OCR Interpretation


The herald. (New Orleans, La.) 1905-1953, July 13, 1911, Image 7

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064020/1911-07-13/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

- --ANALYSIS
Pitman-Spencerian Chartier By J. M. REASER, Prin. Com' Department
.
.ONG t." .rnn novelists of the world and time was Charles
A Dickt- irliaumentary shorthand reporter. He studied and
used a ::it to which I am going to devote reverential atten
tion
Like RI ,.: I'"..,,.n's steamboat it was the first system-at least
.ithb the Eng : - ,,lki ng race.
The on] ;f . is that Fulton's achievement is unquestionably
ae progenitor : r mighty ocean greyhounds, our battleships, our
lasitaulas. F.,i: , raft grew. The parent Pitman did not. It re
taired an a1,'r'.' ' "he subject entirely different from that for the
deing of wh. " isanr was knighted, to attain a result whose simpli
dt'. ease, leal~t'" ral reading power destines it to rule the world-the
gpgNCERIA N I i \ i IElI System o Shorthand. Remember those words
."AN APPR(it ii TO TilE SUBJECT ENTIRELY DIFFERENT."
David 'Co~ ;': '!d +ahich is, most of the time, simply a character
1Od by Dickrt ': .is own autobiography) 'thus describes the trials and
ribulations or t',', -A .ry and heart-rending time he had in learning Pit
Sao to prelpar'e !:r:. if' to report Parliament-AND THERE IS NOT A
0AN WHO ATFl'!N TFillS PROFICIENCY IN PITMAN WHO WILL
yOT TELL ")OI Tii.\AT HIS TRIALS HAVE BEEN JUST AS GREAT
AND THE TIME 1ll: HAS TAKEN AS LONG.
t "I bought anl i,:mr.ved scheme of the noble art and MYSTERY of
elogmphy. wliich cost me ten and sixpence, and plunged into a sea of
Wlexity that mright rie, in a few weeks, to the confines of distrao
0. The changes that were rung upon dots, which, in such position,
gsant such a tim:., and in such another position something else entirely
geresst; the wonderful vagaries that were played by circles; the unac
esstsble consequences that resulted from marks like flies' legs; the tre
indous effects of a curve in a wrong place, not only troubled my waking
rsn, but reappeared before in my sleep. When I had groped my way
~fily through these dlfficulties. and had mastered the alphabet, which
as rn Egyptian temple in itself, there appeared a procession of new
Lrerrs called arbitrary characters-the most despotic characters I have
r known. When I had fixed these wretches in my mind, I found that
sy had driven everything else out of It; then, beginning again, I forgot
isa; wile I was picking them up, I dropped the other fragments of the
ssti---in short, it was almost heart-breaking."
This is Charles Dickens' own account of his struggles with what may
aDRled the parent system of all shorthand now in vogue.
It is a vivid and true picture n the struggles of the best and bright
ainds who undertake, with this medium, to report so exacting and
"flealt a kind of work as debates and sp eches-with this exception:
PME NEVER LEARN PITMAN, IN SPITE OF EFFORT. OTHERS
agR ACQUIRE A FAMILIARITY WITH WHAT THEY WRITE
0CRH AS TO ENABLE THEM TO TRANSCRIBE IT ACCURATELY AND
IUENTLY.
.TO EXAMINE WilHY THiIS IS SO-TO LAY BEFORE YOU WHY IT
Wt 80 WITH THE WONDERFUL SPENCERIAN CHARTIER SYS
IS THE AIM OF THESE ('OMPARATIVE ANALYSES.
Sir Isaac Pitman was born in 1813.
He was a scholarly thinker.
Is 1837 he published what he called "Stenographic Soundhand."
The system, the invention of a trained, logical and well-ordered Ina
gdiet, reflects those intellectual qualities.
You can trace the mental process by which Sir Isaac devised the al
IINst which once ruled the stenographic world.
Sir Isaac. a graduate of the British Normal College. fell back on the
y useful circle; the angle or slant of straight lines, and finally suo
is in composing an alphabet, itself easily remembered, but, used as
Ssorsthand system, presenting difficulties it requires months and years
aster so thoroughly as to be able to take testimony, speeches, et.,
it. In some instances, a heavy percentage, this mastery s never
blt's look Into this, first tracing the steps of Sir Isaao's pioneer
m d then analyze why. this system, having no reference to English
sdggY, to the ingrained habit of the mind by which people spell and
sits la longhand, requires so much study and work of the student of It
be sea master it.
I Mr Isra took a circle and cut it up into as many parts as would ea
Ssee to use the segments or arcs as symbols for consonant souand
eafutsion. This is indicated by the points checked off in the
Tdtrn we to Figure 1
S1gure s. ri yguree
I
.4 I
: -.( =sh:. I /S-c=- = =d
"71 =
-ISY 1 ·,,.uP
CHARTER
BRN MISSISSIPPI OIL
ulV D DEVELOPMENT
COMPANY.
at ALmerica. State of Lou
Parish of Orleans.
That on this nineteenth
of June, In the year of
hundred and eleven, be
Kenton Bailey, a notary
l=ldastoned and qualified in
ýe of Orleans, therein re
St presence of witnesses
sad undersigned. person
lpeared the several persons
ft hereunto subscribed, who
that, availing themselves
of the laws of this state
organisation of corpora
...oa covenanted and agreed
 nn presents covenant and
ta mselres, as well as all
Yb may hereafter become as
*hs. to form and constitute
body politic in law, for
purposes and under the
Utlations hereinafter set
AR ' TICLE I.
ON title of this corporation
bSthbra nMislalssppl Oil and
Company, and by that
aad enjoy corporate ex
lfor a period of twen
fromt dte hereof with
rosecution of and for the I
k aens as hereinafter set
tad be sued ; to acquire
oal and p-rsonal, by pur-i
Sherwli. and the same to
pledge. hypothecate or I
of to appoint or elect i
1eers, managers or other
as its business may re- .
ad use a rorlrate seal,
b alter at pleasure; and to I
all things necessary and
by law to corporations
CLE II.
,( trhl eorporation shall be
TMS Orleans. state of Loa- I
, attooas and other legal i
process shall be served upon the president,
or in hil absence upon the vice president.
or in the absence of both, upon the secre
tary-treasurer.
ARTICLE III.
The objects and purposes for which this
corporation Is organlsed and the business
to be carried on by it. are hereby declared
to be: To explore, mine and operate for
oil, gas, salt, sulphur and other minerals:
to purchase, hold and Improve and sell
real estate, oil, gas and other develop
menta; erect, own and operate oil refineries
and manufacturing plants, market the
products of same and to conduct a general
business of developing the corporate hold
ings.
ARTICLE IV.
The capital stock of this corporation is
hereby fixed at the sum of fifty thousand
($50.000) dollars, divided into and repre
sented by five hundred shares of the par
value of one hundred ($100.00) dollars
each, which stock shall be paid for in cash,
or may be issued In payment of or for serv
ices rendered, rights or property actually
received by the said corporation.
ARTICLE V.
All the corporate powers of this corpor
ation shall be vested in and exercised by
a board of three (3) directors. a majority
of whom shall constitute a quorum for the
transaction of business.
Said directors shall be elected at a gen
eral meeting of the stockholders to be
held on the second Tuesday in January of
each year.
Notice of such meetings, and of all other
meetings not otherwise provided for by law.
shall be given n writing to each stockhold
er, by mailing same to such stockholder's
last known address, ten days before each
meeting.
At the first meeting of the board of di
rectors after its election it shall elect from
among its own number a president. vice
president and a secretary-treasurer : and all
vacancles occurring shall be- filled by the
remaining directors, for the unexpired
term.
I'ntil the second Tuesday in January,
1912, the following shall constitute the
frst hoard of directors, namely : P. Charles
Cavaroc, Henry Wirth and Oliver H. de La
morton. with the said P. Charles Cavaroc
as president, the said O. H. de Lamorton as
vice president, and the said Henry Wirth as
seeretary-treasuer, and they shall serve
antl their suecessors are elected.
SaiOOu re I
+t l

Se r N00 0- -00
r = A^=n=owt =o r1=c L-=Ld
d
t circle of Figure 1, marked with numerals from 1 to 8. Segment, arc or
A:curve. 1-7, he called "f"; curve, 2-8, "th"; curve, 4-6, "a"; curve, 5-7,
L "sh"; curve. 1-3, "1"; curve. 3-5, "r"'. Having thus obtained six con
r sonant signs or symbols, he doubles the use of five of these by writing
them heavy and thus giving symbols for the heavy sounds of these five
f consonant signs. Thus the sign for "f," written heavy, becomes "v";
"th" (as in "m.th") becomes, writter heavy, "th" (as in "with"); "s"
becomes "z"; '1" is written upward or downward, the usefulness of '
this segment of the circle is single; "r" written heavy becomes the vowel
sIound, "y"! "M" and "n" are the top and bottom of the circle.
SIR ISAAC WAS STILL SHORT AT LEAST EIGHT CONSONANT;
,. SOUNDS, and he proceeded to use all possible unconfusable radii of the
g circle for these missing consonants: Radius, 3-c, he called "p"; S-c, "t";
y 4-c, "ch"; 1-c, "k." Observe, please, that there is not a single other seg
h ment of the circle or ralius thereof which can be used without imminent
' and even hopeless danger or confusion, but he had now all necessary!S
e'CONSONANT SOUNDS and the EMBRYO of a sys'em, HOPELESSLYi
,toNONFLUENT. and IESTINEºI ABSOLUTELY to require, for the reason
,t of its CUMBERSOMENESS. a vast distionary of word-signs.
e HE HAD NOT YET A SINGLE VOWEL SIGN. Of these---in the
writing of English, these vowel signs are absolutely imperative, at least: I
y ah, eh. ee, aw, oh, oo, and (short) a, e, i, (short) o, u, oo.
The device by which Sir Isaac attained their expression is hopelessly
t- defective. as will be shown. He made position the expression of the vowel,
d calling above the line, on the line and below the line the three positions.
: "Ah," for instance. Is indicated by a heavy dot above the line. That
S heavy dot on the line or in the middle of the stroke or letter becomes
l "eh" and In the last.place. "ee." Written light, it becomes the short
D sound of the same vowels. Taking a short dash and writing it heavy
in these three positions. he furnished his system the second series of long
r or heavy vowel sounds, "aw," "oh" "oo":; and, writing them light, the
I- second series of short vowel signs. "o," ",u" "oo" (short). The dip
thongs are arbitrary characters, as are "I," "u."
That is the alphabet of the system for the invention of which Queen
Victoria conferred upon Sir Isaac the great honor of knighthood! With
these signs anything can be written, in some sort of a fashion, but be
I- fore a man can take testimony or speeches running from 125 to 200
words a minute, or twice as fast as a clock ticks, he has to acquire a
I- skill, to so make this system a part of him, to so WRITE SOUND (ab
stractly) that the apparent simplicity vanishes and he finds that he is
e against practically the problem which kept the immortal Dickens sleep-;
- less. hewing down forest after fores of difficulties even in his dreams.
a This article proposes to discuss this matter to a finality-to show
s the relative merits of the Spencerian Chartier and Pitlnan.
It is not doing so in a spirit of cavil.
r It believes in the sublime dignity of the 114-foot craft of Fulton,
which made Its way laboriously up the Hudson at five miles an hour.
r But it is certain if the restless progressiveness and energy of man had
. been content with it and declared it the finest possible boat that human
d genius could build, he would not to-day be crossing the ocean In a little
t over four days on mighty leviathans which are practically safe against
all storm and which breast the fieroest of them without a perceptible
, decrease in speed!
a This is the age of progress.
s Progress isimpossible if we cling with blinded eyes to opinions which
we have accepted for their age and by reason of no thought which we our
selves have spent.
Progress is possible only as a result of investigation---nd investiga
tion is the child of freedom from bias, freedom from accepted convention
alities. Fogyism has no place in America.
With all honor to the great intellect of the student who has. in spite
of all the criticism to which his system is open, made It possible for men
to transcribe thought with the swiftness with whioh it glides from the
tongue. THIS ARTICLE ASKS THAT YOU INVESTIGATE WHAT IT IS
SEEKING TO PUT BEFORE YOU WITH ALL DEFERENCE AND HU
MILITY, BUT WITH A CONVICTION THAT EVERY CLAIM AND AR- I
GUMENT ADVANCED IS SANE, SOUND, TRUE-WORTHY OF YOUR
ATTENTION, INASMUCH AS THE DAY IS FAST ARRIVING WHEN
EVERY CHILD IN THE THIRD READER WILL BE LEARNING
SHORTHAND (SPENCERIAN CHARTIER SHORTHAND) WITH AN'
EASE AND READINESS IMPOSSIBLE IN ANY OTH~Bn SYSTEM.
THE GREAT PITMAN'S DIFFICULTIES
Before we go any further in this analysis, and while you have the al
phabet of the Pitman system fresh before you, let me give you another 4
plate in order that we may make plainer our talk.
I pick this plate at random. It is a Pitman transcript of an utter
ance of the great showman, P. T. Barnum, and here is what he said, writ
ten in longhand: '
"As far as business is concerned, I have a particular hobby. My
erase is that every young person, of both sexes, should learn at leasti
shorthand and typewriting. Here you have mental discipline and knowl
edge together, knowledge, too, that is almost certain at some time to be
convenient and practically available. I cannot conceive that one who I
knows these two branches thoroughly will ever need to go hungry in the
present generation, for they have a constantly widening use."
Know Pitman thoroughly! Truly P. T. is a humorist. P. T. was I
either ignorant of his subject or joking.
How many there be of these craftsmen in this city of almost 400.000'.
souls? Count them over--those who really answer P. T.'s description. I
You or anyone with the slightest sort of memory can learn that alphabeta
which has Just been given and which, with endless use and practice, can .
enable ope to do that speedily, but try, knowing this alphabet, to take a<
At all meetlipgs of tle stockholders each
stockholder shill be entitled to one vote
for each share of btock owned by him and
such shares may be voted in person or
by proxy.
ARTICLE VI.
This act of incorporation may be amend
ed, or this corporation dissolved by and
with the consent of two-thirds of the en
tire capital stock represented in person or
by prosy, at a general meeting called for
the purpose after written notice as provid
ed for by law.
In case of the dissolution of the corpora
tion, 4ts affairs shall be liquidated by two
commissioners elected from among the
stockholders at a meeting called for that
purpose, or at the mee.ting at which the dis
solution is voted, and they shall serve until
the affairs of the corporation are liquidated.
Should either of the commissioners, for any
reason, be unable to act, the remaining
commissioner shall fill the vacancy.
ARTICIE VII.
No stockholder of this corporation shall 1
be held liable for the contracts or faults of
this corporation beyond the unpaild bal
ance due on the stock subscribed for by
him; nor shall any Informality in organi
zation have the elfect of rendering this
charter null. or of exposing any stock
holder to any liability beyond the unpaid
balance due on his stock.
Thus done and passed before me. notary,
at the city of New Orleans. on the day.
month and year first hereinabove written in
the presence of Albert J. Taper and Flor
ence Flynn. competent witnesses, who have
hereunto signed together with said appear
era and me, notary, after due reading of
the whole.
Original Signed: Prof. O. II. de IAmor
ton, one share: P. C. Cavaroc. two hundred
and thirty-eight shares: H;enry Wirth. one
share. Albert J. Taper. Florence Flynn.
(Seal) J. KENTON BAILEY.
Notary Public.
I. the undersigned. Recorder of Mort
gages, in and for the parish of Orleans.
State of Louisiana. do hereby certify that
the above and foregoing act of incorpora- I
tion of the So. Mims. Oil and land Devel.
Co. was this day duly recorded In my omeet
in Book 101$. ollo 746.
New Orleans. June 20. 1911.
(fignedi EMILE I LEONARD. . R.
A true copy of the original act of ineor. o
poratlon extant and on file in my oece. d
(Seal) J. KEINTON BAILEY. n
Notary Public. it
ju29Jull13.2-27ag3 '11 N
Balzac and Dumas Literary Foes.
It is said that Balzac detested Dumas.
Once he brought to the Siecle the man
uscript of a novel. which was to follow
"Les Trois Mousquepilres." then being
published. lie asked to be paid 2%
francs a line The director of the Jour
nal hesitated. "You see. M. Dumas is
being paid only 2 francs a line." "If
you are giving 2 francs to that negro.
I shall get out!" And Balzac stalked
off.
Dumas was not ignorant of Balzac's
feelings toward him and did not spare
him. In the foyer of the Odeon theater
Balzac was talking loudly in a group
of literary men. "When I have written
myself out as a novelist I shall go to
playwriting." "You can begin right
away," called out Dumas.
Easily Answered.
"Mention the name of some well
known Greek," said the teacher of the
jauve&ie class in history.
"George." spoke up the curly haired
little boy.
"George who?"
"I don't know the rest of his name.
ma'am. He comes around to our house
every Thursday with bananas an'
oranges."-Chicago Tribune.
CHARTER
OF THE MENDOLA BROS., INC.
I'NITED STATES OF AMERICA, STATE
OF I)UISIANA, CITY OF NEW OR
LEANS.
Be It known, that on this foarteenth day
of June, in the year one thousand nine hun
dred and eleven, before me, John Wagner, a
notary public, duly commlssioned sad sworn
In, for the Parish of Orleans sad City of
New Orleans, therein resldita sad in the
speaker at I:t.) words per rn!rn'l:e, an,.! .'e hw thor' .gly :i: r,.'
kn,i it.
., if you dIn? t f in,i r I. , il ti!: ',1. ,: - It tf its thit it
flicts,, that of the r,.at lr,,'., S
JOKER BARUM'S It ORDS IN SIIORT/HAND
~-. - zN
The above is the pIlate showing the transcril,t in shorthand of iar
num s s point of view of .tshorthand. I is I.r(balily writtenu ;i , a 1 +
answers Itarnurn's descriltion., full o)t aordl-signs, correctly i. ,1 a i.
feet specimen.
First, let us call your attention to 'I:e fact that tl.e va l -el ii ari,
entirely eliminated-- and bitel \,, m ni at!: n Col are taking a s;.,.,"*- . .oi
have no time for vowel-signs S\ith I'i:t.itn sh(rtl.an TIilI ll.:.\ (i\
WVHY IT TAKES YOU ) SM,0'll Ilit l-( T TO T .'" MAKE Tills SYSI i;'.1
VALUABLE TO YOU IS TII.HAT Yv('Iit EiYI:. Yitlt INST''INI' MI ST I-;
TRAINED SO THAT Y(t'it l'YES 18l.\1 S' SI l'lYL TilE INVISIItl.IK
AND NON-EXISTINi; V WVILS 'n 'at liti g ",i are forced to 1 i
the vowels. We set forth here .':e propositsion of horthand liIuh dI 'h1.t
refutation.
It Is elemental:- The rea:ding powear of any s'ste'm is tlased on tl,-'
percentage of vowel sunds \ o+l can indicate.
Here is a another truism: ITS SPEED IS BASED ON TIlE S:IEE:I
WITH WIC('ll YOl CAN I( T illS.
From these two axioms it is inl,,.isil,!t. to get aw\ay.
Now, in this light so c-lear and i self-.-\ident let us get at the. tr:-n
script of what Joker Blarnum sat;s. as transcrlted ill the l'itman \s,
Notice, please, that the very tirst three words a:re written a, a i\orl
sign-the very first thri-e words. TI',hes fiIst three words are "as far . i.'"
and the I'itnman syste a rites thtem 'sfrs"' Tlhere is not a hint of a vtoc.!
sound anywhere. In the tpoit ion'ti \hy sho,;ld "':' lie wri:tten in the tiag
position and In the last pisition. and teach taiiis spell "as"? The accullrn
of geometry is sadly desecrted in this: "Fr," "far." Is there any po-s lil'e
reason, conceding for the sake of argument that the "fr" is In the first
position, why this should not he "far." ",tfar." and since there is tniir,
position visible, why it should nmt be "off-""''' It is. however, "far" to
the trained eye in Pitmnan, for tihe r"ason that that house there is a lhouse(
to your familiar vision. In "business'." position irettyv wel Indicates tlhe.
word. You have "bs" and "ns." andi rtq uite no flight of Im:agination to
make it out. "In'" is conventionally in the secondil uposition, mnaking it
literally and meaninrlessly "u''oln' ilh the "o''" long. as In "model" or
"pone" (same long ol or "pain" ( long a' . or "ipen" (short e). etc.
In short, the "pn" in the second position spells "upon", because it is con
ventlonally so accepted. "C'oncern.ed' has a little bit of dot hbefore the in
itial circle--s for "con." an "r" cut half Its le-ngth, thus adding "d anl a
little "n"--hook-still the "id," created by the shortening of the "r" is
read after the "n"-hook. Here, then. are the tonsonant signs guidirng
the experienced eye in reading "concern et"-"consrnd." "I" Is the
"tick" on top of the "v." and "v" is a aordl-siin for "have." "Iv." in other
words, is "I have." "A" is the dot in the first lpositioln. "Partlcular" is
"p" shortened to half length to sho, that the-re is a "t" or "d'" sou nd
somewhere concealed about its person. and the "Ip" is hibgun with an "r"- -
hook, although the "r" is read aftier the "'p." Literally, we have "rpt I or
d)" spelling "particular." Anothter word-sign: "IfI " (vowel sounds to
be guessed) "hobby." In a F'sent'Ience of eleven words. thus, t'e haltve
seven word-signs.
What now is really a word-sign? It Is something that has to tie
learned and stored away in the menmory. When the first eleven words
of the man who says that his hobby is that every young person shouldl
learn shorthand "thoroughly." are found to contain seven words that
have absolutely to be remembered, it is to be seen at a glance that he is
either ignorant of what he is talking about, or has a large and expansive
sense of humor. This system cannot lie taken on and carried as a side
line. One who learns it has to dedicate himself to it as did Dickens. An
other thing, this system cannot be mastered and allowed to rust. Speed,
accuracy, a working order of the possession is maintained by constant
practice and that alone.
There are sixty-eight words in the rest of what P. T. Barnum here
said. There are over forty word-signs in this number. Capacious mem
ory at this gait, don't you think, to know this language of lines and area
and circles thoroughly-a big word-sign store-house necessary; and you
cannot pause, you know, when you are writing 150 words a minute to re
call how "I have been." "as far as" "that" "particular," etc., are writ
ten. Pitman is almost impossible with night students.
It is strange. almost remarkable, that an analytical genius such as
must have been the mind that invented and evolved Pitman system did
not reflect that the two greatest impediments in his system were Inflict
ed unabated on all the men and women who studied and the compara
tively few who mastered his system:
A lack of vowel power.
A diminution of speed proportioned to the number of vowel signs
used.
Net result-an absolute necessity of an enormous dictionary of word
signs.
A difficulty of mastery increased by every word-sign.
A MULTIPLICATION, IN THE CASE OF EXPERTS, OF WORD
SIGNS SO GREAT AS TO MAKE THE WRITING OF EACH EXPERT A
SYSTEM OF HIS OWN. BASED ON PITMAN. BUT PECULIAR TO THE
WRITER AND ABSOLUTELY UNDECIPHERABLE BY ANY ONE
ELSE.
As a matter of my own knowledge I know that Spencerian Chartier
shorthand can be learned with one-fifth the study required for Pitman;
it can be written faster than Pitman--it makes fewer strokes in writing
any given matter-and it can be read with an ease never claimed for Pit
man. In fact, people knowing the system, correspond In it and read eaeta
other's writing as though it were longhand or Roman print.
presence of the witnesses hereinafter named
and undersigned, personally appeared: thea
several persons whose names are hereunto
subscribed, who declared that availing them
selves of the laws of Louisiana. relative to
the organisation of corporations, do by
these presents covenant, agree and stipulate
to form themselves, their heirs and assigns
into a corporation and body politic for the
objects and purposes and under the follow
Ing stipulations, which they hereby adopt
as their charter, to-wit:
ARTICLE I.
The name and title of this corporation
shall be "MENDOLA BROS.. INC'.," and its
domicile shall be in the City of New Or
leans. o, Lousana. and under said name it
shall have and enjoy a corporate existence
for a period of ninety-nine years from this
date; to site and be sued: to make and use
a corporate seal, the same to break or alter
at pleasure: to purchase, hold, own, lease,
acquire, sell, alienate, mortgage pledge prop
erty. both real and personal; to borrow
money and give or receive securities: to
own stock nla any other corporation : to con
duct and carry on the business hereinafter
stipulated; to elect and appoint directors
and such omcers, agents and employees as
may be necessary in its business and to do
all things necessary to carry on such bust
ARTICLE II.
The domicile of this corporation shall be
in the City of New Orleans. la., and all
citation and other legal proce-ss shall be
served on the president, or in his absence or
disability on the vice-president.
ARTICLE III.
The objects and purposes for which this
corporation is organized and the nature of
the business to be carried on by It are here-1
hv declared to be to manufacture from wood.
paper, press board, tag boards, card board.
straw, manilla and news board and from
other like substances. different kinds of
boxes, cartoons and like receptacles and to
print on and label same; to do printing, em
bossing, steel engraving and lithographing
of a general nature, and book and pamphlet
binding. etc., and to undertake any other
enterprise or' business which may be ger
mane or which may grow out of the objects !
and purposes above enumerated. and gener
ally to do a general printing business and to
deal in stationery. office furniture and sup
plies. It being optional to carry out any or
all of the objects above named from time to
time witboat the necessity of engaging in
all e mid al eremt ebjeta.
ARTICLE IV.
The capital stock of this corporation is
henreby fixed at three thousand dollars, di
vided into three hundred shares of the par
value of ten dollars each, which said stock
shall be paid for in cash, or In property,
goods or merchandise, or in services or lasbr
performed for the corporation; all stock
shall be full pail and and non-assessable. No
shares of stock shall be transferred except
on the books of the company and until the
certificate of stock shall be delivered to the
company and camncelled.
ARTICLE V.
All the corporate powers of this corpora
tion and the management and control of its
business, Including the power to buy, sell.
mortgage, pledge, or In anywlse acquire or
alienate or encumber the property, ltth real
and personal, shall be vested In and exer
clsed by a board of directors nmpln.sed of
five directors, three of whom shall consti
tute a quorum for the transaetlion of hust
ness. The board of directors shall ie elected
annually on the first Monday of January
at a meeting of the stockholders called for
that purpose. All such elections shall Is
by ballot and conducted at the office of the
company under the supervision of two, com
missloners to be appointed by the tboard of
directors. Each stockholder shall Is' enti
tied to one vote on each share of stock held
by him as shown on the books of the com
pany. to be cast in person or by proxy. and
the majority of the votes so cast shall elect.
A ten days' notice of such election shall te
given by the Scretary-'Treasurtr to each
stockholder in person or by mall to his last
known address as shown on the books of the
company. The directors thus elected shall
continue In ofice for one year and until their
successors shall have been elected and qual
Ified, but a failure to elect directors on
the date designated shall not dissolve th'
corporatlon, hilt the directors then In ,i.e
shall remain In office until their sllrcessors
shalh be elected and quallfled, and shall
cause an election as soon thereafter as tpos
sible, after notice shall have been given as
above specified. Any vacancy occurring
among the directors by death, resignatlion or
otherwise shall he filled Iny thne remaining nIl
rectors. The board of dlrectors shall at
their first meetlng after their election, el,.'ct
fromm Its number a presidnt. a vlce-pr'sl
dent and a secretary-treasiurr. :tlid lmnrd
of directors shall have the right to appoint
and discbarge numch clerks. agents and esm
plovees as may be necessarv. Certificates ,f
stock shall hear the silgnature of the pren.i
dent and the scretary-treasurer. Any mr
the directors shall have the right by wrIt
ten Instrument to depute all powers pos
sessed by him or them aS such directors to
Lazard's
I We'll
(iet
SYou.
Yet
" - , * ,
Tickets on Sale Daily. June 1 to
S Sept. 30, 1911. Limit October
31, 1911.
Especially
,ii
iil Vry Lo
ILow RatesRates
ATTR ACT THOUSAILYDS TOVIA
SoualteorniAn
[ Every Low Summer rates to
COLORADO and YELLOW.
STONE NATIONAL PARK.
xTickets on Salerie Daily. June 1 toby
the Southern iPacithc and ('on
Septions. 30,Fr full particularst October
31, 1911.
Especially('all on or write
CITY TICKET AGENT.
Low225-227 St. Charles Street, New
OrJune 5 ands. PhoJune Main to 22 and7.
June 27 to July 5, 1911. Returna
Limre Furnished on Request.1911.
TWO TRAINS DALLY VIA
Sprn r perSouthern
nali.t ic,-t partilea. hion. e-n., mu11t ii.- ane-Id
Aleo Vt ery Low Summer rates tof
liilr-. wthtr geieri o, spitl, c hai
lCOLORADO and YELLOW
Exrel olent after ice An aors led rey
lirthe Southert given aacivic and ('on-i for
I|nertions. Fo~r full partic~ulars,
ITh iirt li'all on ior write imy
t CITY TICKET AGENT,
ic i225-227 elrt. Charlet m Street, New
S Ornleainl. Phone Malin 40am 7. i
il, lBeautifully Illustrated Litera
1 rure Furnished on Request.
tllth prsident. r primonM i tnly lla vy (lirea
Il-lent, .itrnan W~Vi unoI --till m t w re -Ir treasiure-r
ihIIIo. shiii ill r it hoi 'mll'. r II1i lit-a i lri.ul' ae
of Jieniiaerv. 1I11". a ii Il0.1 their simli-essorN
AltTICL.E VI.
Ni uticakhlcelr shalt ever hi- re-9een-aitie
for lithe hone li'i-t Al ilrfate of s tai corcora
I tion Ia any fun her nnr than thn leae nil teal
aleh- . r, list ncaey ls- duie rel lit oi 0 'hai i-ierleer r
atiton en th,-eunpatil amolilt in the share-s
of ictock owned cy him, flr Ih tehan l any infl. r.
mairati tn an en iatI sha ll iav tlrhe- efcetor.
of re-nile-ring this charter nut! or e-pienalg
'l'hI·tir* ll~r~l loarl l dlrr~·clr*l il h,I ~i'ill lplllly
lice sIhckly chrlel-rl io iaie for snll . furtherl
aeionnt than the uneaiiI lniranie due by
thei. ln their sItlonk anu a. ripetion. -
t-AltTII'LE VII.
S Theit act of chcernratiin may he amended,I
ailtered or. molilled. or this lollrrl tir aiccn may
te- dtiactve-d ty a voete of tiere-efourtha eef
$'h ?ll I.. llcl',l~ rI' l hHIi.qn M,.iddi i 'l· pr t..-)nL~~
S the capcia stn k erellleent ,or rcilcrcee-nlrtl atlr
Die-et Ing of Ito- stokckoldelrc u-altl-e fier tbat
h erloiIe- after th th en lday Iin l tll(le a pre
ne-rita-e aiaye.
ARtTIC'IE" VII.
Whenever this rorpeirceliun Is eltsanive-e
either y limitation or tlhcerwl h, its affair
shall tee ttqndie- under thlie ciiieervs-rion cf
-thre l llituiat tlly ll h y o ie ale lntid fr aorlm amnr
15 lihe- ctcekhcclce-rs at a ncelting if Ith- slick
It. heutiers ejc-all for that tiurtcice after the
fi t n i c ln tie reiln pairel amOl vel.t lll ll iqellar -
al atoLrs wcall Ire himn nor SiN lntl ne llfair
o~llllly ill orgalslnlzilhl rhcrll hIrvl, lhr cl~flrc~t
Sof re ndcrlo any are fhitl li iulater -ei anel
aIlIrollII tlhln lhe Iil hlLd l,:iriln.ll dill bI
e any o ui n their ccclur ininth-rll nalra.
-Ir hl a,'t of ,,orlH,ratlon may t. amrnbl,,
aIltered or mil. or thie re sing rlilulcrs mwho
i, sill -iinttne le ant eotering sacir-c vacancy.
Ii did lit quttl Iars rsharll h tla r t- plwer to sei
-v and lietnge of the ptehol.rit .and oaseeIS teit
|lllrlws,,' alter the ien day,' Il,tlhe ~as rco
1 AR(TICIE VIII.
ir thle orporaton. eiter at ia vte9 ll lublc,
s- ate- fccr eenih teri-ce anit en -a-l tc-rma and
Scndither ions Ilmlta loen or otirwlt. Ia t allrept
sh and sign ilqllld iet , deet r li -illt rvl l in or
f Iruints lneoeeeairy in tlce- lerIim-ea ic Iell.
It ating thel,- . affairs of the iictalny said iiot
it ciuidati-rs shalt illistrilcite- t a- r--alcuce-. after
aimhohrnt iof de-it- ar tlat n Iurle-ia anuaun the
a t kltlrs r s l rll rl atan Ia oe-r lintll t t-ilc lirhe
t. nunli Cer of hcalln re hillcd ly t-il , nd
s- Trhus ecnce and 1ca----i in ay tic- , -m-- 17
Ih ari utdelet t t. or in tc ll.r ni lt.ntr iih anll
SIw yeart htn Ie- r-ra fir- l llna i ilhlrIIi. oIn e pr
lentie * onleieP to at e clicrni , riit vn.cl anl.
lii lco n .1 M-ulcal ike-v. a-uiip--int wltness-5a-,
it wshi hiereniu ii -la' the-I iii --n s a w it eaje li
a- aptpe-ri-r-i ,an liil . liit ry ai : in ae1 te re-ading
a ,if the wlq-ld.r. hall the taci lhp. i,.r to aler
Ic Inn lust thu-v l thet cicr-l sftr tla-i eitcatli re
S rh- nuaa1 -r -i f shares cif etk a ni lic-il ly
r thcr . whior -rhln. t -tlrey att tr atl i Ir rpull r
. sanle f~r *ll('h p~rh,,,· annd ,n -IIl,'h t,.rms and
II indl ons ctiu- tala s l Hrlit le . i- 1i, Ilpt
- uiricinsl signc- N-eme-- ccl ti-
itan ill aen IllI ac . c- ,*'s tiDaa d it!la r Int rl-J.
.1g - -oky J- .W *.J Nit. jati.
ii I. the uin'le-asIgntl . It-Inr -e ,f 11rtgaae-a,
lt I .n anul fir tie-r In p ir ? ii -ai --i. Iltate Ihfl -
nI laalh-ala.iiia, ohi-ri-v -c-t.---'ha at-r
It- dalnt f arun-glrn o t cf ir- -llllnr sad -of
rIl a-lnhtilra Itrhua. ll rilir h. rw ,l lt- - I ltly Ir
ato I-r in , m,.hyf and liahi lui . 1m, onlt hlb
i-l New( l clr it. ran llll :1 7 ti, rl l
" (l igl nedr i su 1 h h Ii O lb -I .Rll.
i Tte u clyu ind ifr-.: it r!na! on file in
It m o'r, dlrt lce. i ii li, llch s
is- tee TNC). W.4.1cEtt. sot. P-et.
to June lr2in or a, wi. In ,ly t 13 20 11
,I.I ri,. tn .I. l~·i',I~Lr. \V~~lrlhllil· i rillncu·...ai
I J liilJ. .%~lr '' h~· lc~c,'# ,' l,r, : al... rll wll rlt-.u .
:I whol hl~l·~lEt , .Izltl t~l"rllll0-.lllti·~ `,ai
i. 8 [li ,lricr l i| 1 #'c.~ llllii ".' il ? " , il" 1('I' i ll.
II- I. thP Ihlnce,'n~. al,,I flip1·· >ai d;)I.,l!tpaq d..li
P' I11 an lllt h~ i llr 'i'i| I, r hl " "It-i", .ilL'T it l'll 'q
"i n ls,,k si~rll~tn I.
ol %%!:i, .?;. I il': liam I'ti. ! in ,l l..h, I,'
Iimc'- .ky J. Rt'A,.NlEl[. Not. Ii',b.
I- ,lto J 'llne 3  ,I j ii,' 1 ,t i!I "',: ," 11 , th

xml | txt