OCR Interpretation


Cayton's weekly. (Seattle, Wash.) 1916-1921, June 22, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093353/1918-06-22/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

A CONCRETE VILLAGE BUILT OF
SLABS BY A DERRICK
The house cast solidly of concrete in one
piece, poured into a mold like cast metal,
has not materialized commercially. But con
crete houses cast in pieces and then assem
bled are apparently both practical and in
expensive. This method of building in
"units" has been employed for some time
to erect large industrial structures, but it
is now being used, it is asserted, for the
first time in a group of dwellings in Youngs
town, Ohio. We quote from a descriptive
article in The Engineering News-Record
(New York), according to which the ex
pense of moving and handling the slabs is
more than offset by reduction in the cost
of forms and the possibility of operating
the concrete-plant continuously. Says the
writer:
"Precast slabs, poured in a yard and
erected by a traveler, are being used for the
first time in this country to construct dwell
ing houses. The so-called unit method of
concrete construction ... is being suc
cessfully applied to the construction of 146
dwellings for the first section of a commun
ity center . . . east of Youngstown,
Ohio. This settlement marks one of the
first attempts to provide living quarters of
a permanent and inexpensive type which
will be comfortable, sanitary, and practical
ly fire-proof. The success of the experiment
is made possible by the almost indestruct
ible character of the buildings, and by the
low cost which could be secured through
erecting a large number of houses at one
operation.
"The method of construction allows the
concrete-plant to operate continuously, re
gardless of the progress of the other work,
and greatly reduces the cost of forms. These
advantages, according to the contractor,
much more than offset the added cost of re
handling and erecting the slabs after they
are cast, which is the only item that would
not be required if the houses were poured
in place. The use of concrete-casting plat
forms, granulated slag-cores for forming hol
low wall-slabs, and of a traveling erection
derrick, mounted on towers, characterizes
the work.
"The dividing walls between houses are
hollow, while all other slabs cast are ribbed.
The exterior slabs are set with the smooth
face out and the ribs, with wood inserts,
form studs to which a lath-and-plaster wall
is secured on the inside. The ceilings of
the basement and the first floor are beamed,
the smooth side of the slab being turned
up. With the ceilings of the second floor,
however, the ribbed sides of the slabs are
turned up, leaving a smooht ceiling below.
The window and door openings are cast in
the wall-slabs, but the window-sills are cast
separately. After the sills are placed, wood
en door and window frames are fitted.
"The roof design is of timber framing
with one-inch plank sheathing, on which a
red tile roof is nailed. The gable ends are
made with triangular concrete slabs. These
red gable roofs on the white buildings are
expected to give a very pleasing architec
tural effect.
"A casting yard through wiiich runs a
trestle track from which the slabs can be
cast by chuting from a side gate car is laid
out at the top of the hill, where it will not
interfere with any of the houses now being
built. Parallel to the trestle and located
on the up-hill side is a standard guage track
for the locomotive crane which stacks and
handles the slabs. Up hill from this, on the
side toward the street by which materials
are received and near the middle of the
yard, is located the concrete plant. This
consists of a two-bag batch mixer supplied
with material by a car on a narrow-guage
track which runs beneath bins into which
motor trucks dump the sand and crushed
slag through gratings.
"Work was first started in the easting
yard on the single-family and three-family
houses, 150 concrete beds and 100 timber
beds being required to keep the mixer plant
going on slabs for these two types. One
form is poured at a time, tho of course one
batch will fill several of the small forms.
such as those for -window-sills. Two men
handle, fill an dempty the ear on the trestle,
while five or six men work in the larger
forms and do the finishing. As soon as the
concrete has set, the side forms are stript
and notch marks are painted on the edge of
the concrete. The slabs are allowed to set
from two days to a week, depending on the
weather, then raised from the beds and
stacked on edge with others of the same
type.
"The hoisting is done with wire-rope
slings and hooks, which are hooked into
eye-bolts embedded in the concrete. The
heads of these bolts come inside the form,
recesses being cast around them large
enough to permit slipping in the hook. The
floor-slabs have four such rings so that they
can be suspended level, while the wall-slabs
have rings only in the top edge. The lighter
pieces, such as the chimneys and the win
dow ledges, are set by hand and hoisted in
bundles with a sling."—Literary Digest.
GENE JOHNSON GETS IT
It is pleasing news to our people in this
city and its environs to learn that the pop
ular young: pharmacist, Eugene G. Johnson,
has become the proporietor of the Prentice
Drug Store located near the corner of 12th
and Central Avenue, thereby saving this
highly creditable and efficient enterprise to
the race. Dr. Johnson has been employed
at this store for a long time and is one of
its landmarks. By his courteous treatment
and affable disposition he has gained a host
of friends who will be his valiant boosters.
He lived formerly at Seattle, Wash., where
he worked at his profession, after graduat
ing from the University of Washington. He
is the son of Rev. E. Johnson, prominent
clergyman of that city. He is a man of
family, with wife and child. He will leave
no stone unturned to keep this establish
ment up to the highest standard. Just as
soon as the Brunswick Wholesale Company
came into control, on the leave taking of
S. L. Prentice, Dr. Johnson got busy to
take over this store. The papers for the
same went into escrow June Ist, and this is
the story of the rare tact and enterprise of
this splendid young man.—California (Los
Angeles) Eagle.
An old colored woman in the South went
to see the deacon of her church about the
way her husband was treating her. She
said that he not only neglected to provide
food for the home and clothing for the
children, but that he used the most disre
spectful language to her.
''Has yer eber tried heapin' coals ob fire
on his head?" asked the deacon.
"Well, not perzactly dat," answered the
imposed upon wife: "but I's soused him
wid a bucket or two ob cold water every
now an' den."
Are You Going?
Yes. Where?
To the Banquet Given by the
U. B. F. and S. M. T,
Renton Hill Club House
Eighteenth and East Madison
June 25th, 1918, 8:30 p. m.
Committee of Arangements: W. E.
Mitchell, chairman; J. B. Barnes, R. P.
Franklin, S. E. Buxton, M. T. Comer,
Mrs. E. Dixon, Mrs. Alberta Gay, Mrs.
W. E. Mitchell, Mrs. L. C. Giles, Mrs
S E. Buxton.
Admission $1.00
K. Leg-gr, Prop. W. H. Banks, Mffr.
We Carry a Full tine of Fancy and
Staple Groceries
WE KINDLY INVITE YOUR INSPECTION
Our New Store:
1201-3 Jackson St. Phone Beacon 505
TUTT'S BARBER SHOP JftJ-BWiS:
Tonsorial Work. 300 Main Street, Seattle. Latest
race papers. All kinds of toilet supplies.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF
Washington for King County.
Georgia Watson, PlaintifL', vs. Milton Watson, De
fendant—No Summons by Publication.
The State of Washington to the said Milton Watson,
Defendant:
You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty
days after the date of thn first publication of this
summons, to-wit: within sixty days after the 15th
day of June, 1918, and defend the above entitled
action in the above entitled court, and answer the
complaint of the plaintiff, and serve a copy of your
answer upon the undersigned attorney for plaintiff
at his office below stated; and in case of your failure
so to do, judgment will be rendered against you ac
cording to the demand of the complaint, which has
been filed with the clerk of said court.
The object of the above entitled action is to ob
tain a decree of divorce from the defendant by the
plaintiff on the ground of cruelty.
ANDREW R. BLACK,
Attorney for Plaintiff.
P. O. Address, 316 Pacific Block, Seattle, Wash.
June 15—August 3, 1918
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OK
Washington for King County.
Chester A. Fleming, Plaintiff, vs. Christina Fleming,
Defendant—No Summons by Publication.
The State of Washington to the said Christina
Fleming, eDfendant:
You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty
days after the date of the first publication of this
summons, to-wit: within sixty days after the 11th
day of May, 1918, and defend the above entitled
action in the above entitled court, and answer the
complaint of the plaintiff, and serve a copy of your
answer upon the undersigned attorney for plaintiff
at his office below stated: and in case of your failure
so to do, judgment will be rendered against you ac
cording to the demand of the complaint, which has
been filed with the clerk of said court.
FRANK SMITH.
The object of the above entitled action is to ob
tain a decree of divorce from the defendant by the
plaintiff on the ground of desertion.
ANDREW R. BLACK,
Attorney for Plaintiff.
P. O. Address, 316 Pacific Block, Seattle, Wash.
May 11—June 22, 1918.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF
Washington for King County.
Mildred Holmes, Plaintiff, vs. William Holmes, De
fendant—No Summons by Publication.
The State of Washington to the said William Holmes,
Defendant:
You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty
days after the date of the first publication of this
summons, to-wit: within sixty days after the 11th
day of May, 1918, and defend the above entitled
action in the above entitled court, and answer the
complaint of the plaintiff, and serve a copy of your
answer upon the undersigned attorney for plaintiff
at his office below stated; and in case of your fail
ure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you
according to the demand of the complaint, which has
been filed with the clerk of said court.
The object of the above entitled action is to ob
tain a decree of divorce from the defendant by the
plaintiff on the ground of desertion.
ANDREW R. BL.ACK,
Attorney for Plaintiff.
P. O. Address, 316 Pacific Block, Seattle, Wash.
May 11—June 22, 1918.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF
Washington for King County.
Dottie Blackadar, Plaintiff, vs. Carl H. Blackadar, De
fendant.—No Summons by Publication.
The State of Washington to the said Carl 11. Blacka
dar, Defendant:
You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty
days after the date of the first publication of this
summons, to-wit: within sixty days after the 18th
day of May, 1918, and defend the above entitled
action in the above entitled court, and answer the
complaint of the plaintiff, and serve a copy of your
answer upon the undersigned attorney for plaintiff
at his office below stated; and in case of your fail
ure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you
according to the demand of the complaint, which
has been filed with the clerk of said court.
The object of the above entitled action is to ob
tain a decree of divorce from the defendant by the
plaintiff; on the ground of desertion.
ANDREW R. BLACK,
Attorney for Plaintiff.
P. O. Address, 316 Pacific Block, Seattle, Wash.
May 18—June 29, 1918.
A SAMPLE COPY
Cayton's Weekly sends out a similar
paper to this every week.
It is not the leading paper of the
Northwest, nor does it "occupy an ex
clusive field", but it is always well
edited and full to the brim with up-lift
matter.
Cayton's Weekly would like you for
a subscriber and if you would subscribe
you would like it. Let us get together.
Telephone Beacon 1910
513 Pacific Block
ALHAMBRA CASH GROCERY

xml | txt