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The daily Cairo bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1878-1???, November 06, 1883, Image 4

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THE DAIU CAIRO BULLETIN: TUESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 6. 1888.
The Daily, Bulletin.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
IHotirealu tftii eoiumn, eignt cenu per line fot
lr.ltnJT cw Pr 11M eachaubaequentlnier.
"loo. For one week. 30 cunu per line. Kor one
B.outh.Wcenti per line
A Reward.
I will pay & liberal reward for the re
turn ot a couple of note books and some
papers, that were in the pockets of the
coat ftoien trom me last evening.
of value only to me. Harry alkeh.
35 Cents
will buy a good meal cooked to order, at
DiBaun .
tf
Foil Rem. My brick residence, corner
4tl st and Wsliinjton ave., now occupied
by Mr. BarcUy rnn room, marble nian
teN, bith ro nu, two cisterns, cemented cel
lar, ami. nut-buiidiugs. Possession given
Nov. I5tli. Apply S'K)n to
lOJO tf Wm. B. Gilbert.
Ke.sUurunt and Oyster House,
Levee.
56
Ohio
tf
FiusisiiED rooms for rent, northeast
comer lltii and Washington avenue.
1091m Mrs. Ansa Parrkll.
Saddle flock Oysters at DeBauo 86 Ohio
Levee. "
.ew Blacksmith Shop.
A new horse shoeing shop has been open
ed by Mr. l Powers on Tenth street. All
wanner of blacksniitbing and wagon work
done to order. Repairing work a specialty.
Wort done promptly. tf
35 Cents
will buv a good meal cooked to order at
DcB.iun's. tf
Womau's True Friend.
A friend in need is a friend indeed. This
noue can deny, especially when assistance
is rendered when one is sorely afflicted
with disease, more particularly those com
plaints and weakness so common to our
female population. Every woman should
know that Electric Bitters are woman's true
friend, and will positively restore her to
health, even when all other remedies fail.
A single tr.al always proves our assertion.
They are pleasant to the taste, and only cost
fifty cents a bottle, sold by Barclay Bros.(2)
35 Cents
will buy a good meal cooked to order at
De Bairn's, tf
tfuckien's Arnica Salve
The Best Salve in the world for Cuts,
Bruises, Sores, Ulcers, Salt Rheum, Fever
Sores, Tetter, Chapped Hands, Chilblaius,
Corns, and all Skin Eruptions, and positively
cures Files. It i guaranteed to give per
fect satisfaction, or money refunded. Price
2.5 cents par box. For salo by Barclay
Brothers.
The most delicato persons eujoy taking
Emory's Little Cathartic Pills, give a whole
some appetite, put new life in a broken
down body. 15 cents. (5)
GENERAL LOCAL ITEMS.
Notice in tneae coinrana. ten rent per line,
each insertion and whether marked or not, if calcu
lated to foward any man 'i hunlnum Interest are
klwayapald for.
New type at The Bulletin office.
Vote forT. W. Hullidny for county
comm.seioner.
C i'y council meets to-night in first
reir.iUr si-ssion this mi nth.
Furnished rooms to rent, apply to Mrs.
Willi'iuison, 7di street.
llickimu, Ky., is much agitated over
th'j appu'irance of smallpox in that town.
Eighth Btret t, beyond Washington ave
nue, is being repaired with gravel where
needed.
Job printing at The Bulletin office.
Engiueer Charles Tlirupp was about
again yesterday, after a two weeks' tussle
with measles.
The 2'J:h of this mouth is to be ob
served as a day of thanksgiving lu Mis
souri, by erder of Gov. Crittenden.
Velvets of all shades to be found at
Mr?. WiliiauiS 'ti's, 7th street.
Two Ciises of excessive alcoholism and
oue ( f disorderly conduct were disposed of
by the down town police courts yesterday.
Messrs. Clark & Lovutt are spreading
out. They yesterday ruoved their tt'ck in
to the L tinbert brick store on 8;h street.
Oysters, hot coffee, slaw, pickles, sand
wichts, &c, for 23 cents, at Temper ince
Hall, Tuesday eveniug, Nov. Gth. 2t
John Gites is Imving the ceiling of
Jiis saloon handsomely frescoed. Mr. II
.'Meyeri1, au ticcomlish-jil painter, is doing
the work.
The residence of Mr. C'his. Pink will
be warmed by a furnace hereafter. Work
men were st work yeiterdiiy pn paring the
way fur one.
New pn-sei at The Bulletin office.
A four-year-old daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Risen, on 8th street, died yetterday
morning of croup, and will be buriel to
day.
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman have settled
down to the cosient kind of housekeeping,
in a neat cottage on 8tb street west of Wal
nut. The Temperance ladies will give a fii e
oyster supper Tuesday evening. Come one,
come all! 2t
- Dr. Parker dressed the band of a b y
named Jno. Maitel yesterday morning, wlo
had several fingers cut off while at work at
t law in Lancaster & Rice's planing mills.
Last Dight Alderman Walker bung lti
coat and bat upon a rack in the hall of It s
house on Sixth street, beforo going to su, -
per. When tw returned itin oiu aim urn
were gone. Snno one had ftolen them.
The coat contained several note books and
papers of value to himself alone, for which
he offers a reward. See notice in special
locals.
The latest sensation is French felts to
be found at Mrs. Williamson's, 7th street.
The usual voting places iu this city
will bo open to day. The matters to bo
voted upon aro of sufficient importance to
demand a strong expression from the
people.
The Woman's Christian Temperance
Union B-jts a supper at Temperance ball to
night.
A new plank walk is being laid on
Ohio levee, between Ninth and Tenth
streets. It is the extention downward of the
new walk begun at Fourteenth street some
time ago and a much needed improvement.
The work needs to bo extended down to
Eighth street in order to make it complete,
and it probably will be.
Latest For 5j. you can pass a bliss
ful hour dispel your sorrows, and quiet
your nerves. The "Bid Boy" cigar was
built for that purpose. It is the smoker's
inevitable. Don't stand back, but drop
right in where you are and get oue. Every
dealer handles them. F. Korsuieyer, Prop.
tf
Constable Llaz. Martin was still at
work with the jail gang yesterday, closing
up the gap made at the Tenth street sewer
out-let. Iu removing some of the timbers
which held the walls of earth up, one of
the heaviest pieces fell upon the officer's
right leg, near the knee and, glancing off,
tore tho skin and flesh for five or six in
ches downward. The wound was very
painful and Dr. Parker was enlisted to
dress it. It was the Dr's opinion that the
officer narrowly escaped having a broken
leg.
The Illinois Central has recently made
another reach for additional miles of track.
The new lino is dubbed the "Winona, Alma
and Northern Railroad," and is to run
along tho east shore of tho Mississippi
river to Alma, opposite Winona, and thence
to the commercial and manufactnring heart
of Wis. The entiro line will then be,
in a certain sense, tho Mississippi on
wheels, a grand trunk road between the
north and the south, and "a medium of
transportation is a bond of union and a
constant destroyer of sectional prejudice,"
as Barton of tho Free Press puts it.
Barton's Free Press: "Cairo ia now
without a Republican newspaper. For
years it has not had an article of that char
acter that amounted to much, and now
even that little has gone. Bro. Scott, editor
of the Gazette, has cut the traces that held
him to the Republican chariot, and is
floundering about somewhere in the mys
terious road that divides the two great par
ties. The Gazette is now neither fish nor
flesh, but i?, bo to speak, a crowd to itself.
There ought to bo a good, live Republican
paper iu Cairo, and Pavey, Murphy and
Fisher ought to see that one is promptly
staited,
A copy of N. W. Ayer & Sou's Ameri
can Newspaper annual for 1883 is received
at this office. It is a volume of 910 pages,
nicely printed and substantially bound. Its
contents are of importance not only to
newspaper men but to advertisers in gener
al. It gives the name, location and circula
tion of every paper in the country; the pop
ulation of the city and county in which it
is published and the principal products of
the county; also the population of each
county and state and the political complex
ion thereof according to the last presiden
tial vote. Other interesting data are
given which render it a valuable addi
tion to any library. Newspaper men and
advertisers particularly should not be with
out it.
Two negroes attacked and attempted
to rob a white man named Michael Con
ners, on Ohio levee abovo Twelfth street,
during Sund:iy night; but Officers Tayh r
and Tyler were close at hand and came
upon the would be garrotters before they
had time to do their work. The scoundrel-?,
however, perceived the officers before these
came upon them and they ran. Officer
Taylor captured his man on the fly aud
took him triumphantly to jail. The other
fellow was too swift-looted for Officer Ty
ler and got away; but he was also arrested
yesterday by Officer Taylor and jailed. One
of tho fellows, named Bill Shannon, was
exairined by Magistrate Comings jester
day aud held to bail in the sum of $500.
The other will probably be examined to
day. Conner is a carpenter in the employ
of Mr. W. F.. Russell.
Mt. Vernon News, October 21th: "To
illustrate the way the 'soldiers' reunions'
ate carried on this year, we will briefly state
the fact that Gen. W. B. Anderson of this
city, was invited by the Committee of Ar
rangements to be present at the soldiers'
reunion in Olney recently, as one of the
quests and speakers; which invitation he
lormally accepted and so notified tho com
mittee. In response to tho invitation ho
visited that place in company with Cullotn
Oglcsby, Hamilton, Pavey, 'McCartney,
Strattan and others with whom he was per
sonally acquainted, and was met at the
railway station by said committee. All the
Republican guests aud speakers were
promptly assigned quarters and handsomely
rceived and entertained, but Gen. Ander
son was left to hunt his own. Although be
was probably the most distinguished soldier
present and the equal in ability of any
other speaker, his presence was entirely ig
nored and he was not called upon to speak,
the whole time being taken up by 11t",,:
lican candidates and politicians. Tie
slight was disgraceful to the Olney com
mittee of arrangements, but an emphatic
illustration of the intent and motive of
'soldiers reunions' of the present day."
Chester Tribune: Egypt is hi(,h'y
honored in the Masonic Grand Lodge of
Illinois. We have Judge D.M.Browning,
of Benton, as grand master; lion. John It.
Thomas, of Metropolis, as deputy grtod
master; Rev. J. Gilham, of Carbondale, as
grand chaplain; Hon. F. M. Youngh'.ood,
of Benton, as grand orator; L. A. Go(ldrdt
of Marion, as senior grand deacon; S. T.
Webber, of Eldorado, and E. L. Stoker, of
Centralis, as grand stewards; J. W. Thrift,
of Metropolis, as grand sword bearer. On
the standing committees we have the fol
lowing: On jurisprudence, Rev. W. H.
Scott, of Salem; on appeals and grievances,
Judge M. C. Crawford, of J onesboro, V. S.
Cantrells, of Benton; on chartered lodges,
C. Kirkpatrick, of Anna. The committee on
credentials is not announced, but will prob
ably contain one or more Egyptians. James
Douglas, of Chester, is one of the grand
examiners.
The President has proclamated on the
Thanksgiving question, and already the
turkeys are beginning to roost high. Thurs
day, Nov. 29th, is the day selected by
Brother Arthur for a season of general
thankfulness and feasting. Last year it
was suggested to the Governors of the sev
eral States that they shape their respective
proclamations so as to harmonize with the
bazoo blast from the White House. They
accepted the suggestion, and never was an
annual Thanksgiving Day celebrated in
this country with more harmonious har
monization than that of last Nevember.
The matter has been th-'wht over during
the past few dys, au 1 it has been con
cluded to instruct the G v. mors to pursue
a similar course this ytir. Aud so the pub
lic may expect soon to see proclamations
issuing from the various S;to capitals ap
pointing Thanksgiving l).iy ou the same
day announced by Brother Arthur.
Willis Littrel, a prominent farmer of
Hardin couuty, accidentally shot himself
last week, dying in a few hours from tho
wound. Speaking of the accident, the
Hardin Independent says: The tragic
death of Willis Littrel Sunday eveniug,
near Cave-in-Rock, furnishes the third link
of coincidouts in that locality. On Sunday
night before the fourth Monday in Octo
ber, 1881, Nancy Roland, living with Dr.
Hill, retired at uight apparently as health
ful as ever, but was a corpse the next
morning. On the same night, before the
same Monday of the same month, just a
year later, Dr. Grace, Cave-in-Rock's popu
lar doctor, retired feeling as well as ever,
but was a corpse the next morning. And
now comes the sad fata ot Mr. Littrel, on
the same night of the same Monday of the
same month. This furnishes plenty of food
for the superstitious in that section, who
are fearfully waiting for the next year to
roll around.
People will to-day have an opportunity
to exprtss themselves upon the question of
permitting hogs and cows to run at large
within the city and county. There is con
siderable difference of opinion on this ques
tion. Citizens who take 'pride in having
well-kept flower and shrubbery gardens
about their premises, and who love to have
the streets in front of their premises neat
aud clean, aud who occasionally on their
way borne from the lodge, a little belated
but perfectly sober, stumble over cows
taking their nightly rest across the side
walks these citizens will each vote "nay"
upon the proposition, and emphasize his
bull'it with several exclamation points. But
the owners of cows and hogs, and some
who are not owners, too, will fail to see any
harm in having the stock run at large,
and will vote for the proposition. At
present there is no law in the city prohib
iting cows from running at large, though
there is one against hogs, which bas, how
ever, been enforced only against boars, in
tho belief, doubtless, that hogs generally
were good scavengers. A decisive vote
ought to he cast upon this proposition to
day, so that tho matter may be disposed of;
and if the vote be affirmative, that the leg
islative and executive brsnches of the city
government may be moved to action.
So far as known Mr. Thomas W. Halli
day is the only candidate for county com
missioner, that is in the Geld to day. His
re-election would seem therefore to be as
sured. Tho importauce of electing a Cairo
man to the board will tie apparent to every
voter, in this end of the couuty at least, and
the importance of retaining Mr. Halliday
on the board will be at once self-evident to
every intelligent voter in tho county who
knows anything of the county's history.
As a rule a Cairo man will act and vote for
the good of the whole county, because he
knows that Cairo is affected by the condi
tion of the county as a whole; and as a
rule a man elected from any other section
of the county considers himself in duty
hound to make an especial effort always to
gain concessions from the board for his par
ticular section. The county road from this
city out is still incomplete and there are
several other important matters in which
Cairo is particularly interested that will cn
gago the attention of the county board for
some time. While it is not probable that
any opposition ctndidato will be run, up in
the county, yet it is possible; hence the ad
visability of turning out here in full fores
for Mr. Halliday. The county will proba
bly poll a small vote and a good electioneer
er there, even though he bad made no can
vas before hand, could poll a comparative
ly Btrong vote, which it would take
a strong vote in this city to overcome
voters of Cairo should, therefore, be on the
alert and each drop his little paper into
tho ballot-box as ho goes to or from his
meals.
Of the ten saloon-keepers whoso licen
ses expired on the 1st of this month, only
three have taken out licenses at the new in
creased rate, namely, Messrs. Keunedy,
Malony aud Ronecker. The ten, paying
licenses at the old rate, produced a revenue
to the city of $1,500. The three, at tho in
creased rate, produce tho same revenue ex
actly and there are seven saloons less in
the city. It is not at all prob ible that this
is a criterion to the result in case all the
saloon licenses in the city expired, for it is
likely that most of these seven had deter
mined to quit long ago and therefore failed
to extend their licenses at the old rate when
the opportunity wss given; but that the
number would be reduced by about one
half is probable. Such a result would
greatly iucrease the business of those re
maining, and would also increase tho reve
nue to the city, so that the high license
would benefit the corporation and the sa
loon keepers alike. These beneficial results
are due to the wisdom of our city council
in ignoring entirely that partisan, Republi-can-machiue
made feature of the Harper
bill, known as the "$150 beer sop," thrown
to the Germans of the State to catch their
suffrages.
Last 'Sunday Drs. Parker aided
by Dr. Gordon performed a very
important surgical operation upon
Mr. Jno. Koehler, the up-town
saloon-keeper. Mr. Koehler had for
some time been suffering from a tumor in
the thigh of the left leg; hut it had not in
terfered much with his daily duties until
about two weeks ago, when it caused him
much pain. He could hardly move about;
he lost sleep and Iknh, until he Ml away to
about half his normal weight and was in
almost continual misery. He finally resovl
ed(to have the cause of his troubles remov
ed and Drs. Parker were entrusted with the
difficult operation. The operation was
skillfully aud speedily performed. While
Mr. Koehler was under the Influence of
chloroform, about two pounds of diseased
fltsh were cut from his thigh, almost ex
posing the bouo of the leg. The tumor had
permeated the muscle and almost readied
the bone, ami was gradually spreading up
and down and around the leg. Its removal
was timely, tor it is Ihe Dr's opinion that
Mr. Koehler would not have lived thirty
dajs longer had it not been removed. It
was also attended with danger, for Mr.
Koehler was not a good subject for a suigi
cal operation lor several reasons, chief of
which is that he is no linger a young man
being over fifty-four years of age. But
there is every reason to believe that he
will survive the operation and that, by rea
son of it, his career here, w hich seemed to
be so nearly and certainly drawing to a
close, may be lengthened many years.
Not long ago the Times-Democrat, of
New Orleans, contained interviews with the
governors of all the souhern states upon
various subjects of importance to their re
spective states. One of the most important
subjects was Mississippi river improve
ment and concerning this Governor Knott,
of Kentucky, said : "I think that under an
enlightened system of engineering the Mis
sissippi river can be and should be made
navigable from the Belize to Cairo for the
largest ocean-going steamers, and the peo
ple living within its enormous water-shed
will never realize their true commercial in
terest or their own political importance,
until it is done. But 1 very much fear, sir,
that this generation will not even see it
commenced, for there ia such a contrarity
of opinion among those most interested in
its accomplishment, as to the manner in
which it should be done, that nothing
practicable will be agreed upon. The mere
building of a levee along the banks so as to
protect your people from overflow, would,
no doubt, gratify the people of Kentucky
very much, but what their interest demands
is the opening of the Mississippi so that
the steamer from Liverpool or Rio Janeiro
ctn discharge its cargo and take ou its
freight at Columbus or Cairo. That can not
be done, however, by petty appropriations,
to be frittered away year after year in mud
walls along its banks. Tho enterprise will
demand skill aud millious, but it can bo
done if the two should be combined, ami if
it should be done the advantages resulting
from it would be simply beyond computa
tion. It is idle, however, to speculate upon
the valuo of the diamonds on tho far side
of the moon."
COLD WAVE TO-DAY.
The following telegram was received by
Sergeant W. H. Ray here from General
Hazeu, chief signal officer at Washington,
last evening at 6:40:
Washington, I). C, Nov. 5th, 1883.
To Ohaerver, Cairo, Ills:
"did wave indicated for your section
to-morrow." Hazen,
Chief Signal Officer.
FUNERAL NOTICE.
Died, yesterday at 6 o'clock a. m., Lizzie,
four-year-old daughter of Lizzie and VnleO'
tine Resell.
Funeral will occur this afternoon. Re
miins will be taken from residence on
Eighth street to St. Patrick's church, at 1 :30
o'clock. Special funeral train will leave
foot of Eighth street for Villa Ridge at 2
o'clock.
ATTENTION,
DIAMOND PACKAGE DYES
unequalled for quantity and quality of Dyes, or for brilli
ancy and durability of Color. Best Dyes ever made for
SILK, WOOL or COTTON.
For coloring Dresses, Coats, Cloaks, Scarfs, Hoods, Yam,
Carpet Rags, Stockings, Ribbons, Feathers, Basket Work,
or any fabric of fancy article to any desired shades without
risk or failure. With thes Dyes any desired color of ink
can readily be made.
Also Diamond Gold Paint, Silver Paint, Bronze Paint aud
Diamond Artist's Black. Price 10 cents for any package
of the above. We also have Logwood, Indigo, Maduer and
other Dye Wood and Dye Stuffs.
WM. M. DATIDSOnT '
13EA.LKR IN
STOVES, RANGES, FURNACES,
Tin, Copper and .Aeato Ironware.
Roofiujr, Guttering and all kinds of work in Tin, Copper
and Sheet Iron done to order.
Nos. 25 & 27, 8th St, Cairo.
TKblHOXE NO. UO.
CLOSING OUT SAXE !
PIANOS AMD ORGANS!
!! SIXTEEN ORGANS and SIX PIANOS !!
Do not forget the Closing: Out Sale of Pianos and Organs at
W. C. JOCELYN'S
No. 128 Commercial Avenue.
MUST BE CLOSED OUT AT OM'E.
Persons contemplating piu chasing a Piano or Organ
within the next few months, it will be to their advantage to
call and examine the above stock, as the same will be posi
tively closed out at reduced prices.
&
0. KOCH'S
Boot & Shoe
STORE,
No. 90 Com'l Ave., Bet. 5th & 6th Sts.,
J net received a full line of
FALL and WINTER GOODS
which he will at the lowest bottom price.. It
comprise the bent of hT. LOUIS HAND-MADS
find of ItUHTON MAN C'FAL'Tl.'RKS, I.ADIE'
nd cntLUItttN' HUOES, and GKNTS' KUB
11 KK BOOTS and SHOKS.
WWe alo mtike to order anything In our line
of the beat material and workmauauip.
MERCHANTS.
"aS'iRSsn Cairo, Illinois.
DRY GOODS and NOTIONS,
a full line of all the latest, neweat colon
and quality, aud beat manufacture.
CARPET UKPAKTMKN 1
Rody Brnaanlfi, Tipeetrien, Ingraina, Oil
Clotba, Ac,, Ac.
Clothing and Gents' Furnishing
GOODS.
This Department occapiea a full floor and
la complete in all reapects. Good a are
Riiarantcod ot latent atyle and beat ma
terial. Bottom Priera ami First-class Woods 1
CLAEK
LADIES!
BAECLAY BEOS.,
DRUGGISTS.
74 OHIO LEVEE
and Cor. 8th & Wash. Ave.
LOTBTT.
W. TRIGG j
Proprietor
Planing Mill,
A full atock of
DOORS, SASH, BLINDS,
Shingles, Lath and Lumber of all Kinds
always ou hand.
Sixth St., - - Cairo, 111.
113-1m 7
JfciVY V UKK rt'l OKh,
WHOLKSALE AND RL l"A) L.
The Largest Variety Stock
IN TliW CITY.
GOODS SOLD VERY CLOSE
NEW YORK STORE CO,
Cor. Nineteenth atreotl P..ii Til
Commercial Ann f (Hint, III.
MILLINERY &
DRESSMAKING
NO. S3 EIGHTH STEET,
(North bide.)
Her atock of Millinery Oooda is entirely new and
conn rli-oa everything to be fout.il iu a mil inerj
eetabllahment, Frlcet are reaaonable.
fcSTDresses Cut and Made to Order.
Yonr patronage is aollclted. llllm.

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