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The citizen. (Honesdale, Pa.) 1908-1914, October 11, 1912, Image 2

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PAGE TWO
THE CITIZEN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER xx, 1912.
O
Scientist Has
To Shift
Would Build Jetty to Divert
Its Meeting With Lab
rador Current.
IP we may credit a drop sen scien
tist It will cost lesa tlfhn $100,
000,000 to ninUo Siberia n sum
mer resort, start Ice famines In
Lnurador, give Scotland an all day
Hummer, with a temperature like Ja
pan's, change the cllmato of tho At
lantic const to one like that of south
ern California, melt all tho ice on and
nrouud the north pole and open it to
truck gardening. To do so will be
cheaper, much easier and twice as
quickly dono as to build the Panama
canal.
AH that is necessary to accomplish
these results, some of which would re
sult from tipping the old earth side
ways, Is to build a riprap Jetty about
"00 miles long across the shoals ex
tending eastward from Newfoundland,
near Cape Race. That would stop the
Labrador current, whose cold Is capa
ble of making 2,000.000 tons of Ice
every second, from running right Into
the gulf stream, whoso heat Is equal
to tho burning of 2,000.000 tons of
coal every minute. They moot now
on tho Grand banks, where tho water
is only about 200 feet deep. The gnlf
stream Is split up and spreads out over
millions of squaro leagues of the At
lantic. If such a jetty wero built the Lab
rador current coming down from tho
nrctle would bo turned eastward and
would be sunk so far when the gulf
stream met It that tho latter warm
blue river of the ocean would pass
over the great cold river from the
north pole. Tho warm gulf Ftream
would continue in almost undiminish
ed volume to the northward, and tho
Labrador current would run a mile
deep through tho great depths of tho
Atlantic, making the torrid zone about
the equator cooler, whllo tho gulf
stream would requlro only threo
months to molt every Inch of ice
around tho pole.
Scientific Men Interested.
Fantastic though this may appear,
it has received the closest lnterost
from the foremost men of practical
science in America and other coun
tries. Every detail of tho astounding
enterprise has been worked out by
Carroll Livingston Rlkcr of New York,
who built in 187-1 the first mochanlcal
refrigerating warehouse ever con
structed and devised and constructed
tho refrigerating plant on board tho
steamship Celtic, which carried to Liv
erpool the first cargo of American
dressed meats ever landed there.
lie designed and constructed the
first Ico and cold air refrigerating ma
chlne ever constructed. He was called
visionary when he proposed each of
these, which have proved pioneers in
the great industrial equipment of the
world.
When the federal government decid
ed to make Washington, the national
capital, sanitary by dredging the Po
tomac Mr. Itlkcr designed and built
tho largest and roost powerful pump
ing dredge ever constructed np to that
time. It pumped up a solid block of
jgraulte weighing 1,300 pounds as if it
were n pebble, lifting it thirty feet
nbove the water, and snatched a big
pteel safe from tho river ooze with the
same ease. Then he built wharfs and
Jetties from Bar Harbor to tho Mag
dalcna river and salved tho steam
ships St. Paul, Otranto nnd A. A.
Shaw when they went on the beaches
in famous wrecks. He wns one of thn
American government experts who ex
amined the dredging for tho Gatun
dam, at Panama, no surveyed Ha
vana hnrbor for the Spanish govern
ment nnd prepared tho system for dis
posal of Havana sewage.
His record Is that of a visionary, and
HIGH PRICES IN BABYLON.
Letter 3,400 Years Old Telle About
Them.
Letters written from 1G0O to 400
B. C. In cuneiform on bricks have lxKn
translated by Dr. P. C. Elslen of the
Chicago university, professor of Old
Testnment interpretations. A youth of
Babylon in 1500 B. C. kicked on his
boarding house fare. Ho took n lump
of clay nnd cnrefully Inscribed tho fol
lowing: "To my father, from ZImrl
Eramma May the gods Shamash nnd
Mnrduk keep thee nllve forever. May
nil go well with the. I nm stationed
In Bur-Sin on the cunal Bltmlsklrlm.
Tho house whero I live there Is no
food which I am ablo to eat Here Is
the third part of spealcel which I havo
pealed up nnd forward to thee. Send
mo for this money fresh fish and other
food. Tho cost hero Is high."
This love letter has dato -100 B. C:
"To BIbeya from Glmll-Mnrduk May
Shamash and Marduk grant thee, for
my sake, to live forover. I wrlto this
to Inquire after thy health. I nm now
settled In Babylon, but I nm In great
anxiety because I havo not seen thee.
Send news when thou wilt como."
Pin Jackets For Suffragettes.
London suffragette demonstrators
are experimenting with quilted Jack
ets In which thousands of pins arc im
bedded, points outward. They afford
considerable protection nnd mako the
wearers dangerous to handle.
O-
a Plan I
Gulf Stream!
Advantages That Would Ac
crue $190,000,000 Cost
of the Project.
the respectful interest nccordod him
by his worldwldo correspondents on
the Great bnnk Jotty project Indicates
that ho Is known to tho scientific world
in no undignified aspect
Details of the Scheme.
In a book, "Power and Control of
the Gulf Stream," Mr. Itlkcr dlscussoa
the problem of preserving to the uni
verse the benevolent warmth of the
gulf stream for tho destruction of the
sterilizing cold of the arctic. He goes
into details to prove thnt tho Groat
Bank Jetty will do what he clnlms for
it by preventing tho destructive meet
ing of the great frigid and warm ocean
streams. He shows that tho matcrlnl
for the Jetty I" ready nt hand, that tho
Labrador cu.i-ent will itself build up
with Its sand scoured from Its arctic
course the barrier to Its conflict with
the gulf stream, and ho has exact fig
ures and other data for nil tho amaa-
I lng results he declares must inevitably
follow the construction of that ocean
dam.
Ocenn currents, he recites, controJ
the distribution of tropical solar heat,
the waters heated alxmt tho equator
bearing nway townrd the poles th
hoat there absorbed and modifying
lands near which they run. The great
warm flood of the gulf stream, forty
miles in width and 1,200 feet deep,
with a temperature abovo 73 degrees
P., Is like a hot wnter pipe warmlmj
the Atlantic coast and ndjolnlng re
gions ns it flows northwnrd.
Tho Labrador current, 250 miles wide
nnd 200 feet deep, sweeps down from
the arctic with n temperature below 32
degrees, or freezing. It meets and
robs the gulf stream of its heat in the
meeting on tho Grand bnnk. The shoal
on the Great bnnk where the cold nnd
warm world arteries meet Is n princi
pal cauRO of their neutralization of
each other's effects.
Jetty Would Divert Meeting.
Mr. Rlker declares that the Jotty
would divert this meeting at great
depths to the enstward of the Grand
bank nnd by the time tho Labrador
current wns running there it would be
taking n course with Its heavy saline
cold n mile below the surface, permit
ting the warmer, lighter and less sa
line gulf stream to sweep nbove It, car
rying n message of warmth nnd sun
light nnd fertility to tlio snbvbound.
Ice clad acres of the polar circle.
Even nfter Its destructive conflict on
the Grand bank with the Lnbrndor cur
rent the gulf stream now survives and
rolls onward, giving to the British Isles
and northern Europe tho wnrmth with
out which Scnndlnnvln would be unin
habitable and England as sterile as
Labrador.
No more icebergs in tho steamship
lanes, no more of such fogs ns now pre
vail about the meeting of the cold nnd
wnrm currents, storms reduced to a
minimum, nnd the whole of eastern
North America n garden of paradise
with no great cold or heat are some of
the results Mr. Itlkcr foresees from
building tho Jetty. Capo Hntterns, he
believes, -would disappear through th
Increased speed of tho gulf stream,
which he estimates would flow closer
to the Jersey coast nnd Incidentally re
deposit nlong tho coast about 0,000,000
acres of land.
The melting of the arctic Ice cap, he
estimates, would shift the equalizing
balance of the globe, nnd tho then pre
ponderating weight of the antnrctic lco
cap would mako whnt Is now the north
polo point shift toward northern Eu
rope, with the result of producing n
nlghtless summer in the nren of Scot
land without n dayless winter.
A A A AAA AAA A A AAA AAA A AAA AAA
FOREIGN NAMES FOR FORTS.
Two at Panama Called After De Les
teps and Amador.
A request has been received by the
war department that the fortifications
to defend the Panama canal bo named
after distinguished Latin Americans
as n sign of the Interest the Latin
American countries as well as the
United States havo In tho now high
way. While the question of naming tho
forts hns not been definitely disposed
of nnd most of them will probably bo
tinmed nfter Amerlcnn generals, two
of them already have been named
after foreigners, one of theso n Latin
American, Dr. Amador, tho first presi
dent of the Panama republic. Tho
other will bo named Fort Do Lesseps,
after tho French engineer who plan
ned tho canal and superintended ex
cavations under tho original French
company.
Windows Made of Maps.
Celebrated old maps of tho world,
reproduced as glass transparencies In
tho windows of tho American Geo
graphical society building, New York,
aro now being nsod by tho socloty for
permanent window decorations. Forty-two
maps seloctod to represent the
development of mapmaklng from the
first to the. seventeenth century are
shown In the windows of tho first
floor.
BABY IS TO BE
A "PERFECT WOMAN."
She Was Able to Swim When Eight
Months Old and Walked at Ten.
To become the world's most perfect
woman physically Is tho future map
ped out for Margaret Terry Hudson
Brant, two years and two months old,
)y her father, IMchnrd Grant, director
it track athletics of the University of
Minnesota. Ever slnco she wns three
weeks old the baby hns been training
for tho place she Is expected to fill.
Systematic exercise under the careful
supervision of her father, who himself
wns formerly n track star nt Yale and
who hns "made" many Minnesota nth
Ictcs, Is ns much n part of little Mnr
gnrct's daily life as tho food she rats.
The little girl, who has Just begun
to talk, delights In her exercises. The
more common of these Include n wand
drill to Rtrengthen nnd develop her
chest muscles; oxerclses on a horizontal
bar, consisting of n cane held In the
baud of her father, to which she can
hang for forty-five seconds, swinging
back nnd forth whllo holding to her fa
ther's finger, and reclining on tho floor
nnd rising without touching her hnnds
to tho floor.
The exercises have already hnd won
derful results. Some of the ways In
which Mnrgaret diners from other two-yoar-olds
are those: Every part of her
body Is perfectly formed. She has a
normal chest measurement of nineteen
Inches and nn expansion of nearly two
Inches. Her biceps muscles measure
five Inches. She could walk when she
wns ten months old. She could swim
when she wns eight months old. She
weighs twenty-eight pounds, without
an ounce of fnt on her little body. She
enn wnlk up three flights of stairs nnd
back without stopping.
NEW PARCELS POST STAMPS.
Larger Than Ordinary Issues and of
Characteristic Designs.
When the new parcels post system
becomes operative on Jan. 1 twelve
new stamps will be placed on sale In
postolllces for affixing to packages.
Theso stamps will bo larger than the
ordlnnry postage stamps. Arrange
ments already made by Postmaster
General Hitchcock for their engraving
nnd manufacture provide for a series
of nn even dozen so distinctive ns to
color nnd size as to prevent possible
confusion with other stamps.
The twelve stamps will be issued in
three perle of designs. In the first
series modern methods of transport
ing mnll will be Illustrated. The mall
car of a railway train will be shown
on one stamp, nn ocenn steamer on an
other, the third will havo a motor
wagon of the typo used In the postal
service, and the fourth will show a
mall carrying aeroplane. Postal em
ployees will bo shown at work In tho
second series. Tho figures will be
those of railway mall clerks, postofflco
clerks, city letter carriers and rural
free delivery enrrlers. The third se
ries will represent four industrial
zones, showing the principal sources
of products that will bo transported
most extensively by parcels post
By Dec. 1 the stamiw will probably
bo ready for distribution to the 00,000
postofflees in the country.
U. S. DRINKS MOST BEER.
Leads In Consumption and Production,
Say Belgians.
Uncle Sam Is the champion beer
drinker of the world. At lenst be pro
duces more than any other country, ac
cording to statistics sent to the depart
ment of state by Alexander Helngnrt
ner, Amerlcnn consul nt Liege, Belgi
um. The statistics set forth thnt the
world's production of beer in 1010 was
8,003,754,705 gallons. It Is estimated
that at least 7,025,000,000 gallons were
consumed.
Basing his statements on these statis
tics, Mr. neingartner says:
"The United States occupied first
place among tho beer producing coun
tries of the world, with an output of
1,903,010,317 gallons. Germany was
second, with 1,703,COO,-100 gallons man
ufactured by 13,180 breweries, 4,783
Bavarian breweries producing 482,221,
8S2 gallons of this total. Great Brit
ain, with 1,479,352,280 gallons, ranked
third, nnd Austrla-IIungary was fourth.
"The manufacture of beer is nn impor
tant industry In Belgium, thero being
4,000 breweries In operation, nnd tills
country stood fifth ns to production In
1010, with 422,072,280 gallons, closely
followed by France, with 417,388,870
gallons. Russia's output In 1010 was
232,470,000 gallons. Next In order of
Importance, but with much smaller
quantities, came Denmark, Switzerland
and Sweden."
EGGS IN CONTEMPT.
Supreme Court to Decide What Con
stitutes Rottenness.
Tho supreme court must dccldo when
an egg Is bad. Just what constitutes
n rotten egg will bo decided by Chief
Justice White and his associates at nn
early day.
In enforcing tho pure footLlaw the
government seised 443 cases 6x eggs In
Now Jersoy put up by tho Seymour
Packing company on tho order of the
II. J, Keith company of Now York.
The packing company raised tho point
ns to how an egg was to bo determin
ed good or bad.
Dr. G. W. Btlles, bacteria expert of
tho bureau of chemistry, was called to
explain the method of passing upon
tho quality of an egg. no said that ho
counted the bacteria. Just how many
bacterid it takes to make a bad egg
bo supremo court will havo to say.
THIS
REAL PROGRESS
UNDER TAFT.
Many Progressive Measures
Put In Force.
THE WHOLE PEOPLE SERVED.
Express Companies Compelled to Re
duce Rates, Paroels Post Law En
acted and Other Notable Progressive
I Policies Made Effective by Taft
j Without Boasting and Noise.
Dispassionate Judges will accord to
the Taft administration the credit of
putting in forco moro measures of if
positively progrosslvo character than
any other administration since the
civil war. Not only have such meas
ures been numerous, but they havo
been of great and farreachlng impor
tance. President Taft has labored in
dcfatlgably to servo tho whole people,
and by means of his broad experience
nnd rare Judicial mind and having at
his command legal talent of the high
est order ho hns put his progressive
policies ono after another into valid
and practical legislation. This has
been dono without boasting and nolso.
Whethor vindicated or not nt the com
ing election, Mr. Tnft's work will stand
ns a chapter of achievement as bril
liant as It Is meritorious.
. Wo wish at this time to Invite atten
tion to two specific features of gov-
j crnmental progress. One consists of
tho Interstate commerco commission's
i investigation of tho express compa-
j nies, resulting In the recent report or
dering tho companies to reduco rates
I nnd institute sweeping reforms in vari-
jous directions. The other Is the en
actment of the Bourne parcels post bill,
! ono of tho most useful measures ever
put In forco In this country under any
administration. These two reforms,
taken in connection, will exert a pow
erful influence for a reduction of tho
cost of Uvlng.
Mr. Taft has been in complete sym
pathy with tho Interstate commerce
commission's inquiry into the express
business, a process consistent In nil re
spects with the administration's gen
eral policy of compelling big corpora
tions to squaro themselves with tho
law and the public interest Some of
thn more powerful corporations do not
J like that v'' but the Pul)1'c ousut
to Indorse it Tho enactment of a par
cels post law brings to fruition n plan
I that found Indorsement In the platform
I upon which tho president was elected.
Through the action of the senate the
Bourne bill, looking to n parcels serv
ice at the lowest practicable rates
within a given territory, was substi
tuted for the house bill with its flat
rnto provisions. The measure as pass
ed probably is not perfect nor should
the rates be regarded as permanent
Tho plan is experimental In certain re
spects. But we believe the principle
of tho act Is correct One of tho most
Important aspects of this measuro Is
Its bearing on the food situation. It
will givo consumers nnd producers a
new medium of direct contact Tho
interstate commerco commission's rul
ings respecting tho express companies
also mako special account of this prob
lem. The express companies aro re
quired to order their business in such
a manner as to givo quicker service
nnd lower rates on food products.
It is recognized by all economic In
vestigators that ono of tho greatest
problems related to tho cost of living
is that which has to do with the sys
tem of distribution. Express reforms
nnd tho parcels post will be of great
value In promoting prompter and
cheaper distribution of food products
especially, nnd nt tho samo time tho
scope of theso measures is so compre
hensive as to apply to nil classes of
merchandise. Production, too, should
bo greatly stimulated by tho influence
thus invoked.
Wo do not say thnt President Taft
deserves tho sole credit for these de
partures, but we clto them ns features
of nn administration that somo persons
would have us bellevo Is nonprogres
sive, when In reality they form a log
ical part of a great progressive epoch,
which opened with tho inauguration of
Mr. Taft and which, In the people's
patriotism and good sense, will bo con
tinued during four more years of tho
same courageous and ablo leadership.
More Work Than Workers.
To tho Editor of Tho World:
I have read your paper for about fif
teen years and during that time I havo
always found It very much on tho lev
el, but Just now I don't agree with
you on Wilson. 1 am a Republican,
and bavo been for moro than fifteen
years, so I am for Taft always. I will
answer why by taking up your adver
tising sheet of Sunday, Sept. 20.
That's tho answer. Can you or Mr.
Wilson tell mo, if bo Is elected, wheth
er you will hnvo moro pnges of help
wanted advertisements than you bad
on that day? Eight pages of help
wanted, femalo and male, and a HUM
two and one-half pages of situation!
wanted, male and femalel Don't you
think that means something?' Busi
ness must bo good in this little city.
Will it be better If Wilson Is electedl
I know It won't bo nearly as good and
you don't want to know It
H. O. RODDER.
New York. Oct 1.
New York World (Dem.), Oct 3.
A PPRAI8UJMENTS. Notice is giv
en that appralsoment of $300
to tho widows of tho following nam
od decedents havo boon filed In tho
Orphans' Court of Wayno county, and
will bo presontod for approval on
Monday, Oct. 28, 1912 viz:
John Bishop, H'aupack, porsonal.
Edwin F. Torroy, Honesdalo, per
sonal, Ira Ellsworth, Mnnchester, per
sonal. Chas. W. Orchard, Berlin, por
sonnl. Win. II. Allen, Clinton, personal.
Goorgo Moycr, Texas, porsonal.
Georgo W. Butterworth, Sterling,
personal.
W. J. BARNES, Clerk.
Honesdalo, Oct. 3, 1912.
EXECUTOR'S NOTICE,
Estate of
MATTHEW PARREL,
Lato of Honesdalo, Pa.
All persons Indobted to said es
tate aro notified to mako Immediate
payment to tho undersigned; and
thoso having claims against tho said
cstato aro notified to present them
duly attested, for settlement.
C. P. SEARLE, Ex.
Honesdalo, Pa., Oct. 8, 1912.
Sond Tho Citizen tho news.
ABSOLUTE SECURITY.
Wayne County
Savings Bank
HONESDALE, PA.,
1871 41 YEARS
BECAUSE we have been transacting a SUCCESSFUL
banking business CONTINUOUSLY since 1S71
and are prepared and qualified to renderVALU
ABLE SERVICE to our customers.
BECAUSE of our HONORABLE RECORD for FORTY
ONE years.
BECAUSE of SECURITY guaranteed by our LARGE
CAPITAL and SURPLUS of $550,000 00.
BECAUSE of our TOTAL ASSETS of 3,000,000.00.
BECAUSE GOOD MANAGEMENT has made us tho
LEADING FINANCIAL INSTITUTION of
Wayne county.
BECAUSE of these reasons we confidently ask you to
become a depositor.
COURTEOUS treatment to all CUSTOMERS
whether their account is LARGE or SMALL.
INTEREST allowed from the FIRST of ANY
MONTH on Deposits made on or before the
TENTH of tho month.
OFFICERS :
W. B. HOLMES, PRESIDENT. II. S. SALMON, Cashier.
HON. A. T. SEAIILE, Vice-President W. J. WARD, Asst. Cashier
DIRECTORS :
H. J. CONGER.
W. B. HOLMES,
C. J. SMITH.
H. S. SALMON.
T. B. CLARK,
E. W. OAMMELL
W. P. SUYDAM,
Carpenters
WANTED
APPLY
F. A. HAVENS & CO.
ON SITE
Honesdalo, Pa.
D. & H. CO. TlflE TABLE
In Effect Sopt.
A..M
SUN
P.M.
A.M.
A.M.
P.M.
SUN
8 30
10 00
10 00
10 00
4 30
... Albany ....
Blucbamton .
6 15
A.M.
10 30
2 15
12 30
.. Philadelphia..
3 15
4 051
7 10
8 00
4 45
6 35
12 30
1 19
7 00
.Wllkes-Harre.
....Scrantou....
7 60
P.M.
A.M.
P.M.
P.M.
A.M.
Lv
S 40
8 60
5 51
8 45
8 65
8 6y
9 12
9 IB
6 25
635
6 39
2 05
2 15
2 10
Carbondale....
...Lincoln Avenue..
Whites.... ..
Qulcley
Farvlew
Canaan
.... Lake Lodora .-
Waymart
Keene
Steene
...... Pronip ton
Fortenla
...... fielyvllle
Houesdale
6 OS
6 51
6 67
2 31
237
2 43
6 11
6 17
6 23!
8 24
7 03
7 09
7 12
7 IB
9 29
U 32
2 49
2 62
6 28
O 32
V SI
2 67
8 35J
8 30
9 43
7 21
2 69
3 03
0 30
6 13
7 25
7 29
732
736
B 47
3 07
B 60
9 65
3 10
3 16
6 DO
IN THE COURT OF COMMON
PLEAS OF WAYNE COUNTY.
Homor LoveraBS v. Daisy M. Lovelass
To DAISY M. I.OVKf.AHS: onnro here
by required to appear In the said Court oa
the fourth Monrtny In October nnxt. to ans
wer tho complaint exhibited to tho ludso of
said court by H. Ixvclnss your husband
In the cause above stated. or In default thnrc
of n decree of divorce ns nrnyed for In said
complaint may be nyulonyHliistyou In your
absence. FRANK 0. KIM11LK, Sheriff.
aeario Ac Salmon, Attorneys.
Honesdalo, Pa., Sept. 26, 1912.
78w4.
NOTICE TO BIDDERS.
Tho Board of School Directors of
tho School District of South Canaan
Township, Wayno county, Pa., will
sell for ensh to tho highest and best
bidder a certain lot of land contain
ing two acres and eleven perches,
situate In said township of South
Canaan, fronting tho public road
leading from South Canaan to
Honesdalo and adjoining tho Metho
dist Episcopal church property.
Bids aro Invited and will bo receiv
ed until October 31st, 1912, and will
bo opened and awarded at tho meet
ing of tho schood board on that date.
mo uoaru resorves tno right to ro
ioct anv and nil hlda nrrnonorl
Bids sealed nnd In writing may bo
sent to tno undersigned.
LESLIE M. CEASE, See'y.
Way mart, Pa. 80w3
OF SUCCESS 1912
J. W. PARLET,
P. P. KIMBLE,
A. T. SEARLE,
HONESDALE BRANCH
29, 1912.
P.M,
p.m.:
A.M
I. M.
A.M.
SUN
SUN
2 00
12 40
11 00
11 00
oo
8 45
4 09
7 45
2 65
8 13
8 12
7 45
8 12
P.M.
10 03
9 12
A.M
P.M.
9 35
8 45,
7 2!U
12 65
12 05
6 30
Ar
A.M,
P.M,
P.M,
P.M
P.M.
8 05
754
7 60
7 39
733
7 25
7 19
7 17
1 35
1 25
6 60
11 25
8 27
8 17
8 13
8 00
1 64
7 47
7 41
7 39
7 32
7 30
72
7 22
7 19
1 16
6 40
11 14
1 21
6 34
5 21
11 10
10 69
10 63
10 45
1 09
1 03
12 66,
12 61
12 49
12 43
12 40
12 36
12 32
12 29
12 26
6 18
6 11
5 06
io as
10 37
10 32
10 29
10 25
5 01
7 12
4 68
4 65
7 09
7 05
4 61
7 01
4 47
4 41
4 40
10 21
6 68
10 18
10 15
6 65
A.M.I P.M
P.M.lA.M,
P.M.lP.M.lA.M.lAr
LvlA.M.lP.M.tP.M,
jr. fH

xml | txt