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Daily Arizona silver belt. (Globe, Gila County, Ariz.) 1906-1929, December 03, 1907, Image 1

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LY ARIZONA SILVER
MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS
BTT1T Fii -' 1m
gj 1 I f I ' SAVd
I J M J JL DNIS!lH3AaV M
. 'i JjSS
PRICE FIVE CENTS H
----- JiUlsB
Volume II. No-. 46.
KLEINSGHN1IDT IS
PURGED OF GUILT
OF KILLING GF
Lrand Jury After Hearing Forty
Witnesses Refuses to Return
an Indictment Yesterday.
REMARKABLE ENDING
OF STRANGE AFFAIR
,nef of Police Greatly Sur
prised and District Attorney
Says It's the End Young
Student Goes Free Today.
BERKELEY, Cal., December 2. The
ameda county grand jury tonight re
f ed to return an indictment against
n-irry Klcinschmidt, tlio wealthy young
ege student, who has been held in
t( county jail two weeks under "in-
f.rmation and belief," charged with
mrdoring Frank Bellows, filed ly De
tedivo Henry Jnmicson of Berkeley.
The decision of the grand jurors was
arrived at after an all-day sossion dur
eg which they examined nearly forty
witnesses, whose statements had been
taken by the chief of police and tho
district attorney since the investigation
began. .
At 5:30 p. m. Foreman Charles Eng-u-r
sent for District Attorney Brown
acd announced that tho jury had de
eded not to indict. Brown at onco
cformed waiting newspaper men of the
result, and said: "This euds it so far
si my office is concerned."
Continuing Brown said: "Undor tho
evidence as it wa3 presented I think
tte grand jury did everything possible
acd I shall not pursue tho case further.
Klcinschmidt will no doubt bo rolonsod
tomorrow when habeas corpus proceed
ngs come up for decision. Blanche Ker
faot did not testify today, but I do
cat think her testimony would mako
cuch difference."
Chief of Police Vollmer was surprised
a' the action of tho grand jury. A few
cinutes before their decision was an
canecd ho stated to newspaper mon
teat ho believed ho had a complete cir
cumstantial case.
Tho news was first brought to Klein-s-binidt
by newspapor men and when ho
walked from his cell he looked pale and
taggard. Ho had no inkling of what
awaited him.
"Well, Klcinschmidt, the -grand jury
tas refused to indict you and you go
fee tomorrow," said one reporter.
The prisoner did not scorn to compre
opnd tho news.
I will make a statement tomorrow,"
fc said "I have been ordered not to
atk by my lawyers, I can say noth
o " Then ho turned to Jailer Sherry
tttl said, with n return of college slang:
Is this the straight dope!"
Yes," said Sherry.
Then Klcinschmidt smiled for the first
ne and laughed, his face beaming
with happiness. "Just tell them I'm
S'.ad and happy," ho said and skipped
lack down the corridor to his cell.
Deputy District Attorney Carry ex
plained tonight by saying that the wit-c-sses
did not tell tho same stories in
tup jury room that they told tho chief
of police in tho original investigation.
Vow that Klcinschmidt has been
r-irged of all suspicion of guilt, he will
orobably re-enter college. Ho is a mem
b"r of the 1909 class of the c,ollogo of
of mines, University of California.
CONSTABLE ANDY MAYSS
IS CALLED BY DEATH
EARLY SUNDAY EVENING
Andy Mayss, who for tho past fivo
cars has been a constable of Globe
precinct, died suddenly Sunday evening
'ptween 5 and C o'clock. Ho had been
a.iing with liver trouble for tho last
ar and several weeks ago returned
f'ym tho Indian Hot Springs, where ho
1
HEW BRIDGE-OVER TRE GILA RIVER
IT LAST GOES INTO COMMISSION
No more will the poetical knights of
f grip compose ,sntirical verse at tho
tpenso of the Gila bridge; no more
'it dull and lonely hours and days be
nt by disgusted travelers at San
' r!os and Bowie; no more will Globe
o egg and butter and coffee and
- id famines; no more will Globe bo
off from tho outside world. Tho
'aging Gila may rago and tho turbulent
waters may turblo; floods may como
1 floods may go; the banks of tho
la may bo forced to suspend or fail
terly, but no longer will tho river
"inch was onco a boundary lino of tho
" mted States bo a menace to tho busi
es and comfort of Globe, or to thbso
o travel to and from tho city.
Tho foregoing eloquence was inspired
tho fact that tho now steel bridge
er tho Giln river is at last completed.
f'or thirteon long months of work and
"orry, and wondoring at what the next
l"od will do to the construction work,
io new structuro went info commis
in yesterday and Percy Jones, who
as the engineer in chargo of the work,
'oathed a sigh of relief that roverbcr-
ed through tho near by mountains,
rossed tho river several times and then
died nwny in tho somnolent valley of
IE
R 10 SCORE
IN MEET DEATH
1 MINE HORROR
Forty-seven Believed to Have
Been Suffocated by Black
Damp in Coal Mine .
PITTSBURG, Pa., December 2.
The fato of five American and
forty-two foreign miners, who were
entombed by an explosion of
black damp last evening, while
not definitely know, was pretty
well estimated today by tho find
ing of tho body of a initio pumpor
near tho twenty-second entry of
the Naomi mine of tho United
Coal company at Fayette City,
thirty-flvo miles from this city.
Tho man had died from suffoea
t ion.
Judging from the two fatalities
thus far known, both of whom
have been suffocated by poisonous
gas fumes, it is almost cortain
that the forty-seven miners still
entombed in tho mine havo suc
cumbed to the deadly after damp.
Up to midnight thirteen bodies
had been recovered from tho
Naomi mine.
.'. ". p. .'. J. .Jt. -Jl. 0 "' "- -'- -i s"; 'z z
'.. - V "- - iv 3(- n- - -.f w s" ir '-
s.-
GUNNER 1IR
cue nun k ncv
llf BURN:
American Puts British Cham
pion to Mat for Count in the
Tenth Round
LONDON, December 2. Tommy
Burns, the American, knocked out Gun
ner Moir of England in tho tonth round
before tho National Sporting club to
night. Tho Englishman never had great
hopes of tho ability of Moir to regain
tho English lost honors and in tho
somewhat exciting contest the Amoricnn
champion had n eompaVativoly easy
task. Aftor the fifth round Burns' vie
tory was cortain and in the tenth tho
gunnor failed to rise to tho tcall of
time, aftor being literally cut to pieces,
Tlurns left tho ring with scarcely ,n
mark.
Burns proved himself suporior in
every detail. Ho displayed greater sci
ence, infinitely better goncralship and
his blows wore delivered with tnoro
power than thoso of the Englishman.
The contest aroused a greater nmount.
of enthusiasm than any since Slavin's
defeat at the hands of Peter Jackson.
Burns was favorite at 7 to -I, which
would have been still longer but for
tho fact that two titled backers ofi
Moir covered Burns money for a largo
amount on tho chance of a big winning.
Except for the diffcrenco in weight and
Moir's advantago of two jnehes in
height tho men were evenly matched
and in porfect form.
CONGRESSMAN DEAD
MURPHYSBORO, 111., December 2.
Congressman George W. Smith died
at his homo tonight of typhoid fever.
spent four months in scaich of relief.
Tho disease had, however, made such
inroads that there was no hopo for his
recovery; nevertheless tho end camo
much sooner than expected and was a
great shock to his many friends. Tho
deceased was a native of Kentucky
and was 63 year old. He came to Globe
about thirteen years ago from New
Mexico. It is not known whether or
not ho has any near relatives. Ho was
a member of tho Eagles in this city
and tho order will havo chargo of tho
funeral, which will bo held at 3 o'clock
this afternoon from the chapel in the
Jones undertaking parlors.
tho Gila.
Tho first train to cross tho bridgo
passed over at 3 o 'clock yesterday after
noon. It was a freight train pulled
by engine No. 5G6, with Sam Clark
at tho throttle and Conductor Wordcn
on tho cupola of tho caboose with a
camera in his hand. It was tho most
important event in tho history of the
Gila Valley, Globo & Northern railroad
and ono that has been looked forward
to with more or less misgivings over
since tho first washout of tho old bridgo
caused tho first famino in Globe.
The passenger train from Bowio last
evening carried tho first passengers over
tho bridge. It was in chargo of Engin
eer Arkills and Conductor Hayncs.
It was really a doublo event, as tho
now San Carlos river bridgo a short dis
tance north was also formally put in
commission and tho cutoff on which tho
two new bridges are located shortens
the distanco between Globo and Bowio
by about a half mile. All trains will
now lro over tho cutoff and tho old
bridge, which has cost tho lailroad thou
bands of dollars and tho imbue thou
sands of regrets, will be pulled up and
all that remains, which will consist en
tirely of sorrowful memories, will pass
into history.
'GLOBE, GILA COUNTY, ARIZONA, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1907
w
FEDERAL UNO
CONVENES
AND ADJOURNS
ill Meet Again this Morning;
for Consideration of Five!
United States Cases. i
ILLICIT DISTILLING
IS PRINCIPAL CASE
Ph. Freudenthal Chosen Fore
man U. S. Attorney De
clines to State if Land Cases
Will Be Investigated Here.f
United Statos court for Gila and
Graham counties was convened yester
day morning with Judge F. S. Nave
presiding. After tho grand jury was
impaneled tho members adjourned to tho
grand jury room, whore only a short
session was had, adjournment being ta
ken at noon until this morning. Ph.
Freudenthal of Solomonvillo was named
foreman of tho grand jury and B. B.
Adams of Clifton was selected as sec
retary. Tho following Is the complote
grand jury:
I. E. SOLOMON, Solomonvillo.
PH. FREUDENTHAL, Solomonvillo.
S. C. PHILLIPS, Globe.
J. M. CURNUTT, Globe.
G. S. VAN WAGENEN, Globe.
E. II. FRANZ, Globe.
G. It. BROWN, Globe.
G. D. DARCLAY, Globe.
FRANK M. BINGOLD, Globe.
CON McCORMICK, Globe.
C. G. MARDORP, Globe.
JOHN K. CHILTON, Duncan.
ARTHUR MURPHY Jr., Duncan.
It. T. HILL, Clifton.
B. I). ADAMS, Clifton.
W. A. PITT, Clifton.
GEORGE WEBSTER, Clifton.
J. T. HOLMAN, Clifton.
ADAM SMITH, Clifton.
T. F. McCLELLAN, Morcnci.
J. T. OWENS, gafford.
Thcro are only fivo cases on tho cal
endar for consideration by tho federal
grand jury, four of which arc for sell
ing liquor to Indians. Tho other case
is that of Peter Swcnson, who was
bound over for illicit distilling, Swcn
son lives at a littlo settlement in tho
Gila Valley called Eden and ho is nc
cubed of manf tincturing "moonshino"
at his home. Yesterday United States
Attorney Alexander wired to Solomon
villo to have Suensoiv's distillery
brought to Globo and it arrived last
night. A largo dry goods box would
cover tho entire outfit. Thoso charged
with unlawfully selling liquor to In
dians aro Charles Ilussoy, It. G. Scott,
Frank Attaway and Nucves Gonznlcs.
All excopt Scott aro in custody.
Whother or not any further business
will come before this session of tho
grand jury is conjecture, but thcto is
a well defined suspicion that thcro will
bo moro doing owing to the fact that
a weok will elapso between tho meet
ing of tho grand and trial juries, when
usually thcro is a difference of only a
few days.
It has been suspected among local
court officials that tho grand jury
would make an investigation of the lo
cal end of tho New Mexico coal land
cases, but no information on this point
would bo given by Captain Alexander;
tho United States attorney. When tho
captain was seen by a representative
of tho Silver Belt yesterday ho stated
that he was not at liberty to divulge
-what he knew of tho plans of tho gov
Jernmont nor what ho intended to bring
beforo tho prcsont grand jury.
",I will say, howevor," said tho cap
tain, "that thoro aro no spies or detect
ives connected with my office and there
SLIGHTLY REVISED.
Hey, diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon,
But remarked ti the dog and the dish dotvn
"I'll be back on the ground pretty soon!"
i. Jo
i
is Ho sub rosa investigation going on
that I know of.- If there is nnyouo
hero whoknowsTf any violation of. tho
fedomftitatutos or thinks ho has infor
mation which wpuld warrant investiga
tion, I will soo Hint the grand jury
gives him n hearing and I will guaran
tee to prosecuto tb tho limit anyone
who is indicted."
Evidently someono is expected to
come through witi information,- as the
attorney stated that the grand jury
would probably be in session, until next
Saturday.
UICK PROGRESS
li MADE
PETTIBONE
BOISE, Idaho, December 2. Surpris.
ing progress was mado today in the
work of selecting fi jury to try Petti
bono for complicity in the Stcttnenberg
murder. The state passed. .the jury for
cause beforo adjournment' thtointorning"
and at tho nftprnoon and evening ses
sions eight were passed by the defense.
There- wore contests in tho cases of only
three talesmen. Two of these Judge
AVood decided in favor of the defense
and one against it. Witnesses were
produced in court by tho defense in a
fruitless effort to disqualify Alex Hof
iligor, at present an inmate of the
soldiers' home. Hoffiiger stated that
ho had expressed no opinion as to tho
guilt or innocence of Pottibone, but tho
dofense endeavored to show that he
mado a statement that tho defendant
should bo hanged. Thc4 judge denied
tho challenge. It has been decided to
hold night sessions until a jury is
secured.
ADLEY JURY IS
TILL WRANGLINI
WASHINGTON, D. C, December 2.
Aftr deliberating five hours and forty
fivo minutes in tho case of 'Mrs. Annie
M. Bradley, charged with tho murder
of Ex-Senator Brown, failed to reach
an agreement and were ordered locked
up for tho night at 10 o'clock, when
the court crier announced that they
would bo unnblo to reach an agreement
tonight and that court would adjourn
until tomorrow. Justico Stafford, who
went homo shortly after 0 o'clock, re
ceived word by telcphono of tho failure
to reach a verdict and through his or
dors the jury was locked up. Tho case
went to the jury at 4:15 p. m.
FIRE IN FREMONT
EINC
DRYTOWN, Cal., December 2. Tho
fire in the Fremont mino is under con
trol sinco noon today. Skips aro kept
constantly running up itnd down tho
Gover shaft nnd powerful blowers arc
kept steadily at work trying to clear
tho shafts above the firo levels of tho
hot gases which formed during tho fiio,
but with slow success. Tho wholo ef
fort of the management is to get' to tho
upper -levels above the firo with tho
hopo that tho cloven entombed mineis
will bo still alive.
At 3 o'clock this afternoon Manager
Goodall, accompanied by four picked
minors, made another attempt to reach
tho COO foot level through tho hot
gases. They reached that level, but
tho three were overcome with gas.
All were brought to tho surface in an
insensible condition nnd havo but par
tially rccovorcd. They had to bo car
ried to tho fresh air from the skip".
Constable Bono and a force of officers
IN
BR
M
R
',
below, Wl
hnson in Philadelphia North America:
no
iuinui unnnuLu
PLEA TO GUILT!
OF LESSER CRIME
To Be Sentenced Today for As
sault with a Deadly Weapon
Change Causes Surprise..
CONTINUANCE GRANTED
IN DANIEL'S TRIAL
Case Set for December 23
Wesley Burgess Now on
Trial for Murder of Mexican
on Lower Pinto Creek.
After almost the entire morning and
part of the afternoon in the district
court was consumed yesterday in selcct
a jury to try Henry S. Buckner, who
had pleaded not guilty to nssault with
intent to commit murder, tho defendant
sprung a surprise on tho big crowd as
sembled in the courtroom to hear the
proceedings by entering a plea of
guilty to the lesser charge of assault
with a deadly weapon. He will re
ceive sentence this morning and will
probably get the maximum penalty, ten
years in the territorial prison.
It is understood that overtures were
mado yesterday morning by Attorney
riannigan of the defense and a consul
tation was held at noon between Dis
trict Attorney Henry, Attorney Raw
lins, who had been engaged ns special
prosecutor, and David James, who had
been Buckner 's intended victim, and
Buckner 's change of plea was tho re
sult. The expected motion for a continu
anco in the Daniel murder trial wns
made Into in the forenoon and it was
accompanied by an affidavit signed by
Daniel, which set forth that on account
of difficulty in securing tho presence
of Fred Tcmme, an important witness,
for tho defense, it was necessary that
a continuance be had for twenty dnys.
District Attornoy Henry in an effort
to havo tho case go to trvil immediately
admitted the truth of all tho defense
wished to prove by Tcmme that ho
had heard Brown mako threats to kill
Daniel but tho defenso insisted that
tho effect of tho personal appearance on
tho stnnd of the witness was of utmost
importance. After sqnio, delay in which
authorities were cited by the defense,
tho court granted a continuanco and the
caso was sot for December 23.
Zee Hayes and Raymond Howard, in
dieted by tho grand jury for unlaw
fully branding cattle, will answer the
indictment this morning.
Dan Nenl pleaded not guilty to. as
sault with a deadly weapon and his
trial was set for tomorrow.
Elmer Richards will also be tried to
morrow for embezzlement.
Joso Castro Durego, indicted for tho
theft of a piece of retorted gold from
a man named Lightfoot on Pinto creek,
pleaded no guilty nnd ho will bo tried
Thursday.
Wesley Burgess, colored, indicted for
tho murder of a Mexican woman named
Cabrera at Crowloy several weeks ago,
was placed on trial yesterday after
noon and n jury had been secured when
court adjourned for tho day. Judge
McCollum is defending Burgess.
PULLMAN HAS LOSS
BUFFALO, N. Y December 2.
Tho pullman company's big paint shop
horo was burned to the ground tonight.
Twenty Pullman cars wero destroyed
with a loss of $400,000 and about 250
men wore thrown out of work.
from Drytown aro having a, hard time
to keep back tho vast crowds that con
gregate about tho mouth of tho shnfts
eager to get news of the entombed
miners. '
?.
1
Wl
mmrna rusur
IS DIE
IN RANGR TRAGEDY
Mother, Son, Daughter and the
Foreman of Ranch Cremated
in Burnmg House
SALEM, Ore., December 2.
News of the murder of four per
bons on a ranch near Macley
reached here today. Tho bodies of
Mrs. Castcel, her daughter, aged
21, son, aged 19, and the foreman
of tho ranch, named Montgomery,
aged ."30, were discovered in tho
burned ruins of their adobe in
what is know as tho Purest ranch.
Just how they were killed may
never be known, owing to the
charred condition of the bodies,
but from tho fact that a shotgun
and bloodstained hatchet were
found near the place, lit is sur
mised that the weapons were used
in the slaughter. Trom the best
cyidencc at hand it seems Hint the
killing was done by tramps bent
on robbery and who afterwards
fired the house to give the impres
sion that the victims had been ac
cidentally burned to death.
'. J' J .K. .- J(. ' J', .V j. ., j,
e ',f 'ff 'if -ic r 'if 'tc -.- -,.- ,? -,f
E ACTIVITY OF
E OLIVER GRAND
JURY IN FRISCO
Prize Fight Trust Indicted and
More Woe for Ex-Boss Ruef
and Ex-Mayor Schmitz
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., December 2.
After being inactive several months
the Oliver grand jury today brought in
a partial report, returning nine joint
Indictments against the so called
"Pri?e Fight Trust," the members of
wHnTfi arc E. M. Graney, J. W. Cof
jfnfth and Willis E. Britt, and Abraham
ltu$f and former Mayor Schmitz. A
separate indictment was found against
Schmitz, for receiving a bribe from the
"Fight Trust" and three against for
mer Supervisor Duffy, one for accept
ing a bHbp of $0,000 from the Home
Telcphono company, ono for accepting
a bribe of $4,000 from theUnted Rail
roads and a third for accepting a bribe
of $7o0 from the San Francisco Gas
company. An indictment was found
against Luther Brown for subornation
of perjury in connection with the testi
mony of his chauffeur, Peter Callcndar,
in the Older kidnaping case.
The three members of the "Fight
Trust" against whom indictments were
found ate charged with the bribery of
nine supervisors, each to the amount of
$lo, which is alleged to have been paid
for prize fighting privileges in 1900.
Bail for each case was fixed at $0,000
bopd or $2,o00 cash, compelling each to
put up $22,500 cash bail or $54,000 in
bonds. Tho Oliver grand jury will
probably bring in its final report and
adjourn sino dio tomorrow.
It is stated, however, that more in
dictments will bo returned tomorrow be
foro final adjournment.
OF THE GLO
All over the country Sunday was Me
morial day for Elks and every lodge of
that great order observed tho day by
holding the usual Lodge of Sorrow in
honor of tile departed brothers. In this
city tho day was appropriately observed
by Globo Lodge No. 189 B. P. O. E.,
but in more elaborate manner than ever
before by tho local lodge. The Dream
land theater was used for the occasion,
to which tho public was invited, the
invitation being accepted by a very
large number of people. Tho theater
itself was never more beautifully deco
rated than it was for tho memorial ser
vices and the program was one of tho
best over carried out by the Globo
Elks.
The floor of tho theater was arranged
in tho shape of a horseshoe, the inner
row of which wns occupied by tho mem
bers of tho order and tho officers at tho
samo stations they occupy in the lodge
room. Tlio stage was reserved for the
exalted ruler and tho speakers and, like
the floor, the stngofwas adorned with
a profusion of flowers. The front of
tho stage was banked with purple and
white flowTers, interwoven with greens
and ilnnlml by columns of smilax set
with pomegranato blossoms. In the cen
ter of the floor tho altar of the lodgo
surmounted bv tho flan, bible and ant
lers, was set" in a bed of purple and
white, surrounded by strings or smiiax.
Vases containing bouquets of roses and
carnations occupied places on tho edge
of the flower bed, on the altars of the
officers n,nd on tho stage. On cither
side of tho stage was a largo oil paint
ing of an elk's head and the magnifi
cent head and antlers, ono ofthe most
prized possessions of tlio lodge, occupied
the front conter of tho stage, surround
ed by cut flowors. Bundng streamers
of purple and"1 white, the, Elks' colors,
and tho national colors, were strung
about the ceiling nndr,wnlls. The whole
FOUR PERSON
TRAMPS
U
r J v, jo .. m
nun
TR
)
THE A LODGE
IGONGRESS OPENS
BRILLIANCY AND
STRIKING SCENES
Notable Gatherings of Officials
and Society in Galleries of
Both Houses of Congress.
CANNON IS SELECTED
SPEAKER WITH CHEERS
Both Leaders Applauded and
Bryan Cheered by Demo
crats When He appears on
Floor Former Rules.
WASHINGTON, D. C, December 2.
A brilliant sceno characterized tho
meeting of the Sixtieth congress today.
In tho senate and house there were no
table gatherings in the galleries of
representatives of official society of the
world.
The coming together for the first time
of tlio men who have been elected to
tho senate and house, about a hundred
oJ whom have not served in congress,
made the occasion one of particular in
terest. Ono of tho striking scenes of
tho day occurred in the house where
the formal selection of Cannon again
to bo speaker and the designation by
the democrats of John Sharp Williams
as their leader, were the occasions for
ovation t for these gentlemen. The vast
hall of tho house rang with cheers of
the republicans and democrats for their
Jcadon and tho speaker received as
warm , reception from the minority as
he did from his own party. The ap
pearance of Bryan qii the floor of the
house was tho occasion for enthusiastic
cheering by the democrats.
Adopt Same Eulcs
When the adoption of rules for the
government of the house during the Six
tieth congress came up the rules of the
last congress were opposed by Williams
and he was joined in his opposition by
he democratis and a single republican,
Cooper of Wisconsin. The old rules
were declared too autocratic and plac
ing too much power in the bauds of the
speaker, but after a somewhat acri
monious discussion they were adoptlu
by a party vote. A committee was ap
pbinted by both houses to inform the
president that congress was ready to
receive any message that he might wish
to. communicate. The new senators and
representatives were sworn in in both
houses, which adjourned out of respect
for the memory of members who diedo
during tho recess. ' "'
MURDER. IN NEW MEXICO
SANTA FE, N. M., December 2.
Miss Agnos Tcrapleton, the only white
woman missionary of the Baptist Indian
mission at Halvde, jn Arriba county,
was brutally murdered yesterday by
cither Mexicans or Indians. Full de
tails of the crime are lacking, but the
unconfirmed report has it that Miss
Tcmpleton was assaulted before she was
put to death. David Martinez Sanchez
is under arrest as a suspect.
THOUSANDS BACK TO
WORK IN NEW ENGLAND
BOSTON, Mass., December 2. Thou
sands of mill operatives throughout New
England resumed work today. Tn most
cases tho mills will hereafter run full
time.
OF SI
BE LODGE OF ELKS
mado an extremely beautiful effect,
which was heightened by tho sweet odor
of the flowers which filled the hall nnd
the semi-darkness of tho theater.
The opening ceremonies, conducted
by Exalted Ruler II. F. Blevins and
tho officers, followed tho rendition of
Schubert's "Serenade," and at their
conclusion Secretary Oldficld read the
names of the departed brotliers. They
are: W?
C. M. EZEKIELS. T
A. P. FLOOD.
J. E. BROILES.
W. K. KATZENSTEIN.
JAMES PARKS.
EDWARD LAWTLER.
""WILLIAM GRAVELLE.
ALBERT MYERS.
HENRY J. WINDMILLER.
..
EDWARD P. SHANLEY.
CHARLES SYMES.
R. W. REED.
Tho Elks quartet, composed of P. L.
Butz, E. It. Keith, W. Moon and R. E."
Merritt, then sang "Farewell" and tho
lodge sang tho oponing ode for Memor
ial day. Row George Sclby invoked tlio
divine" blessing and the quartet sang
"The Vacant Chaii." For delivering
the eulogy, George It. Hill, past exalted
ruler, was chosen and he paid an elo
quent tribute to tho departed. The
eulogy was ono of tho most brilliant
evr delivered b'eforo a local lodgo or
lio public of this city. Mr. Hill said:
Exalted Ruler and Brothers:
According to tho custom sacred to
tho Benevolent and Protective Order
of Elks our Secretary has called the
Roll of tho dead, and in tho hushed
silence that followed tho calling of
(Continued on Page Three)
G. O. P. WINS IN MAINE
PORTLAND, Maine, December 2.
Republicans today elected Adam II.
Loughton, mayor. Tho city has been con
trolled by tho democrats for a year.
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