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The star. (Reynoldsville, Pa.) 1892-1946, May 11, 1892, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87078321/1892-05-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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KEYNOLDSVILLE, PENN'A., WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 1B92.
KUMHKlt 1.
YOLUMK 1.
Jifaf
7:
iUcrUtnteue.
1 MITCHELL,
ATTORN EY-AT-LA W.
t iMoa ! VmI M n In mt nt. rmrwxlt , 1 ha
. . ... II I Pa
I TAR. n. eThoOVEIL
REYNOLDSVILLE, PA.
Resident dentist. In IiiiIIiIIiiij liesr Metho
dist i-htircli, impiislte Arnold IiIih-Ic. Cleiitle-
111! III llMmtlllK.
olrU.
II
OTELMcVONNELL.
REYNOLDSVILLE, PA.
FHAXh'J. lil.ACK, l'iii'r!r(or.
The lending hotel of the town. Ileiiiliiiitir-tei-s
for cntmm-ivlnl iiu-ii. Hli-inn heat, flee
'Iiiih, Imtli iismis mid closets on every floor,
sumiile room, liilllmu iisim, tel-ihme con-nei-iuins.
Ac
jvn r.u ur.uiAi ,
$ REYNOLDSVILLE, PA.
fi'WA'KA'tf- CO.XSEH, I'iniuiilnrr.
l-'lmt rliixw Inevciv il I Iriihir. I.m-llti-d 111
I he very cent tv of tit' husim-ss kiii't of town.
fKivo 'Inn til inifl fi-om luilns anil -iimiiHMlloiin
' sample iiMinif fill ronimi'ivlul travelers.
iMERICAN HOTEL.
HHOOKVILLE. PA.
JllFFIMiTOX if- I.O.Ml. I'vnfi-H.
Otnnlhus to anil froniull IihInh. Knt-oimiM
rcsumi-iint. Iloii-e hi-iMi'il mill llirlni'ii ly
iitiH. Ili;t mill co'il iiiiti'i'. Witcni I'iiIoh
Tell nml.ll otMi'c III litoldltiu. The hotel I
tilled V Mil ull ihe iiiihIi-:ii convenience.
1 iui'KAlX). K K 1 1 ESTKU & PITT
J UL'Hti UA1LWAY.
Tin1 slmit lliu leiecn Diill-il-., Kliluwiiy,
Ill-lMlfotd. Mlllllitlllirll. Hll n ll hi. Ilm-hestcr,
Nliuitrii Falls mid isiihts In the unticr oil
l'l!toll.
tin mill iifier NovemlM-r 22il. IWI, passen
ger iiiiins ill iiiTivii uml iN'piirt from Fulls
'icek nun inn, dally, except Sunday, hh fol
lows: lilO A. M. Mindfoi-d Aivomiiiodntlon For
F mints Noitli lietween lulls Creek mill
tniilrotil.
0:fi A. M.-lliiiriilonnil Hncliesler nmll For
Hi m kwii Willi', llluiviiy..loliiiMinliiiit,Mt.
Jewett, llimltcinl. hiiliiinmii'ii, lliilliilo uml
Ris-hester; colimi'tlhg lit .lohlisnntilUK
with I', ft E. train 3, for Wlleox, Kline,
Wimeii, Con y mill Frle.
10:4ft A. M. Aeeonniiodmion I'or I 111 Hols,
Svki H, UiK Kun anil I'uiixniitit ney.
1:11(1 1'. M. IIiiiiKokI AeiiininiiHlHlion For
Heerlitroe, HiiM'kwny vllle, Kllniont. t'ai
nion, Kldirwiiy, JohiiMinliiirii. Mt. Jewett
Bnd Uriidfcinl.
4:&ft I. M.-Mall-For llilHoli, Hyke, Wit
Hun. I'unxHiitHWiiev hihI WnlHtoti.
Slfia I'.M.Ai'eonimiHlmion For Dillliiln.lllg
Kun mid I'liiiXKUtiiutify.
Trtilii ArrlVfT:10 A. M., Aceoniniodntloii
l'iinxutiiney;tl:.W A. M., Mull from Wiil
nton Hiiil 1'unxi.uliiwneyi 1(1:4.1 A. M.. Ar
eoniniodiitlon tiimi llriidfonl; 1:20 I. M.,
AfHomniiKlutlon from I'liiiXHiituwneyi 4:M
I. M., Mull from Humilo mid HiM-henter:
H:fA V. M., AivoniniiHhitloti from Hrndford.
ThouHHiid mile tlcketx lit two eentH per
mile. Kood for pmiHiiire iH'tween Hll Htntlotm.
J. II. UclKTTHK, Auent, FiiIIk rrpek, I'k.
G. W. rlABTi.?rT, Job. P. Tmomhuon
Ovnerul Hupt. lien. I'h. Avent
r lirudfoid, Til. ltiM'lientr, N. Y.
LUOGHENY valley uailwa y
(HJMPANY ctminiencinij Snnilivy,
Juno 38, 1HIU. Low Urttdo UiviHiim.
KAHTWAHU.
fTATIONB. iNo. !.N'O.IV.;No. II.
Hill
A. M l
. M. A,
4 :
4 441
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12 (IV
12
ii 4.1,
I 01
New llethlelieni
(nk KUIkv...
Mlllville
MiiyHvllle....
hiimmervllle
HriHikvlllo ...
Fuller
(I I4l
(I I.Y
1) M
H All
II AM
7 07
II M
KeynoldNVllle ..
6 Ml
7 03
rmiroiiNi
FiiIIh Cl-eek..
))ii HoIh
PHhula
Wintenilmni
IVntliild
' Tyler
(tlen FUlier..
Henrietta....
tlrnnt
llrlftwood....
1 IM
I I-
7 in
10 m
1 40
1 Ml
1 ll
1 42
1 iU
7 1
7
11 (
7 M
7 40
7 4A
7I
H Wi
H 'ti
h .a
1 ft"
l on
t ml
1 ml
3 44
a 10
u
P. M,
. M
WBKTWARD.
NoJ I No.d iNo.101 10S
110
A. M
A. M,
r. m
r. h
Prlftwood ,
Grant ,
Kenetette ,
Glen Fisher....
Tyler...
PenHeld
Wlnterburn ...
Rnlula
PuBotH ,
Fall Creek....
Paneoant
Beynoldavllle .
Fuller
Kmokvllle
I -Hummerville...
' MavU.e
Mlllvllle
OkkKldrn
10 OA
a HA
10 K
I ON
10 4
11 m
7 SI
T 41
11 1A
11 tA
7 AA
a 07
a 13
a 27
a 4.1
11 ai
11 48
u 00
7 00
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11 4A
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a ok
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1 42
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i w)
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a i
a aa
a s
10
a 4a
10 00
I 04
New Bethlehem
I 1.1
a 47
1 01
Lawnonnmn
-Bed Bank...
Train dally except Sunday.
DANID McOAKUO, On'L Hnrr.,
PlttMliurR, Pa.
JAB. P. ANDERSON, Gbm'u Paw. Aot.,
Plttoburg, Pa
DO YOU NEED
A NEW ATTIRE?
v If ao, and you want a good
fitting and well made suit at a
reasonable figure you will re
ceive same by placing your
order with
J.C.Froehliche,
THE AUTISTIC
TAILOR,
Next door to lintel MuConnell.
KEVNOLI'f V1LL.K, PA.
SUBSCRIBE FOR
"THE STAR"
81.50 PER YEAR.
Specialties -
Fine
DRESS GOODS,
WRAPS
AND CLOTHING.
OUK MOTTO
Good Goods
AT LOW PRICES.
N. HANAU
DEALER IN
Dry Goods,
Notions and
Underwear,
LADIES' and CHILDREN'S
WRAPS.
HATS AND MEN'S
FURNISHING GOODS.
Fine Shoes.
UEYNOLDSVILLE. PA.
rocery Boomers
w
nUY WHERE YOU CAN
UET ANYTHING
YOU WANT.
Salt Meats,
Smoked Meats,
CANNED GOODS,
TEAS, COFFEES
AND AIX KIND or
Country Produce.
FRUITS,
CONFECTIONERY,
TOBACCO,
AND CIGARS,
Everything in the line of
Fresh Groceries, Feed,
Btc.
Gootla delivered free any
place in toton.
Grill on wa and get price.
W. C. Schultz & Son.
H
U
N
PniinJ
Mm !
1 111 111
VIVl It 111
The Leading Jeweler of Reynoldsville
Wishes to announce to the readers of this
paper that he carries a full and
complete line of
Watches - and - Jewelry.
REPAIRING OP
Watches, Clocks and Jewelry
1
A SPECIALTY. , .'
ENGRAVING ON ALL GOODS SOLD FREE OF CHARGE.
, GIVE ME A CALL BEFORE GOING ELSEWHERE,
H ' ' ' a .
Isatistaction Guaranteed.
and y
a VICH TISEttsS&
WE CAN SAVE. YOU MONEY
WE HANDLE THE FIXF.fT LINE OF
Qeiitlcmeii'H
MDCliildreii'H
Shoos in
Town.
FiiicGdsaSpcf-ialtv
Shoe Stoae
i Iulics
AVI 10
AVonr
: OxloL'd
1 rries
We have Hie largest
ntock ever brought to
town; and all the latent
tieH 011 the market; prices
uway down. Call and
nee name.
EVEUYTHINO MARKED IN
REED'S
Shoe Store,
UEYNOLDSVILLE, PA.
DEALER IN
Dry Goods,
Notions,
Boots, and
Shoes,
Fresh Groceries
Flour and
Feed.
GOODS DELIVERED FREE.
OPERA HOUSE BLOCK,
Reynoldsville, Pa.
a a
OppoHite Stoke's Drug Store.
PLAIN FIGURES.
I . MORROW
THREE DESIGNATIONS
HEBREW, I8RAELITE, JEW; THEIR
MEANING AND THEIR USE.
The Ktymo1c and Hl.tarlcal lrnlfl
canee ef the Name Apilld to th
Ueaeendenta of Abraham A llabbl'i
Kiplanatlan That In Intereatlaf.
It ia not an nnfreqneut ocenrrence
that I am asked which of the three ap
pellntiona given to onr people, Hebrew,
Israelite or Jew, be the more correct or
acceptable. 1 have 110 doubt that one
or the other among you have had similar
questions to answer, nor that yon ex
perienced some difficulty in shaping
your reply. In books, jwriodlcals anil
daily papers, in pnlillc meetings anil
private conversations, these words itro
used either indiscriminately or with an
apparent donbt as to whether or not one
or the other wonld be preferable, or per
haps objectionable. In order to form n
correct opinion it would appear neces
sary to have some knowledge of tlm
etymology, origin mid former usage of
these terms.
Hebrew in our unwed tonorue called
"Ibri" Is derived from "nvar" "to
cross," "come over." It was lirnt applied
by the ancient inhabitants of Puli-stine
to the family of our ancrstor Abraham,
who, migrating from Mesopotamia to
Palestine, had to crotui or pum over the
river Euphrates. It was the mime lit
which the Jews were known to fureign
crs in nncient days. Thus .liwepli is
spoken of by the Eyptianx, mid Intro
duced himself to them ns 011 ,-Ibii" or
"Hebrew." Miriam auks Pharaoh's
daughter whether Rhe should go and call
a "Hebrew" woman. Moses speak to
Pharaoh of the "God of the Hebrews."
and the Prophet Jimuh tells the heathen
mariners, "I am a Hebrew."
The second term, "Israel," "Israelite."
Is to be traced to the story of Jacob
wrestling with a mysterious being at
"Penlel," when he was told. "Thy name
shall be called no more Jacob, but
Israel," that is. "striving with Mod.
victorious in Ood," or, as Uesendu
translates, "soldier (or champion) of
Ood."
Thus the term Israel or Israelite point
to the mission of the children of our
race to wrestle with or battle against
any forces hostile to their sacred trust,
at the same timo foreshadowing their
final Uitimp and victory.
The name "Israel" became the na
tional name of the twelve tribes collec
tively. Later, after the division of the
kingdom nqder Jeroboam, the name ap
plied only to the teu seceding tribe
forming the northern kingdom, known
as the kingdom of ' Israel, in contradis
tinction to the southern kingdom, con
listing chiefly of the tribes of Jndah,
Benjamin and Levi. After the destruc
tion of the ten tribe kingdom we find
the old name Israel again used to desig
nate the people of the kingdom of Ju-
uah, and tbo name "Israel collectively,
and "Israelite" individually, has to this
day remained in common usage.
The third appellation, "Jehndi" or
"Jew," originates in the name given by
Jacob a wife, Leah, to her fourth son
"Judah" or "Jeliudah," meaning praise
or thanks to Ood. For at his birth the
mother exclaimed, "This time I will
give thanks unto the Lord!" The name
was worthily borne by the noble and
sturdy son of Jacob, whose record
throughout is without stain or blemish.
The tribe of Juduh, named after hiin,
was the most numerous, enterprising
and valiant among all the tribes of
Israel. During the inarch threugb the
desert Jndah a place waa In the van oi
the host.
The traditional standard of the tribe
waa lion's whelp, with the words,
"Arise, O Lord, and let thine enemies
be scattered." Later the name "Jehndi,"
or "Jew," was applied to member of
the kingdom of Judah (alter the separa
tion of the kingdom of Israel), even to
those aot of the tribe of Jndah, proof of
which we find In the fact that in the
book of Esther Mordacai, though of the
tribe of Benjamin, U called "Ish John
di." "Jehudi" or "Jew." After the re
turn from the Babylonian captivity all
the members of the new state were
called Jehndim, Jews or Jndeana, the
name being extended to the remnanta of
the people scattered throughout the na
tions.
So much as to the etymology and his
torical significance of the names "He
brew," "Israelite" and "Jew." From it
it appears that among the three the
first, "Hebrew," la the most ancient and
remote. And as in ancient days, by it
the Jew was distinguished from for
eigners, so today it would appear that
in order to point out anything distinc
tively Jewish the word Hebrew is more
properly applied. Thus we speak of a
Hebrew language, Hebrew literature.
Hebrew melodies, etc. Otherwise the
appellations Israelite and Jew, or Israel
iUsh and Jewish, are more frequently
employed as more expressive and char
acteristic in their meaning and impor
tant in history.
Of the two the former is a name of
honorable distinction, referring to the
divine calling of Israel, the spiritual
combat of truth against falsehood, of
light against darkness, in which our
people were enlisted as a nation, in
which they were soil engaged when,
with the fall of Jerusalem and the de
struction of the temple, they ceased to
be a nation, and which will not termi
nate until, in the fullness of time, God'a
lighi. and truth will finally triumph.
, And with the name "Israelite" that of
"Jew" the children of our race will ever
nroudJybeaj and cjjerjah. They trace
Its origin to the noble ancestor, and
brave and distinguished tribe, whose
Same was perpetuated in the kingdom of
Judah, loyal and true to its ancestral
faith and traditions.
And when the autonomy of Israel as
nation waa destroyed its fragments
thongh scattered broadcast over the
earth were still closely united by the
strange spell of that unci ant name Je
hudi or Jew, ov wmcii, individually, we
were and still are wont to rail each
other, and by which we are chiefly recog
nlzefl by the world. A Rabbi in Wash
ington Star.
Bow It tlm la Hni a Lloa llll Too.
Mr. Invemrity, a member of the Bom
bay bar, says: "80 large an animal as a
lion coming at full speed against you of
course knocks yon off your legs. The
claws and teeth entering the flesh do
not hurt so much as you would think.
The only really painful part of the busi
ness is the squeeze given by the jaws on
the Ixme. 1 felt none of the dreamy
atnpor Livingstone descrilies, but on the
Contrary felt as usual. I adopted the
course of lying quite still, which 1 be
lieve Is the best thing one can do, as
yon tiro quite helpless with 11 heavy ani
mal on you. anil they are inclined to
make gral.s at everything that moves,
and the fewer bites ynu can get tiff with
the I letter.
All the wounds are centers of inflam
mation nnd blood poisoning, and the
more you get the lens chance you have.
The Miwr of tne lion s jaws may be in
ferred from the fact that the lioness
that seized me. although it had a
broken jaw, scored deep grooves in the
barrels of my ride with her teeth. 801110
claw wounds were mere scratches.
which laliril'iite to the fact that thev
clutch nt the surface of your coat, think
ing it is all solid underneath, and so
reach the flesh pretty late. In fact, my
coat was torn in some places without
any corresponding wound beneath.
'1 never felt thoslightestshock. Tigers
and panthers, as a rule, immediately
leave any oue they seize in a charge, but
this lioness, having left 1110, went a few
yards to roar at my men, returned, and
stood over me growling, and then bit
my arm. I got no bite the first go off,
as she whs occupied in biting the riile."
London Times.
rift? Kinds of Kleetrln tinhea.
According to the statements of the
English naturalist. Professor Stirling,
there are in existence today upward of
fifty species of fishes having more or less
apecialixed organs, the function of which
is the generation of electric discharges.
The fishes differ widely, sometimes
strikingly, from each other, belonging
mostly to different families, and oc
casionally even to different orders of the
'Pisces. In structure they closely re
semble the other species of the genera
to which they severally belong, differ
ing from them, with an occasional ex
ception, mainly in the possession of or
gans for electric generation.
The well known "electric rays," for
example, of which Nicholson mentions
three and Onnther six, are the most
prominent. These rays are found in tho
Atlantic and Indian oceans and the
Mediterranean sea, and are seen in the
English channel, or even farther north;
while other electrio fishes are still more
cosmoolitan, though most of them in
habit limited areas and warm waters.
Electricity.
A FhraM That In Not KnalUh.
"I will give a prize of (100 to any one
who can prove that the expression 'don't
yon know.' or. as it is often rendered,
'doncberknow.' was ever used in Eng
land by a real Englishman." declared a
person of the British persuasion the other
day.
"The phrase had Its origin in Philadel
phia, where it is much in vogue, because
certain dndea there believe it is English.
No Englishman ever says 'Don't you
know.' The expression he does use is
'You know,' such as 'I'm going up to
London, you know, to get me new
trousers, you know.'
"This may be a startler for certain
young men about town, who by dint of
great practice are able to interject
'doncherknow at about every ten words
in their conversation. I'm sorry to hurt
their feelings." New York Herald.
I Moods No Coords.
The smallest, simplest and best pro
tected postoffice in the world Is in the
Straits of Magellan and has been there
for many years. It consists of a small
painted keg or cask, and is chained to
the rocks of the extreme cape in a man'
ner so that it floats free, opposite. Terra
del Fuego. Each passing ship sends a
boat to take letters out and put others
in. This curious postoffice is unprovided
with a postmaster, and is therefore un
der the protection of all the navies of
the world. Never in the history of this
nnique "office has its privilege been
bused. Philadelphia Press.
His Klootion Cow Htm Foor Cants.
Mr. H. R. Williams may be compli
mented upon the economy he exercised
in seeking re-election to the Middlesex
county council, his expenses being set
down at twopence. This fairly beats
the "record." Mr. Deputy Bedford's
election expenses were said to be but
mnepence on one occasion, but he must
pale his ineffectual fires before the su
perior financial prowess of Mr. William,,
London City Press.
Dopth of the Kodltarraaean.
.The Austrian government has made a
number of soundings in the Mediter
ranean, and the greatest depth reached
was 2,406 fathoms, which is deeper than
any sounding yet recorded for that body
of water. New York Journal.
SENSITIVE MAUHJNE&
1
TYPEWRITERS ARE JEALOUS Of
THEIR INSTRUMENTS.
Whf It Is That tho Exprrt Manipulator
of tho Kay of tho Writing- Maohlno
Are Particular About tho Car of Thalr
Favorite Plna-ora Travel Miles.
Stories innumerable have been told
relative to the engineer and the sym
pathy exisHng between him and his loco
motive. Veracious writers have reveled
in singular tales in which the engineer's
superstitions mind and the locomotive's
almost animal instinct have been the
chief and bewildering foatnres. But the
remarks of girl typewriter the other
day open an almost limitless field Of
thought and discussion, and discovers a
new subject for the dissertation of psy
chological students.
"My typewriter Is intelligent," said
this human typewriter, referring to hor
mechanical friend.
"That is, I understand It and It under
stands me. I wouldn't lend it to any
one. It's a sensitive little thing, and
its resentment at being loaned out would
soon lie manifested to me when I rain
attempted to use it. Skillful type
writers lire extremely jealous in the
care of their instrument. I have sev
eral very dear friends engaged in the
same business, yet not one could obtain
the iiso of my typewriter, and 1 am con
fident they could not be induced to lend
me theirs."
Investigation shows theso statements
to be correct. Those who have their
own machines never lend thorn even for
temporary use, while in large offices,
where the firms furnish the instruments.
each of the latter has a certain operator.
and no one else is allowed its use. r anci-
ful as the idea is that the prosaic writing
machine should resemble the violin in its
readiness to respond to familiar hands
and its consequent rebellion at being
used by strangers, there is no doubt in
the minds of the typewriters as to its lie
In g a solemn and important fact.
"Whatever the reason, said the sup
tntendent of an establishment wh ..
typewriters are sold, "a machine t
has been constantly used by a cen
person is ruined for that person by so ' -one
else's use of it. This refers to
pert typewriters those who do mi 1
work and whose constant practice I
developed a remarkable rate of spec I
So pronounced has this opinion become
and so luxuriantly has the idea flourished
that typewriters are usually f nmished
in cabinets that can be locked and are
then secure from molestation. I know
ef no explanation for this queer state bf
affairs. Machines are mode by the
dozen; the pieces that form the machines
are made by the hundred, yet each com
plete mechanical typewriter has what is
known as a distinct 'touch.'
"An operator may try several ma
chines before she finds one to her liking,
and when she does no other will she use.
An experiment was once made for the
purpose of testing this. An operator of
a particularly sensitive and nervous
temperament, and who was particularly
annoying in her complaints regarding
the use of her typewriter by others, was
blindfolded and tried in rapid succession
fifty different machines of the same
make. To every one's surprise she se
lected the one she had been in the habit
of using."
Few people know the amount of man
ual labor involved in a day's typewrit
ing or realize the distance the hands
travel in a day's work. Probaby few of
the typewriters themselves appreciate'
It. Yet their hands cover a distance
they wonld never think of covering with
their legs unless necessity compelled it
The highest rate of speed ever at
tained 1 200 words a minute. This is
supposed to be the result of the moet '
rapid movements the human hands or
capable of. The person making th
record maintained this speed for or :
four consecutive minutes, and has iter,
been able to exceed that limit Aawln -ing
the words average six letters apaec,
1,200 letters a minute were written, - .'
Is estimated that to moke each let",
the fingers are raised height of t
Inches from the keyboard. Two ineb.
added (for the descending liinriiisn
make the finger travel four inches c.
fore each letter is struck. So this ex
pert's hand in writing these 200 words
traveled 4,800 inches, or 400 feet, dur
ing the minute in which she wrote 200
words. .
But this is unusual, of course. Very
rapid writing is a speed of seventy-five
words a minute, and this rate is too fast
for comfort Practical work is ten
pages of legal paper an hour. Each
page contains 800 words. Six hours'
steady writing can be regarded as an
entire day's work. This is a speed
of fifty words a minute, and the prac
tical worker writes during the day sixty
pages 18,000 words, or 108,000 letters.
If her finger travels four inches to make
each letter, during the day it travels
482,000 inches.
This provides for the perpendicular
movement only, and it is fair to increase
this distance by one-third to estimate the
distance the hands travel over the key
board in a horizontal direction. This
total sum in inches is 576,000. This is
equivalent to 48,000 feet, or a little over
nine miles a day. In a week the hands
faTi Mva flFt-v-fnn, mllAa Bn.l In a
year's steady application to business
over 2,800 miles.
So the vagary of the male and female
typewriters- can in a large measure be
excused and their preference for thci.
respective machines """"Hll .,
New York Recorder. ,
X
1

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