore the oificlai dog
tags about their necks.
Firecrackers Tabooed.
Regarding the use of fireworks and
other explosives in celebration of In
dependence day as u "barbaric fash
inn," tho commissioners of the Dis
trict have drafted n regulation to pro
hibit the practice. .Tho commissioners
think July -1 can be celebrated In a
more fitting manner than by the use
of fireworks, and the regulation is In
tended principally to prevent tho
largo number of deaths and accidents
occasioned by fireworks, as well as to
do away with tho racket and din oc
casioned by their explosion. ,
The regulation provides that no fire
cracker, squib or other fireworks of
of corn per putmd of gain. A little
Eklmmilk was fed once a day in addi
tion to the corn, and the pigs had the
ran of a pasture.
Sugar is said by a contributor In tho
Journal of Agriculture, Paris, to bo
good for fattening sheep. In a test
covering eighty-four days the average
dally gain per head on a ration con
taining sugar was 'J02 grams as com-
To the level-headed young
man, a bank account,
added to a determination to
make it larger, means
much. The names of many
such are enrolled on
our books and the number
is steadily increasing.
Are you among the number?
FARMERS' and MECHANICS' BANK.
Honesdale, Pa.
"The Era of New Mixed Paints !
to be of most excellent quality
A disease commonly known as swoll
en head of turkeys Is described In tho
Journal of Agricultural Science. The
most characteristic symptom Is an ex
tensive swelling about the head, which
becomes so enlarged that the birds are
unable to see. The swelling Is due to
on accumulation of gelatinous sub
stance in the Infraorbital cavity. This
Bwelllng may disappear iu a short time
or may persist for several months.
Tho swellings contain n cheesy, foul
smelling material, and death may tnko
place without regard to the apparent
severity of the disease. The lesions
,Tlns year ojilmis with a duluge of now mixed paints. A con
dition brought about by our enterprising dealers to get some kind
of a mixed paint that would supplant CHILTON'S MIXED
PAINTS. Their comnounds. beint: new and beavilv advertised.
pared with 127 grams per day on a ra- ' lay r,;u ;l saie witi, tle umvary.
tion without it. When slaughtered tho , J J
llcsh of the sugar fed sheen was found ...
SiSrCHIU
ulsJADWIN'S PHARMACY
There are reasons for tho pre-eminence of CHILTON PAINTS:
1st No ono can mix abetter mixed paint.
2d Tho painters declaro that it works easily and has won
dorful covering qualities.
3d Chilton stands back of it, and willagreo to repaint, at his
own expense, every surface painted with Chilton Paint that
proves defective.
4th Those who have used it are perfectly satisfied with it,
and recommend its use to others.
any kind shall be sold and delivered, tare confined to tho head except for nn
discharged or set off in Washington or
the fire limits. On occasions of pub
tic celebration and exhibition fire
works may be discharged through spe
cial permit of the commissioners.
GAEL SOHOFIELD.
occasional distension of the coca,
pacilll related to tho diphtheria bacil
lus arc frequently found In tho exu
dation, but no organism has been defl-'
nitely shown to be the primary cause
of the disease.
SUBSCRIBE FOR .
"THE CITIZEN" ThpSKd &" per'
The CITIZEN Publishing Co.

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